Currently viewing the category: "Cicadas"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Food chain: cicada killer in action
Location: Takoma Park MD
August 24, 2012 4:41 pm
Hello WTB,
This cicada killer startled me somewhat as I was out weeding the garden. I initially thought it had deposited a bit of trash. When I realized the ”trash” was an annual cicada, I dashed in to fetch the camera and thought you’d like to see the outcome.
Signature: Takoma Park animal lover

Cicada Killer with Annual Cicada

Dear Takoma Park animal lover,
Wow, what a marvelous series of photos. 

Cicada Killer with food for her brood.

The female Cicada Killer is really a powerfully built wasp to drag and glide back to her burrow with a paralyzed Cicada for each egg she lays.

Female Cicada Killer provides for her offspring

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Annual Cicada in molt.
Location: Levittown pa
August 13, 2012 9:13 am
Noticed you have plenty of pictures of Cicadas post molt, I thought I’d add a few during molt. I have a bunch, but your website won’t cooperate with me.
Signature: Jen k

Cicada Metamorphosis

Hi Jen,
Cicadas are one of our Top 10 insect identification requests and submissions, whether they be adult Annual Cicadas, Periodical Cicadas, Australian Cicadas (which arrive during northern hemisphere winter), Metamorphosing Cicadas, Cicadas as prey to Cicada KillersCicada Nymphs or Cicada Exuviae.  Adult Cicadas are often mistaken for extremely large flies by folks who don’t know much about insects.  Thank you for your lovely submission.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What bug is this?!
Location: Gunma, Japan
August 7, 2012 12:55 pm
I am an exchange student in Japan and I can’t place this bug that I saw today (8/7/12). I live in Gunma, Japan and it’s the middle of summer at about 100 degrees everyday with 90%+ humidity. I’ll keep searching through the site but I haven’t been able to find anything yet.
Signature: Talia

Exuviae of Cicadas

Hi Talia,
These are the exuviae or shed exoskeletons of Cicadas.  The immature Cicadas live underground for years, and when they have matured and conditions are right, they dig to the surface, molt, leave behind the exuvia, and become winged adults.  Many Cicadas produce audible calls, some quite loud, and the noise of Cicadas buzzing from the trees is a common summer sound in many parts of the world.  It is interesting that there are so many exuviae in one location in your photograph.

Thank you so much! I have seen many cicadas in my life, mostly due to Japan being filled with them, but to see so many insects in one spot made me think them to be something else. Since it was just the exoskeleton left behind, the coloration looked different and seemed like an entirely different insect to me instead of the obvious answer of a cicada. I had heard a loud cicada chirping from that tree and when i saw the exoskeletons i backed away thinking they could be dangerous since i didn’t know what they were. Thank you very much for being so expedient in answering my question.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug Question
Location: Columbus, OH
August 6, 2012 12:56 pm
Hi Bugman!
I’ve been scouring the ’Net trying to identify this bug, which looks to me to be a type of beetle, but isn’t showing up on any searches.
It was late at night and he was crawling aimlessly around for hours in the same area just outside our house.
It’s summer, and this was a particularly humid night. He was cream-colored on his back with a distinctive dark brown mask-like pattern on his back.
Signature: Ohiobug

Cicada Nymph

Dear Ohiobug,
This is the nymph of a Cicada.  It has been living underground for several years.  It has just made its way to the surface in preparation for its metamorphosis into a winged adult Cicada.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown bug
Location: Minnesota
July 31, 2012 6:42 pm
I saw this one crawling toward my son when we were having a picnic at the park. It was about an inch long and half inch wide. Can you tell me what it is, not sure I saw it in the directory.
Signature: MH

Cicada Nymph

Dear MH,
This is a Cicada Nymph.  They generally escape notice since they live underground for from several years to as long as 17 years in the case of the Periodical Cicada, AKA 17 Year Locust.  While underground, they take nourishment from plant roots.  When they have neared maturity, they dig to the surface, metamorphose into winged adults, and live for several more weeks as adult Cicadas.  Most Cicadas in North America belong to the genus
Tibicen, the Annual Cicadas, and one of the most common is the Dogday Harvestfly.  Annual Cicadas are the sole prey of Cicada Killer Wasps, one of our most frequent summer identification request subjects.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Giant wierd bug
Location: Grantham, NH
August 1, 2012 8:11 pm
Found this on our fake turtle. The bug was about 1 inch long. It was scary looking. What is it? It died a day later.
Signature: Tony

Dogday Harvestfly

Hi Tony,
This hitchhiker is a Cicada in the genus
Tibicen.  We believe it is the Dogday Cicada or Dogday Harvestfly, Tibicen canicularis, based on comparing the markings on the head and thorax with this image on BugGuide.  If you would like some very detailed and specific information, turn to BugGuide.  The loud grinding call of the Dogday Harvestfly is a common summer sound throughout much of its range.

Dogday Harvestfly

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination