Currently viewing the category: "Cicadas"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this ???
Location: Stratford Ontario
August 15, 2014 5:32 am
I was pulling weeds and this fell out of my tree
Signature: John grieve

Cicada

Cicada

Dear John,
This is a Cicada in the genus
Tibicen, and we would wager that even though you did not recognize it, you are familiar with the loud buzzing sound they produce from the tops of the trees in the latter half of the summer.  These Cicadas are sometimes called Dog Day Harvestflies, though they are Hemipterans, not true flies.  We are curious what damaged this individuals wings.  Perhaps a predatory bird.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big fly?
Location: corinth, tx
August 12, 2014 6:23 pm
I was . walking the dog and solve this bug eating a cicada.it looked like it was about one and a half to 2 inches long. I have never seen one and I wanted to know what it was.
Signature: Larry L.

Robber Fly eats Cicada

Robber Fly eats Cicada

Dear Larry,
This is some species of Robber Fly in the family Asilidae, and it is not a species we immediately recognize, so we are going to have to research its identity.  It is indeed eating a Cicada.  Robber Flies are highly specialized predators that are very adept at taking large prey on the wing.  Texas and Arizona both have unusual, not commonly seen Robber Flies that are not found elsewhere in the U.S., though the ranges of those species frequently extend into Mexico.  We believe that based on this image from BugGuide, it may be
Microstylum morosum.  According to Beetles in the Bush, this is “North America’s largest robber fly” and “Until recently, Microstylum morosum was considered a Texas-endemic.  However, Beckemeyer and Carlton (2000) documented this species to be much more broadly distributed in the southern Great Plains (from Texas up into Oklahoma and Kansas and west into New Mexico, Arizona, and Colorado), and Warriner (2004) recorded it shortly afterwards in Arkansas.”  We wrote to Eric Eaton to see if he agrees with our identification.

Eric Eaton concurs
I would agree.  Seems to be a pretty distinctive species.
Eric

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this
Location: South west pennsylvania
August 6, 2014 12:19 pm
I was digging in my backyard and dug up a bunch of these. What is it?
Signature: Frank

Cicada Nymph

Cicada Nymph

Hi Frank,
This is an immature Cicada, commonly called a nymph.  Cicada nymphs spend several years underground feeding from the roots of trees and shrubs.  When they are nearing maturity, they dig to the surface, molt for the last time leaving behind an exuvia or shed exoskeleton, and fly off as winged adult Cicadas.  Perhaps you are familiar with the loud buzzing din produced by Cicadas from the tree tops in mid to late summer.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what in the world?
Location: Dartmouth, Massachusetts
August 5, 2014 5:41 am
Dear Bugman,
Hello, I was at work in Dartmouth, Ma. It was in late summer and found these dangling from under the leaves. They were shells. It looked like some type of bug that shed it’s skin. It was large almost 2 inches. I was stumped when I saw the claw like arms. I posted it on Face Book and no one knew what it was. Any ideas. In all my days I’ve never seen anything like it. Beetle family?
Signature: Thanks, Kristin

Cicada Exuvia

Cicada Exuvia

Dear Kristin,
This is the shed exoskeleton or Exuvia of a Cicada.  The Cicada nymph has been living underground for several years, and upon reaching maturity, it dug to the surface, molted for the final time, and emerged as a winged Cicada.  Perhaps you are familiar with the buzzing sound Cicadas produce from the tree tops in the summer.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unidentified Green Winged Bug
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
July 30, 2014 5:34 pm
My sons and I found this bug on the edge of the treadmill. He had just grown out of it’s previous skin and it was still attached to the string below. It sat around for a while even while they were jumping. They both started getting a little too interested and frankly I was worried that the bug would jump on them and spook them so I got it to go away with a leaf. I didn’t see it leave so I don’t know if it jumped or flew away. We have the National Geographic Bugopedia and looked around for a match but couldn’t find one. It almost looked like a grasshopper with wings but the only one in the book had blue wings and was from Europe and this one we saw had clear wings and we are in the U.S. Please let us know if you can. My enthusiastic 3 and 6 year old boys are budding entomologists and would love to know what they saw. We saw this bug in a north hills suburb of Pittsburgh in July after a rainstorm.
Signature: Gretchen Cetti

Annual Cicada

Annual Cicada

Hi Gretchen,
This is an Annual Cicada in the genus
Tibicen, and they are active in the latter half of summer.  Though many people are not familiar with the physical appearance of Cicadas, most all residents of the eastern portion of North America are familiar with the loud buzzing sound they produce, often from the tops of trees.  This sound is quite loud, and resembles the sound of a buzz saw.  Cicada nymphs live underground, often for several years, and when they emerge, they shed their exoskeleton for the last time, emerging as winged adults and leaving behind the exuvia.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I think I found a Cicada!
Location: Toronto, Ontario
July 19, 2014 5:05 pm
I wish I could have taken a better picture, but this not so little guy was hanging out on my second floor window. It’s been raining all day, so it looks like he found himself a nice spot to dry off. Aside from a little green at the base of his wings, he was mostly brown and grey, with the majority of grey found on his underside. He looked like he was wearing armor, with a buffe on his face and a breastplate.
I live in Southern Ontario, in Toronto.
Signature: Angelique

Cicada

Cicada

Hi Angelique,
You are correct that this is an Annual Cicada.  North American Cicada sightings tend to peak in August except in years where the Periodical Cicadas make a 17 year appearance in the late spring.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination