Currently viewing the category: "Millipedes"
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Subject: Can you help me identify this bug?
Location: Chapel Hill, NC
June 22, 2016 5:36 am
I find so many of these around and in my house during the summer months. They’re maybe an inch and half long and dark brown with many legs. They have to antennae sticking out from the front (at least that’s what I think they are). I don’t know how they keep getting in or what I can do to keep them out.
Signature: Sam

Greenhouse Millipede

Greenhouse Millipede

Dear Sam,
Your image is not of the highest quality, but this appears to be a Greenhouse Millipede,
Oxidus gracilis, based on this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Native to Asia, introduced to North America and found throughout the lower 48 states and southern Canada.” 

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Subject: What is this?
Location: Southern Ohio
June 18, 2016 4:02 pm
Found this creature in the woods, curled up in a ball. (Was around 1:30 in June).
Signature: Fallistar

Flatbacked Millipede

Flatbacked Millipede

Dear Fallistar,
We identified your colorful Flatbacked Millipede as
 Apheloria virginiensis corrugata on BugGuide where it states:  “Caution: Many millipedes with bright color patterns secrete a compound containing cyanide. Wash your hands after handling them and do not allow children to pick them up. ‘Millipedes are entirely non-toxic to humans and can be picked up by hand. Some secretions discolor the skin, but this wears away in a few days without lasting effect. Some large, cylindrical, tropical species squirt their defensive secretions up to a half meter (2-3 feet) and can blind chickens and dogs. Their fluids are painful if they get into the eyes, and persons working with tropical millipedes should be suitably cautious.’ ~Rowland Shelley”

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Subject: Snail eating millipede
Location: Harpers Ferry, WV
May 23, 2016 5:24 pm
I thought you guys might like the picture I took this morning of a snail eating a millipede. Enjoy!
Signature: Barb

Predatory Snail Eats Millipede

Predatory Snail Eats Millipede

Dear Barb,
There is a similar image on BugGuide, but we think yours has more attractive subjects.  We don’t know if this is a native Snail or an introduced species.

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Subject: Centipedes?
Location: Southern California
May 16, 2016 6:37 pm
Image #1 was in the hallway at work, in my office in Santa Ana, CA on May 13, 2016 Baby Centipede? Image #2 (deceased) was taken as I entered my weekend retreat in Cherry Valley, CA. About a week earlier. I’m assuming is some type of centipede as well. Just wondering if either one is dangerous?
Signature: Thanks so much!! Betsy

Multicolored Centipede

Multicolored Centipede

Dear Betsy,
The critter you found in your office is a Flat-Backed Millipede in the Order Polydesmida, which is pictured on BugGuide.  The other image from Cherry Valley is a Multicolored Centipede,
Scolopendra polymorpha.  According to Charles Hogue in Insects of the Los Angeles Basin:  “The bite of this species may be painful.  Although there are no data on the effects of its poison on humans, it is probably harmless.  Contrary to popular belief, the sharp claws on the legs are not poisonous, although the last pair of legs is capable of pinching.”  According to BugGuide, the common names are Tiger Centipede and Common Desert Centipede.

Flat-Backed Millipede

Flat-Backed Millipede

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Subject: Three red and black bugs found!
Location: Missouri, U.S.A.
April 1, 2016 5:44 pm
I would like your help on identifying three orange and black stripped bugs. I was in my yard searching for bugs, so I lifted up a rotting log and to my excitement I found three cool looking bugs all near each other! Pretty please with cherries on top help me identify them! :)
Signature: Gracie S.

Flatbacked Millipedes

Flatbacked Millipedes

Dear Gracie,
These are Flatbacked Millipedes in the order Polydesmida, a group well represented on BugGuide.

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Subject: Madrone wood bug
Location: Northern California
November 22, 2015 3:59 pm
Hi,
I see this bug in our madrone firewood & was wondering what it is
Signature: Romel

Millipede:  Brachycybe rosea

Millipede: Brachycybe rosea

Dear Romel,
We believe we have correctly identified your Millipede as
Brachycybe rosea based on images posted to BugGuide where it states:  “Found typically under rotting oak lying on soil. I found these both in Cool (El Dorado County) and Fair Oaks (Sacramento County) but only collected in Cool.”

Millipedes:  Brachycybe rosea

Millipedes: Brachycybe rosea

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination