Currently viewing the category: "Cicadas"
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Subject: I think I found a Cicada!
Location: Toronto, Ontario
July 19, 2014 5:05 pm
I wish I could have taken a better picture, but this not so little guy was hanging out on my second floor window. It’s been raining all day, so it looks like he found himself a nice spot to dry off. Aside from a little green at the base of his wings, he was mostly brown and grey, with the majority of grey found on his underside. He looked like he was wearing armor, with a buffe on his face and a breastplate.
I live in Southern Ontario, in Toronto.
Signature: Angelique

Cicada

Cicada

Hi Angelique,
You are correct that this is an Annual Cicada.  North American Cicada sightings tend to peak in August except in years where the Periodical Cicadas make a 17 year appearance in the late spring.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Allergic Reaction To Insects!
Location: Arkadelphia, Arkansas
July 19, 2014 12:39 pm
My son and I found this bug on our driveway it had landed and was fluttering around on the. ground. Being that I just found out that I’m allergic to some insects and I do not know what this thing is I’m really concerned about this.
PLEASE HELP!
Signature: Kia Harris

Cicada

Cicada

Dear Kia,
This is a Cicada, and since we are not medical experts, we are uncertain how to address your allergy concerns.  According to the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology:  “Experts estimate that 2 million Americans are allergic to insect stings, and many of these individuals are at risk of suffering life-threatening reactions to insect venom.”  Since Cicadas do not sting, we would suppose that should not be an issue.  We are aware of allergies to Cockroaches, and according to the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology:  “Cockroaches live in all types of buildings and all kinds of neighborhoods. Some people develop allergy symptoms when they are around cockroaches. Luckily, there are ways to treat a cockroach allergy and prevent and get rid of cockroaches.”
  Since Cicadas are not even remotely related to Cockroaches, we do not think that should be a concern for you.  Many insects will bite, so we decided to research bite allergies, and according to the Mayo Clinic:  “Signs and symptoms of an insect bite result from the injection of venom or other substances into your skin. The venom causes pain and sometimes triggers an allergic reaction. The severity of the reaction depends on your sensitivity to the insect venom or substance and whether you’ve been stung or bitten more than once.  Most reactions to insect bites are mild, causing little more than an annoying itching or stinging sensation and mild swelling that disappear within a day or so. A delayed reaction may cause fever, hives, painful joints and swollen glands. You might experience both the immediate and the delayed reactions from the same insect bite or sting. Only a small percentage of people develop severe reactions (anaphylaxis) to insect venom. Signs and symptoms of a severe reaction include:
Nausea
Facial swelling
Difficulty breathing
Abdominal pain
Deterioration of blood pressure and circulation (shock)
Bites from bees, wasps, hornets, yellow jackets and fire ants are typically the most troublesome. Bites from mosquitoes, ticks, biting flies, ants, scorpions and some spiders also can cause reactions. Scorpion and ant bites can be very severe. Although rare, some insects also carry disease such as West Nile virus or Lyme disease.”  Cicadas are not mentioned in the list of insects with bites that might cause a reaction.  According to Cicada Mania:  “Technically cicadas don’t bite or sting; they do however pierce and suck. They might try to pierce and suck you, but don’t worry, they aren’t Vampires nor are they malicious or angry — they’re just ignorant and think you’re a tree. Just remove the cicada from your person, and go about your business. Cicadas also have pointy feet, egg-laying parts (ovipositors) and other sharp parts that might feel like a bite.  Cicadas don’t have jaws (mandibles) like a wasp, mantis or ant, built to tear and chew flesh. Cicadas don’t have stingers, like bees and wasps, meant to deploy venom and paralyze or otherwise harm their victim. See a video of a Japanese hornet to see what I mean.  Cicadas obtain sustenance by drinking tree fluids, which are relatively watery compared to human blood. Drinking human blood would probably kill a cicada.”
  For many years we informed our readership that Cicadas do not bite nor sting, and then in 2009, we received this report:  “A few years ago, while working in a state park nature center in Indiana, a young (6 years old) entomologist brought his latest aquisition, a cicada, to show me. I picked it up and let it crawl on my thumb. When I was ready to give it back, the thing wouldn’t let go, and decided to press that sucking mouth part into my thumb. It was pretty painful. They can DEFINATELY bite (or perhaps STAB is a more appropriate term).”  In our opinion, you do not need to fear Cicadas because of an allergic reaction, but we must qualify that with the reiteration that we do not have medical credentials, nor entomological ones for that matter.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Flying insect ID
Location: Paradise, CA
June 23, 2014 5:32 pm
I’ve always wondered what these are. I almost never see them, but they make a constant buzzing sound.
Signature: Thanks, Steve

Cicada

Cicada

Hi Steve,
This is a Cicada, but we are not certain of the species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: My 7 year old son is so excited to find out what these are…me, not so much! Lol!
Location: Long Island, New York
June 24, 2014 8:27 pm
Hello Bugman,
While digging in our garden my 7 yr old son yelled out in excitement at these large bugs he found. He was so cute-he thought he found a new species and wanted to send these pics to a science museum! When I told him about your website he was ecstatic.
So-they were found buried in the dirt, found today June 24 on Long Island New York, they are about 2-3 inches??
Thank you!!!!!!
Signature: Curious nature buff’s mon

Cicada Nymph

Cicada Nymph

Dear Curious nature buff’s mom,
We hope you are a mom and not a mon.  This is a Cicada Nymph, but sadly, we don’t have the necessary entomological skills to identify it to the species level.  Cicadas are winged insects that are often mistaken for large flies, but they are most familiar to the average person because of the loud sounds they produce, often from the tops of trees during the summer months.  We cannot say for certain if this is the nymph of an Annual Cicada like a Dog Day Harvestfly, or if it is the nymph of a Periodical Cicada or Seventeen Year Locust.  Cicada Nymphs remain underground feeding from the roots of plants for several years, and in the case of the Periodical Cicadas, the nymphs are underground for seventeen years with the adults emerging, often in great numbers.  North America has 17 viable, identified broods of Periodical Cicadas and you can find additional information on the Magicicada website.  According to the map on the Magicicada site, New York is in the range of three of the broods, with Brood VII next expected in 2018, Brood X next expected in 2021 and Brood XIV next expected in 2025.  Alas, we don’t have much advice for keeping this Cicada Nymph alive now that it has been dug up and separated from its food source.  Cicadas have mouths designed to pierce so they can suck nourishment from the roots as opposed to chewing them.  They must feed from living plants.

Cicada Nymph

Cicada Nymph

Thank You! I can’t wait for my son to get home from school he’ll be so excited to have received this response! You’re awesome!
And yes-I’m a severely sleep deprived MOM of 3 not a mon-lol!
Thanks again for your time it is much appreciated

    

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug on apple/pear trees
Location: Utah, USA
June 11, 2014 6:01 pm
This bug “clicks” 4 times in succession and bugs on trees across the yard answer in kind. It’s quite loud and I only noticed them in the last couple of weeks. It is late Spring now and has been sunny for several weeks. The bugs are on the branches of my two apple and one pear tree and are about 3/4 to 1″ long? All three trees have fruit that is about 1/3 of the way to harvest and don’t appear to have any damage. The bugs can fly and are quite large.
Signature: Kind of scared of large flies

Cicadas

Cicadas

Dear Kind of scared of large flies,
We have been away from the office for ten days, and on Friday the 13th, we were trying to prepare your submission for posting when our shuttle to the airport arrived early, so our response has been delayed.  These are Cicadas, and though they resembles large flies, they are not related to flies.  Cicadas are among the most “vocal” insects in the world, though the sound that they produce does not emanate from vocal cords.  According to Cicada Mania:  “Cicadas are insects, best known for the sounds made by male cicadas. The males make this sound by flexing their tymbals, which are drum-like organs found in their abdomens. Small muscles rapidly pull the tymbals in and out of shape — like a child’s click-toy. The sound is intensified by the cicada’s mostly hollow abdomen. Female cicadas also make a sound by flicking their wings, but it isn’t the same as the song cicadas are known for.”  According to BugGuide:  “Males sing loudly during the day to attract mates.”
  You do not need to fear the Cicadas, and they will not harm your fruit, and though they might feed on the plants, according to BugGuide:  “Despite their numbers and large size, cicadas do little damage to crops or trees.”  We are uncertain of the species as “There are 166 species of cicadas in the United States and Canada” according to BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: cicada nymphs??
Location: Sandia Park, NM
May 27, 2014 4:40 pm
Hi,
Have seen adult cicadas all our lives-are these nymphs? They are all over our pine trees and make lots of “clicking noises” sort of like the initial cicada noises.
Thanks!
Signature: Warner family

Cicada

Cicada

Dear Warner Family,
Immature Cicadas, known as nymphs, live underground and they do not have wings.  These are adult Cicadas of some small species.  We will attempt to identify your Cicadas to the species level.

Thanks so much for getting us this far.
We really appreciate your site for all our bug-questions!

Cicada

Cicada

Cicada

Cicada

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination