Currently viewing the category: "Dragonflies and Damselflies"
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More bug love
I love your site!! I just found it and will be using it to help identify some of my insect species I find up here in southwestern Manitoba in Canada. My co-workers have been teasing me lately b/c of my photos of what they call, ‘beetle porn’. I noticed you didn’t have many for the dragonflies so I thought I would send my most lovely one to you…photo that is. And if you care to tell me the species, I would great appreciate that as well, save me from looking it up!
Sherry Lynn Punak-Murphy
Natural Resource Technician/Biologist
Manitoba

Hi Sherry-Lynn,
Your photo of mating Dragonflies. It truly is wonderful. We are not that adept at exact species identification of Dragonflies. Perhaps a reader will supply us with an answer and perhaps you will do the work on the exact identification and notify us. Please include Dragonfly ID in the subject line.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Bug love!!
Good Morning!
My friend, Kevin, bought a new camera and went for a nature hike (here in Kentucky) and as he knows that I like to take photos of insects and spiders he showed me the assortment that he had taken. Amongst them was this spectacular bug love photo. I explained to him about your collections and he gave me the file to send to you. I hope you enjoy it, I thought it was particularly lovely when rotated to the left (also attached). Sincerely,
Teresa
(Normally photographing the bugs of Wisconsin…)

Hi Teresa,
Kevin’s image of mating Ebony Jewelwings, Calopteryx maculata, a species of Damselfly, is pretty great. We also prefer the rotated image, not only for the more obvious heart space produced between the bodies, but because it formats so nicely to our site while maximizing the image size. The photo has excellent lighting and a perfect camera angle for showcasing these lovely insects caught in the act.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

More bug love
I love your site!! I just found it and will be using it to help identify some of my insect species I find up here in southwestern Manitoba in Canada. My co-workers have been teasing me lately b/c of my photos of what they call, ‘beetle porn’. I noticed you didn’t have many for the dragonflies so I thought I would send my most lovely one to you…photo that is. And if you care to tell me the species, I would great appreciate that as well, save me from looking it up!
Sherry Lynn Punak-Murphy
Natural Resource Technician/Biologist
Manitoba

Hi Sherry-Lynn,
Your photo of mating Dragonflies. It truly is wonderful. We are not that adept at exact species identification of Dragonflies. Perhaps a reader will supply us with an answer and perhaps you will do the work on the exact identification and notify us. Please include Dragonfly ID in the subject line.

Update: (07/07/2008) Mating Dragonflies
Hi Bugman:
Re: Mating Dragonflies (07/04/2008) More bug love Really nice shot! These look like American Emeralds (Cordulia shurtleffi). I am from Manitoba as well and this species is fairly common here. There are lots of good photos online; e.g.,: http://www.pbase.com/dragonhunter/image/63103267 and http://talkaboutwildlife.ca/profile/?s=741 Regards,
Karl

Hi Karl,
Thanks for doing the work on this identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

dragonfly
What is the name of this found two in my yard and have never seen them around before.

The Ebony Jewelwing, Calopteryx maculata, is a Damselfly, not a Dragonfly. Damelflies and Dragonflies are in the same insect order Odonata, but different suborders.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Dragonfly
I found this very friendly fellow one morning in my back yard of Strongsville, Ohio, in June of last year. He was just sitting there, clinging to some grass. I went inside to get my camera, and he allowed me to get within inches of him to take some incredible close-ups. Eventually he tired of my attention and flew away, but I was left with about 20 amazing photographs. These are actually scaled down, the originals that I have are double the resolution.

Your Dragonfly is a Saddlebags in the genus Tramea, but we are not certain of the species. We really consider currency when posting images, so we are very happy your image was taken in June, even though it was last year.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

While clearing away the dried sweet pea vines in preparation for mandatory brush clearance in Southern California, we encountered this lovely female Flame Skimmer, Libellula saturata, waiting to warm up in the morning chill. She was quite cooperative, not flying away until we attempted to move her from the dried vine she was resting upon. The Flame Skimmer is called the Big Red Skimmer by Charles Hogue in his wonderful book, Insects of the Los Angeles Basin.

Update: May 22, 2011
We now believe this is a female Neon Skimmer,
Libellula croceipennis, based on this photo on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination