Currently viewing the category: "Sow Bugs, Pill Bugs, Isopods, Lawn Shrimp and Amphipods"
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Subject: What kind of bug is this?
Location: Slidell Louisana 70461
April 18, 2016 11:05 pm
Moved into a house. 30+ years old. Sprayed insecticide around perimeter and noticed this insect/bug. I tried to observe one alive but couldn’t. The only one’s i find are dead.
Signature: Signed by the BUGMAN!!!

Lawn Shrimp

Lawn Shrimp

These terrestrial Amphipods are known as Lawn Shrimp or House Hoppers.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: ID bug
Location: Sydney, Australia
January 22, 2016 2:36 pm
Hello,
I have found many alive and dead bugs in a bedroom. Sometimes they’re curled up in an almost ball.
Please help to identify them.
With thankd
Signature: N/A

Woodlouse

Woodlouse

This terrestrial Isopod is commonly called a Woodlouse, and those that roll into balls are frequently called Pill Bugs or Rollie-Pollies.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What are they?
Location: Chula Vista, California
September 19, 2015 4:06 pm
We found these dead insects next to our outdoor garbage cans after a recent heavy rain We live just south of San Diego. We’ve never seen them before in our yard. Do we have an infestation?
Signature: Susan J.

Lawn Shrimp

Lawn Shrimp

Dear Susan,
Lawn Shrimp or House Hoppers, terrestrial Amphipods, generally go unnoticed in irrigated Southern California landscapes until heavy rains drive them from the garden and they die near homes.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Legalities of sow and pill bugs in California.
August 8, 2015 2:54 pm
Is it legal to sell and buy sow and pill bugs in California.
Signature: Andrew smith

Dear Andrew,
To the best of our knowledge, there is no state law prohibiting the sale or purchase of Pill Bugs, Sow Bugs or Woodlice in the state of California, but there may be local laws.  We cannot fathom why a person would want to buy or sell Pill Bugs in California or elsewhere.  We have used an image of Pill Bugs from our archives to illustrate your query.

People have been using them for reptile food. But more importantly they’re being used in their terarriums to keep mold bacteria and such things under control. So kinda like a live in cage cleaner.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Found at Crissy Field
Location: Chrissy Field Beach, San Francisco
June 2, 2015 11:19 am
Hey Mr Bugman, what’s my bug?
Signature: Griffin

Beach Hopper

BeachHopper

Hi Griffin,
This is a Marine Amphipod commonly called a BeachHopper, probably
Megalorchestia californiana.  Your submission will post live to our site later in June while we are away from the office.

Thanks for getting back to us.  We found this guy on the beach and he was resourceful, so we really wanted to know what he was.
Thank you!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bright Orange Woodlouse
Location: Missouri, United States
March 20, 2015 11:49 am
during my searches for various bugs and critters I’ve come across a total of three of these bright orange woodlice. I have a large plastic tub full of woodlice that I feed and observe, so the three I’ve found are part of my little ecosystem now.
what I’m wondering is, is this a rare genetic coloration of some sort? or a different species of woodlouse than the gray ones? perhaps neither and it’s something else, so I thought I’d ask you!
Signature: Stolz

Orange Woodlouse

Orange Woodlouse

Dear Stolz,
Long ago we fielded a question about a Blue Sowbug and we learned it was infected with an Iridovirus which caused the coloration.  We found a similar question posted to BugGuide, but there is no response other than that it is identified as the European Sowbug,
Oniscus asellus.  On the Woodlice Oddities Page, it states:  “Orange Porcellio scaber This orange form appears to be rare in this region. The example here is the only one found in a collection of over 400 from the same compost heap – it is also the only one, of two, that I have observed over the last 10 years. The red forms of woodlice are genetically determined but their rarity suggests that this form is not as well adapted to the habitat as the darker gray forms.”  On Terrain.net it states:  “The Orange woodlice is a rare colour form the the common slater  Porcellio scaber.”  On BugGuide we learned that Porcellio scaber is a synonym for Oniscus granulatus.

Habitat with Woodlice

Habitat with Woodlice

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination