Currently viewing the category: "Dobsonflies and Fishflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Possible caddisfly?
Location: Lewis Center, OH
May 26, 2016 2:03 pm
Hi I found this guy today (May 26th 2016) on the screen door of my house. I thought it was a caddisfly, but those feathered antenna! He also looks like he has yellow fangs.
Signature: JRH

Male Spring Fishfly

Male Spring Fishfly

Dear JRH,
This is a male Fishfly, most likely a Spring Fishfly,
Chauliodes rastricornis, a species pictured on BugGuide where it states they are found “Near calm bodies of water with detritus.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?!
Location: Tennessee
May 17, 2016 12:45 pm
Found near a creek. Wriggling around on a rock. What is it?
Signature: Raya D Whitworth

Dobsonfly Pupa

Dobsonfly Pupa

Dear Raya,
This is the pupa of a Dobsonfly.  We get numerous submissions of images of adult Dobsonflies, and we get a fair number of images of larval Dobsonflies known as Hellgrammites, but images of Dobsonfly pupae are not that common.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Crazy Jungle Bug
Location: Costa Rica
May 7, 2016 9:39 pm
Found this thing at a rest stop in Costa Rica. It’s almost as big as my palm. What on earth is it?
Signature: Ryan

Male Dobsonfly

Male Dobsonfly

Dear Ryan,
We cannot provide you with an exact species name, but this is a male Dobsonfly from the subfamily Corydalinae.  Despite the formidable looking mandibles, male Dobsonflies are perfectly harmless.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Awsome find ? Or not?
Location: Carmen de viboral, Colombia
April 5, 2016 6:09 pm
Bugman help !!
What is this beautiful creatures name. Been in Medellin Colombia for 14 years and never saw one. My farm is where I found it . About 8500 ft above sea level. Thanks bugman!!
Signature: Anyhow

Female Dobsonfly

Female Dobsonfly

These are wonderful images of a female Dobsonfly.  Male Dobsonflies have much more impressive mandibles.

Female Dobsonfly

Female Dobsonfly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Dobsonfly laying eggs
Location: Southwestern Maine
April 5, 2016 4:46 am
Dear Bugman,
This photo was taken last year at a river in Maine. Our family is fascinated by all creatures, great and small. So I was thrilled to be lucky enough to come across this Mama laying her eggs.
Signature: The Cartwrights, NH

Dark Fishfly Ovipositing

Dark Fishfly Ovipositing

Dear Cartwrights,
Your images are awesome, however we need to make a slight correction.  This is not a Dobsonfly.  This is a closely related Dark Fishfly in the genus
Nigronia.  According to BugGuide:  “Emergence of adults may be synchronized. Adults are diurnal (seen flying near streams) and also nocturnal, so come to lights. Eggs are laid on the underside of vegetation overhanging a stream. Larvae are aquatic, predatory. Perhaps take three years to mature in more temperate areas, such as West Virginia. Pupation occurs in earthen cells on the edge of streams.”  Your images illustrate an option to laying eggs on vegetation.

Dark Fishfly Ovipositing

Dark Fishfly Ovipositing

And we learned something new!  Thank you so much :)

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Found at south Carolina lake house
Location: South Carolina
April 3, 2016 5:19 pm
I found this in the driveway of my parent’s home in South south Carolina. It’s very slow and about 5 inches long. It’s head is flat with large pincers. The front half looks like a beetle, hard segments, 6 segmented legs. The rest looks like a centipede. It has multiple segments with what seem like non functioning legs.
Signature: Curious in Carolina

Hellgrammite

Hellgrammite

Dear Curious,
Though we have never been able to identify successfully the etymological origin of the word Hellgrammite, it is nonetheless an appropriate name for the impressive larva of the Dobsonfly.  While five inches seems like a bit of an exaggeration, Hellgrammites are large insects.  Hellgrammites are found near sources of water since they are aquatic, but they will move to drier ground to pupate.  Adult Dobsonflies should begin to appear in your area very soon.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination