Currently viewing the category: "Caterpillars and Pupa"
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Subject: Judean Swallowtails
Location: Judean Desert, Israel
March 22, 2015 1:49 am
Hi Bugman,
On my hiking trip last week in the Judean Desert, I noticed a bunch of these colorful caterpillars on one specific bush. Didn’t see them anywhere else in the area.
Some research identified them as common yellow swallowtails, Papilio machaon.
Enjoy!
Signature: Ben from Israel

Yellow Swallowtail Caterpillar

Yellow Swallowtail Caterpillar

Hi Ben,
It is nice to hear from you again. 
Papilio machaon is also found in North America where it is called the Old World Swallowtail, even though BugGuide notes that it is:  “Holarctic, with a very wide distribution in boreal and temperate Eurasia and in western North America.”  Because of the wide range with different climactic conditions and food plants across the range, BugGuide indicates:  “The various subspecies included here under the name Papilio machaon have been (and contunue to be) treated differently by different authors. The most commonly seen alternate classification would have the subspecies bairdii, dodi, oregonius, and pikei placed as subspecies of a distinct species Papilio bairdii, and the more boreal subspecies would be left under the species Papilio machaon. There are good reasons for doing this, but the majority of workers currently place them all under one species. There are also still some people who would prefer to see each name treated individually at species ranking, though this is not widely accepted practice. The result is that these butterflies may be listed under a number of different name combinations, depending upon the preferences of the individual author.”  From the Grapevine has a page of Israel’s Ten Most Beautiful Butterflies that has a lovely image of the Old World Swallowtail.  Since food plants tend to differ with the range, do you know the plant upon which these caterpillars were feeding?  By the way, please include larger digital files in the future if possible.

Yellow Swallowtail Caterpillars

Yellow Swallowtail Caterpillars

Hi Daniel,
I saw the caterpillars on just that one plant, and it wasn’t in flower so identifying it is difficult. However, I believe it to belong to the Resedaceae family, possibly Reseda stenostachya.
I can send larger files if you want, let me know!
Thanks,
Ben

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Subject: green catapillar with hard horns
Location: RSA
March 13, 2015 5:25 am
I found a green catapillar with grey hard horn like spike with red edges on the gras in north west RSA. can u please tell me what it is as I cant find it anywhere on the web
Signature: mail

Marbled Emperor Caterpillar

Marbled Emperor Caterpillar

This is a Marbled Emperor Caterpillar in the genus Heniocha.  There are several African species in the genus and we cannot be certain which you sighted.

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Subject: green caterpillar with beige stripes
Location: stanford dish loop, northern california
March 20, 2015 2:28 pm
I love your help IDing this beautiful caterpillar.
Signature: virusmanbob

Cutworm, we believe

Cutworm, we believe

Dear virusmanbob,
We believe this is a Cutworm or some other species of larval Owlet Moth from the family Noctuidae, which is a large and diverse family which is well represented on BugGuide.  We will attempt to provide more specific information, but that is the best generality we can offer at this moment.

Dear Daniel –
Thanks so much for your rapid reply and for the useful links!
All the best, Bob

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Subject: Cocoon ID please
Location: Mill Bay BC
March 14, 2015 7:13 pm
HI There,
Please help me identify robust looking cocoon ( index finger for scale) that I found under one of my gardening trays . Mid March , location Vancouver Island off the west coast of British Columbia , Canada . I enjoy this page very much and am hosting several mason bees condominiums on our property , no bees= no food. Thanks in advance…
Signature: Mhairi

Cocoon of a Tiger Moth

Cocoon of a Tiger Moth

Dear Mhairi,
This is the cocoon of a Tiger Moth in the subfamily Arctiinae, but we cannot provide you with an actual species.  Caterpillars of Tiger Moths, commonly called Woolly Bears, incorporate shed hairs with silk when constructing cocoons.

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Subject: Big catrepillar -moth
Location: côte d’ivoire
March 12, 2015 11:19 am
Hi,
Just found a few of these moths in my garden in Abidjan,
Close to our Ylang Ylang tree,
Size of a finger !
Thanks for helping in identifying them.
Signature: brucama

Cabbage Tree Emperor Moth Caterpillar

Cabbage Tree Emperor Moth Caterpillar

Dear brucama,
These are Cabbage Tree Emperor Moth Caterpillars,
Bunaea alcinoe, and they can be very plentiful at times.  They are considered edible.  The adult Cabbage Tree Emperor Moth which is pictured on iNaturalist is quite beautiful.

Cabbage Tree Emperor Moth Caterpillars

Cabbage Tree Emperor Moth Caterpillars

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Subject: Tussock Moth Caterpillar
Location: Singapore
March 2, 2015 7:41 pm
I found this caterpillar crawling on my mother’s eggplant about a week ago, and as I’ve a weird interest in all kinds of creepy crawlies, I’ve made it my mission to see this guy to adulthood. He’s molted twice now and I’ve been feeding him leaves off the plant I found him on.
Through google I’ve determined that this guy is a Tussock Moth caterpillar, but I couldn’t find any images or information as to exactly what species he is and/or how the adult moth looks like. I’m attaching a few pictures of it as of 3 March 15, in hopes that you can help!
Thanks in advance!
Signature: Saphiea

Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Dear Saphiea,
We agree that this looks like a Tussock Moth Caterpillar in the genus
Orgyia,  but we have not had any luck determining a definite species.  Females in this genus are flightless, and it will be interesting to see what happens when your adult ecloses.

Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Tussock Moth Caterpillar

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination