Currently viewing the category: "Caterpillars and Pupa"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar
Location: Pennsylvania
June 14, 2016 3:49 pm
Found these in our garden on a dill plant, there’s about 10 of them and we don’t know what they are or if they will harm the plants. Thanks!
Signature: Marissa

Black Swallowtail Caterpillars

Black Swallowtail Caterpillars

Dear Marissa
These are Black Swallowtail Caterpillars,
Papilio polyxenes, and they are sometimes called Carrot Worms or Parsley Worms because they feed on the foliage of carrots and related plants, including parsley and dill.  They will eventually mature into gorgeous Black Swallowtail Butterflies.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillars
Location: On a Chiku (Sapodilla) tree in Singapore.
June 16, 2016 11:04 pm
Dear Bugman,
I found this caterpillar chomping on my Sapodilla leaves this morning. It’s about 6 cm in length. Would you be able to identify it?
Signature: Dillan

Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Dear Dillan,
This is a Tussock Moth Caterpillar in the Tribe Orgyiini. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: caterpillar
Location: pretoria
May 30, 2016 4:53 am
Halo bugman :-)
I found 3 of these on a daisy type flower bush. sorry I’m a keen gardener but don’t remember the plant names. can you identify this and what kind of buuterfly does it become. is it a pest?
Signature: René

Hooded Owlet Moth Caterpillar

Hooded Owlet Moth Caterpillar

Dear René,
It was not until we searched through North American species of Hooded Owlet Moth Caterpillars from the genus
Cucullia on BugGuide that we realized you were writing from South Africa.  BugGuide describes the caterpillars as:  “usually smooth (hairless) and very colorful, with mixed patterns of spots, stripes, and/or patches of mostly yellow, red, green, blue, and black – the range of variation between species is too complex to describe in general terms.”  We did find an excellent visual match to your Caterpillar on iSpot, but it is only identified to the genus level.  Adult Moths from the genus Cucullia are generally drab and brown, and it seems the caterpillars are the beautiful stage of development.  Your submission will not go live to our site until mid-June while we are away from the office. 

Good morning
Thank you for your prompt reply. I just assumed it’s a South African website. Where are you guys situated?
I asked all of our nurseries in the area and nobody knew that such a beautiful caterpillar turns into such a dull moth. I relocated all of them into the fields close to my house. Now they can leave my flowers alone!!! I’m a very novice gardener and plants EVERYTHING that looks pretty. I did not appreciate these guys ravishing a WHOLE bush in 3 days!!! So far it looks like only the earthworms are welcome in my garden.
Thanks again for the help!
Vriendelike groete / Kind regards
René

Our offices are in Los Angeles, but we are a global website.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: Maui
June 7, 2016 2:11 pm
Please ID
Thanks!
Signature: Jason

Caterpillar eating Marijuana Leaf

Caterpillar eating Marijuana Leaf

Dear Jason,
This appears to be a Caterpillar eating a Marijuana Leaf.

Yeah I’ve seen plenty of caterpillars eating cannabis flowers… I did not realize they also ate/attacked leaves.
Thanks

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar/Inchworm Michigan
Location: Redford, Michigan
May 31, 2016 6:40 am
Dear Bugman,
This little caterpillar fell on my arm, while I was sitting under a Black Walnut Tree in southeastern Michigan on 5/28/2016. He was quite small, maybe inch long and a quarter inch wide.
Thank you for the service you provide.
Signature: Kristin

Filament Bearer

Filament Bearer

Dear Kristin,
This Inchworm is one of the Filament Bearers in the genus
Nematocampa, an identification that can be verified on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar id
Location: Big Lake, Minnesota
May 30, 2016 3:29 am
Good morning. My sister has caterpillars in her semi woodland garden in Big Lake Minnesota that are literally dropping from the trees (pine and ornamentals) on the margin of the woodland. They seem to be most active now – mid May. It is her first summer there so cannot say whether this is unusual.
Signature: Lorna

Ed. Note:  We had an offline exchange with Lorna since the image attached to the original email was a Black Arches Caterpillar from our site.  We finally received the correct image.

Oops. I don’t know how that happened – I am sorry. Here it is:

Inchworms dropping from trees

Cankerworm dropping from trees

Dear Lorna,
The general term Cankerworm is used to describe several species of Inchworms or Spanworms that feed in trees and drop to the ground.  According to Virginia Green Lawn Care:  “The term ‘canker worm’ is used, not to describe a single caterpillar, but a group of inchworms that cause damage to many different ornamental and fruit trees. … These leaf eating insects are not only a nuisance; they can cause great damage or even destroy a grown tree over a period of time. You may have run into one dangling from a silk thread as you walked under a tree. It is a battle between canker worms and the trees you love and have planted and nurtured.  When heavy populations are present, they can completely defoliate a tree in just a few weeks. This is when you need to step in.”  The individual in the new image you attached looks like the Linden Looper,
Erannis tiliaria, a species that according to BugGuide feeds on:  “Deciduous trees, including apple, ash, beech, birch, elm, maple, oak, poplar, Prunus and Ribes.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination