Currently viewing the category: "Dragonflies and Damselflies"
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Unknown bug in CT
May 30, 2010
Dont know much about this bug, but a friend took a pic of it in southern CT
Curious?
Conneticut

Dragonhunter Larva

Dear Curious,
In a general sense, this is the aquatic larva of a Dragonfly, known as a naiad.  In an attempt to be more specific, we are nearly certain it is the larva of a Dragonhunter, Hagenius brevistylus.  You can compare your image to photos posted to BugGuide.

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Dragonfly or Damselfly
May 21, 2010
I photographed this specimen on my deck railing today. He was very large, probably 4″, and has a very interesting black and white geometric pattern. Can you identify? Thanks.
Joe
North Georgia (Appalachian Mountains)

Gray Petaltail

Hi Joe,
Dragonfly identifications can be very challenging for us, but we quickly identified your Gray Petaltail, Tachopteryx thoreyi, on BugGuide which has this comment:  “Rather elusive, but can be easy to find in the proper habitat. Often perches on odonate watchers.

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Aquarium Larva
March 19, 2010
I know it’s not your usual fare, but I’m hoping you could help identify this larva. I found this specimen living in the filter of my tropical aquarium.
It is about 12mm long, and was not present a month ago. The water is hard, with a pH or 8.0 exactly, at around 25.5 degrees Celcius.
There were three specimens in the filter, all around the same size, but no evidence of any others anywhere else.
Thanks in advance.
Nik
Reading, UK

Damselfly Naiad

Hi Nik,
This immature Damselfly is known as a Naiad.  It was probably introduced to the aquarium on plants.

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For your “Bug Love” page…(blue damselflies from Illinois)
February 7, 2010
Hello. I took this picture early this past July on Lake Shabbona in Illinois, near Chicago while on a fishing trip. There were mating pairs of these blue damselflies everywhere, and these two landed right in front of me. They didn’t flinch when I put the camera right up to them. I thought I’d submit it to see if you guys would like to post it on your Bug Love page. Thanks for your time.
Justin M. Fabre
Illinois

Mating Bluets

Hi Justin,
Thanks for sending us your wonderful photo of mating Bluets in the genus Enallagma.  BugGuide has numerous possible species, and we would defer an exact species identification to an expert.  This mating position is called a Wheel or Heart formation.  Are you by chance related to Jean Henri Fabre, the French entomologist who lived from 1823 to 1915 and who wrote one of the first popular culture books on insects?

Hi Daniel.
I was happy to submit my photo to WTB. Reading the submissions, responses and seeing the great photos is a lot of fun. I didn’t realize how many different species of Bluets there were until I googled “blue damselfly” just before I submitted it. I’m glad you guys will try to find out. As for a relation to Jean Henri, I’ve wondered myself as it’s possible, but I honestly don’t know. I was away longer than expected this week and finally dug out the external hard drive with the rest of the set that I’ll attach to the email. The top one is the “I (heart) U” shot I submitted. Feel free to use any or all that you wish on the site. Thanks again.
Justin

Mating Bluets

Thanks for sending additional photos Justin.

Mating Bluets

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Mating dragonflies
September 10, 2009
I saw these dragonflies in my garden a few days ago (in September). I thought it was interesting that they were able to fly while coupled together. Fortunately they landed on a lovely pink dahlia and allowed me to take some close-ups of them.
I thought these would be a good addition for your bug love category, but identification would be great too!
Thanks
Brandon A
San Jose, CA

Mating Dragonflies

Mating Variegated Meadowhawks

Dear Brandon,
We haven’t the time to properly identify you beautiful mating Dragonflies at the moment, though we believe they are Skimmers in the family Libellulidae.  Hopefully, we can do a proper ID later, or perhaps a reader will provide us with an answer.

Update:
Thanks so much to Karl who sent in a comment identifying these Variegated Meadowhawks, Sympetrum corruptum.  There are numerous images on BugGuide.

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Mosaic or hero darner?
September 3, 2009
At first I thought it was a low plane, but it was just this injured dragonfly. I’m guessing it’s a mosaic darner; it didn’t last long after it landed on the garden hose. The wingspan was a bit over 5 1/4 inches-pretty huge.
dexter
southeastern LI, NY, USA

Darner

Swamp Darner

Dear Dexter,
There are people out there far more qualified than we are to correctly identify your Darner.  Hopefully, someone will write in with an identification.

Darner

Swamp Darner

Update from Eric Eaton
September 6, 2009
Daniel:
I believe the “unknown darner” is a “swamp darner,” Epiaeschna heros, one of the largest dragonflies in North America and a great find.  Nice images of it, too!
Eric

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination