Currently viewing the category: "Caterpillars and Pupa"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Caterpillar
Location: Daphne, Alabama
August 15, 2016 5:16 pm
Hello, I’ve tried in vain to ID this possible looper or inchworm, and hope you can help!
I found several of them feeding on Rattlebox plants on the eastern shore of Mobile Bay, Alabama last week. Thanks for any info you can provide!
Signature: Joe Thomassen

Legume Caterpillar

Legume Caterpillar

Dear Joe,
This was a tricky one.  Loopers or Inchworms are distinguished from most caterpillars that have five pairs of prolegs in that they only have only two pairs of prolegs, causing them to “loop” as they move.  Your caterpillar actually has two pairs of prolegs, but it also has appendages appearing to be a horn at the tip of the abdomen.  Some Owlet Moth relatives in the superfamily Noctuoidea have a similar fake horn, so we searched that superfamily, and it is a big superfamily.  We eventually discovered the Legume Caterpillar or Pale-Edged Selenis, S
elenisa sueroides, thanks to BugGuide where it is described as:  “Larva: body cream or yellow with dull reddish or yellow lateral markings and several thin black dorsal stripes; two reddish or yellowish prolegs; two long anal appendages project backward from last abdominal segment; head reddish with numerous black spots.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar ID
Location: Yokosuka City, Japan
August 15, 2016 10:12 pm
I live in Japan and found this caterpillar on our blackberries. I think it is a caterpillar for a Shingidae moth. Can you tell be the scientific name of the moth it will be?
Signature: Dale in Japan

Impatiens Hornworm

Impatiens Hornworm

Dear Dale,
Though we have images of an Impatiens Hornworm,
Theretra oldenlandiae, from Japan in our archive, its coloration is different from your individual.  We were able to verify its identity on Butterfly House

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar found in Sepilok Borneo
Location: Sepilok Borneo
August 16, 2016 5:05 am
Can you help my little boy find out what this caterpillar will turn into? We found it in Sepilok Borneo yesterday.
Signature: Thanks amy

Stinging Slug Caterpillar

Stinging Slug Caterpillar

Dear Amy,
This is a Stinging Slug Caterpillar in the family Limacodidae.  We have not had any luck identifying the species, but the moths are relatively drab and unassuming looking.  Many of the moths are pictured on the Moths of Borneo site.  You should warn your family that carelessly handling the caterpillar may result in a painful sting.   

Thank you so much for your reply.  Fred was thrilled to know the answer.
Amy Crook

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: leaf looking with no legs
Location: Auburn, NY
August 15, 2016 6:07 pm
I live in Auburn, NY and this was on the table underneath a black walnut tree. We thought it was a shriveled leaf, but it was soft and moved.. Looking closer, it has a soft whitish underbelly and no visible legs, just star like legs of the leaf looking back.. But they don’t move. Very slow moving, What is it?
Signature: Pat P

Monkey Slug

Monkey Slug

Dear Pat P,
The Monkey Slug is the caterpillar of the Hag Moth.  Handle the Monkey Slug with caution.  It is a stinging caterpillar.

Thanks so much. We were all surprised by it and did not touch. Are they a nuisance moth  should they not be killed ?
Thanks again.
Have a truly wonderful day!
Pat

This is a native species, not a pest species.  We do not support killing either the Monkey Slug caterpillar of adult Hag Moth.

Thanks again. I was careful to let it go in the brush. I don’t kill critters unless they are a danger. Good to know they aren’t harmful. It was very interesting to watch.
Have a truly wonderful day!
Pat

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this
Location: Castle Hayne,N.C. USA
August 11, 2016 10:08 pm
This critter was found in my flower garden in May or June in Castle Hayne, N.C. I am unable to find any info to ID it even though I have seen pictures of it somewhere. Do you know what it is?
Signature: James

Possibly Baltimore Checkerspot Chrysalis

Possibly Baltimore Checkerspot Chrysalis

Dear James,
Can you possibly send another image with a different angle, like a lateral view?  Since it was in your flower garden, are you able to provide the name of the plant upon which it was found?  How large was it?  To us, this appears to be a Baltimore Checkerspot Chrysalis, but something does not look right.  It appears to be either deformed, or damaged.  You can also see this BugGuide image of a Baltimore Checkerspot Chrysalis.

This was the only pic. It was on a cone flower or black-eyed susan. It was small. Less than 3/8 of an inch.
thanks,
James

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar
Location: South-eastern CT
July 30, 2016 2:41 pm
I found this green guy on a tomato plant. Should I be concerned about whether he will damage the plant? It’s the end of a hot sunny July.
Signature: Emily

Tobacco Hornworm

Tobacco Hornworm

Dear Emily,
Though they are frequently found eating the leaves of tomato plants (and other plants in the family including pepper and eggplant), the caterpillar of the Carolina Sphinx,
Manduca sexta, is commonly called a Tobacco Hornworm.  They will eat leaves and numerous Tobacco Hornworms may defoliate a small tomato plant.  They will also eat green tomatoes.  Many gardeners remove them.  We do not.  We suspect if you did not remove it, it is long gone, having dug beneath the surface of the ground to pupate.  We frequently received requests to identify the pupae of the Carolina Sphinx when gardeners discover them while turning the soil the following season.  The adult Carolina Sphinx is an impressive moth. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination