Currently viewing the category: "Cicadas"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug from Cayman Islands
Location: Grand Cayman Island
November 27, 2016 1:41 pm
Hi there, I wondered if you might be able to identify this bug for me please? It flew onto the branch in the picture like a huge flying truck! It was slow and laboured and was about 1 ½ inches long. It was spotted in the Queen Elizabeth ll nature park on Grand Cayman Island on a recent trip. It was early November and the weather was clear and sunny.
I would love to be able to identify it but don’t know where to start! Google has thrown up nothing! I took the picture myself by the way when I was looking for birds.
I look forward to hearing from you.
Signature: Linda Martin

Cicada

Cicada

Dear Linda,
This is a Cicada, and based on the image posted to CaymANNature, we believe it may be the endemic species
Diceroprocta cleavesi.

Thank you so much Daniel.  We don’t see cicadas here in the UK!
Kind regards
Linda

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this insect?
Location: Coffs Harbour, New South Wales, Australia
October 16, 2016 2:39 pm
Hi, my names Jess. I found an insect in my garden and I don’t know what it is. It has a leafy exterior and a very large behind. It has six legs and big brown eyes. When disturbed it make a similar noise to a small frog, kind of. I haven’t seen it fly but it has wings.
Signature: Jess Burton

Bladder Cicada

Bladder Cicada

Dear Jess,
Australia is home to hundreds of different species of Cicadas, and this Bladder Cicada,
Cystosoma saundersii, is one of the more unusual looking ones.  According to the Queensland Government site:  “The bladder cicada is a large cicada up to 5 cm long that is green in colour, and with leaf-like wings. The most distinctive feature of males is their large abdomen (from which they have gained the name ‘bladder’), which is hollow and acts as an echo-chamber to amplify their calls.”  Much like your observation, the site also states:  “The large, hollow abdomen of male bladder cicadas helps them to produce a distinctive and deep, frog-like sound. Their calls last up to half-an-hour, and can be heard from dusk to early evening.”  According to Climate Watch:  “Breeding: mating occurs from September. The female cuts small slits in the branches of a plant into which she lays her eggs. The eggs hatch into nymphs, drop to the ground and burrow into the soil where they feed on sap in the roots of plants. They remain underground for several years (possibly six or seven!) until fully grown, then emerge as adults at night from September. They climb up trees and shed their complete brown shells before flying off to find mates. After so long underground, they live for only a few weeks more.”

Bladder Cicada

Bladder Cicada

Bladder Cicada

Bladder Cicada

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Thought you might enjoy hangin out w/ this guy 😉
Location: Cahokia, IL
August 27, 2016 10:32 pm
Caught this little guy comin out of his shell. Looks like he’s already found a friend to hang with.
Signature: Jokerswylde

Annual Cicada Metamorphosis with Assassin Bug Observer

Annual Cicada Metamorphosis with Assassin Bug Observer

Dear Jokerswylde,
Thanks for sending us your image of the metamorphosis of an Annual Cicada.  The observer is a predatory Assassin Bug.  Even though insects are especially vulnerable during and immediately after metamorphosis, we don’t believe there is any threat from the Assassin Bug which would normally prey upon smaller creatures.  Interestingly, both the Cicada and the Assassin Bug are classified together in the same insect order Hemiptera.

So this Cicada has a hired Assassin (Bug) for a bodyguard? lol Funnily enough, I was so focused on the Cicada that I didn’t even notice the other little guy when I first took the picture. & when I looked at the picture later, to post it, I thought it was just a common green grasshopper.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cicada in eastern, new brunswick
Location: Hillsborough, New Brunswick canada
August 21, 2016 3:20 pm
Thanks to your website I have identified yet another bug I have never seen before!
This cicada was found on my step this evening. Never seen one before. Ugly huge fly. Are they common in New Brunswick? Because I’ve never seen one before around here.
Signature: Nb nick

Annual Cicada

Annual Cicada

Dear Nb nick,
We are happy to hear WTB? enabled you to identify your impressive Annual Cicada.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Help identify bug
Location: Denver, NC
August 22, 2016 5:22 am
Hi! Can you help identify this bug? My friend found it near her home in Denver, NC. She thought it was a husk and nudged it with her toe, and it made a horrible “chittering” sound. It’s as wide as her hand.
Thank you!
Signature: Kimberly Pruitt

Annual Cicada

Annual Cicada

Dear Kimberly,
This is some species of Annual Cicada.  Cicadas are known for the loud sounds they make, often from treetops.  Cicadas are widely regarded as being the loudest insects on earth, so we imagine the “chittering” sound your friend heard was quite startling.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this thing?
Location: Wisconsin
July 31, 2016 12:58 am
I found this on top of my girls car in the middle of summer in Wisconsin, we both are absolutely puzzled!
Signature: -Erik

Decapitated Cicada Head

Decapitated Cicada Head

Dear Erik,
This is the head of a Cicada, and we have received similar decapitated Cicada heads in the past, but what is really unusual is what we discovered when we tried to name your image file for our archives.  Someone named Erik submitted a similar severed Cicada head in 2010.  We have long suspected that birds are behind these mysterious remains.  Cicadas are quite fatty and nutritious, but the head is hard, and perhaps not as tasty. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination