Currently viewing the category: "Millipedes"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Millipede

Millipede

Subject: Unidentified Bug
Location: Ecuador
October 20, 2014 5:49 am
Hi
I took this picture of a bug in the Amazon, Ecuador.
Can you help to identify it?
Regards
Ian
Signature: Ian Rowlings

Hi Ian,
This is a Millipede in the class Diplopoda.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Millipede

Millipede

Subject: Slug with legs?
Location: North Eastern Kansas
October 15, 2014 5:39 am
Not sure what this is? I thought it was a slug but it has legs. Maybe just a slimy centipede?
Signature: Thank you

This is an omnivorous Millipede, not a predatory Centipede.  Millipedes feed on decaying organic matter.  This statement from BugGuide surprised us as we were not aware that any Millipedes were considered carnivorous:  “Most eat decaying plant material, but a few spp. occasionally can be carnivorous. Some may also occasionally eat living plants.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Tailless whip scorpion eating millipede
Location: South Mexico – Jungle
September 23, 2014 4:46 am
I have been reading (and loving!) your site for many many years and have never had anything to submit because I live in the UK where we do not have an abundance of large and/or exotic insects and where, due to my interest in all things bug, I tend to already be able to identify many critters. In fact I’m a little bit of a “bugwoman” myself, to my family and friends at least, who often save photos to ask me about. I have learnt much of what I know from your amazing site.
However, I recently returned from a wonderful trip to Southern Mexico where I spent much time in the jungle and encountered many wonderful creatures of the six, eight, and more legged variety.
I thought you might enjoy this picture of a tailless whip scorpion eating a millipede for your food chain series? Apologies for the photo quality I took these with my camera phone (the macro lens being shamefully hogged by my less insect-loving companion!).
Signature: Long time avid WTB reader

Tailless Whipscorpion eats Millipede

Tailless Whipscorpion eats Millipede

Dear Long time avid WTB reader,
Thanks for sending us your excellent image of a Tailless Whipscorpion feeding on a Millipede.  The quality of your image is much higher than most images we receive.  Regarding your comment about the fauna of the UK, we are surprised as there are many interesting creatures to be found in your location.  Though it contains some adult content, you may enjoy the film Angels and Insects, an adaptation of an A.S. Byatt Victorian novella.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Glowworm?
Location: Palo Duro Canyon – near Amarillo Texas
July 23, 2014 1:46 pm
Saw this worm while hiking in Palo Duro Canyon near Amarillo Texas last week (7/20/2014). In one picture it appears to be eating a millipede.
Signature: jcochran

Glowworm eats Millipede

Glowworm eats Millipede

Dear jcochran,
Thank you for sending us your excellent documentation of a Glowworm eating a Millipede.  Glowworms, which are the larvae of beetles in the family Phengodidae, are also called Railroad Worms because of the bioluminescence.

Glowworm

Glowworm

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this bug?
Location: Garden
June 30, 2014 7:42 pm
Hello, I found this millipede in my yard and I cannot seem to find out what kind if millipede it is. I have all ready tried to find out what type of millipede this is but no website has told me………so I hope you can give my the answer!?
Signature: From lia

Flat-Backed Millipede

Flat-Backed Millipede

Dear lia,
Since the images you attached were pilfered from our website and since there is already a posting with considerable information on this Flat Backed Millipede, we are unclear what additional information you desire.  We do not have the necessary skills to identify the millipede in the image beyond the very broad order Polydesmida, the Flat Backed Millipedes, but another distinct possibility is
Apheloria virginiensis which we found on BugGuide and contains the identical information we have already posted on the submission where you downloaded the image:  “Caution: Many millipedes with bright color patterns secrete a compound containing cyanide. Wash your hands after handling them and do not allow children to pick them up.   ‘Millipedes are entirely non-toxic to humans and can be picked up by hand. Some secretions discolor the skin, but this wears away in a few days without lasting effect. Some large, cylindrical, tropical species squirt their defensive secretions up to a half meter (2-3 feet) and can blind chickens and dogs. Their fluids are painful if they get into the eyes, and persons working with tropical millipedes should be suitably cautious.’ ~Rowland Shelley”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Stunning and Curious Grasshopper
Location: Marloth Park, South Africa
April 18, 2014 3:49 am
Hello bugpeople!
… And would it, by any chance, leave a hard yellow, white and black striped “shell” when it dies? I recently found one on the ground that looks similar to his body. But we’ve also seen a lot of furry yellow black and white striped caterpillars that I’ve been unable to identify (last pic)
I appreciate your help! Thank you!
Tomorrow I’ll go outside and see if I can find that “skin” and take a photo. It looks like it has little feet attached to it.Almost like what a millipede would have but it’s striped – yellow, black, white.
Cheers,
Signature: Kenda

Possibly Lappet Moth Caterpillar

Possibly Lappet Moth Caterpillar

Sat, Apr 19, 2014 at 5:27 AM
I took two photos of the caterpillar “shell” thingy. It has lost a lot of color since I last saw it. It’s now become a dull grayish, and it’s falling apart. All the little rings are coming loose. I wonder if it’s not the shell of the caterpillar we’ve been seeing around here (3rd pic). Should I be posting this on your site? I’ll gladly do so.
No pressure about getting back with me. I imagine you all receive tons of emails.
Many thanks!
Cheers,
Kenda

Millipede Exoskeleton

Millipede Exoskeleton

The exoskeleton is unrelated to either the caterpillar or the grasshopper.  This is a millipede exoskeleton.

Goodness. Thank you!  I’m working on my next blog post. I will send you an email when it’s published. Hopefully it will help drive some traffic to your site, but then again, maybe you have too much traffic already!
Thank you, kindly, Mr. Marlos!
Cheers,
Kenda

Hi again Kenda,
The caterpillar might be a Lappet Moth Caterpillar in the family Lasiocampidae, though we were unable to locate a matching image on ISpot.
  The Millipede might have fallen prey to Millipede Assassin Bugs or a Glowworm.

Oh wow. I didn’t even realize you were working on this one!  Thank you. We’ve seen about 6 of these caterpillars around the house (3 coming inside), and they are moving fast. I’ve taken them all out and watched 2 climb the outside wall and disappear in the rafters. I figured they were looking for a place to hang and pupate, but they disappeared.
Thank you again, SO much for your help!
Cheers,
Kenda

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination