Currently viewing the category: "Dragonflies and Damselflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Skimmer? Dragonfly?
Location:  Whitewater Preserve, Riverside County, California
July 25, 2014
dear what’s that bug?
this handsome creature posed on my car’s antenna at the wildlands conservancy’s “Whitewater Preserve” in riverside county this past weekend. could you ID him for me, please?
thank you! clare.

Flame Skimmer

Flame Skimmer

Hi Clare,
We believe that based on images posted to BugGuide, this is a male Flame Skimmer,
Libellula saturata, a species of Dragonfly.  It is described on BugGuide as:  “males bright orange with amber color in the wings covering half the width of the wing, out to the nodus, and all the way to the rear of the hind wing. Females paler but still with some amber at least on the leading edge of the wing.”

Flame Skimmer

Flame Skimmer

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Swarming Dragonflies
Location:  Corralitas Red Car Property, Silver Lake, Los Angeles, California
July 15, 2014 10:30 AM
This morning we accepted an invitation to walk the Corralitas Red Car Property with community activist Diane Edwardson and we evaluated the merits of preserving the site as open space.  A large Tarantula Hawk was flying about lazily and then we saw some of the California Harvester Ants that Diane observed swarming about a month ago, but the real treat was seeing a large swarm of Dragonflies circling an endangered California Walnut Tree.  They did not appear to be feeding or mating, and there were at least 50 large Dragonflies in a small bit of air space.   Though we could not get a clear image of a static individual, the large size and overall green coloration has led us to speculate that the Dragonflies are Green Darners.

Swarming Green Darners

Swarming Green Darners

In researching this behavior we learned that the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences states:  “ Dragonflies swarm for two reasons.  Dragonflies are predators so if there is abundant food in the area, i.e. lots of small flying insects such as mosquitoes or other flies, a swarm may form in the same area.  In these static swarms, the dragonflies fly back and forth over a specific, well-defined area, eating the small flying insects within that space.  Dragonflies also migrate, so you might see large groups of them flying together in a single direction, either to escape poor local conditions (dry, very hot) or to seek warmer regions in the fall.  Migratory swarms can contain several million dragonflies and travel thousands of miles!”  Though we did not observe any prey, we can only presume that smaller swarming insects were providing food for this magnificent aerial display.  More information on swarming Dragonflies can be found on BayNature.

Swarming Green Darners

Swarming Green Darners

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this a type of dragonfly?
Location: Putnam County, NY
July 1, 2014 12:43 pm
Hello,
I found this little guy on my porch. I live in upstate NY. Is he a dragonfly? My children and I googled different types of dragonflies but none looked just like him.
Any info will be appreciated!
Signature: CJ

Damselfly

Damselfly

Dear CJ,
You are astute to observe the similarities between this Damselfly and a Dragonfly, as both are in the insect order Odonata.

Thank you so much for identifying it for us!!
Best,
CJ

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of dragonfly is this?
Location: Northern Illinois, USA, close to a river.
June 27, 2014 9:49 pm
I was down town for a flea market when I caught this interesting little dragonfly sitting on the side of a building, not moving very much at all. I got some good photographs of it, but I’m not sure what kind of dragonfly it is. Perhaps you know? :)
Signature: Amy

Damselfly

Damselfly is male Eastern Forktail

Hi Amy,
Though it is in the same order, Odonata, as the Dragonflies, this is actually a Damselfly in the suborder Zygoptera.  Damselflies feeble fliers, lacking the strength of Dragonflies, and Damselflies hold their wings folded above the body when at rest as opposed to the wings lying flat like Dragonflies.  We believe your Damselfly is a male Eastern Forktail which we initially located on the Flying Kiwi, and then checked its identity on BugGuide where we learned the scientific name is  
Ischnura verticalis.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Daniel, Anax junius?
Location: Hawthorne, CA
June 11, 2014 1:29 pm
Hi,
We spotted this out back this morning and I’m wondering if I have it properly identified as a male Anax junius. How’s that rodent?
Signature: Thanks, Anna Carreon

Green Darner

Green Darner

Hi Anna,
This is indeed a male Green Darner, and your image is positively gorgeous with great detail.  The gopher continues to dig around the yard and plants continue to vanish.

Have you thought about getting a few gopher snakes?  I know that years ago we came into possession of a few and Marty gave them away to a friend who had gophers.  Gopher problem solved.
Anna

That is exactly what I have thought of doing, but since the problem is so recent, I haven’t had a chance to act on it.  Gopher Snakes are native to Mount Washington, and I live right near an entrance to a state park, so the habitat would be wonderful for them.  I may still try to act on that.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug Identification
Location: Findlay, OH
May 28, 2014 7:15 pm
This bug was found in a Findlay, Ohio pond. No one knows what it is. I live in Florida and have no cue, either. Can you help?
Signature: Lynn

Dragonfly Naiad

Dragonfly Naiad

Dear Lynn,
This is a naiad or aquatic nymph of a flying insect, and we believe it is a Dragonfly Naiad.  Each species of Dragonfly has a different looking naiad, but we haven’t the skill to identify most to the species level.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination