Currently viewing the category: "Dragonflies and Damselflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

A skeeter hawk 4 U
Thu, Apr 2, 2009 at 7:37 PM
Hey Dan,
What do you call this creature when it is not flying ? — A ‘dragon’ ?
Ferd Hall

Common Whitetail

Common Whitetail

Hi Ferd,
Since Dragonfly is not two words, it would not be likely that anyone would call a stationary specimen a dragon, but we do like the colloquialism Skeeter Hawk since Dragonflies prey on Mosquitoes. Some people call Crane Flies by the name Mosquito Hawk, but that is not at all accurate. Though Dragonfly identification is something we prefer to leave to those more proficient with the order Odonata, we are relatively certain your distinctively marked specimen is a male Common Whitetail, Plathemis lydia. It sure is a stunning photograph and it matches an image posted on BugGuide. Since you are a longtime reader of our site, you did not use our new form, and your query did not contain a sighting location, a new feature that we really like since our site migration last September.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Dragonfly Love
Mon, Mar 30, 2009 at 7:23 AM
I was working in my yard yesterday when this pair of dragonflies flew in and stuck around long enough for me to get a camera and take some pictures of them while they were on their “honeymoon” :-) Thought you might like this for your Bug Love page.
Paul
Garland, TX

Dragonflies mating

Dragonflies mating

Hi Paul,
Thanks for sending the mating Dragonfly image. Many Dragonflies mate in this position, with the male grasping the female by her neck with his claspers. We don’t want to even attempt to identify your species since Dragonflies still tend to baffle us after all these years.  Perhaps one of our readers who is more adept at Dragonfly identification can assist in this matter.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Dragonfly Some kind of Meadowhawk?
Thu, Feb 19, 2009 at 12:25 PM
Can you help me identify what kind of Meadowhawk dragonfly this is. I found this one late July, Hennepin County, Minnesota.
Jeanne
Richfield, Hennepin Cty., MN, USA

Meadowhawk

Meadowhawk

Dear Jeanne,
We have often mentioned that the exact identification of Dragonflies and Damselflies is not our strongest area, but just yesterday, Renaud Bernhard of Switzerland was kind enough to write to us and provide corrections to many of our unidentified or misidentified postings. We will post your letter and photo and hopefully Renaud can provide you with a correct answer.

Meadowhawk

Meadowhawk

Update: Monday, February 23, 2009
Hi Daniel,
That one is tricky. There are three north american meadhowhawks species with female that are troublesome to ID
without close examination, all three shows those black triangles on the side of the abdomen and more or less extended
amber patches on the wings: Cherry-faced Meadowhawk (Sympetrum internum), Ruby Meadowhawk (Sympetrum rubicundulum) and
White-faced Meadowhawk (Symeptrum obtrusum). There I would say Ruby Meadowhawk but that’s only because the guide I have
says that female of it can have as much extended yellow patch on the wings.
I’m just an amateur wildlife lurker but I’m fascinated with dragonflies-damselfies so I have collected a few
identification guides.
Renaud Bernhard

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

water scorpions share meal
Tue, Jan 6, 2009 at 10:49 AM
Hi,
I thought you guys might like this picture I took last year. Over the summer I raised several water scorpions, and these are two of them. They were both eating the same damselfly larva at the same time. I thought that this was a rare moment and snapped several shots. I later realized that the darker one had little egg pouches, or mites of some kind on one of its legs, and that there is another damselfly larva on the lighter one’s back. I hope you guys enjoy this image. Thanks again for the awesome site.
Josh Kouri
Oklahoma

Water Scorpions eat Damselfly Naiad

Water Scorpions eat Damselfly Naiad

Hi again Josh,
Thanks for the interesting image of two Water Scorpions feeding on a Damselfly Naiad.  It will be an excellent addition to our Food Chain section.  We took the liberty of adding Oklahoma to your posting as you did not submit your letter using our new form that requires a location.  Adding the location requirement to our online form has saved us the bother of writing back for a location.  Please include a location in any future letters.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

pink dragonfly
Sun, Nov 30, 2008 at 2:55 PM
his beauty is from my trip to Hong Kong in August. I have never seen one this color and thought I would share it with you for the upcoming holiday season…even though it is hot pink.
polymersn
hong kong

Unknown Dragonfly

Trithemis aurora

Dear polymersn,
Magenta is quite an unusual color in the insect world. Certain katydids have this bright jarring coloration, but they are color sports and not typical. We have never seen such color in a Dragonfly, but a google search for “pink dragonfly hong kong” turned up a matching image on Flicker identified as Trithemis aurora. The TrekNature website has information on the species, but the image is not of a brightly colored individual. There is also online reference to the common name Dawn Dropwing or Crimson Dropwing. We visited numerous websites while trying to gather information on the Dawn Dropwing, and there are many photographs posted online, but your photo is, in our critical estimation, the loveliest we encountered.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

desperately seeking damselfly
Sun, Nov 23, 2008 at 8:50 PM
Hello again Bugman. I realize that damselflies are murder but can you help us get close on this one? This is another shot from Sam,11, taken near a pond by our house. Is this some variation of female Eastern Forktail? Hope you have a great Thanksgiving. We give thanks, among other things, that you are here! Jimmy
Sam and Daddy Jim
Pond, wetlands, 35 miles west of Chicago

Probably Eastern Forktail Damselfly, female

Probably Eastern Forktail Damselfly, female

Hi Sam and Daddy Jim,
Male Damselflies are difficult enough for us to distinguish from one another, but the drabber females are really a challenge.  We hope that by posting your image, a reader can comment.  A female Eastern Forktail, Ischnura verticalis, seems like a very good bet based on imagery posted to BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination