Currently viewing the category: "Caterpillars and Pupa"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar identification.
Location: El Paso county colorado manitou spring 80829
January 27, 2016 11:26 am
I have posted this picture to many websites and know one can Identify it here is the information on it. I am in El Paso county colorado manitou spring at 8000 feet. I found it crawling on the rocks I do not know the host. It was August 16 2015.
Signature: Zack vogel

Woolly Bear

Woolly Bear

Dear Zack,
This is a Woolly Bear, the caterpillar of a Tiger Moth in the subfamily Arctiinae, but we are having a problem with its species identity.  We scoured BugGuide and we found an image of
Hypocrisias minima posted to BugGuide that is the closest match, but we are not satisfied that is a correct ID.  The Caterpillar of the Virginia Ctenucha pictured on BugGuide also looks similar, and it is reported from Colorado, but again, it does not look like an ideal match.  This Tiger Moth Caterpillar from Colorado posted to the Life of Your Time blog is also somewhat similar.  We are going to contact Julian Donahue, a Lepidopterist specializing in Arctiids in the hope he can provide some information.

Julian Donahue Responds
 The caterpillar may just be a color form of Pyrrharctia isabella, the “standard” woolly bear.
I suggest you contact the caterpillar guy, David Wagner at Univ. of Conn., who is publishing books on the subject.
Julian

David Wagner Responds
I am not sure I have seen it before and am very, very intrigued.
I am writing a book on caterpillars of western North America and I don’t think I have seen this one before.  It is possible it is the very rare Alexicles aspersa.  If not something in the genus Hypercompe.
Was the individual saved?  I would be quite interested in learning more about the elevation and location, and especially altitude of the capture.
Thanks for sharing.
David L. Wagner Professor
University of Connecticut

Thanks for the information Dave.
I run the pop culture website What’s That Bug? and the photo was sent to my site.
I will write back and request additional information and get back to you.
Daniel Marlos

Zack Responds
Unfortunately I did not save it because I did not want it to starve. I am around 7500 in Crystal park Manitou Springs Colorado In a mountain community. The mountain Is covered in pine, fer and blue spruce with large spots of Scrub Oak. It get up to the 90 degree weather in the summer time and get down to the 4 degrees and lower in the winter. Thank you if you need more in formation please let me know and can I have David Wagner email in case he whats to talk to me.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: identify this bug
Location: NC. in our home . Laundry area.
January 25, 2016 11:32 pm
I love this site and plan to help support your effort !
We just moved to this home and it has all kinds of trees everywhere. Other than a few new strange looking friends we love it.
Signature: Lost in the woods !

Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Dear Lost in the woods,
This Tussock Moth Caterpillar appears quite dead, and we are guessing that you found the carcass while cleaning your new home.  It might be a Southern Tussock Moth Caterpillar, which according to BugGuide is found in North Carolina.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Seems to have horns but slides like a snail…
Location: Columbus, Georgia, United States
January 22, 2016 6:07 pm
Coworker found this on her truck, last summer…maybe end of July. We are in Columbus, Georgia, United States.
She said this bug was in the process of forming a web; it was leaving some sort of sticky substance. It ‘slid’ like a slug but moved sideways, it had no legs. It looks as if it has some sort of horns above what she thinks are the eyes. She saw a smaller one the next day but never saw anymore and hasn’t been able to find out what it is online or in any book she’s researched.
Signature: Monica Edmonds

Monkey Slug

Monkey Slug

Dear Monica,
This is a Monkey Slug, one of the Stinging Slug Caterpillars in the family Limacodidae.  It appears to be missing several of its “arms” and it is described on BugGuide as being:  “Bizarre, brown, hairy creature that resembles some sort of aquatic creature more than a caterpillar. Three pairs of long arms and three pairs of short arms, which are “deciduous” – often one or more is missing.”  It is capable of stinging and it should be handled with caution.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Caterpilar
Location: Tanzania
January 19, 2016 8:43 am
Hi,
A friend of mine from Arusha-Tanzania has posted this picture on his FB account wondering witch
species this is. Been searching the internet and i can only find pictures but no description of the species.
So in order to help him and solve my own curiosity ;P i’m asking The bugman or help.
Friendly greetings from a Belgian in France 😛
Signature: Kurt Vogeleer

Oleander Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Oleander Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Kurt,
This is the caterpillar of an Oleander Hawkmoth,
Daphnis nerii, and its color indicates it is getting ready to pupate.  We found the species listed on African Moths and this wide ranging species is reported throughout much of Africa.  The adult Oleander Hawkmoth is a stunning green moth.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar
Location: Vieques, Puerto Rico
January 19, 2016 9:19 am
Can someone please identify these caterpillars. They are infesting one of my plants :(
Signature: Playacofi

Spotted Oleander Caterpillar

Spotted Oleander Caterpillar

Dear Playacofi,
Knowing the plant host is often a great help in identifying caterpillars and other herbivorous insects.  This is a Spotted Oleander Caterpillar,
Empyreuma affinis, and it is commonly found feeding on oleander.  According to Featured Creatures:  “It is a native of the Caribbean region and has been recorded from Guadeloupe, Martinique, Haiti, Dominican Republic, and Cuba.”  The plant in your image does not appear to be oleander, which is the food plant identified on BugGuide.  You can compare your image to this image on BugGuide for verification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Yellow caterpillar
Location: Johannesburg south africa
January 13, 2016 1:03 pm
I stood on this and am in considerable discomfort. I’m a bit worried that they are poisonous.
Signature: James

Stinging Slug Caterpillar

Stinging Slug Caterpillar

Dear James,
This is a Stinging Slug Caterpillar in the family Limacodidae, and it matches this image on iSpot that is only identified to the family level.  We have several images of this Stinging Slug Caterpillar in our archives and we believe it is
Latoia vivida.  According to this Taylor Francis Online article:  “Larvae of the moth Latoia vivida (family Limacodidae) have spiny tubercles which cause sharp pain and subsequent urticaria upon contact with human skin.  This study describes the sting’s clinical consequences and evaluates the effect of various pharmacological modifiers on the clinical response.”  We suggest that you refer to that article and consult a physician if your symptoms persist.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination