Currently viewing the category: "Cicadas"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cicada in eastern, new brunswick
Location: Hillsborough, New Brunswick canada
August 21, 2016 3:20 pm
Thanks to your website I have identified yet another bug I have never seen before!
This cicada was found on my step this evening. Never seen one before. Ugly huge fly. Are they common in New Brunswick? Because I’ve never seen one before around here.
Signature: Nb nick

Annual Cicada

Annual Cicada

Dear Nb nick,
We are happy to hear WTB? enabled you to identify your impressive Annual Cicada.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Help identify bug
Location: Denver, NC
August 22, 2016 5:22 am
Hi! Can you help identify this bug? My friend found it near her home in Denver, NC. She thought it was a husk and nudged it with her toe, and it made a horrible “chittering” sound. It’s as wide as her hand.
Thank you!
Signature: Kimberly Pruitt

Annual Cicada

Annual Cicada

Dear Kimberly,
This is some species of Annual Cicada.  Cicadas are known for the loud sounds they make, often from treetops.  Cicadas are widely regarded as being the loudest insects on earth, so we imagine the “chittering” sound your friend heard was quite startling.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this thing?
Location: Wisconsin
July 31, 2016 12:58 am
I found this on top of my girls car in the middle of summer in Wisconsin, we both are absolutely puzzled!
Signature: -Erik

Decapitated Cicada Head

Decapitated Cicada Head

Dear Erik,
This is the head of a Cicada, and we have received similar decapitated Cicada heads in the past, but what is really unusual is what we discovered when we tried to name your image file for our archives.  Someone named Erik submitted a similar severed Cicada head in 2010.  We have long suspected that birds are behind these mysterious remains.  Cicadas are quite fatty and nutritious, but the head is hard, and perhaps not as tasty. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cicada?
Location: Burns Flat, OK
August 8, 2016 3:26 pm
Could you help identify this bug?
Signature: Melissa Niavez

Northern Dusk Singing Cicada

Northern Dusk Singing Cicada

Dear Melissa,
You are correct that this is a Cicada, and we believe based on this BugGuide image, it is a Northern Dusk Singing Cicada,
Neotibicen auletes.  According to BugGuide it:  “is our LARGEST EASTERN Tibicen SPECIES.”  It is described on BugGuide as:  “1) SIZE: Avg. 2.25-2.75 inches (up to ~3.0”) in total length (incl. wings).   2) COLORATION: 2 color forms ‘Olive-Green/Olive-Taupe-Tan’ or ‘Rust/Reddish-brown   … 3) PRUINOSITY: These cicadas often look as though they are molded or have been dusted in “powdered sugar”. No other US species is so pruinose (NOTE: This white wax will wipe off and over time, esp. in older specimens, much of the white can be lost! Reduced white wax often changes the general appearance of these insects)  4) EYES: when alive/fresh, the eyes are a light – often described as a sandy tan, grey-tan or rarely purplish-grey or purplish-tan. “

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Nice Cicada-killer wasp with prey
Location: Charlottesville, Virginia, US
August 11, 2016 3:38 pm
I actually have two of these in front of my door — one burrow is beneath a corner of my front walk, the other is apparently under a nearby holly tree. Here’s a pic I got of the former carrying a cicada
Signature: Dave H,

Cicada Killer with Prey

Cicada Killer with Prey

Dear Dave,
You don’t know how refreshing it is for us to receive an image of a Cicada Killer with its prey that we can tag with Food Chain as opposed to tagging it with Unnecessary Carnage since we receive so many images of dead Cicada Killers.  So many people have irrational fears about Cicada Killers, and we concur that they are large and quite formidable looking, but as the host to two underground broods, we would love to have you write back so we can verify to our readership that Cicada Killers are not aggressive toward humans.

A Facebook Comment from Wanda
In all my years of weeding and tending my Rain Garden, I have never – repeat never – been approached or threatened by a Cicada Killer Wasp, even those who were larger than my thumb! I can safely say the same for the other wasps in my garden: Northern Paper, Great Black, Great Golden Digger, Potter and others. They are all more interested in the nectar from the plants, especially the milkweed. I walk past them, they fly past me as I work, they don’t even land on me. I welcome them for the pollinating work they do.

Dave H. confirms Cicada Killer Docility
Subject: Re:  Indeed, Cicada-killers are quite mellow
August 12, 2016 11:42 am
I’ve watched them often as I stood outside smoking,  and they’ve never even made a warning swoop toward me.   Surely one of the biggest wasps most folks will encounter, but also one of the least dangerous.
While I’m at it, I just wanted to compliment that picture of a molting cicada — that one is truly spectacular, and the little girl in the background just underlines the wonder of the moment.
Signature: Dave Harmon

We agree that it is a wonderful image Dave.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cicada
Location: Wv
August 8, 2016 8:19 pm
Periodic
Signature: Brandon

Annual Cicada Metamorphosis

Annual Cicada Metamorphosis

Dear Brandon,
Thanks for sending your awesome image of the metamorphosis of an Annual Cicada.  Annual Cicadas spend several years underground as nymphs, and as they mature, they dig to the surface and molt for the last time, emerging as adult Cicadas.  Annual Cicadas appear every year, which distinguished them from Periodical Cicadas.  Periodical Cicadas in the genus Magicicada spend 17 years underground as nymphs (13 years in southern states) and they emerge in great numbers in a given year.  They are not seen again in that location until the next Brood matures in 17 or 13 years.  Earlier this year, we put out a request for Periodical Cicada images from Brood V, which ranges in the states of Ohio, West Virginia, New York, Virginia, Pennsylvania or Maryland, according to Cicada Mania.  We did not receive an Brood V images.  There are currently 15 active broods being monitored by Cicada Mania, and you can see the predicted emergence schedules on the site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination