Currently viewing the category: "Cicadas"
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Subject: Solifugid and Cicada
Location: Mayhill, NM, USA
June 20, 2015 10:52 pm
It’s been a little while since I’ve visited your site, mostly being busy with other things; however, revisited it about a week ago because I remember greatly enjoying the different pictures and descriptions. Looking through your site reminded me of this picture I nabbed a little over a year ago; I’d just gotten home from a nighttime trip to town for provisions (it’s about an hour drive away, and at the time they were seeing daytime temperatures upwards of 110F) and was checking on my plants I’ve got scattered around outside the house when I heard a strange noise; it was like a clicking and flapping that I couldn’t quite place. Seeking it out, I found these two, a Solifugid and a cicada, the one struggling to eat the other as the other tried desperately to fly away. By the time I managed to get my camera, the cicada had died and the Solifugid was happily munching away, but knowing how rare it is to see even the end result of a hunt like that, I took a picture anyway. Around here, our cicadas are tiny, rarely ever getting over an inch in length; you can somewhat make out a Ponderosa pine needle in the foreground bottom center, extending to the left of the pair, for reference.
I’m gonna go ahead and send this other picture I took about the same time; it’s another tiny Solifugid, resting on a bed of moss. That’s pretty typical moss, and all the “twigs” are actually more Ponderosa pine needles, so you can tell this guy was tiny. I love finding these guys around here; they’re really neat to watch scurry around.
Hope you enjoy the pictures!
Signature: Grady

Solifugud eats Cicada

Solifugud eats Cicada

Dear Grady,
We were out of the office for several weeks and we are just now combing through to find interesting submissions to post.  We know we will miss many because we have so many unanswered submissions, but we are selecting submissions based on subject lines and your subject line caught our attention.  Thanks for submitting this wonderful Food Chain image of a Solifugid eating a Cicada, but especially because of the detailed verbal account of your observations.

Solifugid

Solifugid

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cicada?
Location: North Andover, MA
June 30, 2015 12:48 pm
I’ve never actually seen a cicada. I thought they were a southern bug that came out in big numbers every certain number of years. We are in MA and this little guy was on our screen door. Is it a cicada?
Signature: Maggie

Annual Cicada

Annual Cicada

Dear Maggie,
This is indeed a Cicada, as is the “southern bug that came out in big numbers in every certain number of years”, but the latter is known as a Periodical Cicada or 17 Year Locust.  The second common name is a total misnomer as the Cicada is not a Locust.  They are not limited to the South.  Your Cicada is generally called an Annual Cicada, and it is in the genus
Tibicen.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange Bug
Location: Western North Carolina
June 25, 2015 9:12 pm
I stepped outside my home and found this incredible looking insect clinging to one of the porch columns. The photographs aren’t great but it really threw me off because its appears to be a brown beetle-looking bug but with a very disproportionate green protrusion arching out of its back. The green part looked like its very own bug as nothing about its aloe plant-like body matched the brown bug it was coming out of but I’m almost positive its just one insect. The green part even had very convincing yet almost comically big yellow eyes that I imagine are part of an overall camouflage defense mechanism but its so freakish its like when parasitoid fungi bloom out of insects in the forest. All this aside, what bug is this? I couldn’t find any pictures in a couple nc entomological databases that I searched. I live in Lincoln county North Carolina. I hope you can shed some light on this, many thanks.
Signature: JD

Cicada Metamorphosis

Cicada Metamorphosis

Dear JD,
You are quite lucky to have witnessed the metamorphosis of a Cicada.  The Cicada has been living underground as a wingless nymph and now that it has shed its nymphal exoskeleton, the adult Cicada will fly away once its wings have expanded and hardened.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large Mothlike Fly
Location: Hidalgo County, New Mexico
June 5, 2015 2:59 pm
Found this fly on a yucca and later on a mesquite in the middle of the desert. Later, when it had come in and landed on a mesquite, I got very close to inspect, and noticed its proboscis fully extended into the branch, as if it were drinking from the inside of the stem. It’s very large and quite peculiar, and I’d just like to know what it is. Thanks.
Signature: Daniel

Cicada

Cicada

Dear Daniel,
This is a Cicada, and we are not certain of the species.  Cicadas are large insects, frequently mistaken for large flies, that are able to produce very audible sounds.  We are postdating your submission to go live while we are on holiday later in June.

Thanks! I new it wasn’t exactly a fly, but fly-like. I did some research of my own too and noticed cicadas don’t all have the periodical life cycle. This is probably a dog day type, given my location. Thanks again for the news!

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cicada killers
Location: Tennessee
June 4, 2015 3:47 pm
I was outside and saw these weird bugs eating a cicada. When I looked closee at the Bush they were everywhere. Some cicadas only had a few, but some were completely swarmed. You also can’t really tell in the pic but they have a spider man coloration in the sun.
Signature: -Brad

Florida Predatory Stink Bugs eat Cicada

Florida Predatory Stink Bugs eat Cicada

Dear Brad,
This year marked the emergence of the The Lower Mississippi Valley Brood, Brood XXIII of the Periodical Cicadas,
Magicicada neotredecim, a species that appears every 13 years.  When the Cicadas are plentiful, they provide food for predators, including the Florida Predatory Stink Bug nymphs pictured in your image.  This is an awesome food chain image and it is a wonderful addition to our archive.  Folks can read more about Brood XXIII on Magicada.org where we read:  “2015 will be a remarkable year for periodical cicadas. 13-year Brood XXIII, the Mississipian Brood, and 17-year Brood IV, the Kansan Brood, will both emerge.  The 2015 emergence of periodical cicadas will be extraordinary. 13-year Brood XXIII will emerge in the Mississippi River Valley. This brood contains all four described species of 13-year periodical cicadas- Magicicada neotredecim, Magicicada tredecim, M. tredecassini, and M. tredecula. 17-year Brood IV, the Kansan Brood, will emerge along the western edge of the general periodical cicada range. This brood contains Magicicada septendecim, M. cassini, and M. septendecula. Thus, in 2015, you can see all seven described species of Magicicada.”  Supplied with that information, we don’t know for certain which species of Cicada you observed as so many generations are overlapping this year.  More about the Florida Predatory Stink Bugs can be found on Featured Creatures.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: periodical cicada update – laying eggs
Location: Jackson TN USA
May 24, 2015 12:27 pm
Now that our week of rain has slowed down the cicadas are calling and mating. Here is a female I spotted out by my clothes line laying eggs in a bush. The calling is so loud around our house you actually have to speak louder than normal outside to be heard.
Signature: Jess

Periodical Cicada Laying Eggs

Periodical Cicada Laying Eggs

Dear Jess,
Thanks so much for providing an update on your Periodical Cicada submission from last week.  We suspect that Brood XXIII may have a very limited distribution as we have not received any other submissions for this significant event.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination