Currently viewing the category: "Dragonflies and Damselflies"
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Subject: Bug in Dam
Location: Taggerty, North East Victoria, Australia
November 18, 2014 2:26 am
Hi there,
I was taking photos of dragonfly over my parents dam when I noticed this guy staring at me.
This photo was taken in Taggerty, (north east) Victoria, Australia. We’re at the end of spring but it’s been quite a hot spring. Never seen anything like it before and it was about an one maybe one and a half inches long.
Thanks for your time
Signature: Cait O’Pray

Dragonfly Naiad

Dragonfly Naiad

Subject: Bug In Dam Update
Location: Taggery, Victoria, Australia
November 19, 2014 2:03 am
I sent a ID request yesterday about a bug i saw laying on a lillypad that i’d never seen before. Well today i went back to take a look and i think it’s shed it’s skin?? Thought it might help to ID it if you get the time.
Signature: Cait O’Pray

Dragonfly Exuvia

Dragonfly Exuvia

After having had a look on line i think this might actually be a dragonfly nymph! i did notice what i think is a red dragonfly, yesterday i only noticed one red one and today there was definitely two bright red ones.

Dear Cait,
You are correct that is a Dragonfly Naiad, and your second image is of the exuvia or cast off exoskeleton.  Dragonfly Naiads are aquatic predator, and when the time for metamorphosis nears, the naiad leaves the water and climbs a vertical surface, like the grasses depicted in your second image, and there it molts for a final time, flying off as an adult Dragonfly.

Nickie Cooper Wolfe, Cait O'Pray liked this post
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Subject: Dragonfly Love
Location: Taggery, North East Victoria, Australia
November 18, 2014 2:31 am
Just thought you might be interested in theres, i think they ate egg laying?
Signature: Cait O’Pray

Bluets Mating

Damselflies Mating

Dear Cait,
These are Damselflies, not Dragonflies, but your mistake is understandable because they are classified in the same insect order, Odonata.  When we have more time, we will try to identify the species on the Brisbane Insect website.  They are in fact mating and in the act of depositing eggs.

Thank you for the response, I’ll have to tell me parents what is living in their dam. They’ve let it go seminative so there are at least 5 types of frogs and so many more insects. I recently just bought the book advertised on the website and am starting to read it. It’s all very fascinating!

Jessica M. Schemm, Cait O'Pray, Amy Gosch, Kathy Haines liked this post
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Subject: Large bug in pond seems to be eating frog spawn
Location: Aisen, Patagonia, Chile
October 26, 2014 11:31 am
A few years ago we made a pond in our garden in Patagonia, Chile. A few weeks ago a frog laid some spawn and three weeks later we wondered what had happened to the developing tadpoles, then looked closely and spotted several long insects slightly below the water, congregated around the spawn, which now contained only one of the tiny tadpoles. The insects seem to be sprouting wings. Are they a type of dragonfly?
Signature: Paul Coleman

Naiad:  Possibly Dragonfly nymph with frog eggs

Naiad: Possibly Dragonfly nymph with frog eggs

Dear Paul,
The insect in your image is an aquatic nymph of a flying insect, known as a Naiad.  It is very likely that the naiad will develop into a Dragonfly.

Dragonfly Naiad, we believe

Dragonfly Naiad, we believe

Andrea Leonard Drummond, Brandy Lynn Grigg liked this post
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Subject: Found this in my Aquaponics System
Location: Patterson, CA
October 4, 2014 1:47 pm
I cannot positively identify this bug. I have found things similar to it online, but nothing quite like this…
I have an aquaponics system and the are thriving in my duckweed grow bed. When I drained the bed today these things came out like spiders from the rocks at the bottom of the growbed. When I put in the duckweed there were small things swimming in the water, I actually assumed they were frershwater shrimp, but now I m guessing they have grown and this is what I have. What is this? should I get rid of it? Should I keep it? Can I eat it?
Signature: Nick

Dragonfly Naiad

Dragonfly Naiad

Dear Nick,
This is the naiad or aquatic nymph of a Dragonfly, and it is considered a beneficial insect that will eat mosquitoes and other small creatures in your aquaponics system.  We imagine you can eat it if you wanted to try, though we don’t believe we have seen any references regarding Dragonfly naiads being relished by entomophages.

Aquaponics System

Aquaponics System

 

Emily Camille liked this post
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Subject: Bugs In My Pool
Location: Westminster, California, U.S.
September 17, 2014 6:24 pm
I have found about 50 of these crazy little bugs in my pool over the last two days and have no desire to swim with them. My best guess is that I can be rid of them by keeping the pool algae free, which has been a problem this summer. In the meantime, what is this bug that lives underwater, moves very slowly on land does not survive outside of the water, swims very quickly in trying to escape my net, and has my wife so freaked out she will not swim in the pool until they are gone?
Thank you,
Signature: Gary

Dragonfly Naiad

Dragonfly Naiad

Dear Gary,
This is the aquatic larva of a Dragonfly, commonly called a Naiad, a name shared with other aquatic larvae of flying insects.  We are very curious about your pool, which has algae as well as thriving aquatic insect life.  Do you not use chlorine or other pool chemicals?  Since Dragonfly Naiads are predatory, they need to eat other aquatic creatures, including the larvae of Mosquitoes, hence they are beneficial insects.  Dragonfly Naiads are not aggressive toward humans, and they will not hurt you or your wife.

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Subject: Weird bug
Location: Bowlong Green Kentucky
September 15, 2014 8:10 pm
This huge bug kept trying to fly into my window. It was green and yellow with 4 wings. It looked kind of like a dragon fly mixed with a horse fly. I only got a couple pictures while it landed. I really want to know what it is.
Signature: Hunter Austin

Green Darner

Green Darner

Dear Hunter,
This is an exciting posting for us.  This is a Dragonfly known as a Green Darner.  They are strong fliers and they migrate, and we seem to recall reading somewhere that they are sometimes attracted to lights at night, which causes us to speculate if they might also travel by night.
  Opinicon Natural History has a page entitled Observations of Dragonflies Visiting Lights at Night where it states:  “Dragonflies (order Odonata, suborder Anisoptera) and normally diurnal. However some dragonflies are active by night. This is particularly true of long distance migrants that travel over open water where they cannot roost so must continue to fly even after dark ….  Reports of nocturnal adult dragonfly activity appear to be relatively scarce, especially with regard to North American species.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination