Currently viewing the category: "Dobsonflies and Fishflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Awsome find ? Or not?
Location: Carmen de viboral, Colombia
April 5, 2016 6:09 pm
Bugman help !!
What is this beautiful creatures name. Been in Medellin Colombia for 14 years and never saw one. My farm is where I found it . About 8500 ft above sea level. Thanks bugman!!
Signature: Anyhow

Female Dobsonfly

Female Dobsonfly

These are wonderful images of a female Dobsonfly.  Male Dobsonflies have much more impressive mandibles.

Female Dobsonfly

Female Dobsonfly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Dobsonfly laying eggs
Location: Southwestern Maine
April 5, 2016 4:46 am
Dear Bugman,
This photo was taken last year at a river in Maine. Our family is fascinated by all creatures, great and small. So I was thrilled to be lucky enough to come across this Mama laying her eggs.
Signature: The Cartwrights, NH

Dark Fishfly Ovipositing

Dark Fishfly Ovipositing

Dear Cartwrights,
Your images are awesome, however we need to make a slight correction.  This is not a Dobsonfly.  This is a closely related Dark Fishfly in the genus
Nigronia.  According to BugGuide:  “Emergence of adults may be synchronized. Adults are diurnal (seen flying near streams) and also nocturnal, so come to lights. Eggs are laid on the underside of vegetation overhanging a stream. Larvae are aquatic, predatory. Perhaps take three years to mature in more temperate areas, such as West Virginia. Pupation occurs in earthen cells on the edge of streams.”  Your images illustrate an option to laying eggs on vegetation.

Dark Fishfly Ovipositing

Dark Fishfly Ovipositing

And we learned something new!  Thank you so much :)

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Found at south Carolina lake house
Location: South Carolina
April 3, 2016 5:19 pm
I found this in the driveway of my parent’s home in South south Carolina. It’s very slow and about 5 inches long. It’s head is flat with large pincers. The front half looks like a beetle, hard segments, 6 segmented legs. The rest looks like a centipede. It has multiple segments with what seem like non functioning legs.
Signature: Curious in Carolina

Hellgrammite

Hellgrammite

Dear Curious,
Though we have never been able to identify successfully the etymological origin of the word Hellgrammite, it is nonetheless an appropriate name for the impressive larva of the Dobsonfly.  While five inches seems like a bit of an exaggeration, Hellgrammites are large insects.  Hellgrammites are found near sources of water since they are aquatic, but they will move to drier ground to pupate.  Adult Dobsonflies should begin to appear in your area very soon.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large slender bug with wings
Location: Lake Jackson Texas
March 23, 2016 12:24 pm
Hello from the Lone Star state!stepped outside this morning & seen this bug on the wall, about 1 3/4″ long & about 1/4″ wide, have never seen one like this before , so just curious… What is this strange looking bug? Thanks in advance!
Signature: Curious Rae

Female Dobsonfly

Female Spring Fishfly

Dear Curious Rae,
This is a female Dobsonfly, and though she is considered harmless, she does have strong mandibles and carelessly handling her might result in a painful bite.  Male Dobsonflies have much more formidable looking mandibles, but they are incapable of biting.  The identification of Dobsonflies is one of our most common requests, and your submission is our first North American Dobsonfly submission this year.  Most sightings occur in late spring and early summer.

Correction:  Fishfly, NOT Dobsonfly
Thanks to a comment from Curious Girl, we realized we were too hasty in our identification.  This is in fact a female Spring Fishfly, not a female Dobsonfly.  Dobsonflies have more developed mandibles.  According to BugGuide, the female Spring Fishfly has serrate antennae while the male has pectinate or feathery antennae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unusual moth
Location: Central north carolina
March 30, 2016 9:19 pm
Hi! Last night this guy flew into my house to hang around on the wall near a lamp. I hadn’t seen this kind of bug before so I isolated it under a glass before letting it back outside. It would be nice to know what species it is and if it’s the male or female of said species. I’m only guessing moth by the antennae. Here is what I’ve observed: with wings closed its about 1.5-2 inches long, 6 legs, narrow when wings are closed wings start fairly far away from the eye region, Fuzzy moth like antennae, 2 sets of wings, body is very slender, smooth, and long when wings are open. Almost like how a dragon fly is situated. Either vey dark brown or black in color all over. Wings have a same color raised textured on them. Sorry the pictures aren’t the best. And I am unsure of the wing span.
Signature: Thanks! Lauren

Spring Fishfly

Spring Fishfly

Dear Lauren,
This is a male Spring Fishfly,
Chauliodes rastricornis, and here is what BugGuide has to say:  “Compare C. pectinicornis. Head and pronotum have dark markings on light brown background, as opposed to yellowish markings on dark brown background of C. pectinicornis. Antennae of female serrate, of male, pectinate. So, apparently, a Chauliodes with serrate antennae should be a female C. rastricornis. Note earlier flight (spring) of rastricornis in most of east. C. pectinicornis typically flies in summer.”

Male Spring Fishfly

Male Spring Fishfly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: ID Please
Location: Western MA, USA
March 27, 2016 7:09 am
Hi,
I have looked around quite a bit & keep coming up empty handed. For some reason I got “doodlebug” stuck in my head, however that does not seem correct.
It was having issues navigating climbing the stalks & leaves of the low-lying, plants that were stream side. I am not sure if it had just emerged or had some fermented fruit….
Taken 6/3/15 – Holyoke, MA – At a reservoir. I have not seen one since….
Thank you….
Signature: Kristi

Dark Fishfly

Dark Fishfly

Dear Kristi,
Your Dark Fishfly in the genus
Nigronia is only represented on our site with a two postings so we are thrilled with your submission and your excellent quality images.  Based on BugGuide images, we believe your individual is Nigronia fasciata.  According to BugGuide:  “Emergence of adults may be synchronized. Adults are diurnal (seen flying near streams) and also nocturnal, so come to lights. Eggs are laid on the underside of vegetation overhanging a stream. Larvae are aquatic, predatory. Perhaps take three years to mature in more temperate areas, such as West Virginia. Pupation occurs in earthen cells on the edge of streams.”  It is possible that the flight time in various locations is so brief that if one is not looking at that time, it could be years between sightings.

Dark Fishfly

Dark Fishfly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination