Currently viewing the category: "Millipedes"
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Subject: What is this?
Location: California
March 9, 2014 2:35 pm
I found a couple of these in my bathroom and can’t seem to find out what they are. Can you identify this? If you could email me with an answer or any info that would be great. Thanks.
Signature: Tonya

Millipede

Millipede

Dear Tonya,
We believe we have identified your Millipede as
Brachycybe rosea, based on photos posted to BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Stinky
February 13, 2014
Location:  Turkey
Hello Daniel,
I sent you a letter a month or so ago about a stinky centipede. you answered my letter immediately, and I am very thankful to you. I found another one in my office and got a picture for you. when touched it expels a very foul odor that stays on my hands for hours and stinks up several rooms. You told me it could be cyanide gas. Thanks again, and here is the picture. Thanks again. Timur – in Turkey

Millipede from Turkey

Millipede from Turkey

Dear Timur,
Thanks for sending in your recent photo and description.  This is a Millipede, not a Centipede.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Help identify please
Location: Twin Falls Idaho
February 3, 2014 10:45 pm
Found these shell like things on the carpet in my basement found 3 or 4 but never found any bugs or anything with them yet.
Signature: Colby

Dead Millipede broken in half

Dead Millipede broken in half

Dear Colby,
This looks to us like a dead Millipede that has broken in half.  Millipedes are generally found in damp, dark places, and they are frequently found in basements. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: insect found on back porch
Location: Mechanicsburg, PA
December 15, 2013 6:14 pm
Is it possible to identify the insect in the picture
Signature: Gary T. Schenk

Millipede

Millipede

Hi Gary,
This is a Millipede, and it is not an insect.  Insects have three pairs of legs and Millipedes, which belong to the class Diplopoda, have from 47 to 375 pairs of legs, according to BugGuide.  Millipedes generally feed on decaying plant material.  They roll into a ball to defend themselves as your one image illustrates.

Millipede

Millipede

Daniel
Thank you very much
Merry Christmas to you and yours
Gts

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: bug/larvae attaking and eating millipede
Location: Tehachapi CA
November 27, 2013 12:50 pm
Hi there bugman, last night I was out letting my dog go to the bathroom when he started rubbing on the ground. When I checked what he was rubbing against, I found a millipede being attcked or grabbed by some type of larvae. I caught the 2 animals and now the millipede is dead with its head off and the larvae eating away at it. The larvae looks segmented with six legs, black in color with the sides a dark brown. I have never seen this before so I wanted to know what it was. The third picture is showing the bug eating the millipede inside the head.
Signature: Angel

Glowworm (below) will Millipede Prey

Glowworm (below) will Millipede Prey

Dear Angel,
If you checked out this dramatic occurrence in darkness, you might have noticed the predatory larva glowing, because it is a Glowworm.  Glowworms prey upon Millipedes and we have nice documentation on our site of an eastern Glowworm eating a Millipede.  Your species if probably a Western Banded Glowworm
Zarhipis integripennis, and you may verify its identity on BugGuide.

Glowworm Eats Millipede

Glowworm Eats Millipede

Thank you very much, Daniel Marlos. What is interesting is that I checked the bug guide and it says that these bugs are active during Jan-Feb, but it is late November and getting really cold. Well anyway, thanks again for your help.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Millipede??
Location: Frederick County, Maryland
October 19, 2013 8:08 am
Hi. Saw this guy up on the rocks in the mountain – Frederick County Reservoir Area, Maryland. Friday, October 18, 2013. He was at least four inches long. Moving fairly fast …
Signature: photogirl

Worm Millipede

Worm Millipede

Dear photogirl,
We believe we have correctly identified your Millipede as a Worm Millipede AKA American Giant Millipede,
Narceus americanus-annularis-complex, which BugGuide describes as:  “Usually dark reddish-brown with red edges on each segment. The most commonly-seen large millipede in its range.”  We were searching through interesting, recent, unanswered requests so that we could postdate a few submissions to go live in early November while when we will be away from the office.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination