Currently viewing the category: "Cockroaches"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What Kind Of Bug Is This
Location: United States, NJ
April 12, 2014 7:27 pm
hello..this kind of bug ended up in my house two different times..im wondering what it is..if you could help that would be great
Signature: not sure

Oriental Cockroach

Oriental Cockroach

Though it is commonly called a Water Bug, this is an Oriental Cockroach, Blatta orientalis, and it is one of the species of pestiferous Cockroaches that is closely associated with human habitation.  They can become especially numerous in cool, damp places including basements and sewers.  According to BugGuide, they are:  “Omnivorous but prefers starchy or sugary foods. Often associated with garbage or decaying organic matter, indoors or out. Can survive one month without food as long as water is available, or two weeks with neither food nor water.”  Flushing it down the toilet, which is what it appears might happen immediately after this image was taken, will likely introduce it to more of its kin. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this bug
Location: Greenwood indiana
March 25, 2014 6:05 pm
I recently noticed one of these bugs and now they are in out cabinets and crawling out at nite they have not let out kitchen probably because I have sets traps which you see in the picture and other traps that our poison. I thought it was a cockroach but I think those are wings on them? However I have not seen them fly. And they come out more a night. Please help!!
Signature: Kendra

German Cockroach Family

German Cockroach Family

Hi Kendra,
You have an infestation of German Cockroaches,
Blattella germanica, and based on the family photo you included, they are multiplying.  See this photo on BugGuide for comparison.  German Cockroaches are probably the most pestiferous of the Cockroaches, and according to BugGuide:  “Omnivorous, eats just about anything edible” and “Like most cockroaches, the German Cockroach is nocturnal. It is a major pest of residential and commercial structures.  Some people can develop severe allergies to cockroach parts, feces, and oils.   Females carry the ootheca for up to a month, dropping it just before the eggs hatch.”

German Cockroach

German Cockroach

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wood roaches?
Location: South Central Kansas
March 17, 2014 11:02 am
Hi there!
I found these guys under an old wood-pile I was moving. It’s pretty cold out still here in my part of Kansas (highs in the 50s-60s F, but lows in the 30s F lately) and they were under the lowest level of the pile, in the leaf litter and bark at the bottom. I’ve also found a few random specimens in my basement since last fall, but they die quickly, I think because it’s too dry. Am I right in guessing these are Parcoblatta sp. (aka wood roaches) of some sort?
P.S. I know the gray/silver ones are isopods. :D There were thousands of them under the pile, too… made catching the roaches interesting.
Signature: – Angela, amateur bug nut

Wood Cockroaches and Woodlice

Wood Cockroaches and Woodlice

Hi Angela, amateur bug nut,
Thanks so much for sending us your gorgeous photo of Wood Cockroaches in the genus
Parcoblatta and their wood pile roommates, terrestrial isopods commonly called Woodlice or Sowbugs.  It is not possible to identify your Wood Cockroaches to the species level.  According to BugGuide:  “in males, wings cover the abdomen; adult females typically have small wingpads (tegmina). Older nymphs may also have prominent wingbuds. Nymphs of different spp. are impossible to tell apart based on known characters; identification of adult females is difficult or not possible, depending on the species and geographic location. Only the adult males have the characters that can definitively identify the species in this genus. Unfortunately, the characters needed are covered by wings, and so identification of living males is not usually possible.”  Your observation that they die quickly in the home is supported by BugGuide which states:  “indoors, they wander aimlessly during the day (rather than congregating in a particular room and being active at night), do not breed, and will die within a few days due to insufficient moisture.”

Wood Cockroaches

Wood Cockroaches

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mexican Beetle
Location: San Juan Cosala, Jalisco, MX
March 8, 2014 10:34 am
I took this photo of this beautiful bug at a restaurant in San Juan Cosala, Jalisco, Mexico in February 2014. It was a little less than 1 inch long. Do you have any idea what it is? My internet search has come up empty.
Signature: Jo

Cockroach

Harlequin Cockroach

Dear Jo,
This is a Cockroach, but it does not look at one of the species that infests homes.  We believe it is a Harlequin Cockroach,
Neostylopyga rhombifolia, and according to Allpet Roaches, it is found in Asia, Mexico and Arizona.  Allpet Roaches states:  “The Harlequin roach is certainly among the neatest looking of the pet roaches and is a very quick moving medium sized species. Nymphs start out life as a plain tan color but slowly molt to become very incredible looking adults. Harlequin roaches easily scale smooth surfaces and like most other glass climbers can be controlled by petroleum jelly. Also, this roach is an egg laying species.”

Thank you SO much. Who knew a cockroach could be so beautiful?
I love bugs!
Many thanks again,
Jo

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Back from Antigua
Location: Antigua
February 23, 2014 4:02 pm
Hello,
Just got back from a week in Antigua and found this bug on my carpet floor!
I live in NY.
Can you help identify it and let me know how to control if there are more in my luggage!?
Signature: Mark

Cockroach Nymph

Cockroach Nymph

Hi Mark,
This is a Cockroach Nymph.  We do not offer extermination advice.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Grey round bug
Location: Mexico city
February 2, 2014 12:33 am
Hope you can help me, sorry if
My english is not that good, i found today a very strange bug on my room, its february 1st and I’m located in Mexico city, its round with no antenna visible unless you turn it upaide down, it looks like a roach, but not shure, inaccidentally step on it, and in the photos i took are the guts out, thanks a lot!
Signature: Martin

Sand Cockroach

Sand Cockroach

Hola Martin,
This insect looks like a Cockroach because it is a Cockroach, more specifically, a female Sand Cockroach.  Sand Cockroaches are outdoor insects that do not infest homes.  The female is wingless and the winged male looks more like a usual Cockroach.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination