Currently viewing the category: "Crustaceans"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Dead bugs outside door?

Location: Huntington Beach, ca
December 7, 2014 8:56 am
We woke up today with a bunch of small brown bugs with pincars. Just by back door outside all dead. Can you let me know if they are something we should be concerned about?
Signature: Liz

Lawn Shrimp

Lawn Shrimp

Dear Liz,
The presence of Lawn Shrimp,
Arcitalitrus sylvaticus, in the landscaping generally goes unnoticed until we have a good rain that soaks the ground, at which time they often emerge in alarming numbers, dying on the concrete or entering homes to die.  Lawn Shrimp are native to Australia and they are also known as House Hoppers.  See BugGuide for additional information on Lawn Shrimp.

Lawn Shrimp

Lawn Shrimp

Jen Moody, Amy Gosch, Vickie Allen Griffin, Andrea Leonard Drummond liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: not a fruit fly
Location: Toledo District, Belize
September 20, 2014 3:29 pm
Hi, folks,
Just sending this along for fun; thought you might get a kick out of it.
My kitchen is open air and we get plenty of critters, but this was a first.
Signature: Tanya

Fiddler Crab

Blue Land Crab

Hi Tanya,
What a pretty little Fiddler Crab, and what a poser.  The Smithsonian has a nice article on Fiddler Crabs.

Hello, Daniel,
Glad you liked the photo.  But it’s not a fiddler crab.  It’s a blue land crab (Cardisoma guanhumi) also known as duppy.  They get very large (“huge” says my Peterson Field Guide).  The one in the picture is a small, young animal.  When the mating season is on, they run in large numbers.  Their claws are capable of puncturing vehicle tires which is a hazard when they cross roads in swampy areas.  They are very tasty and are a much-prized delicacy in Belize.
I’m having lots of fun (and learning plenty) reading through the archives of WTB.  What a terrific job you and your small staff are doing.  Plenty of stars in your crowns.
Regards,
Tanya

Thanks for both the compliment and the correction Tanya.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Southwest Florida driveway find
Location: Southwest Florida
August 26, 2014 4:54 pm
Found this on a driveway that is about 100 feet from a pond…it has a friend a little freaked out. Can you help? Saw some other post about a claw on the right side only, and I think this one fits that bill too. Appreciate an accurate assessment. Thanks!
Signature: Scott

Crayfish

Crayfish

Dear Scott,
this is a positively gorgeous image of a Crayfish.  Crayfish are called Crawdads in Louisiana where they are eaten.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this
Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
April 24, 2014 5:57 am
Just want to identify this bug
Signature: Jesse Larocque

Woodlouse

Woodlouse

Hi Jesse,
This is a Woodlouse or Sowbug, a type of terrestrial Isopod.  Though they often enter homes, they are considered benign and they will not damage your house or its belongings, unless rotting organic matter is valuable to you because that is what they eat.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Tree infestation
Location: Los Angeles, California
April 21, 2014 9:12 am
I have an infestation in a mature (about 50ft high) Camphor tree. The infestation seems to be around the root and the insects (in the picture) are revealed if I pull some bark out. Any help identifying the insects would be appreciated, thanks.
Signature: Anshuman Prasad

Woodlice

Woodlice

Dear Anshuman,
These are Woodlice, a type of terrestrial isopod.  They are commonly found in cool, dark, damp places within the garden where they feed on dead plant material.  If the base of the tree is rotting, they may be feeding on the rotting wood, but they will not harm living portions of your camphor tree.  Woodlice will also enter homes, and they are most frequently found in basements where the conditions are favorable.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Raining shrimp?
Location: Fairhope, AL
April 19, 2014 4:19 pm
I emptied the water out of a large bowl I had left outside the other day, but since it rained again yesterday I went to empty it again today and found about ten of these baby shrimp in the bowl. I live about 5 miles from Mobile Bay, but I still thought that was kind of weird… then I found your page and concluded they might be lawn shrimp. The antennae fell off before I took the picture.
Signature: Ray

Lawn Shrimp

Lawn Shrimp

Hi Ray,
You are correct that this is a terrestrial amphipod known as a Lawn Shrimp.  They are also known as House Hoppers because they sometimes enter homes in large numbers after a rain.  Lawn Shrimp are native to Australia, but they have been introduced to North America, and most of our reports come from California.  We have also gotten reports from Florida, but we believe your account from Alabama is a first for us.  Lawn Shrimp can proliferate in great numbers in gardens, but they are generally not noticed until it rains and they enter homes where they quickly die.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination