Currently viewing the category: "Cicadas"
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Subject: Flying Bug
Location: San Jose, California
March 30, 2014 10:59 pm
We found this bug on our car in San Jose Ca. On March 19th 2014 around mid day. It stayed on our car as we drove to the store. It finally left our car after we drove to another store. It did not move as we opened and closed the door it was on.
Any info would be great. Thank you.
Mike
Signature: Mike

Cicada

Cicada

Hi Mike,
This is a Cicada, a member of a family of insects that are often mistaken for large flies.  Though your images are all out of focus and lacking in critical detail, we believe your Cicada is in the genus
Platypedia based on this photo posted to BugGuide.

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Subject: Unidentified beetle or fly
Location: Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
March 23, 2014 11:57 am
Hello bug lovers,
I caught this photo of a bug that looks like a fly which is as big as a tree sparrow. I first taught it was a bird who got trapped in my condo which is on the 16th floor. Its wings is wide and has striking orange veins. Which from a far looked like a bird and one would assume that since its on the 16th floor. So i wanted to help it find the openings to freedom but it kept flying low down the wall on the floor and beneath the sofa. So i decided to capture it first which was difficult cause i was a bit frightened by the size. I finally caught it in a container ( dont worry i didnt hurt the guy not even a scratch) then i took photos of it. I got worried since it decided not to move anymore after it got caught but it was only playing dead. Then i released it on the ground floor of my condo. It flew away really quick but it looked majestic. From the photo i took you can see its bright green neck. The only sound it made was from flapping the wings. Hope you can identify it for me b ecause this is the first time ever ive seen it. It is a really beautiful insect, you shouldve seen it fly with its wings spread wide and bright. I live in a condo which is in the heart of the city, Kuala Lumpur.
Signature: Danial

Cicada:  Tacua speciosa

Cicada: Tacua speciosa

Dear Danial,
This gorgeous insect is neither a beetle nor a fly, but rather a Cicada.  It is
Tacua speciosa, and there are several images on Cicada ManiaAccording to Cicada Mania:  “The Tacua speciosa is a beautiful cicada native to Malaysia, Indonesia, Borneo, Sumatra, and other countries & islands in the Malay Archipelago” and it “is one of the largest cicadas.”  Though you did not hear any sounds, Cicadas are among the loudest of all insects.

Cicada:  Tacua speciosa

Cicada: Tacua speciosa

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Subject: Thousands of these things spotted!
Location: New South Wales, Australia
January 13, 2014 5:15 am
Dear bug experts,
While wandering around a forest in the Hawkesbury River area of NSW, Australia, we saw thousands of these things clinging to every tree. Any idea what they are please?
Cheers!
Signature: Curious bug watcher

Cicada Exuviae

Cicada Exuviae

Dear Curious bug watcher,
Did you hear a cacophony of sound emanating from the treetops?  These are the exuviae or shed exoskeletons of Cicada nymphs that have been living underground awaiting maturity. When conditions are right, they sometimes emerge in exorbitant numbers, molt for the last time and emerge as winged adults.  Adult Cicadas produce loud sounds during the mating season.  Australia is blessed with an incredible diversity of Cicada species, and each year during the summer months down under, we receive images of adult Cicadas.  We just posted a photo of a Cherry Eye a few days ago.

Cicada Exuviae

Cicada Exuviae

Wow – thanks Daniel!
That’s a brilliantly informative answer, and puts me out of my misery :-)  You are spot on as usual.
Yes, it was incredibly noisy, and now that you mention it, none of the things moved. I had given up trying to search myself (though did learn a lot about beetles in the process).
PS, I have copied another photo to Dropbox which looks like the adult after it emerged. I didn’t link it to the exoskelton when I was researching it, but it seems to confirm the exact species I was listening to. Take a look if you’re interested, here: https://www.dropbox.com/s/xvxehurjqpiyoa6/DSC03507.JPG
Thanks again!

Cicada

Double Drummer Cicada

Hi Chris,
We are really excited to be able to add the adult Cicada to the posting.  It appears to us to be Double Drummer,
Thopha saccata, and according to the Brisbane Insect Website, they are:  “the largest cicadas in Australia. They make loudest sound in the insect world. They are brown to orange-brown in colours with black pattern. On each side of the males’ abdomen there are the small pockets, the double drums, which are used to amplify the sound they produce. Females do not have the double drums but with longer abdomen tip.”  Your individual has very tattered wings, but appears to be a male.

Great work again, Daniel! Fascinating info.
Yes, I noticed the wings were in poor shape too. And as to the noise, imagine being unable to hear someone talking right next to you without them shouting… That’s what they sounded like.
Chris.

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Subject: Giant winged bug.
Location: Victoria, Australia.
January 10, 2014 8:54 pm
My dog was going crazy in the backyard and I came out to find this huge winged creature crawling around. It had a broken wing, and didn’t seem vicious in the slightest. I removed it away from my dog but not sure if she had already came in contact with the bug, and if it could it harm her.
Signature: Greatly appreciated, Maddi.

Cherryeye Cicada

Cherryeye Cicada

Hi Maddi,
This is a Cicada, and we were only going to use your correctly focused image in this posting, however, close inspection of the blurry photo (the one where the photographer considered the background content to be more important than the Cicada) revealed the stunningly red eyes.  That really assisted in our identification, because we quickly learned on Australian Museum website that this Cicada is known as the Red Eye Cicada,
Psaltoda moerens.  The Australian Museum does provide this information:  “The Red Eye cicada can be very common one year, with thousands of individuals in a few trees, but then completely absent the next year.”  We learned on Cicada Mania that this species is also commonly called the Cherryeye.  The University of Queensland website has photos of mounted specimens as well as a link to the song of this species.  Some species of Cicadas are among the loudest insects in the world.  Elsewhere on the University of Queensland site, the song is described as:  “A rich growl that increases in volume until it becomes a roar. This then breaks up into a melodious yodel sequence, which then fades away. This sequence sounds something like: ‘de-e-yaw de-e-yaw de-e-yaw de-e-yaw de-e-yaw de-e-yaw de-e-yaw de-e-yaw de-e-yaw de-e-yaw de-e-yaw de-e-yaw de-e-yeeeeeeeeeeeeeawwww…’”  The limited range is listed as:  “From Kroombit Tops in Queensland south to the eastern half of Tasmania. In Victoria it occurs west to the Grampians, with isolated populations on the Victorian/South Australian border and in South Australia at the Adelaide Hills. In Queensland and north-eastern New South Wales the species is mostly restricted to the highlands, on or adjacent to the Great Dividing Range. Adults occur from November until March.”  Lastly, the INaturalist site compiles much of the preceding information and also supplies additional information, including:  “ They feed primarily on eucalyptus but also on Angophora trees.”  Cicada nymphs spend several years underground feeding on the fluids in the roots of plants, and the occasionally emerge in great numbers.  Australia is known for Cicada diversity and there are many species with interesting common names.  Cicadas do not sting, so they really can’t harm your dog, though once we did publish a report of a person being bitten by a Cicada which has a mouth designed to pierce and suck fluids.  Cicadas are considered edible, and a great source of protein.

AKA Red Eye Cicada

AKA Red Eye Cicada

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Possible Deaths Head Hawk Moth?
Location: Johannesburg, South Africa
December 26, 2013 12:08 am
Hi,
I found this moth last night after investigating a very loud screeching sound in my house. Turns out that it was this moth. Looks similar to a Deaths Head Hawk Moth, but not sure as markings seem different from what I have seen online.
Your views?
Thanks,
Signature: Ryan

Cicada

Cicada:  Is this the newly discovered species????

Hi Ryan,
This is not a moth, but rather, a Cicada.  Cicadas are capable of making sounds which would explain the loud screeching you heard.  We typically see photos of Cicadas with clear wings, so this individual with its forewing markings (that do resemble the wings of a Death’s Head Hawkmoth) and brightly colored underwings is quite distinctive.  We did not think it would be difficult to identify to the species level, and we did find matching images on the Photographs from South Africa website, however, the Cicada is not identified to the species level.  Continued research led us to a matching photo on the Wildlife Extra News site with the subject 18 New Species of Invertebrate Discovered in South Africa.  The photo is captioned:  “A cicada currently in the process of being named and described. Photo credit Earthwatch.”  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to find more current information on the name of this unusual Cicada.

Hi there,
Many thanks for the fast and informative response! Cicada was my second option, but didn’t think so due to the wings.
Very cool to experience something that unusual flying into my house twice on the same evening :-)
Thanks,
Ryan

Update:  Possibly Orange Wing Cicada
Thanks to a comment to this posting, we now believe this may be an Orange Wing Cicada in the genus Platypleura.  There are photos posted to ISpot that look very similar to the Orange Wing Cicada.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug?
Location: Kentucky
October 16, 2013 1:54 pm
I keep seeing these bugs on my tree out front of my house. I am curious to see what it is but cannot find it online. It’s gross and large. I’m not from the country – where I now reside. What is this bug?! (:
Signature: Super curious, slightly afraid lol.

Cicada Exuviae

Cicada Exuviae

Dear Super curious,
We love your photo of the Exuviae or shed exoskeletons of Cicadas.  The Exuviae were left behind when the larval Cicadas, which spent several years living underground, dug their way to the surface, climbed a vertical feature like a tree or a wall, and molted for the final time.  The adult winged Cicada emerges and the adult males fill the air with a most unmelodious yet nostalgic sound.  We suspect your Exuviae belong to the Dogday Harvestfly or a near relative in the genus
Tibicen

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination