Currently viewing the category: "Centipedes and Millipedes"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Just Saying Thank You!
Website: lhexperience.blogspot.com
April 29, 2013 12:02 pm
Dear WTB,
I found your website back in 2008/2009 and have been revisiting it pretty often ever since. I have never had anything that I wanted identified, a few times I did have a question but I was able to find it myself by looking through the archives first. I really enjoy reading it just for fun. I am not all that very interested in bugs really but I just really like this site here. Thank you for making it such fun to browse through! I always come here first whenever I want to know something about bugs. Today I discovered centipedes in my garden and I was worried they were bad. I looked around and discovered that there are quite a few different kinds of centipedes!
Thanks again!
Signature: Elise

House Centipede Eats Cricket

House Centipede Eats Cricket

Dear Elise,
Thank you for the sweet message.  We love getting fanmail.  It really made our day.  We try to make the site entertaining and fun.  Though we strive for accuracy with identifications, we are more generalists that are attempting to promote an appreciation of the lower beasts in an effort to help folks understand the interconnectivity of all life forms on this fragile planet.  We are illustrating this posting with a photo from our archives of the much maligned and misunderstood House Centipede, a beneficial predator that will keep the house rid of other unwanted creatures like cockroaches.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Correctly identified a millipede on my own? Location: Columbia, TN March 16, 2013 9:11 pm I just wanted to share my favorite critter find of the day today. Found March 16, 2013 in Middle Tennessee in a heavily wooded and mossy area. I believe based on my searching of this site that it is a Sigmoria trimaculata, however, since I am usually wrong in my assumptions, a confirmation would be appreciated. Feel free to share my photo as I did not see very many on here. Thanks for all that you all do! Signature: S Carter

Flatbacked Millipede:  Sigmoria trimaculata

Flatbacked Millipede: Sigmoria trimaculata

Dear S. Carter, We agree with your identification.  Back in 2007, we posted an image of a Flatbacked Millipede that we identified only to the order level of Polydesmida, but a year later, Rowland Shelley of the North Carolina State Museum of Natural Science identified it a Sigmoria trimaculata.  His comment at the time was:  “Most are quite old; don’t people submit new ones more often than this?”  We don’t get images of this interesting Millipede that often, so your photos are a great addition to our archive.

Flatbacked Millipede:  Sigmoria trimaculata

Flatbacked Millipede: Sigmoria trimaculata

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Giant Millipede?
Location: Gold Run, CA
March 11, 2013 7:43 pm
Assuming this is a Giant Millipede, although I know ”Giant” is in the eye of the beholder! He/She was very calm and attractive – once my little girls got over their fear they had a lot of fun. No distinguishing colors other than shades of grey. Turned him/her loose in the overgrowth after taking a pic – any info would be great! Thanks again, love your website!
Signature: Whitnei B.

Millipede

Millipede

Hi Whitnei,
Since most Millipedes are much smaller, calling this a giant Millipede makes perfect sense.  We are uncertain how many different species of large Millipedes can be found in northern California, and most likely even scientists are certain how many species can be found.  According to our favorite source for information on southern California “bugs”, Charles Hogue’s Insects of the Los Angeles Basin:  “Several species live in the basin;  most are small and inconspicuous.  But two closely related species,
Hiltonius pulchrus and Tylobolus claremontus, are very large (exceeding 3 in., or 8 cm, in length) and a third species, Atopetholus californicus (=angelus), is only slight smaller (up to 2 in., or 50mm).  All are otherwise similar, with cylindrical shiny black, dark gray , or brown bodies.”  The genus Hiltonius is represented on BugGuide  Tylobolus is also represented on BugGuide and Atopetholus can be found on BugGuide as well.  We can’t say for certain if your Millipede is in one of those genera or if it is in a different classification. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of Centipede is this?
Location: 15 miles east of Tecate Mexico, in Baja Norte
March 8, 2013 10:01 pm
Can you tell me what kind of Centipede this is. I saw several of them over the course of the day.
Found in under a Rock in Sage Habitat/w Rock. About 15 miles east of Tecate Mexico, in Baja Norte.
Please let me know if you nee more info.
Thank You In Advance.
Brian
Signature: Any

Multicolored Centipede

Multicolored Centipede

Dear Brian,
We believe this is either a Multicolored Centipede,
Scolopendra polymorpha, or a closely related species.  According to BugGuide, the range is:  “w. half of the US north to SD-se.MT-e.OR; Mexico.”  The bite is rumored to be quite painful.

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Subject:  Strange Bug
Location:
March 10, 2013
Hi Daniel, friend found this when he was draining his pool. I know you’ll know what it is.
Hope you’re well.
Laura Gutierrez

Multicolored Centipede

Multicolored Centipede

Hi Laura,
This appears to be a Multicolored Centipede,
Scolopendra polymorpha.  Where is your friend’s pool?

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: giant centipede in Dominican Republic
Location: Dominican Republic
February 18, 2013 6:26 pm
I encountered this amazing critter in Jaragua Park, Dominican Rep, back in 2007. I can see it’s a ”giant” centipede but searches on the net have just left me confused as to species. Regardless, it was a pretty cool animal – huge!!
On the same trip I also came across this rather fabulous looking snail shell (I can’t recall whether it was occupied) – very striking. Land snail, tree snail?
(Incidentally, this is a great site for bugs and such, but do you know of a similar site for attempting to ID herps??)
Thanks,
Paul Prior
Signature: Paul Prior

Caribbean Giant Centipede

Hi Paul,
Most Giant Tropical Centipedes are in the genus
Scolopendra, and searching for that, we found this image of Scolopendra alternans from Haiti on iNaturalist.  Another iNaturalist page places it in the Bahamas and Haiti.  BugGuide lists some Florida sightings as well.  Vladimir Dinets websiteindicates the common name is Caribbean Giant Centipede.

Caribbean Giant Centipede

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination