Currently viewing the category: "Centipedes and Millipedes"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what is that bug?
Location: new zealand
August 5, 2014 5:09 am
Could you please help me identify the bug on this picture?
Signature: Andre Pinheiro

House Centipede

House Centipede

Dear Andre,
This is a beneficial House Centipede, a nocturnal predator that will help keep your home free of Cockroaches and other undesirable insects and arthropods.  Our North American House Centipedes are generally classified as
Scutigera coleoptrata, but we recall individuals from the Southern hemisphere as being a different species.  According to the Australian Museum site, the native Australian species is Allothereua maculata.  The site states:  “House Centipedes eat spiders and many insects found inside houses, moving quickly and pouncing on their prey” and “Technically, House Centipedes can bite but they are considered harmless to people.”  We also located an article on House Centipedes from the New Zealand Herald.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange bug I’ve never seen before
Location: Southern Ca. San Fernando Valley
July 28, 2014 11:15 am
Hi I found this bug in our front lawn. It looks really creepy almost like a mix between a spider and cricket. I’m hoping you can help me out in figuring what kind if bug this is.
Signature: Creeped out

House Centipede

House Centipede

Dear Creeped out,
Most images of House Centipedes we reserve come from indoor sightings as they seem to benefit from cohabitation with humans.  A large House Centipede might bite if handled carelessly, but they are not considered dangerous.  They are beneficial as they will help to rid the area of Cockroaches and other noctural visitors that are not desirable.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Dead Multicolored Centipede found in Mount Washington
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
July 26, 2014
Yesterday, we wa
lked out onto the patio and saw the Argentine Ants surrounding something on the concrete.  We were surprised to see a small, two inch long, Multicolored Centipede in the genus Scolopendra.  Though Hogue writes about them, we have never in our 34 years in Los Angeles seen one.   Since our garden is kind of wild, we hope more may be lurking under stones and logs.

Dead Multicolored Centipede

Dead Multicolored Centipede

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Glowworm?
Location: Palo Duro Canyon – near Amarillo Texas
July 23, 2014 1:46 pm
Saw this worm while hiking in Palo Duro Canyon near Amarillo Texas last week (7/20/2014). In one picture it appears to be eating a millipede.
Signature: jcochran

Glowworm eats Millipede

Glowworm eats Millipede

Dear jcochran,
Thank you for sending us your excellent documentation of a Glowworm eating a Millipede.  Glowworms, which are the larvae of beetles in the family Phengodidae, are also called Railroad Worms because of the bioluminescence.

Glowworm

Glowworm

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this bug?
Location: Garden
June 30, 2014 7:42 pm
Hello, I found this millipede in my yard and I cannot seem to find out what kind if millipede it is. I have all ready tried to find out what type of millipede this is but no website has told me………so I hope you can give my the answer!?
Signature: From lia

Flat-Backed Millipede

Flat-Backed Millipede

Dear lia,
Since the images you attached were pilfered from our website and since there is already a posting with considerable information on this Flat Backed Millipede, we are unclear what additional information you desire.  We do not have the necessary skills to identify the millipede in the image beyond the very broad order Polydesmida, the Flat Backed Millipedes, but another distinct possibility is
Apheloria virginiensis which we found on BugGuide and contains the identical information we have already posted on the submission where you downloaded the image:  “Caution: Many millipedes with bright color patterns secrete a compound containing cyanide. Wash your hands after handling them and do not allow children to pick them up.   ‘Millipedes are entirely non-toxic to humans and can be picked up by hand. Some secretions discolor the skin, but this wears away in a few days without lasting effect. Some large, cylindrical, tropical species squirt their defensive secretions up to a half meter (2-3 feet) and can blind chickens and dogs. Their fluids are painful if they get into the eyes, and persons working with tropical millipedes should be suitably cautious.’ ~Rowland Shelley”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this
Location: Atlanta, GA
June 11, 2014 9:29 pm
Hello,
This was on my bed the other night. Can you tell me what it is? Is it posoinous?
Thanks,
Signature: Phil

Centipede

Centipede

Hi PHil,
This is a Centipede in the order  Scolopendromorpha and though it is not deadly, it is venomous and it should be handled with caution as it may produce a painful bite.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination