Currently viewing the category: "Caterpillars and Pupa"
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Beautiful Saturniid Caterpillar

Saturniid Caterpillar, possibly in genus Automeris

Saturniid Caterpillar, possibly in genus Automeris

Subject: Not sure about this little friends
Location: Panama, Chiriqui province
November 3, 2014 7:48 am
Here in Panamá is common the encounters with worms if you live near forest zones. Here two species that I want to know more about. I think the fist one can be a hawkmoth caterpillar and the second one maybe a silkmoth caterpillar. Thanks in advance, bugman.
Signature: KLS

Possibly Automeris species

Possibly Automeris species

Dear KLS,
We agree with your identifications, but alas, we haven’t the time right now to investigate further.  Your images and the caterpillars are both wonderful.  We believe the Silkmoth Caterpillar may be in the genus
Automeris, or a closely related genus. Perhaps one of our readers can investigate this further.  We will also try to contact Bill Oehlke to see if he has any ideas.

Hornworm

Hornworm

Nice pictures of amazing animals!
The Saturnid caterpillar is probably of an Automeris species indeed.
The Sphingid caterpillar is most likely a Manduca pellenia.
Nice wishes from Berlin,
Bostjan

Thanks Bostjan,
We will search for some appropriate links.

Ed. Note November 4, 2014:  Identification submissions to What’s That Bug? can include three attachments and very few folks actually attach all three.  In instances where three images are submitted, we generally only post two.  We are retroactively amending this posting to contain the third image as all three are so beautiful.

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Subject: what is this….
Location: Davis, CA
November 1, 2014 5:08 pm
Hello, Do you know what these are? They were found in our persimmon tree. Thanks.
Signature: No need

Red Humped Caterpillars

Red Humped Caterpillars

Dear No need,
These Red Humped Caterpillars,
Schizura concinna, ” feed on a wide range of woody plants, from many different families” according to BugGuide.

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Subject: Alice in Wonderland caterpillars
Location: Toledo District, Belize
October 30, 2014 9:09 pm
Hello, bugman and devoted staff,
These caterpillars repeatedly defoliate the plumeria, which suffer no apparent ill effects. Can you tell me what these turn into?
Many thanks.
Signature: Tanya

Tetrio Sphinxes

Tetrio Sphinxes

Hi Tanya,
The bright colors of these Tetrio Sphinxes are quite spectacular and they really do look like fantasy creations of the imagination.

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Subject: What kind of caterpillar is this?
Location: Ames, IA
October 26, 2014 1:53 pm
Hello,
I have found this caterpillar in the grass while taking my dog on a walk. I would like to know what species of caterpillars it is and what it will become. I was hoping this website would help me.
Thanks!
Signature: Emily

Whitelined Sphinx Caterpillar

Whitelined Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Emily,
Your caterpillar is a Whitelined Sphinx Caterpillar,
Hyles lineata.

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Subject: Catapillar invasion

Location: Pacifica CA
October 26, 2014 2:42 pm
I have been invaded by hundreds of these catapillars around the outside of my house … Can you please give me some info on these critters – thanks !
Signature: Gina

Genista Broom Caterpillar

Sophora Worm

Hi Gina,
Your caterpillar is known as a Sophora Worm, the larval form of the Genista Broom Moth,
Uresiphita reversalis, and you can verify our identification by viewing this matching image on BugGuideAccording to Bugguide:  “‘Sophora Worm’ is reference to the native host genus: Sophora.  ‘Genista Broom Moth’ is an odd common name for a native North American moth as Genista (common name of ‘broom’) is an Old World genus, family Fabaceae.”  BugGuide also notes:  “Larvae feed on Acacia, Baptisia, Genista, Lupinus, Texas Mountain Laurel (Sophora secundiflora) and other pea family shrubs. Also reported on Crapemyrtle (Lagerstroemia indica) and honeysuckle (Lonicera spp.)” so we are speculating that one of those plants might be growing in your yard.

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Subject: Strange bug
Location: Naples, FL
October 25, 2014 2:15 pm
Yesterday I found a bug in the bathroom, a type I have never seen before. Since we occasionally have silver fish, I thought it might be an odd looking one. Then today I saw something move ever so slightly at the rug’s edge [an area rug in the den]. Closer checking and it looked just like the bug I found yesterday. I got a magnifying glass and tried to figure out what it might be. I spent the last 90 minutes searching the web as best I can. No luck. I’m as puzzled now as ever. I will attach a couple of photos, though not the best, but the best I could do.
The bug measures 5/8 inches by 1/4 inch. Color appears to me to be a tan or ivory and the head appears to be a redish color.
Any ideas?
Signature: Charles Sebrell

Case Bearing Moth Larva

Case Bearing Moth Larva

case bearing moth larva

Dear Daniel Marlos,
Bravo!
That was quick.  My thanks.  I have now checked it out with that title.  Must admit, I have never seen one before.
My sincere thanks!
charles sebrell
naples, fl
Life is just simpler if you plow around the stumps.

Dear Charles,
Thanks so much for your kind response to our terse identification of a Case Bearing Moth Larva.  We have decided that your original written request was so nicely worded and your response was so kind that we retroactively determined to go live with a posting.

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