Currently viewing the category: "Cicadas"
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Subject: Huge ugly brown bug
Location: Brooklyn, NY
September 10, 2013 9:44 pm
Found this huge, ugly, brown bug on the wall outside my house. It hasn’t moved in over a week. I saw 2 of these same bugs last summer and if I remember correctly, they stayed there all summer. I live in brooklyn, ny and its been around 85 degrees for the past week here.
Signature: Leah

Cicada Exuvia

Cicada Exuvia

Hi Leah,
This is the exuvia or shed skin of a Cicada.  The nymph lives underground where it feeds on the sap from roots.  When it matures, it digs to the surface, molts for the final time leaving the exuvia behind and flies off as a winged adult Cicada.

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Subject: What type. Of bug is this
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
August 25, 2013 11:41 am
I don’t recall ever seeing this before. It’s about 1.5 in (2” including wings
Signature: Donna

Annual Cicada

Annual Cicada

Hi Donna,
Annual Cicadas in the genus
Tibicen like your individual are often mistaken for large flies.  Annual Cicadas are sometimes called Dog Day Harvestflies.  They make a loud sound like a buzz saw that can be heard in the trees in mid to late summer.

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Subject: Brood II Periodical Cicada
Location: Manassas, VA
August 20, 2013 6:01 am
Hi Bugman-
These pictures were taken in the Manassas National Battlefield Park (in Manassas, VA) on June 15th. There were quite a few cicadas still around at that time, but not as many as previous weekends. The cicada and exoskeleton were on different trees, so it is unlikely they are ”related”.
Hope you enjoy the pics!
Signature: Katherine

Periodical Cicada

Periodical Cicada

Hi Katherine,
Thanks for your photos.  Are you the same Katie from Manassas who sent us the Brood II metamorphosis images this past June?

Periodical Cicada Exuvia

Periodical Cicada Exuvia

Nope! That wasn’t me. I was on your site looking to identify another bug and noticed you had very few pictures of our cicadas.
Katherine

Interesting coincidence.

 

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Subject: A really big bug!
Location: Alanya, Turkey
August 2, 2013 11:42 am
Hey, bugman!
We’re on a vacation in Turkey, Alanya and these enormous bugs (about 5-7cm, plus the wings) are everywhere! We hear them make these sound, which sounds like crickets. And they are really loud. They are on trees and bushes and seems like they use the bottom of their body (maybe legs, too) to make the sound.
I’m really curious to know what are these enourmously big bugs that make such noise all day long. Hope you can help me.
All the best,
Kertu
Signature: Kertu

Cicada from Turkey

Cicada from Turkey

Dear Kertu,
This is a Cicada, and one species of Australian Cicada is considered to be the loudest insect in the world.  Cicadas are found in many parts of the world and we are not certain which species you have submitted.  We recently began reading Samuel Butler’s translation of Homer’s Iliad, and we are amused by this quote from Book 3, verse 152:  “These were too old to fight, but they were fluent orators, and sat on the tower like cicadas that chirrup delicately from the boughs of some high tree in a wood.”
  Here is another translation of this passage online.  We don’t personally consider the song of the Cicada to be delicate.  It sounds more like a buzz saw, but it is such an iconic summer sound.  Considering your location in Turkey, this might be the very Cicada that Homer wrote about.

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Subject: Strange, Large, Winged Bug
Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
July 27, 2013 1:07 pm
Hey Bugman!
We spotted this interesting bug on our large ash tree today. We also found two old exoskeleton skins on the tree. This bugs wings are still crinkled so we suspect it recently shed it’s skin. It seems to have a strange pocket of aqua coloured liquid within one wing, not sure what that’s about. The bug is large, measuring about 1.5 inches (see ruler in the photo). Anyhow, I’ve never seen anything like this in my life and am very curious to know what it is. I’ll let the photos do the talking.
Thanks!!
Signature: Nat + Kris

Newly Metamorphosed Cicada

Newly Metamorphosed Cicada

Dear Nat + Chris,
Your photos are related as you suspected.  The insect is a newly metamorphosed Annual Cicada, sometimes called a Dogday Harvestfly, and the exoskeleton is the exuvia or cast off skin left after the nymph metamorphosed into a winged adult.  Cicada nymphs live underground for several years taking nourishment from the roots of trees and shrubs.  Adult Cicadas create quite a din when they call to mates from the treetops.  The Cicada call is a nostalgic summer sound for our editorial staff who now resides in Los Angeles.  The pocket of aqua liquid does not look normal.  Perhaps a wing vein was damaged, releasing fluids.

Cicada Exuvia

Cicada Exuvia

Thanks so much for the quick reply! We have often heard cicadas but never knew what they looked like. Cool!
Nat

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unidentified Bug – Cicero, NY
Location: Cicero, New York
July 11, 2013 5:36 am
Good morning,
Thank you for taking the time to view my question and photo. Attached is a photo of a bug and it’s cocoon, this is the second day in a row that the bug has hatched on the side of our garage door – in the exact same spot. On July 10th, the hatchling was noticed around 7:30 am and remained in the same place until it moved up into a corner of the garage door frame. The wings started as clear and then turned darker in color until it flew away near dusk (approx. 7:30 pm).
Any assistance is appreciated!
Signature: Natalie

Cicada Metamorphosis

Cicada Metamorphosis

Dear Natalie,
This is the metamorphosis of an Annual Cicada.  The immature stages or instars of the Annual Cicadas are found underground where the nymphs take nourishment from the roots of trees and shrubs.  When the time to metamorphose into an adult is at hand, the nymph climbs to the surface, climbs up a tree or wall and molts for the final time.  The adult Annual Cicada flies off leaving the exuvia or shed skin behind.  Annual Cicadas are sometimes called Dogday Harvestflies.

Thank you so much!  I thought that is what it was but wasn’t positive.  Have a great day!!  J
Natalie

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination