Currently viewing the category: "Dragonflies and Damselflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bugs In My Pool
Location: Westminster, California, U.S.
September 17, 2014 6:24 pm
I have found about 50 of these crazy little bugs in my pool over the last two days and have no desire to swim with them. My best guess is that I can be rid of them by keeping the pool algae free, which has been a problem this summer. In the meantime, what is this bug that lives underwater, moves very slowly on land does not survive outside of the water, swims very quickly in trying to escape my net, and has my wife so freaked out she will not swim in the pool until they are gone?
Thank you,
Signature: Gary

Dragonfly Naiad

Dragonfly Naiad

Dear Gary,
This is the aquatic larva of a Dragonfly, commonly called a Naiad, a name shared with other aquatic larvae of flying insects.  We are very curious about your pool, which has algae as well as thriving aquatic insect life.  Do you not use chlorine or other pool chemicals?  Since Dragonfly Naiads are predatory, they need to eat other aquatic creatures, including the larvae of Mosquitoes, hence they are beneficial insects.  Dragonfly Naiads are not aggressive toward humans, and they will not hurt you or your wife.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Weird bug
Location: Bowlong Green Kentucky
September 15, 2014 8:10 pm
This huge bug kept trying to fly into my window. It was green and yellow with 4 wings. It looked kind of like a dragon fly mixed with a horse fly. I only got a couple pictures while it landed. I really want to know what it is.
Signature: Hunter Austin

Green Darner

Green Darner

Dear Hunter,
This is an exciting posting for us.  This is a Dragonfly known as a Green Darner.  They are strong fliers and they migrate, and we seem to recall reading somewhere that they are sometimes attracted to lights at night, which causes us to speculate if they might also travel by night.
  Opinicon Natural History has a page entitled Observations of Dragonflies Visiting Lights at Night where it states:  “Dragonflies (order Odonata, suborder Anisoptera) and normally diurnal. However some dragonflies are active by night. This is particularly true of long distance migrants that travel over open water where they cannot roost so must continue to fly even after dark ….  Reports of nocturnal adult dragonfly activity appear to be relatively scarce, especially with regard to North American species.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth/dragonfly/horsefly
Location: Owasso, OK (outside Tulsa)
September 11, 2014 8:10 am
Can you tell me what kind of bug this is? It looks like a cross between a moth/dragonfly/horsefly. Thanks!
Signature: Meagan

Saddlebags Dragonfly

Saddlebags Dragonfly

Hi Meagan,
This Saddlebags Dragonfly in the genus
 Tramea appears to be missing its abdomen.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: dragonfly
Location: Dewey Lake Prestonsburg, Kentucky
September 6, 2014 7:49 am
I recently camped at Dewey lake in eastern Kentucky and got this picture you might like.
Signature: Paul Morris

Damselfly

Damselfly

Hi Paul,
This is actually a Damselfly, and not a Dragonfly.  Both are in the same insect order Odonata, but the wings of Dragonflies lie flat while resting and the wings of Damselflies are held folded over the body.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Dragonfly Bug Love <3
Location: Clifton, Va
August 31, 2014 7:01 am
Found this amorous pair in Hemlock Park- Clifton, Va
Signature: Katie from Manassas

Mating Dragonflies

Mating Dragonflies

Hi Katie,
We believe your mating Dragonflies are Tiger Spiketails,
Cordulegaster erronea, based on this image from BugGuide and the distribution range.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Dragonfly ID
Location: Butler, PA
August 13, 2014 7:14 am
I found this dragonfly at Jennings Environmental Education Center in Butler county, PA. Having trouble finding it in the books. Best I can come up with is Black Meadowhawk, a young one.
Thanks,
Signature: Glenn

Skimmer Dragonfly, but which species???

Skimmer Dragonfly, but which species???

Dear Glenn,
We cannot say for certain that your identification of a Black Meadowhawk is correct, however your individual does look very similar to this female Black Meadowhawk,
Sympetrum danae, that is posted on BugGuide.  We do believe you have the family Libellulidae, the Skimmers correct.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to provide some information.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination