Currently viewing the category: "Caterpillars and Pupa"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: is this a orange swallowtail
Location: Grand Junction, CO
July 19, 2014 9:49 am
what is this? my cat brought this in the house today. I took it away from her and put it back outside
Signature: Tracie

Tiger Swallowtail Caterpillar

Tiger Swallowtail Caterpillar

Hi Tracie,
You are correct that this is one of the Tiger Swallowtail Caterpillars, which look very similar, and the orange color indicates that it is getting ready to pupate.  Several species are reported from Colorado according to BugGuide, including the Eastern Tiger Swallowtail and the Pale Swallowtail.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth
Location: Michigan
July 17, 2014 4:13 am
Can you tell me what kind of moth this is? From Michigan and I used to see them a lot when I was a kid. Wing span is about 4.5 inches
Signature: Melanie Wilson

Five Spotted Hawkmoth

Five Spotted Hawkmoth

Hi Melanie,
Your moth is a Five Spotted Hawkmoth, and we are speculating that there is a vegetable patch near where the sighting occurred as the caterpillar, known as the Tomato Hornworm, feeds on leaves of tomato and related plants.  More information on the Five Spotted Hawkmoth is available on the Sphingidae of the Americas website.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: microlep?
Location: Midland, MI
July 17, 2014 6:47 am
Hi bug man,
…  For fun and unrelated, I am sharing a photo of hatching cecropia eggs that I took yesterday :)
Signature: Elly

Hatchling Cecropia Caterpillar

Hatchling Cecropia Caterpillar

Hi Elly,
The newly hatched Cecropia Moth Caterpillar is a wonderful addition to our archives.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth Caterpillar inf California
Location: California
July 16, 2014 7:27 am
My husband found this caterpillar on our garden 5 days ago and has been keeping it in a plastic bowl and feeding it with leaves so it won’t eat our plants. Do you know what this is? How long will it be before it turns into a moth or a butterfly? Thanks! We live in Chino Hills, California and it is the middle of summer.
Signature: Ana

Tobacco Hornworm

Tobacco Hornworm

Dear Ana,
Your caterpillar is a Tobacco Hornworm,
Manduca sexta, one of two closely related, similar looking species that feeds on the leaves of tomatoes and other related plants in the family.  According to the Sphingidae of the Americas website:  “Tobacco Hornworms, equipped with a red-tipped horn at the end of the abdomen, are true gluttons and feed on tobacco and tomato, and occasionally potato and pepper crops and other plants in the nightshade family (Solanaceae).”

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: unidentified caterpillar
Location: houston, tx
July 14, 2014 8:53 am
Hi. Found a bunch of these guys yesterday eating my anise plant and nothing else..
People are calling them monarchs, but, I do not agree.
Your input would be most interesting.
Signature: Angela gumerman

Anise Swallowtail Caterpillar

Anise Swallowtail Caterpillar

Dear Angela,
You are correct to recognize that this is not a Monarch Caterpillar.  It is a Swallowtail Caterpillar, and considering the Texas location and the anise food plant, it might be the caterpillar of an Anise Swallowtail,
Papilio zelicaon, though BugGuide does not report the species as far east as Texas.  The caterpillar of the Black Swallowtail, Papilio polyxenes, looks very similar and it has a more eastern range, and though BugGuide lists food plants as:  “Larvae feed primarily on plants of the carrot family (Apiaceae = Umbelliferae), and some in the Rue Family (Rutaceae). Commonly found on Dill, Parsley, Fennel, Carrot, and Rue in gardens, and Queen-Anne’s-Lace, Poison Hemlock, and Lovage in the wild. They will occasionally be found on Citrus trees”, we believe they will also feed on anise.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What made this?
Location: San Antonio, TX (west side)
July 13, 2014 11:35 pm
Noticed this yesterday while working in the yard. It’s dangling from a live-oak tree. I’ve been here 8 years and never seen one here before, or anywhere else I’ve ever lived. If you’re the size of a bug I think this is a marvel of construction. As far as I can tell those are very neatly cut or chewed twigs. Notice the hanging apparatus, it almost looks like braid, or rope.
It is approx 3″L x 14/16″ at the widest point. I showed it to a friend asking if he knew what it was, and his reply was, “Mini air-beavers?”
What’s your guess?
Signature: Sarah

Bagworm

Bagworm

Dear Sarah,
Though the thought of mini air beavers is tremendously amusing, this is actually the pupa of a Bagworm, a moth in the family Psychidae.  Construction on the bag begins with the young caterpillar and the bag is enlarged as the caterpillar grows.  The Bagworm caterpillar drags around its bag which acts as shelter and camouflage, and eventually the Bagworm caterpillar pupates within the bag after attaching the bag to a brand or fence.  Your Bagworm is in the pupal stage.  When it is mature, a winged male Bagworm moth or a flightless female Bagworm moth will emerge. 

Bagworm

Bagworm

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination