Currently viewing the category: "Dobsonflies and Fishflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug?
Location: A river in Indiana
June 23, 2016 5:04 am
My aunt saw this bug this morning up at her river home here in northern Indiana.
Signature: Jessica

Female Dobsonfly

Female Dobsonfly

Dear Jessica,
This is a female Dobsonfly and we would caution you and your aunt to stay clear of her mandibles.  Adult Dobsonflies do not eat, but the mandibles of the female are used to defend herself from predators, and she may deliver a painful nip if carelessly handled.  There is nothing to fear from the nip, as the Dobsonfly has neither venom nor poison.  The male Dobsonfly has much more spectacular mandibles, but they are not capable of inflicting a bite on a human.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: never seen before bug
Location: Laval North west subburbs, Quebec
June 20, 2016 5:45 am
Hello Here is a photo of a winged insect that is very beautiful but we never seen any of them before.
Signature: Richard

Male Spring Fishfly

Male Spring Fishfly

Dear Richard,
This is a male Spring Fishfly,
Chauliodes rastricornis, which you can verify by comparing to this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “The antennae of females are serrate (saw-like):  The comb-like, (pectinate) antennae of the males are quite obvious.”  BugGuide data indicates Quebec sightings occur in June and July.

Thank you
I and will go to sleep a little smarter.
Love that guide will start using it more and more
Site is a bit intimidating with its large content I will get familiar.
Is there a way to arrive at an identification beside looking at all the items ? like a series of questions that would narrow the search?
Thanks again
Richard

The search engine on our site might be helpful if you type in a few key words.  Because people send in letters that we post verbatim, there is pop culture language on the site that is used to describe the insects.  Prior to the advent of cellular telephones with cameras and internet connectivity, the letters were a bit wordier because they were typed on a computer.  We just typed in “beautiful winged insect” and your posting came up early, but Giant Conifer Aphids also came up, but not because they were described as beautiful, but because the tree they were living on was described as “beautiful and expensive.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug found by river in Indiana
Location: Bristol, Indiana
June 13, 2016 5:42 pm
We found this bug while walking by the river in Bristol, Indiana.
Signature: Bliss Family

Male Dobsonfly

Male Dobsonfly

Dear Bliss Family,
This is an awesome image of a male Dobsonfly, and we believe his mandibles are so white because he recently metamorphosed and that they will soon darken, like most of the images we have on our site of male Dobsonflies.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cool Bug
Location: Ottawa, Ohio
June 18, 2016 7:02 pm
Hoping someone can identify this really cool looking insect.
Signature: Not sure

Male Dobsonfly

Male Dobsonfly

This spectacular insect is a male Dobsonfly, and it is one of our most common summer identification requests.  Despite his formidable looking mandibles, the male Dobsonfly cannot bite and is perfectly harmless, though his mate who has considerably shorter mandibles can deliver a somewhat painful bite that could even draw blood, though she too is considered harmless as she has no poison nor venom.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beautiful Insect
Location: Birmingham Alabama
June 7, 2016 4:35 pm
Found on a bed in Birmingham Alabama . Presuming it entered through an open window and was comfortable enough to stay.
I carefully got it to crawl into a paper towel and carried it outdoors.
Signature: David Gentry

Male Dobsonfly

Male Dobsonfly

Dear David,
We love that you consider this male Dobsonfly to be beautiful.  Male Dobsonflies are harmless.  We are tagging this submission with the Bug Humanitarian Award for the kindness you showed in relocating it outdoors.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What in the world is this bug?
Location: Bella vista, ca
June 6, 2016 9:08 am
This bug was just sitting on the wall for about a week not moving, then suddenly flew away.
Signature: Laura Merrill

California Dobsonfly

California Dobsonfly

Dear Laura,
Though it is commonly called a California Dobsonfly,
Neohermes californicus is actually a related Fishfly in a distinct subfamily.  According to Charles Hogue in Insects of the Los Angeles Basin:  “This is a stream-loving species … it is common in higher elevations.”  Here is a matching image from BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination