Currently viewing the category: "Sow Bugs, Pill Bugs, Isopods, Lawn Shrimp and Amphipods"
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Subject: Carpet Moth/Beetle
Location: United Kingdom
April 14, 2014 2:16 am
Good Morning, Please see photos of bugs collected from carpet with rice like cocoons?? Can you identify what the bug is and what the rice bits are. There are areas of carpet which have clearly been eaten and we need to identify the problem.
Many thanks
Signature: Ashley Clarke

Case Bearing Clothes Moths and Woodlice

Casemaking Clothes Moths and Woodlice

Hi Ashley,
The “bugs” are Woodlice or Pillbugs, and though they might be a nuisance indoors, they are not eating your carpet.  They are attracted to damp conditions.  The rice like cocoons appear to be the cases of Casemaking Clothes Moths,
Tinea pellionella, a species that will eat wool rugs and clothes and we believe that is the source of the damage.  According to BugGuide, the larvae feed on:  “Feed on wool, feathers, fur, hair, upholstered furniture, leather, fish meals, milk powders, lint, dust or paper.”  The larvae, not the adult moths, are responsible for the damage.  It appears that one of the cases in the center of your “collection” is a different species in the same family, a Household Casebearer Moth case, Phereoeca uterella, which according to BugGuide:  “feed on old spider webs; may also eat woolen goods of all kinds if the opportunity arises.”  BugGuide also notes:  “Larval cases can be found on wool rugs and wool carpets, hanging on curtains, or under buildings, hanging from subflooring, joists, sills and foundations; also found on exterior of buildings in shaded places, under farm sheds, under lawn furniture, on stored farm machinery, and on tree trunks.”

Many thanks really helpful
Regards,
Ashley

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wood roaches?
Location: South Central Kansas
March 17, 2014 11:02 am
Hi there!
I found these guys under an old wood-pile I was moving. It’s pretty cold out still here in my part of Kansas (highs in the 50s-60s F, but lows in the 30s F lately) and they were under the lowest level of the pile, in the leaf litter and bark at the bottom. I’ve also found a few random specimens in my basement since last fall, but they die quickly, I think because it’s too dry. Am I right in guessing these are Parcoblatta sp. (aka wood roaches) of some sort?
P.S. I know the gray/silver ones are isopods. :D There were thousands of them under the pile, too… made catching the roaches interesting.
Signature: – Angela, amateur bug nut

Wood Cockroaches and Woodlice

Wood Cockroaches and Woodlice

Hi Angela, amateur bug nut,
Thanks so much for sending us your gorgeous photo of Wood Cockroaches in the genus
Parcoblatta and their wood pile roommates, terrestrial isopods commonly called Woodlice or Sowbugs.  It is not possible to identify your Wood Cockroaches to the species level.  According to BugGuide:  “in males, wings cover the abdomen; adult females typically have small wingpads (tegmina). Older nymphs may also have prominent wingbuds. Nymphs of different spp. are impossible to tell apart based on known characters; identification of adult females is difficult or not possible, depending on the species and geographic location. Only the adult males have the characters that can definitively identify the species in this genus. Unfortunately, the characters needed are covered by wings, and so identification of living males is not usually possible.”  Your observation that they die quickly in the home is supported by BugGuide which states:  “indoors, they wander aimlessly during the day (rather than congregating in a particular room and being active at night), do not breed, and will die within a few days due to insufficient moisture.”

Wood Cockroaches

Wood Cockroaches

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange looking dead bug!
Location: Ireland
March 15, 2014 10:56 am
Hi there found this weird bug dead on sofa..there were 2 of them!  Founding n Ireland! Is this some sort of carpet beetle perhaps?
Signature: Ali

Lawn Shrimp

Lawn Shrimp

Hi Ali,
This looks like a terrestrial Amphipod,
Arcitalitrus sylvaticus, commonly called a Lawn Shrimp or House Hopper.  These Australian natives have become established in southern California as well as several other parts of the world.  According to BugGuide, their range is:  “Southeastern Australia (New South Wales and Victoria), as well as nearby areas of the Pacific, but introduced into New Zealand, the British Isles, Florida and California.”  They are known to enter homes when their garden habitat is flooded due to rains.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: BUG IN MY NEW APARTMENTS
Location: scarborough, Ontario, Canada
December 15, 2013 2:40 pm
Hi guys!!
Okay so I moved into a new basement apartment yesterday (its December and quite cold) When I first walked in I saw about 4 of these bugs dead in a small spider web. so I just cleaned it up and thought of nothing since the apartment had been vacant for about a month. Then last night I saw about 4 more of these bugs walking. I killed them. I didn’t see any this morning, but then after I had breakfast I saw 3 more in the bedroom. One of which was crawling out from under the baseboard. I need to know what this is. Im afraid I have an infestation and I just moved in. I don’t know what this is though. I hope you can help.
Signature: Tania

Woodlouse

Woodlouse

Hi Tania,
This is a Woodlouse, and we believe we have correctly identified it as
 Porcellio spinicornis thanks to photos posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, these Woodlice are found:  “wherever cool, dark, moist places are available to shelter woodlice from dryness and heat during the day.”  Your basement apartment fits that description.  Woodlice are benign and they will not harm you, your pets, your apartment or its furnishings.  They may be a nuisance if they are plentiful, but they are basically benign creatures.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: House Bug – Is it a Bed Bug?
Location: Washington DC
November 13, 2013 9:00 pm
I found this on my wall, and poked it with my finger. It left a lot of liquid on the wall, making a stain. It is smaller than my smallest nail, maybe 4 mm.
Signature: DC Bugsy

Sowbug

Sowbug

Hi DC Bugsy,
This is a benign terrestrial crustacean commonly called a Sowbug.  You can read up on Sowbugs on Texas A&M Agrilife Extension.

Awesome, thank you for the reply! I love this site, and will donate tonight :)

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug?
Location: Wyoming
October 20, 2013 6:04 pm
I live in wyoming, the season is fall and these little bugs keep appearing in my basement bedroom. They almost look like flat pill bugs. Very tiny bugs, but there are so many of them.
Signature: Grossed out girl

Terrestrial Isopod

Terrestrial Isopod

Dear Grossed out girl,
This is some species of terrestrial Isopod, and it is classified in the same Crustacean order as Pill Bugs, and that order is Isopoda.  See BugGuide for additional information.  Isopods tend to favor damp conditions, and perhaps climactic conditions in your area favored a surge in populations this season.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination