Currently viewing the category: "Cicadas"
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Subject: What is this bug???
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
July 21, 2016 11:12 am
I’ve been seeing this shell/skin of a big sll over the exterior of my house walls. Uncertain what it is.
Signature: Thanks so much! – AD

Cicada Exuviae

Cicada Exuviae

Dear AD,
These are the exuviae or shed exoskeletons of Cicadas.  The Cicada nymphs live underground for several years (up to 17 for the 17 Year Locust or Periodical Cicada) and then as they mature, they dig to the surface, molt for the last time, and fly off as adult Cicadas.  Cicadas are among the best known “music makers” of the insect world, and according to the BBC Earth, they may be the loudest insects on the planet.  Cicada Mania mentions other loud Cicadas.  Natalie, our coworker, just returned from Las Vegas and she was quite surprised to have heard Cicadas.  Perhaps you are having a significant population explosion of Cicadas this year.  According to Hub Pages in a 2012 posting and Las Vegas Sun in a 2014 posting, they are Apache Cicadas, a name we proposed as a common name for
Diceroprocta apache back in 2010.

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Subject: Closeup of annual cicada
Location: Northern Virginia
July 17, 2016 9:39 pm
Found this guy on my driveway and took a few pictures before letting it latch onto a stick to relocate it to a nearby tree. My best guess is either Neotibicen pruinosus or Neocicada hieroglyphica. Do you have any idea what species this guy is?
Signature: M

Annual Cicada

Annual Cicada

Dear M.,
Your macro images of an Annual Cicada are gorgeous.  Thank you so much for alerting us to the reclassification that has occurred regarding the Cicada genus
Tibicen.  According to BugGuide:  “Major Changes in TAXONOMY for this group!  Tibicen Latreille, 1825. North American species formerly assigned to this genus are now placed in:  Neotibicen [and] Hadoa … Historically, the Genus Tibicen was in the sub-Family Tibiceninae, but is now placed in the Cicadinae.  Currently, the family Cicadidae is being restructured and additional updates will follow – hopefully soon.”  We have always had difficulty determining exact species with Annual Cicadas. 

Annual Cicada

Annual Cicada

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Subject: regarding your cicada post
Location: atlanta
June 19, 2016 10:00 am
Saw this little cicada in Georgia last week.
Signature: dee

Cicada Exuvia

Cicada Exuvia

Dear dee,
Your image is gorgeous, right down to the color of the background and foreground, and the way they work with the colors of this Cicada nymph.  We needed to crop it and reformat it, so we had to move your signature so that it would still be visible.  This Cicada nymph has crawled to the surface and it is about to molt for the final time into an adult, music making, flying adult Cicada leaving behind the hollow Exuvia, but it is NOT a Periodical Cicada.  Periodical Cicadas have red eyes, and the different broods are different strains of the same species that is most likely in the process of evolutionary diversion.  Additionally you are too far South for Periodical Cicada, Brood V which extends as far South as Virginia.

thank you for that explanation.  I love taking pics of bugs!  I wasn’t sure about the cicada but I am glad you like the pic and glad you can use it.  Have a great day!

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June 19, 2016
We just returned from a trip to Ohio and we read in The Youngstown Vindicator that Brood V Periodical Cicadas had just begun to emerge in West Virginia.  Our cousin heard and saw them while fishing in Eastern Ohio, but we have no images to post.  Cicada Mania has a posting from a few days ago.  If you are in Ohio, West Virginia, New York, Virginia, Pennsylvania or Maryland, please send us your images of Brood V Periodical Cicadas so we can post them.  Thanks for your assistance.  We are using a Brood XIII individual taken by Venom in Glenview, Illinois in June 2007.  Periodical Cicadas emerge every 17 years or 13 years, depending upon the Brood, and they are sometimes called 17 Year Locusts, though they are unrelated Cicadas.

Periodical Cicada: Brood XIII from 2007

Periodical Cicada: Brood XIII from 2007

Subject: regarding your cicada post
Location: atlanta
June 19, 2016 10:00 am
Signature: dee

Thanks dee,
Your nymph is not that of a Periodical Cicada, and Georgia is beyond the known range for Brood V, but your image is gorgeous.  So, we are still awaiting images of true Brood V Periodical Cicadas.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What the heck, HELP.
Location: Northern California
May 19, 2016 9:07 am
I’ve lived in Northern Ca all my life and never seen something so strange and scary looking. What the hell is it?
Signature: Kimberly

Cicada Metamorphosis

Cicada Metamorphosis

Dear Kimberly,
This is not a scary event.  You were lucky to have witnessed the metamorphosis of a Cicada.  The nymph has been living underground, feeding on fluids sucked from the roots of plants.  As the nymph neared maturity, it dug to the surface where it molted for the last time, emerging as a winged adult.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Insect living in dead tree
Location: Pennsylvannia
March 15, 2016 12:19 am
Hello my name is Jeancesar and I came across this bug I found inside a dead tree, I found the bug quite odd and decided to take a photo, I live in PA and I could not find this bug anywhere in the index for insect commonly found in Pennsylvannia and out of the 310 around this area none were the bug I took a photo of. It has a body like a bumble bee, 4 legs, small oval wings and what I think seems to be claws or pincers of some kind as arms if I’m not mistaking. Now I did not catch a live one but it was a dead insect and what the photo shows is its remains the exoskeleton. I’ve been wondering for months now what it is if you could please help with identifying this bug it would be much appreciated,
Sincerely,
Signature: Jeancesar

Cicada Exuvia

Cicada Exuvia

Dear Jeancesar,
This is the Exuvia or cast off exoskeleton of a Cicada.  Immature Cicadas live underground where they feed by sucking nutrients from the roots of trees and shrubs.  When they are nearing maturity, they dig to the surface and molt, leaving behind the exoskeleton after the winged adult Cicada flies away.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination