Currently viewing the category: "Centipedes and Millipedes"
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Subject: Three red and black bugs found!
Location: Missouri, U.S.A.
April 1, 2016 5:44 pm
I would like your help on identifying three orange and black stripped bugs. I was in my yard searching for bugs, so I lifted up a rotting log and to my excitement I found three cool looking bugs all near each other! Pretty please with cherries on top help me identify them! :)
Signature: Gracie S.

Flatbacked Millipedes

Flatbacked Millipedes

Dear Gracie,
These are Flatbacked Millipedes in the order Polydesmida, a group well represented on BugGuide.

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Subject: Many-legged creature
Location: Santa Barbara, CA
March 29, 2016 12:09 pm
A friend posted this on Facebook.
Signature: Stephanie Rioux

House Centipede

House Centipede

Dear Stephanie,
The predatory, beneficial and harmless House Centipede is one of our most common identification requests.

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Subject: Centipede.
Location: Grand Rapids MI
March 20, 2016 11:10 am
Is this a centipede carcass?
Signature: Cathy S

Centipede Exuvia

Centipede Exuvia

Dear Cathy,
This is not an image of a carcass.  It is a Centipede Exuvia, the cast off exoskeleton that remains when an arthropod molts.

Thank you for your prompt response, Daniel.  I found the centipede exoskeleton at the library where I work.  I understand that centipedes prey on other insects, so having a few around might be an advantage, although their appearance might freak out a few of our patrons.
Peace
Cathy

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Subject: Creepy crawly in Chicago apartment
Location: Chicago, Illinois
March 8, 2016 11:12 am
I found this guy in the corner of my closet ceiling. I’ve seen several others like him throughout the 2 years I’ve lived in this apartment in Chicago. It’s currently end of winter/beginning of spring . It seems he has both front and back antenna with 10-20 pairs of legs. Just want to know what it is.
Signature: Katelyn

House Centipede

House Centipede

Dear Katelyn,
This is a beneficial, predatory House Centipede that will help keep your apartment free from Cockroaches and other unwanted pests.  According to BugGuide:  “The 15 pairs of legs are banded, becoming lighter toward their tips, with barbs that help hold onto prey.”

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Subject: rainbow colored centipede?
Location: vancouver, Wa
March 6, 2016 6:05 am
I have a friend who was out on a walk on February 10 and spotted this guy. This was in North Vancouver, WA known as salmon creek. You have permission to use the photo and my writing for this for your website.
Signature: Jason

Centipede

Centipede

Dear Jason,
Though it is quite colorful, we do not believe this is normal for this Centipede.  We believe it is a Stone Centipede in the order Lithobiomorpha.  We will continue to research this unusual coloration.

Very odd indeed, I am a senior completing a bachelor degree in biology and minor in chemistry and tried doing research on it before emailing you guys.  Almost nothing that bright colored naturally exists in this area so it particularly peaked my interest.
Thanks,
Jason

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Subject: Bug found in bed!
Location: Norfolk, England
March 2, 2016 2:14 am
Hi Bugman,
I found this in my bed last night. I woke up at about 3am and I swear I saw something small glowing in the dark under my thin topsheet. I panicked and threw the blanket off, once I turned on the lights I saw this. What is it? How did it get into my apartment situated on the third floor? Will they keep appearing, eggs? This isnt the first time I have found one of these, I found one in my kitchen a few months back but thought nothing of it.
Thanks
Signature: Scarlett

Soil Centipede

Soil Centipede

Dear Scarlett,
This is not the first posting we have received regarding a bioluminescent Soil Centipede in the order Geophilomorpha.  When we posted images of a Fire Centipede from Gabon, we did much research, but alas, the link to information on
Geophilus carpophagus from the Natural England website appears to be broken and no longer active.  Apheloria has information on a bioluminescent Centipede from Thailand including:  “The centipede … glows … and displays a pair of luminous green spots” and “The genus Orphnaeus, in the order Geophilomorpha, are bioluminescent centipedes that are distributed throughout the Old World Tropics including Africa, Central and South America, Southeast Asia, and Hawaii. Orphnaeus (pronounced “orf-nee-us”) is in my opinion a better candidate for the maeng-kah-reaung; however, I’m almost certain they do not crawl into folks’ ears. They do, according to Kim, smell like poop. (That said, If any myriapod is a candidate for crawling into ears, it’s centipedes – as they are fast, flexible, and cunning!)”  EakringBirds has a Centipedes and Millipedes of Nottinghamshire page with a heading “Confirmation of bioluminescence produced by Geophilus easoni” where it states “We also wanted complete confirmation to our initial identification of G. easoni, ending the still scientifically unknown answer to the question, as to precisely which Centipede (or possibly Centipedes) has the ability to create its own bioluminescence. So two specimens were sent to Tony Barber of the British Myriapod and Isopod Study Group, who quickly confirmed that both were indeed Geophilus easoni.  It seems strange that no one had determined bioluminescence in Centipedes before, although G. easoni had been quoted as being bioluminescent by at least one earlier author. The rarity of such reports may have been why no one has spent any time researching the subject.  Three nocturnal path walks in April and May 2013, yielded a total of 20 G. easoni (identification later confirmed before release). Out of the total, 16 produced varying degrees of bioluminescence. Variability was recorded in the length of time bioluminescence lasted, exactly where bioluminescence was emitted from over the length of the Centipede and the release or non-release of bioluminescent fluid which was found to have a distinct odour akin to a sweet urine smell. Specimens in the larger size range (probably all mature females) seemed to react better than smaller specimens.”  We are relatively certain your Soil Centipede is Geophilus easoni.  You might also find this other, well researched posting of a Soil Centipede interesting.  

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