Currently viewing the category: "Cicadas"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown bug
Location: Minnesota
July 31, 2012 6:42 pm
I saw this one crawling toward my son when we were having a picnic at the park. It was about an inch long and half inch wide. Can you tell me what it is, not sure I saw it in the directory.
Signature: MH

Cicada Nymph

Dear MH,
This is a Cicada Nymph.  They generally escape notice since they live underground for from several years to as long as 17 years in the case of the Periodical Cicada, AKA 17 Year Locust.  While underground, they take nourishment from plant roots.  When they have neared maturity, they dig to the surface, metamorphose into winged adults, and live for several more weeks as adult Cicadas.  Most Cicadas in North America belong to the genus
Tibicen, the Annual Cicadas, and one of the most common is the Dogday Harvestfly.  Annual Cicadas are the sole prey of Cicada Killer Wasps, one of our most frequent summer identification request subjects.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Giant wierd bug
Location: Grantham, NH
August 1, 2012 8:11 pm
Found this on our fake turtle. The bug was about 1 inch long. It was scary looking. What is it? It died a day later.
Signature: Tony

Dogday Harvestfly

Hi Tony,
This hitchhiker is a Cicada in the genus
Tibicen.  We believe it is the Dogday Cicada or Dogday Harvestfly, Tibicen canicularis, based on comparing the markings on the head and thorax with this image on BugGuide.  If you would like some very detailed and specific information, turn to BugGuide.  The loud grinding call of the Dogday Harvestfly is a common summer sound throughout much of its range.

Dogday Harvestfly

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug in New Orleans
Location: New Orleans
July 29, 2012 10:28 pm
Hello,
Today I was skating in City Park in New Orleans and as I was leaving the park to go home I saw this little guy hanging out on the sidewalk. He was kind of waving his left front leg and rubbing it against his eye. I think he may have been hurt. His skin was kind of bloated-looking and seemed loose and papery.
My boyfriend said this insect looks like a stag beetle, but the ”horns” in this photo are actually the front legs. His face was kind of plain, with two big black eyes. This bug was fairly large-possibly over 2” in length, and maybe an inch across or a little over at his widest point.
Since the bug was not really moving, and seemed hurt or stuck (maybe trampled by a wayward jogger) I gently nudged him over to the grass with a small stick to avoid any further injury.
Can you tell me what sort of bug this is?
Thank you!
Signature: Rachel

Cicada Nymph

Hi Rachel,
The quality of this photograph is quite poor, but this resembles a Cicada Nymph.  Cicada Nymphs spend several years underground feeding on fluids in plant roots and then they dig their way to the surface to metamorphose into winged adults that are significant contributors to the summer symphony of insect noises.  If this Cicada Nymph was injured, it will probably die before the metamorphosis process.

Hello,
Thank you for the prompt reply! Sorry about the photo quality. The day was waning–I probably should have used the flash.
Now that you mention it, and after seeing the photos online, that bug was definitely a cicada nymph. I think I used to see a lot of them when I was younger but not for years and never up close.
Once again, thanks for getting back to me and appeasing my curiosity!
Rachel

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cicada killers
Location: Warren County, New York
July 26, 2012 6:31 pm
Dear Bugman,
I thought your audience might enjoy these two cicada killer photos taken on July 18th, 2012, a very warm day in northern New York. It was over 90 degrees. One lucky shot is of a female with a cicada beneath her, just seconds before she rapidly dragged it down her burrow, which can be seen behind her, beneath her left wing. An extensive patch of sandy soil had several cicada killers patrolling it, including the male, also seen here, perched on a twig, less than an inch above the ground, by the entrance to another burrow. He flew off of the perch, a few yards or so, numerous times, only to return to the exact spot, apparently guarding his territory. The insect’s behavior was very much like that of a breeding male songbird, and I found it to be fascinating. It took me awhile to get within close enough distance to photograph him with a macro lens, but patience paid off.
Your truly,
Gerry Lemmo
Queensbury, NY
Signature: www.Gerry Lemmo.com

Cicada Killer with Prey

Hi Gerry,
Thank you for sending us your photos and also much thanks for the detailed description of the events.  We are pleased to post your photos that show Cicada Killers under favorable conditions since we receive so many examples of Unnecessary Carnage of this magnificent wasp.

Male Cicada Killer

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Molting Cicada
Location: Stillman Valley, Illinois
July 17, 2012 8:15 am
Hello Bugman,
Long time fan Amy here. I was very fortunate to capture these images of a cicada shedding it’s shell, a sight I’ve never actually witnessed..though the cicada call has always brought to mind images of a beautiful summer day..so I felt quite fortunate to catch this one in the act in my front flower bed. I was also wondering if anyone has had a chance to try the Japanese Beetle remedy that I submitted earlier this year. We haven’t seen too many of these critters this year here in the midwest, maybe it’s just too hot for them too.
Wishing the best for you guys out west,
Amy Berogan
Signature: Amy Berogan, Stillman Valley, Illinois

Molting Cicada

Hi Amy,
Thanks so much for sending us your molting Cicada photo.  We have not heard back from anyone regarding your holistic Japanese Beetle remedy.  Interestingly, there were no Japanese Beetles in Ohio during our brief stay in June and we haven’t heard anything from Daniel’s mother who lives there regarding Japanese Beetles that yearly defoliate many plants in her garden.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mistaken cicada killer
Location: Atlanta, Georgia, US
July 7, 2012 9:02 pm
I live in the Atlanta area and we have seen a host of large bee/wasp/hornet creatures around our house (carpenter bees, cicada killers, asian hornets, etc). When I saw a dead one floating in my dogs’ water bucket, I was interested. I assumed due to it’s size that it was a cicada killer. However, upon further inspection I don’t think it is. The head and mouth (it looks like it has a herbivorous sap-drinking type mouth) seem wrong for a cicada killer or asian hornet. It still has very large size and I often think these things are humming birds flying around until they land. Any idea what it might be? Note: my wife tells me it had been in the bucket for a couple days and i had to wash some algae off it, so I don’t think the green markings are natural and the colors may be somewhat faded.
Signature: Danny G.

Cicada

Hi Danny,
We were very amused that you mistook this for a Cicada Killer because it is a Cicada, the prey of the Cicada Killer.

That’s too funny. I guess I had a different looking bug in mind for cicadas. Thanks for the help.
Regards,
Dan Guerrero

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination