Currently viewing the category: "Cicadas"
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Subject: periodical cidacas
Location: Jackson, TN USA
May 15, 2015 1:13 pm
Just sharing. Our big tree is a hatching ground for brood XXIII this year (At least due to our location I think they are 13 year and not 17 year periodicals). I’ve been out every night and have seen a handful each time. Last night looked like a scene from a horror flick if you looked over your head there were more cicadas than leaves. It was raining bugs under that tree. Bats were dive bombing past us and scooping them off the trunk. The ground and trunk were literally crawling as 100’s if not 1000’s of them were headed to molt. We caught some video last night. I snapped some pics this am and figured I would share some of the various stages of them molting.
Love your page!
Signature: Jess

Thirteen Year Cicada

Thirteen Year Cicada

Dear Jess,
We are positively thrilled by your submission, and we will be featuring your images to document this Brood XXIII emergence of 13 Year Cicadas.  As you have indicated, Periodical Cicadas are divided into two main groups, those that remain underground for 17 years and those that remain underground for 13 years, and the latter are found in more southern states.  Additionally, populations are further divided into broods based on the years they emerge and the locations of those broods.  To further complicate matters, some individuals emerge earlier or later, and if those individuals encounter favorable conditions, new broods may eventually result.  According to Magicicada.org, Brood XXIII is known as “The Lower Mississippi Valley Brood.”  According to the Brood page on Magicicada.Org, your Brood XXIII individuals are right on schedule.  According to Cicada Mania:  “As of May 10th, it would appear that the emergence has begun in Louisiana and Tennessee as well.  The 2015 Brood XXIII emergence has begun! ”  Cicada Mania also notes:  “The cicada species that will emerge are
Magicicada tredecim (Walsh and Riley, 1868); Magicicada neotredecim Marshall and Cooley, 2000; Magicicada tredecassini Alexander and Moore, 1962; and Magicicada tredecula Alexander and Moore, 1962. These periodical cicadas have a 13-year life cycle. The last time they emerged was 2002. According to John Cooley of Magicicada.org, Giant City State Park, Illinois is a good place to observe both M. tredecim and M. neotredecim.”   

Periodical Cicada:  Brood XXIII Molting

Periodical Cicada: Brood XXIII Molting

Periodical Cicadas:  Brood XXIII Emergance

Periodical Cicadas: Brood XXIII Emergence

Alfonso Moreno, Debbie Lynn May, Sue Dougherty, Jessica M. Schemm, Maryann Struman liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: need help identifying
Location: in gound
May 1, 2015 5:43 am
found this bug digging around our sheds. at first i thought it might be a termite but they are translucent and rather long relative to their size. this bug is neither.
Signature: Penny

Cicada Nymph

Cicada Nymph

Dear Penny,
We would love to know if you found this Cicada Nymph in the ground in South Africa, South Carolina, South America or some other location.

Cicada Nymph

Cicada Nymph

Sue Dougherty liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: strange bug?
Location: CA
March 29, 2015 12:02 pm
Hello!
my name is Lauren
as I was walk in home from church today I discovered an interesting bug. I was wondering if you could help on enlightening me? It looks like a nymph, but I know those are restricted to water.
thank you much,
Lauren
Signature: Lauren Haldeman

Cicada Exuvia

Cicada Exuvia

Dear Lauren,
This is the exuvia or shed exoskeleton of a Cicada.  Immature Cicadas, known as nymphs, live underground and they dig to the surface just prior to the final molt, leaving behind the exuvia and flying off as winged adults.  All insects that undergo incomplete metamorphosis have immature stages known as nymphs.  Naiad is a term specific for a water nymph.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this
Location: Australia, port Stephens
November 29, 2014 3:50 am
Had this fly on our door an was a beast, wondering what it is
Signature: Email

Cicada

Cicada

This is a Cicada and many people mistake Cicadas for large flies.  Australia is the home of numerous, diverse species of Cicadas and we will attempt a species identification for you.

Hanalie Sonneblom, Sue Dougherty, Andrea Leonard Drummond liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle? Kampala Uganda
Location: Kampala, Uganda
October 26, 2014 11:00 pm
Hello,
Attaching two pictures (hopefully they go through…my internet is bad!)
Found this guy on my shoe this morning. I’m in Wakiso District Uganda, just outside of Kampala. Can you help me identify him/her?
Cheers!
Signature: Beth

Cicada

Cicada

Hi Beth,
This is not a beetle, but a Cicada, a group of insects known for the loud sounds they produce, often from the tops of trees.  Your individual is  dead ringer for the individual in this Wikimedia Commons image also from Uganda.

Cicada

Cicada

Ito Fernando liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bitten by a cicada
Location: Chicago IL, cir 1980
September 16, 2014 10:05 am
Hi! I’ve noticed in a few of your ID’s os of cicadas you mention the report of someone being bitten (or rather stabbed) by one. I was bitten by one when I was a boy! I always loved them and was super excited when I found one. I let this male that I found under a maple tree in Chicago climb my left index finger. About half way up it stopped and suddenly stabbed into my finger with its proboscis! It hurt like hell, much like being stabbed with a 20g needle. I don’t think it had any venom; the pain was purely from mechanical trauma. Anyway, I yanked it off my finger and tossed it into the air after which it buzzed off happily.
Random butterfly photo from the Bosque Del Apache reserve.
Signature: Mike

Western Painted Lady

Western Painted Lady

Dear Mike,
Thank you for substantiating the possibility that a person might be bitten by a Cicada if it is carelessly handled.  Your image of a Western Painted Lady,
Vanessa annabella, is beautiful.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination