Currently viewing the category: "Crustaceans"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this
Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
April 24, 2014 5:57 am
Just want to identify this bug
Signature: Jesse Larocque

Woodlouse

Woodlouse

Hi Jesse,
This is a Woodlouse or Sowbug, a type of terrestrial Isopod.  Though they often enter homes, they are considered benign and they will not damage your house or its belongings, unless rotting organic matter is valuable to you because that is what they eat.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Tree infestation
Location: Los Angeles, California
April 21, 2014 9:12 am
I have an infestation in a mature (about 50ft high) Camphor tree. The infestation seems to be around the root and the insects (in the picture) are revealed if I pull some bark out. Any help identifying the insects would be appreciated, thanks.
Signature: Anshuman Prasad

Woodlice

Woodlice

Dear Anshuman,
These are Woodlice, a type of terrestrial isopod.  They are commonly found in cool, dark, damp places within the garden where they feed on dead plant material.  If the base of the tree is rotting, they may be feeding on the rotting wood, but they will not harm living portions of your camphor tree.  Woodlice will also enter homes, and they are most frequently found in basements where the conditions are favorable.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Raining shrimp?
Location: Fairhope, AL
April 19, 2014 4:19 pm
I emptied the water out of a large bowl I had left outside the other day, but since it rained again yesterday I went to empty it again today and found about ten of these baby shrimp in the bowl. I live about 5 miles from Mobile Bay, but I still thought that was kind of weird… then I found your page and concluded they might be lawn shrimp. The antennae fell off before I took the picture.
Signature: Ray

Lawn Shrimp

Lawn Shrimp

Hi Ray,
You are correct that this is a terrestrial amphipod known as a Lawn Shrimp.  They are also known as House Hoppers because they sometimes enter homes in large numbers after a rain.  Lawn Shrimp are native to Australia, but they have been introduced to North America, and most of our reports come from California.  We have also gotten reports from Florida, but we believe your account from Alabama is a first for us.  Lawn Shrimp can proliferate in great numbers in gardens, but they are generally not noticed until it rains and they enter homes where they quickly die.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Carpet Moth/Beetle
Location: United Kingdom
April 14, 2014 2:16 am
Good Morning, Please see photos of bugs collected from carpet with rice like cocoons?? Can you identify what the bug is and what the rice bits are. There are areas of carpet which have clearly been eaten and we need to identify the problem.
Many thanks
Signature: Ashley Clarke

Case Bearing Clothes Moths and Woodlice

Casemaking Clothes Moths and Woodlice

Hi Ashley,
The “bugs” are Woodlice or Pillbugs, and though they might be a nuisance indoors, they are not eating your carpet.  They are attracted to damp conditions.  The rice like cocoons appear to be the cases of Casemaking Clothes Moths,
Tinea pellionella, a species that will eat wool rugs and clothes and we believe that is the source of the damage.  According to BugGuide, the larvae feed on:  “Feed on wool, feathers, fur, hair, upholstered furniture, leather, fish meals, milk powders, lint, dust or paper.”  The larvae, not the adult moths, are responsible for the damage.  It appears that one of the cases in the center of your “collection” is a different species in the same family, a Household Casebearer Moth case, Phereoeca uterella, which according to BugGuide:  “feed on old spider webs; may also eat woolen goods of all kinds if the opportunity arises.”  BugGuide also notes:  “Larval cases can be found on wool rugs and wool carpets, hanging on curtains, or under buildings, hanging from subflooring, joists, sills and foundations; also found on exterior of buildings in shaded places, under farm sheds, under lawn furniture, on stored farm machinery, and on tree trunks.”

Many thanks really helpful
Regards,
Ashley

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: looks like a crawfish
Location: reidsville nc
March 22, 2014 10:24 am
Found this crawfish looking creature in a puddle in the woods, what is it?
Signature: Amanda and Billy

What's That Blur???

What’s That Blur???

Dear Amanda and Billy,
We got a real chuckle out of your request.  Your images are all too blurry to identify.  We have posted the clearest (this is so relative) of the three.  For the sake of classification, we are categorizing it as a Crustacean.  Perhaps it is an Amphipod.  See the Missouri State Biology website.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wood roaches?
Location: South Central Kansas
March 17, 2014 11:02 am
Hi there!
I found these guys under an old wood-pile I was moving. It’s pretty cold out still here in my part of Kansas (highs in the 50s-60s F, but lows in the 30s F lately) and they were under the lowest level of the pile, in the leaf litter and bark at the bottom. I’ve also found a few random specimens in my basement since last fall, but they die quickly, I think because it’s too dry. Am I right in guessing these are Parcoblatta sp. (aka wood roaches) of some sort?
P.S. I know the gray/silver ones are isopods. :D There were thousands of them under the pile, too… made catching the roaches interesting.
Signature: – Angela, amateur bug nut

Wood Cockroaches and Woodlice

Wood Cockroaches and Woodlice

Hi Angela, amateur bug nut,
Thanks so much for sending us your gorgeous photo of Wood Cockroaches in the genus
Parcoblatta and their wood pile roommates, terrestrial isopods commonly called Woodlice or Sowbugs.  It is not possible to identify your Wood Cockroaches to the species level.  According to BugGuide:  “in males, wings cover the abdomen; adult females typically have small wingpads (tegmina). Older nymphs may also have prominent wingbuds. Nymphs of different spp. are impossible to tell apart based on known characters; identification of adult females is difficult or not possible, depending on the species and geographic location. Only the adult males have the characters that can definitively identify the species in this genus. Unfortunately, the characters needed are covered by wings, and so identification of living males is not usually possible.”  Your observation that they die quickly in the home is supported by BugGuide which states:  “indoors, they wander aimlessly during the day (rather than congregating in a particular room and being active at night), do not breed, and will die within a few days due to insufficient moisture.”

Wood Cockroaches

Wood Cockroaches

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination