Currently viewing the category: "Dragonflies and Damselflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

pink dragonfly
Sun, Nov 30, 2008 at 2:55 PM
his beauty is from my trip to Hong Kong in August. I have never seen one this color and thought I would share it with you for the upcoming holiday season…even though it is hot pink.
polymersn
hong kong

Unknown Dragonfly

Trithemis aurora

Dear polymersn,
Magenta is quite an unusual color in the insect world. Certain katydids have this bright jarring coloration, but they are color sports and not typical. We have never seen such color in a Dragonfly, but a google search for “pink dragonfly hong kong” turned up a matching image on Flicker identified as Trithemis aurora. The TrekNature website has information on the species, but the image is not of a brightly colored individual. There is also online reference to the common name Dawn Dropwing or Crimson Dropwing. We visited numerous websites while trying to gather information on the Dawn Dropwing, and there are many photographs posted online, but your photo is, in our critical estimation, the loveliest we encountered.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

desperately seeking damselfly
Sun, Nov 23, 2008 at 8:50 PM
Hello again Bugman. I realize that damselflies are murder but can you help us get close on this one? This is another shot from Sam,11, taken near a pond by our house. Is this some variation of female Eastern Forktail? Hope you have a great Thanksgiving. We give thanks, among other things, that you are here! Jimmy
Sam and Daddy Jim
Pond, wetlands, 35 miles west of Chicago

Probably Eastern Forktail Damselfly, female

Probably Eastern Forktail Damselfly, female

Hi Sam and Daddy Jim,
Male Damselflies are difficult enough for us to distinguish from one another, but the drabber females are really a challenge.  We hope that by posting your image, a reader can comment.  A female Eastern Forktail, Ischnura verticalis, seems like a very good bet based on imagery posted to BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Occisa Rubyspot (Hetaerina – Part 2)
Mon, Nov 17, 2008 at 6:14 PM
To follow-up my previous post of the American Rubyspot (Hetaerina americana), I am submitting these photos of a male and female Occisa Rubyspot (H. occisa). There are at least 37 Hetaerina species in the Americas, all but 3 of which are limited to Central and South America.  These photos were taken in 2007 while canoeing on the Macal River in western Belize. Cheers.
Karl

Occisa Rubyspot Damselfly Male

Occisa Rubyspot Damselfly Male

Hi Karl,
Once again, thanks for a wonderful decription and photos of a Central American relative of the American Rubyspot Damselfly.

Occisa Rubyspot Damselfly Female

Occisa Rubyspot Damselfly Female

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

American Rubyspot (Hetaerina – Part 1)
Mon, Nov 17, 2008 at 6:10 PM
Hi Bugman:
The American Rubyspot (Hetaerina americana) is not only one of the most beautiful damselflies in North America, it is also one of the most widespread, having been recorded from all of the lower 48 states except Washington and Idaho, as well as northern Mexico and southeastern Canada.  The Rubyspots belong to the family Calopterygidae (broad-winged damselflies; 2 genera and 8 species in North America), which also includes the jewelwings. All Calopterygidae inhabit river and stream habitats.  I couldn’t find any Rubyspots in the WTB archive, so I thought you might be interested. The accompanying photos of a male and a female were taken last April while on a canoe trip down the Rio Grande in Big Bend NP.  They were just one of the many awesome visual treats in this truly incredible piece of your country. Cheers.
Karl

American Rubyspot Male

American Rubyspot Male

Hi Karl,
Thanks for your wonderful letter with description and photos.

American Rubyspot Female

American Rubyspot Female

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

water creatures
I found these two water creatures in a creek. It looks like they may besome stage of a dragonfly or damsel fly. I don’t know? What do youthink they are. The small one is about 1/2 inch long and the larger oneis about an inch
Ryan

Naiads

Naiads

Hi Ryan,
The larger creature is most definitely a Damselfly Naiad, but the smaller creature is questionable. Perhaps one of our readers will be able to supply an answer.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Canibal – Image 4 of approx. 35
Sat, Oct 11, 2008 at 3:16 PM
Hi!
Don’t know if you want – but here is a image of a Canibal Dragonfly. This was shortly after it bit the head off it’s meal. This is the 4th shot taken out of approx. 35 Hope you can use! Thank’s Again!!! and Have a Great Day!
Brent Hansen
Pinellas County Florida

Green Darner eats Green Darner

Eastern Pondhawk eats Blue Dasher

Hi again Brent,
It seems that both the predator and prey are Green Darners. We wholeheartedly welcome any comments or corrections on this posting.

When I spotted the two on a Hibiscus – I thought they were mating.
Then – right in front of my eyes – I saw one bite the head off the
other. They flew to the fence at the side of my yard – and that was
where I got my best shots. It sat and ate almost all of the other
Dragonfly before flying away to finish it off.
Dragonflies that I have observed in my backyard are voracious
predators. I was trying to photograph a Green Leaf Hopper on my hand.
It flew away and a Dragonfly whizzed in and snatched it out of the
air. I have shots of that Dragonfly munching the Leaf Hopper.
At certain times of year here – they swarm the pool in our backyard.I
have images of Blues ,Reds ,Golds and Greens. Those were the only ones
that sat still long enough.
But – I sure would not want one mad at me – if you look closely at the
jaw – you will see “TWO” sets of chompers. There is a smaller set to
the top and a larger set to the bottom. If ants can inflict a welt
from their tiny jaws – then I think these guys can literally cut a
nice chunk out of your skin.I am now a little leary letting one rest
on my hand and fingers.
If you would like some other colored images of these Dragonflies – let
me know – I have a couple close up head shots that really show the
texture of the eyes and upper body.
Have a Great Day!
Brent

Correction:Sat, Feb 21, 2009 at 12:05 AM
If I may add a correction, the upper one is a male of Eastern Pondhawk (Erythemis simplicollis), which is well known to pray on insects of its own size, as well as for cannibalism, but in this case it’s rather a Blue Dasher (Pachydiplax longipennis).
I hope this helps.
Renaud, Switzerland

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination