Currently viewing the category: "Caterpillars and Pupa"
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Subject: huge caterpillars
Location: little brak river south Africa
January 8, 2015 9:05 am
Hi there,
I found some peculiar caterpillars in my garden in littlrebrak river, South Africa. There was a pair and they seemed to be fighting possibly? They were huge and had tails much like a sausage dogs, along with large heads and small horns.
I moved them to a bush in an open field near by.
I would love to know what they were!!
Signature: Julia Neethling

Hornworm

Coelonia fulvinotata Hornworm

Dear Julia,
This is a Hornworm, the caterpillar of a Hawkmoth in the family Sphingidae, but we are not certain of the species.  We will attempt some research and hopefully we will be able to provide you with a species name soon.  We did not locate any matching images on iSpot, however, we began to have trouble after page 4.

Hornworm

Coelonia fulvinotata Hornworm

Update:  Coelonia fulvinotata
Thanks to a comment from Bostjan Dvorak, we have been informed that this is a
Coelonia fulvinotata Hornworm, a species we already have represented in our archive.  More information is available on African Moths.

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Subject: Daniel – Queen Butterfly Chrysalis?
Location: Hawthorne, CA
January 13, 2015 8:10 pm
Hi,
A while back you identified a Queen Butterfly caterpillar for me, and I’m wondering if the pictures I’ve included are the chrysalis of these caterpillars.
Today’s count in the back is 13 Monarch Butterfly chrysalides and five “hanging J’s” as I call them. This excludes the chrysalides I’ve included here. We know there are many, many more that we haven’t or will not be able to spot as there are some overgrown spots this year. There’s still a smattering of caterpillars on the milkweed but they are fast running out of food.
We know you’ve been away from the office for a while, so no hurry should you be able to help with identification on this submission!
Signature: Thanks, Anna Carreon

Queen Butterfly

Queen Butterfly

Hi Anna,
This is most definitely a Chrysalis of a Milkweed Butterfly, and since it looks different from the chrysalis of a Monarch, we are confident that it is the chrysalis of a Queen, probably the Queen Caterpillar you submitted earlier in the month.

Queen Chrysalis

Queen Chrysalis

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Subject: Odd Monarch Butterfly Caterpillar
Location: Hawthorne, California
January 4, 2015 6:47 pm
Hi,
I spotted the odd markings on the caterpillar on top earlier today, so took a few quick shots. Imagine my surprise when I got them on the computer, zoomed in, and noticed that the rear antennae aren’t where they are supposed to be! I’m as sure as I can be that it is a Monarch Butterfly Caterpillar and that something has gone wrong. Have you ever seen this type of mutation? I’ve seen them with different markings, but not this noticeable and certainly not with rear antennae so high up on the body.
Signature: Thanks, Anna Carreon

Queen Caterpillar (above) and Monarch Caterpillar

Queen Caterpillar (above) and Monarch Caterpillar

Dear Anna,
We are thrilled to be able to tell you this exciting news.  The reason this caterpillar looks like a Monarch Caterpillar is that it is a related “royal” species in the same genus, the Caterpillar of a Queen.  Adult Queen Butterflies are darker than Monarch Butterflies and their markings are not as pronounced, but they look very similar.  Queen Butterflies also have habits very similar to those of Monarchs, including food plants, but Queens do not migrate.  Congratulations on your new species sighting.

Queen Caterpillar (upper right) and Monarch Caterpillars

Queen Caterpillar (upper right) and Monarch Caterpillars

Oh, my!  Well, I am also thrilled!  I was sure it was some sort of mutation.  I guess I really should stop believing I know what I am talking about and leave stuff like this to those who have more experience and know better.
Thank you so much for making my day!
Anna

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Subject: Unknown Caterpillar
Location: Juiz de Fora-MG Brazil
December 28, 2014 2:26 am
Hello, I would like to know what is this caterpillar that I found in a Cecropia´s leaves. Thanks very much, Marcelo Brito – Juiz de Fora-MG Brazil
Signature: Marcelo Brito

Unknown Caterpillar

Unknown Caterpillar

Dear Marcelo,
We just posted a very different looking caterpillar from Argentina that was feeding on Cecropia leaves.  We have not had the opportunity to research your request, but we will do so in the near future.  Meanwhile, we are posting your images in the hope that one of our readers can assist in this identification.

Unknown Caterpillar

Unknown Caterpillar

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Subject:  Bugman Help
Location:  Singapore
January 1, 2014
Hello Daniel!
Appreciate your help to identify this beautiful caterpillar found in the hot and humid Singapore!
Thank you!
With blessings,
Signature:  Jaslin

Unknown Caterpillar

Leopard Lacewing Caterpillar

Dear Jaslin,
We have not been able to identify your caterpillar yet.  We have created a posting and perhaps one of our readers will be able to assist in the identification.

Unknown Caterpillar

Leopard Lacewing Caterpillar

Update:  January 3, 2014
Thanks to a comment from Richard Stickney, we are able to provide a link to the caterpillar of the Leopard Lacewing,
Cethosia cyane, on the Butterflies of Singapore site where it states:  “This migrant species was recently discovered in Singapore in 2005. Since then, it has established a firm foothold and can be considered a common species in Singapore. Across the island, Leopard Lacewing can be found flying in many wastelands where its host plant, Passiflora foetida, grows in relative abundance. The adults have the habit of visiting flowers for nectar and are very fast on the wings.” 

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Subject: Another Costa Rican Caterpillar
Location: Tortuguero, Costa Rica
January 1, 2015 5:55 pm
Hi Bugman,
This caterpillar was found near Tortuguero on the northern Caribbean coast of Costa Rica. Any ideas what species it is?
Signature: Jon

Silkmoth Caterpillars

Colobura annulata Caterpillars

Dear Jon,
We believe these caterpillars are in the subfamily Hemileucinae, and we even located a matching image from Panama on Monga Bay, but it is not identified.
  We are going to contact Bill Oehlke to see if he can provide an identification.

Silkmoth Caterpillars

Colobura annulata Caterpillars

Daniel,
Not sure, but I think they may be butterfly larvae in Nymphalidae family. Elongated scoli from head lead me to that suspicion.
Bill

Thanks for the tip Bill.  We quickly located an image of Colobura annulata on FlickR that was identified by butterfly expert Keith Wolfe that is a perfect match.  Butterflies of America has images of both caterpillar and adult.  According to Butterflies of Amazonia:  “The eggs are white and laid in groups of between 2-10 on leaves of the foodplant. The young larvae feed on Cecropia leaves and make ‘frass chains’ i.e. chains of droppings linked together by strands of silk, which protrude from the edges of the leaves. When not feeding they rest on these frass chains, which provide them with a defence against marauding ants. For reasons that are not fully understood, ants seem unwilling to walk over frass chains. The fully grown larvae are velvety black and adorned with white rosetted spines along the back, and yellow spines along the sides. They live and feed gregariously in groups of between 5 and 20. When feeding they bite through the stems, causing alleochemics ( anti-herbivore juices ) to bleed from the plant, stopping it from mobilising chemicals into the area being eaten.”  The images of the Cecropia Tree on Academic Evergreen look very much like the leaves upon which your caterpillars are feeding.

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