Currently viewing the category: "Dragonflies and Damselflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Dragonfly
Location: Santa Ana, Ca
June 16, 2016 8:21 pm
Found this beauty outside my office in So Cal. Didn’t see anything like it on your site. Could you please help identify?
Thanks so much!
Signature: Betsy

California Darner

California Darner

Dear Betsy,
Thanks to the Monterey Bay website, we believe we have correctly identified your Dragonfly as a California Darner,
Rhionaeshna californica, and we verified that identification on BugGuide.  We have one other California Darner on our site submitted from Washington in 2010.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is it?
Location: Northern Indiana
May 29, 2016 6:57 pm
My niece found this on her property and we can’t identify it!
Signature: Susan Helwig

Dragonfly Naiad

Dragonfly Naiad

Dear Susan,
Though you did not specify, we are speculating that your friend found this Dragonfly Naiad very near to a pond or other body of water on her property.  This BugGuide image and this BugGuide image both look very similar, though we are unable to provide you with an exact species identification.  We will be postdating your submission to go live to our site in mid-June while we are away from the office.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Upstate NY alien bug
Location: Jeffersonville, NY
June 3, 2016 5:23 am
Hello. While visiting Jeffersonville, NY a friend and I found a ton of these bugs mating on a dock of a small Lake. We cannot seem to find this listed anywhere. Thoughts?
Signature: Jay Pellegrino

Dragonfly Exuviae

Dragonfly Exuviae

Dear Jay,
These are not mating insects.  These are the Exuviae or cast off exoskeletons of Dragonfly Naiads.  Immature Dragonflies, called Naiads, are aquatic, and as they near maturity, they crawl out of the water, generally seeking a vertical feature like a log jutting out of the water or reeds growing out of the water, or in your case, the dock, and there they molt for the final time, emerging as winged adult Dragonflies.  We suspect that a second Naiad used the Exuvia of another Naiad that exited the water earlier, and attached to it for support.

Wow thank you for replying!! We learned something today 👍☺️

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug ID in MA after swimming
Location: MA
May 28, 2016 2:13 pm
Could you help us identify this bug.
It was on swimming suit after being in an MA lake
Thanks
Signature: Steve

Dragonhunter Naiad

Dragonhunter Naiad

Dear Steve,
This is a Naiad, the aquatic nymph of a flying insect, more specifically, it is a Dragonfly known as the Dragon Hunter,
Hagenius brevistylus.

Many Thanks Daniel
That’s fantastic. I had no idea the dragonflies came from nymphs like this
Much appreciated
Steve

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Similar to a Belostomatidae Abedus?
Location: Cedar Lake in Oscoda, MI
May 9, 2016 7:56 am
My friend found this in his minnow trap yesterday in Cedar Lake in Oscoda MI. I’ve been researching to learn exactly what it is but am still uncertain. At present, my best guess is a Giant Water Bug (Belostomatidae, genus Abedus) nymph. The uncertainty for me comes from the apparent lack of wings, serrated edges of the body, apparent lack of a protruding mouth and front legs which seem much more slender than other Belostomatidae and 2 claws on the front legs rather than a single point.
Do you know what tour bug is?
Signature: Scott

Dragonhunter Naiad

Dragonhunter Naiad

Dear Scott,
This is an aquatic nymph, but it is not a Giant Water Bug.  Rather, it is a Dragonfly Naiad, and we believe it is a Dragonhunter Naiad,
Hagenius brevistylus.  Dragonhunter Naiads are well camouflaged among fallen leaves at the bottom of ponds and slow moving streams where they are generally found prowling for prey.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I have never seen one of these
Location: Virginia, USA.
April 26, 2016 7:07 am
Found near a creek in Virginia . Halifax county area. It is a couple of inches long. Has a stinger looking apparatus on its tail.
Signature: Matt

Damselfly Naiad

Damselfly Naiad

Dear Matt,
This aquatic nymph is an immature Damselfly, commonly called a Naiad like other aquatic nymphs of flying insects.  Damselflies are classified with Dragonflies in the same insect order, Odonata.  What you have mistaken for a stinger is actually a tripart organ, the gills, used to extract oxygen from the water.

Damselfly Naiad

Damselfly Naiad

Damselfly Naiad

Damselfly Naiad

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination