Currently viewing the category: "Dragonflies and Damselflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Dragonfly Bug Love <3
Location: Clifton, Va
August 31, 2014 7:01 am
Found this amorous pair in Hemlock Park- Clifton, Va
Signature: Katie from Manassas

Mating Dragonflies

Mating Dragonflies

Hi Katie,
We believe your mating Dragonflies are Tiger Spiketails,
Cordulegaster erronea, based on this image from BugGuide and the distribution range.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Dragonfly ID
Location: Butler, PA
August 13, 2014 7:14 am
I found this dragonfly at Jennings Environmental Education Center in Butler county, PA. Having trouble finding it in the books. Best I can come up with is Black Meadowhawk, a young one.
Thanks,
Signature: Glenn

Skimmer Dragonfly, but which species???

Skimmer Dragonfly, but which species???

Dear Glenn,
We cannot say for certain that your identification of a Black Meadowhawk is correct, however your individual does look very similar to this female Black Meadowhawk,
Sympetrum danae, that is posted on BugGuide.  We do believe you have the family Libellulidae, the Skimmers correct.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to provide some information.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: North Frontenac Park in Ontario Canada
Location: Ontario Canada
August 10, 2014 10:46 am
Hello,
I was hoping you could identify this bug for me.
I’ve tried finding it online myself and havent seen anything like it except for bed bugs which are tiny and this thing was quite large. 2 inches? Maybe.
Signature: T.Jones

Dragonhunter Naiad

Dragonhunter Naiad

Dear T. Jones,
We fully understand your confusion that this insect resembles an enormous Bed Bug, and we imagine that must have given you the creeps.  This appears to be the exuvia of a Dragonhunter naiad,
Hagenius brevistylus, the shed exoskeleton of a species of Dragonfly, and this is a ventral view which you may compare to this image on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What the name?
Location: Phrao, Chiang Mai, Thailand
August 3, 2014 6:58 pm
Hi bugman
After the successful answer of my first bug I’m excited to use this site to find all the names of the bugs I’ve been curious about. This is simply a dragonfly I found in Thailand, March 2012. Wanted to find out what the name of this was because this was the only one I found during my time there that was black compared to the more common dragonflies in the area which were all vibrant in color.
Signature: PsychPeter

Dragonfly

Dragonfly

Dear PsychPeter,
We have a very difficult time with North American Dragonflies despite there being so many sites devoted to North American Dragonflies.  Male and female Dragonflies often exhibit pronounced sexual dimorphism, meaning the sexes can look like different species.  Also, male Dragonflies often change drastically between the time they initially metamorphose into winged adults, the teneral or juvenile stage, and the time they attain sexual maturity.  According to BugGuide:  “They are usually pale and unmarked; they acquire adult coloring and markings over the next several days (it can take more than a week to reach sexual maturity.)”  We found a very similar looking Dragonfly on Shutterstock, but it is not identified to the species level.

Update:  August 5, 2014 12:10 am
Hi,
the unknown dragonfly from Thailand posted by PsychPeter is certainly a male of  Neurothemis tullia (Drury 1773). Its wing design is very characteristic. You may compare the pictures in this link:
http://thaiodonata.blogspot.de/2011/03/neurothemis-tullia.html  or wikipedia…
Regards, Erwin
Signature: Erwin M. Beyer

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Skimmer? Dragonfly?
Location:  Whitewater Preserve, Riverside County, California
July 25, 2014
dear what’s that bug?
this handsome creature posed on my car’s antenna at the wildlands conservancy’s “Whitewater Preserve” in riverside county this past weekend. could you ID him for me, please?
thank you! clare.

Flame Skimmer

Flame Skimmer

Hi Clare,
We believe that based on images posted to BugGuide, this is a male Flame Skimmer,
Libellula saturata, a species of Dragonfly.  It is described on BugGuide as:  “males bright orange with amber color in the wings covering half the width of the wing, out to the nodus, and all the way to the rear of the hind wing. Females paler but still with some amber at least on the leading edge of the wing.”

Flame Skimmer

Flame Skimmer

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Swarming Dragonflies
Location:  Corralitas Red Car Property, Silver Lake, Los Angeles, California
July 15, 2014 10:30 AM
This morning we accepted an invitation to walk the Corralitas Red Car Property with community activist Diane Edwardson and we evaluated the merits of preserving the site as open space.  A large Tarantula Hawk was flying about lazily and then we saw some of the California Harvester Ants that Diane observed swarming about a month ago, but the real treat was seeing a large swarm of Dragonflies circling an endangered California Walnut Tree.  They did not appear to be feeding or mating, and there were at least 50 large Dragonflies in a small bit of air space.   Though we could not get a clear image of a static individual, the large size and overall green coloration has led us to speculate that the Dragonflies are Green Darners.

Swarming Green Darners

Swarming Green Darners

In researching this behavior we learned that the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences states:  “ Dragonflies swarm for two reasons.  Dragonflies are predators so if there is abundant food in the area, i.e. lots of small flying insects such as mosquitoes or other flies, a swarm may form in the same area.  In these static swarms, the dragonflies fly back and forth over a specific, well-defined area, eating the small flying insects within that space.  Dragonflies also migrate, so you might see large groups of them flying together in a single direction, either to escape poor local conditions (dry, very hot) or to seek warmer regions in the fall.  Migratory swarms can contain several million dragonflies and travel thousands of miles!”  Though we did not observe any prey, we can only presume that smaller swarming insects were providing food for this magnificent aerial display.  More information on swarming Dragonflies can be found on BayNature.

Swarming Green Darners

Swarming Green Darners

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination