Currently viewing the category: "Crustaceans"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identify bug
Location: Davidson
November 12, 2016 11:25 am
Hi we would like to know what type of bug my son had in his basement bathroom. Seems to come from under the corner shower.
Thanks
Signature: Flo

Woodlice

Woodlice

Dear Flo,
These are Woodlice or Sowbugs, and children commonly call them Rollie-Pollies because they curl into balls.  They are harmless, and though they are normally found outdoors in the garden, they can sometimes be found in damp areas indoors.  Where is Davidson?

Hi,
Thanks for the response.  Davidson is between Saskatoon Saskatchewan and Regina Saskatchewan (about half way).
Is there anything we can use to get rid of them?
Thanks again,
Florence

Thanks for the clarification.  We do not provide extermination advice.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Lawn Shrimp
Location: Castle Hayne, NC
August 3, 2016 7:01 am
I found these little creatures in our pet’s water bowl yesterday and googled what they might be, your site gave me the answer and now I’m letting you know they are also just outside of Wilmington, NC!
Signature: Becky H.

Lawn Shrimp

Lawn Shrimp

Dear Becky,
Thanks so much for reporting this North Carolina sighting.  Lawn Shrimp are an introduced species from Australia that are well established in California, and BugGuide indicates they are also found in Florida, though the data on the site indicates Georgia reports.  This North Carolina sighting cannot be considered a normal range expansion as this is an introduced species, but there is no telling how far North they will be able to survive in North America.  We have already reported Lawn Shrimp in South Carolina.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider or crayfish?
Location: Indianapolis, indiana
June 22, 2016 4:36 pm
Came across this critter flipped over, struggling at the edge of a creek. Managed to take this photo of the ventral side, but some kids crushed it with a rock before I could turn it over. It was quite big, four or five inches at least, large enough that I could have cradled it in my hand. Looking at photo, it appears to have eight legs, but spiders in this region are not normally this big or robust, so my guess is that it was a crayfish and that the other limbs are not apparent in the photo and/or were pulled off by something.
Signature: Anonymous

Crayfish and Fly

Crayfish and Fly

Dear Anonymous in Indianapolis,
This is most definitely a Crayfish (Crawfish, Clawfish or Crawdad) and it appears to be missing its claws or more correctly, its Chelipeds.  Though it is not very distinctive, we are curious about the identity of the Fly in the upper right corner of your image.  We hope we never hear again about the kids who crushed it.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Looks like an Alien
Location: Glorieta, New Mexico
June 20, 2016 2:24 pm
Hi! My dad found this strange creature in a freshwater pond. He has no idea what it is, I found something similar on this site called a shield shrimp or triop, but I wanted to send in a picture because this one is a little bit different! Thanks for the help!
Signature: Kori

Tadpole Shrimp

Tadpole Shrimp

Hi Kori,
This is a very exciting submission for us.  You are correct that this is a Shield Shrimp or Triops, though we personally prefer the common name Tadpole Shrimp.  We have not had a submission of a Triops since 2012.  Sometimes called “Living Fossils,” Triops have developed a very interesting survival tactic due to being found in arid environments.  Like Fairy Shrimp and some Annual Killifish (see Tropical Fish Hobbyist Magazine), the eggs are able to survive desiccation by being preserved in dried mud.  When the rains return, the eggs hatch and the Tadpole Shrimp quickly reach maturity, at which time they mate and lay eggs for the next generation.  The dried eggs are able to survive many years until the next substantial rains.  We believe we once read that the original movie Alien that burst from the man’s chest was constructed of sea food, and it does somewhat resemble this harmless Tadpole Shrimp.

Tadpole Shrimp

Tadpole Shrimp

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: like a silverfish but bigger?
Location: Vancouver, BC, Canada
June 4, 2016 8:38 pm
Hi,
We found these bugs along the seawall of Stanley Park, in Vancouver, BC, Canada. They came in both brownish and grayish colours, and tended to scuttle off over the wall toward the beach / water when we got near. The only one we got a photo of was actually two bugs, with one on top of the other — they crossed the path in front of us and then went over the wall. They were 2-3 inches long. Online searches make us think they might be a kind of silverfish, but they were much larger than any I’ve ever seen domestically!
Signature: K&M

Sea Slater

Sea Slater

Dear K&M,
This is a marine Isopod in the family Ligiidae, commonly called a Sea Slater.  According to the Electronic Atlas of the Wildlife of British Columbia, it is
Ligia occidentalis, also called “Beach Cockroach; California Sea Slater; Rock Louse; Southern Sea Slater; Western Sea Roach.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

aSubject: Hopping Bug
Location: Bluffton, SC
May 21, 2016 4:28 am
What are these hopping bugs that have come out at night under my porch light? The next morning a lot of them have died. These are in Bluffton SC .
Signature: R McLain,

Lawn Shrimp

Lawn Shrimp

Dear R McLain,
This looks and acts like a Lawn Shrimp or House Hopper,
Arcitalitrus sylvaticus, a species described on BugGuide as being from “Southeastern Australia (New South Wales and Victoria), as well as nearby areas of the Pacific, but introduced into New Zealand, the British Isles, Florida and California” and preferring habitat that is “Moist soil and organic matter within 13 mm of the surface, often among ivy or other ground covers, mostly eucalyptus. Their exoskelton has no waxy coating to keep moisture in, so they can’t survive dryness. They drown in water, though, so they need continuously moist, but not waterlogged conditions.”  Based on this BugGuide posting, they are spreading from Florida to nearby Georgia and your posting indicates they have now spread north to South Carolina.

Thank you Daniel.  I thought they resembled shrimp!

Lawn Shrimp and true Shrimp are classified together as Crustaceans in the same subphylum.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination