Currently viewing the category: "Dragonflies and Damselflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Dragonfly is help
Location: Denver, CO
September 10, 2016 10:39 am
This was on my raspberry bush in Dwnver this morning. Do you know what type of dragonfly it is?
Signature: Thank you,

Black Saddlebags

Black Saddlebags

We believe, based on this BugGuide image, that your Dragonfly is a Black Saddlebags, Tramea lacerata.  According to BugGuide:  “Large dark ‘saddlebags’ on hindwings distinctive. Could be confused with Carolina or Red Saddlebags in poor light. Flies constantly, often gliding, perches infrequently.”  We suspect it is significant that your image was taken in the morning, before this Dragonfly warmed up and began flying.  You most likely captured the image after its nightly rest.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Swimming bug?
Location: Tennessee
August 27, 2016 7:45 am
I live in Chattanooga TN, I noticed 4 or 5 of these in the kiddie pool in the backyard. The pool is a blow up pool, and has not been cleaned out for a very long time. I usually see these in the late morning, around 10, and they are very fast swimmers. I caught one and put it on the pavement to take a picture. It has 6 legs, and is kind of a clearish yellow. Its about 3/4 of an inch long. Any ideas what it could be? Thanks for any help:)
Signature: Holly Hickam

Dragonfly Naiad

Dragonfly Naiad

Dear Holly,
This is the larva or Naiad of a Dragonfly.  As you probably realize, standing water is a breeding ground for mosquitoes.  Dragonfly larvae will eat any mosquito larvae that develop in standing water, so they are a beneficial insect.  Adult Dragonflies also feed on winged adult mosquitoes.  We hope you are able to relocate the larvae in your stagnant pool into a suitable area pond.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: pool bug
Location: perth, Australia (Ed. Note:  We needed clarification on the location.)
August 19, 2016 3:57 am
I found heaps of these bugs walking amongst the leaves in the bottom of my pool. They were alive and well and did not seem to be phased being in or out of the water
Signature: djr

Dragonfly Naiad

Dragonfly Naiad

Dear djr,
This is the aquatic larval form of a Dragonfly, known as a naiad.  Is your location Perth in Australia or Canada?

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug in my pond?
Location: Central Pennsylvania
August 16, 2016 6:44 am
Hello.
Recently, I found this bug swimming around in my pond. It is summer here. There are a lot of them in there and they generally stay in the water. They don’t skim on top of the water like most bugs I’ve seen in my pond so I am curious. A lot of the time my fish will chase them around and they are very fast. Faster than the fish actually. Their color looks like that of a green and black tadpole but they obviously don’t look like tadpoles. I don’t know if these bugs are dangerous to my pond or fish and I would be very greatfull if you could help me identify it.
Signature: Makayla

Dragonfly Naiad

Dragonfly Naiad

Dear Makayla,
This is the aquatic larva or naiad of a Dragonfly.  Though they normally crawl among aquatic vegetation in search of prey, and when threatened, Dragonfly naiads are able to move more quickly through the water.  According to the Dragonfly Website:  “They easily propel themselves by expelling water out of their body through the anus.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Dragonfly-Skimmer
Location: Montreal Canada
July 30, 2016 5:48 pm
Is this a female twelve-spotted skimmer? If not, then what? Thanks
Signature: Pauline

Female Common Whitetail

Female Common Whitetail

Dear Pauline,
We apologize for the delay in responding, but we really do have a tiny staff that cannot respond to all of our summer identification requests.  We just posted a new image of a female Common Whitetail, and we went back through our archives of unanswered mail to locate your request.  We believe you also have submitted an image of a female Common Whitetail,
Plathemis lydia, and you can compare your image to this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Females are often confused with the Twelve-spotted Skimmer (Libellula pulchella) but notice the solid stripe down the side of the longer, more slender abdomen here in L. pulchella.

Thank you! I believe that is correct and appreciate your efforts.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Type of Dragonfly?
Location: East Texas
August 12, 2016 9:41 am
Good morning!
I was wondering if you could help me identify which type of dragonfly this is?!
Signature: Katherine Harper

Female Common Whitetail

Female Common Whitetail

Dear Katherine,
We are relatively certain this is a female Common Whitetail,
Plathemis lydia, based on this BugGuide image.  If you look closely at the spotting on the abdomen, you will see it is different than the pattern on the female Twelve Spot Skimmer, Libellula pulchella, also pictured on BugGuide.  Both species have a similar wing spot pattern.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination