Currently viewing the category: "Dragonflies and Damselflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mating Damselflies?
Location: Coryell County, Texas
May 14, 2015 6:26 pm
Hello again,
Are these are mating Damselflies? They were close to the front door, on a Japanese Boxwood shrub. I see that you have several examples of mating damselflies on your website, but I thought the heart was so fascinating.
Today was warm with scattered rain, around 83 degrees when the photo was taken.
Thank you so much!
Signature: Ellen

Mating Damselflies

Mating Damselflies

Hi Ellen,
You are correct.  These are mating Damselflies and your image is lovely.  We will attempt to identify the genus or species when we have more time.

Alfonso Moreno, Sue Dougherty, Jacob Helton, Kristi E. Lambert liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Weird bug in tank
Location: Karnse county, TX
May 2, 2015 2:18 pm
I found this bug in a tank at my house and was wondering what kind its
Signature: thanks

Dragonfly Naiad and Tadpoles

Dragonfly Naiad and Tadpoles

This is an aquatic Dragonfly Nymph, known as a Naiad, an aquatic predator that may eat your small Tadpoles.

Alisha Bragg liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Classification
Location: East Central Texas
April 24, 2015 11:57 pm
I need help identifying this organism. This image is under 40x magnification under a microscope. It was pulled from a pond in East Central Texas, and appeared to be sucking water through its anus as a way over breathing in the water.
Signature: Kendrick

Hatchling Dragonfly Naiad

Hatchling Dragonfly Naiad

Dear Kendrick,
This appears to be a very young, perhaps recently hatched, Dragonfly Naiad.  There are many types of flying insects like Dragonflies, Damselflies, Stoneflies and Mayflies that have aquatic nymphs that are known as Naiads.  The water action that you observed is nicely explained by Charles Hogue in his excellent book Insects of the Los Angeles Basin:  “Human beings are latecomers in the use of jet propulsion.  by porcibly expelling water from its rectum, the dragonfly nymph can drive its body forward through the water at great speed.  This is an emergency method of locomotion that is employed principally to evade enemies.”

Kathleen Travis Perin, Sue Dougherty liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I found this little guy in a lake in utah?
Location: South Jordan, Utah, USA
April 9, 2015 2:00 pm
Hi, I found this bug about 2-3 weeks ago in a lake fashioned like a little beach here in central utah. I’ve been taking care of it this whole time and its been doing fine, I just have no clue of what type of bug it is. please help!
Signature: I don’t care

Dragonfly Naiad

Dragonfly Naiad

This looks like the aquatic nymph of a Dragonfly, known as a Naiad.  Dragonfly Naiads are predatory, and we hope you are providing aquatic prey for it to eat.

thanks so much! and yes i have been able to provide aquatic prey for it, tysm! :)

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: bug?
Location: north carolina
April 5, 2015 10:08 am
I found a bug in a pond in the woods and cant identify it has six legs it looks like it has a stinger and its heas looks like a small preying mantis head
Signature: destiny

Dragonfly Naiad

Dragonfly Naiad

Dear Destiny,
This is the aquatic nymph of a Dragonfly, commonly called a naiad.  It does not sting, however, it is a predator that feeds on aquatic insects and other small creatures, including small fish and tadpoles.

Jacob Helton liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: unidentified damselfly
Location: Mexico, see text
January 30, 2015 4:48 am
During a 5 week trip in southern Mexico in Dec-Jan 2014-15, I had the opportunity to photograph quite a large a number of insects. Among those that I haven’t been able to identify yet is this damselfly, probably an Argia species. The first two photos show the same individual, the 3th photo shows another individual but it could very well be the same species (identical shoulder striping).
Location image 1 and 2: Puerto Morelos, Quintana Roo province, altitude: sea level.
Location image 3: Rio Lagartos, Yucatan province, altitude: sea level.
Any id suggestions would be highly appreciated.
Signature: David Kohl

Damselfly

Damselfly

Dear David,
We are afraid that the proper species identification of your Damselflies is beyond our ability.  We are posting your images in the hope that one of our readers can provide you with information.

Damselfly

Damselfly

Another Damselfly

Another Damselfly

Sue Dougherty liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination