Currently viewing the category: "Centipedes and Millipedes"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Namibian arthropods
Location: Namibia (see above)
November 15, 2011 12:44 pm
Can you please name these.All pictures were taken in April 2011 in Namibia.
The cricket was taken in the Etendeke Mountain camp close to Palmwag. The other 2 images were taken at Durstenbruck farm north of Windhoek.
Signature: Roger Pinkney

Tropical Centipede

Hi Roger,
Though we don’t know what species this is, this Tropical Centipede is one of the most beautiful Centipedes we have ever seen.  We will try to determine the species.  Tropical Centipedes in the genus
Scolopendra are found in many places around the world.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Centipede ID
Location: Canada de Pala Trail, Joseph D. Grant Park, San Jose, CA
November 2, 2011 2:42 pm
Dear Bugman,
I found this colorful centipede on the trail in Joseph D. Grant Park, San Jose, CA, November 1, 2011, elevation 2,600’ in the late afternoon. It is about 4 inches long. I took a photo of it and didn’t touch it, as I didn’t want to alarm it. It was solitary. Is it a Scolopendra polymorpha? It had turqouise green and orange coloring. A lovely thing.
Signature: Holly

Centipede

Hi Holly,
Congratulations on your excellent job of identification.  We agree that this is most likely
Scolopendra polymorpha based on photos posted to BugGuide.  You were wise not to touch it as they are capable of biting.


Hello Daniel,
Thank you for your speedy and helpful reply.  I’m glad I didn’t touch it.  :)  I have never seen a centipede before, it felt like a mega-fauna sighting – surprising to see on the trail in grasslands.
All the Best,
Holly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Flat Orange on Oak wood
Location: Grass Valley, CA
November 1, 2011 6:46 pm
We have these all over the oak wood outside our home. I have not been able to find out what it is. They only seem to be on the oak that is on the ground.
Signature: Brandi Minium

Millipedes

Hi Brandi,
These are Millipedes that feed on decaying organic matter and possibly the fungus that grows on decaying wood.  We believe we have identified them as
Brachycybe rosea based on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

30 legs of ”what the heck” in my room
Location: Peruvian rain forest ( within 25 miles of 12° 36′ 0″ S, 69° 11′ 0″ W)
October 30, 2011 10:35 pm
On vacation this summer, i spent time in the Peruvian rain forest. We slept in an abandoned schoolhouse, and i found this little creature hiding in my room. I took this picture late July/early August
Signature: Adam Protter

House Centipede

Dear Adam,
This is a House Centipede, a beneficial nocturnal predator that is perfectly comfortable cohabitating with humans and feeding off the other nocturnal arthropod residents like Cockroaches.  For years we have been claiming that House Centipedes are perfectly harmless, though larger individuals may be capable of biting and Centipedes do have venom.  The venom of a House Centipede is not considered to be harmful to humans, and we also maintain that bites from House Centipedes are extremely rare.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

26 legged insect
Location: Blue Ridge, Virginia
October 16, 2011 10:13 pm
Hello, I have seen this bug around my house for a few months now and have no idea what it is! I live in Charlottesville, Virginia and have seen this bug since the mid summer. Oddly, while in Italy during the summer I am sure I saw one of these insects. Please help.
Signature: Gabriel

House Centipede

I have realized after looking through your Top Ten list that this is a House Centipede. Though I now know they are harmless, I can’t help but find them creepy after the one that ran at me when it noticed me. I hope you like the pictures!
Gabriel

House Centipede

Hi Gabriel,
Your very detailed photos are a wonderful addition to our website.  We are very happy to learn that you were able to self identify this House Centipede.  There is some indication that they might bite a person if provoked, but their venom is not highly toxic and will cause little more than irritation in most people, however, with severe allergic reactions on the rise from everything, including peanuts and pain relievers, we cannot predict what might happen if a particularly sensitive person happens to get bitten.  For the record, Centipedes are not insects.  Insects have but six legs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

House Centipede
Location: Portland, OR
August 21, 2011 1:52 am
Heya,
I know this is a house centipede, but I am curious if I should avoid picking them up? I realize they are ”harmless” in the sense that their venom is very mild, but is it recommended to use a cup rather than hands to gently place them outside? Love the site, btw.
Signature: J

House Centipede

Hi J,
Thank you for submitting your question.  Our favorite way to remove potentially stinging or biting insects from the home is printed in Daniel’s book, The Curious World of Bugs.  Trap the creature in an inverted martini glass and then slip a postcard between the opening of the glass and the home surface.  The creature can then be safely relocated.  For years we have been claiming that House Centipedes are perfectly harmless, but we concede that they might bite if handled.  More detrimental to the House Centipede would be losing some legs due to careless handling.  The martini glass method ensures that both the House Centipede and the Bug Humanitarian (yes you were tagged because of your question) will remain safe. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination