Currently viewing the category: "Cockroaches"
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Subject: Unknown Beetle
Location: Maryland
November 6, 2014 3:18 pm
Hello, I was wondering if you could tell me what type of Beetle this is. It was photographed in a garage in November.
Signature: Jeremy

Cockroach

Cockroach

Dear Jeremy,
This is a Cockroach, most likely an immature nymph, but we would not rule out that it might be a wingless, adult female Cockroach.

Andrea Leonard Drummond liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: South Korea
May 16, 2014 1:13 pm
Hi, I found this guy in my room tonight. I live in South Korea and the weather has been in the low 80s now. I tried to get rid of it and it seemed a little fast. It doesn’t seem to be able to fly. It looked almost black, if not very dark brown. Thank you.
Signature: Amy

Cockroach

Cockroach

Dear Amy,
This is a Cockroach, more than likely male, and not recognizably a species that infests homes.  We will try to identify its species soon.
  Very few Cockroaches infest buildings, many are quite beautiful and colorful, and we think your individual is handsome.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cool brown and orange striped beetle
Location: Cape Town, South Africa
May 12, 2014 1:38 am
Hello Bugman!
It’s very exciting for me to have someone to turn to for identifying the super cool bugs that I’ve been finding. I try to do the research online and oftentimes I’m successful, but it’s such a relief to have support for those times I need help. Thank you.
This bug (beetle, I’m assuming) was found in the hills/mountains outside of Cape Town, South Africa.
Cheers,
Signature: Kenda

Cape Mountain Cockroach

Female Cape Mountain Cockroach

Hi Kenda,
This is not a beetle, but rather, a Cape Mountain Cockroach,
Aptera fusca.  According to iSpot, it is also known as a Giant Cockroach or Table Mountain Cockroach.  Since iSpot also has images of winged examples of the species, we suspect this is a sexually dimorphic female Cape Mountain Cockroach, or possibly a nymph that has not grown wings, but there are numerous other examples of Cockroaches with wingless females.  Looking at iSpot a bit more closely, it appears our guess that this is a wingless female is correct.

Funny. My husband was certain that little gal was a cockroach. Thank you for the info. I will be posting her pic along with another shout-out for What’s That Bug on an upcoming article.
Also, a friend of mine sent me a photo of a stick bug (he took the pic innSouth Africa) -it’s over a foot long. Is that something you would like me to share on your site?
Cheers,
Kenda

If you have your friend’s permission, we would love to post the Stick Insect.

Absolutely! He is happy to share!  I’ll do it now.
Cheers,
Kenda

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Found in my silverware drawer
Location: Spring hill, Florida
May 4, 2014 8:49 pm
Living in Spring Hill, Florida we sometimes get water bugs but I have never seen thus before?
Signature: N.G.

Metamorphosis of a Cockroach

Metamorphosis of a Cockroach

Dear N.G.,
This sure looks like a Cockroach molting to us.  The exoskeleton of an insect is rigid and does not expand, so when it is time for an insect to grow or metamorphose, it splits its skin and emerges with a new exoskeleton that allows it to increase in size or to change its appearance.  The new exoskeleton if often lighter in color until it hardens and darkens.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: School Project
Location: High Desert California
May 3, 2014 11:11 am
I was assigned a project to pin bugs and give their scientific names but I can’t find the name of this bug.
Signature: Confused Student

Female Turkestan Cockroach

Possibly Female Turkestan Cockroach

Dear Confused Student,
Though we have issues with doing homework projects, your email indicates that you have identified other specimens but this Cockroach is a remaining challenge. At first we thought this might be a  female Turkestan Cockroach,
Shelfordella lateralis, an Invasive Exotic species that exhibits pronounced sexual dimorphism, that was allegedly “introduced to the US in the late 1970s, presumably by military personnel returning from the Middle East” according to BugGuide.  We first posted images of Turkestan Cockroaches in 2011.  Your individual appears to lack the “short whitish lateral dash at base of wing” which are a diagnostic characteristic, according to BugGuide.  This individual from BugGuide also lacks the lateral dashes at the base of the wings.  We will attempt to substantiate our tentative identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: HELP!!!!
Location: SC
May 2, 2014 5:35 am
Hi! I am finding these bugs everywhere. They are mostly around windows and are all small… No longer than half of my pinky nail. I’ve looked around at different photographs and am finding conflicting answers. TIA for your help!!
Signature: Sarah

Smoky Brown Cockroach Nymph

Smoky Brown Cockroach Nymph

Hi Sarah,
Though it is not normally listed as a species that infests homes, we have gotten numerous reports of sightings of Smoky Brown Cockroach,
Periplaneta fuliginosa, nymphs in homes, so we have begun tagging them as Household Pests.  The University of Minnesota Extension site lists the home infesting Cockroaches as:  “There are four kinds of cockroaches that can infest homes in Minnesota, including German cockroach, brownbanded cockroach, American cockroach, and Oriental cockroach. These four species can be major pests in restaurants, hospitals, warehouses, offices and buildings with food-handling areas. “  We will seek another opinion on the pest status of the Smoky Brown Cockroach.

Update to Pest Status Inquiry by Eric Eaton
Daniel:
I have no answer for this….although it is highly possible that the females deposit their egg cases (oothecae) in crevices under siding or something and then the nymphs initially find their way indoors.  That is my only theory.  I have certainly seen adults of this species crawling around the exterior of buildings.
Eric

Hi, thanks for your reply. I live in a heavy wooded area on the water so I was assuming it might be a baby waterbug as we call them in SC.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination