Currently viewing the category: "Caterpillars and Pupa"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown critter
Location: Galveston, Tx
November 25, 2016 10:24 am
Hi,
No, this is not a stuffed toy! Found this 1 1/2″ critter on my patio in Galveston, Texas 2 days ago. I did not touch it but my neighbor’s young daughter put in her hand and it was crawling around in her hand. Any idea what it could be??
Signature: Lonnie

Spicebush Swallowtail Caterpillar

Spicebush Swallowtail Caterpillar

Dear Lonnie,
This is a Spicebush Swallowtail Caterpillar.  The adult Spicebush Swallowtail is a large black butterfly with colorful spots and “tails” on its underwings.

Daniel,
Thank you so much, this was driving me crazy!! Glad to hear it is a butterfly as this is my first year to raise and release the Monarch butterfly.
Thank you again

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Insect larva?
Location: Port Orchard, WA
November 23, 2016 10:06 pm
I found this critter on a wood fence in my garden on the west side of Puget Sound in western Washington state. I shot the attached picture during August. I tried to chase the i.d. down on the internet, but don’t have enough bug knowledge to find it. I’d love to hear your best guess. Thanks.
Signature: Jim McCausland

Underwing Caterpillar

Underwing Caterpillar

Dear Jim,
This is the Caterpillar of an Underwing Moth in the genus Catocala.  While we cannot be certain of the species, your individual does resemble this Ilia Underwing Caterpillar posted to BugGuide, and according to BugGuide, the species is found in Washington.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on leaves of oak” so we are curious if there is an oak tree near where the sighting occurred.

Hi Daniel,
Thanks so much for the i.d. Neither I nor my immediate neighbors have oak trees in the garden, but there is a native oak a few blocks away, plus some ornamental oaks the same distance. Maybe there are closer oaks in backyards that I can’t see from the street. But moths do fly, and I imagine a few blocks isn’t too far.
Thanks again.
Jim

Thanks Jim,
Other species of Underwings feed on other plants.  According to BugGuide, the Charming Underwing feeds on apple and hawthorn, and it is reported from Alberta, Canada.  Again, we are confident with the genus, not the species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s that bug?
Location: Lagos, Nigeria, West Africa
November 21, 2016 9:58 pm
Hello,
My name is Abiodun. I live in Lagos, Nigeria, West Africa. I was at work one day and saw this caterpillar. After searching online and seeing similar pictures, I think it looks like a Tersa Sphinx Moth Caterpillar. It’s actually the start of autumn here. Could you please confirm this. Thank you.
Signature: Abiodun Afolabi

Hornworm

Hornworm

Dear Abiodun,
While your individual is a look-alike of the Caterpillar of a Tersa Sphinx, it is a different species in the same family Sphingidae.  We will attempt a species identification for you.  Many caterpillars have evolved with large fake eyespots as a camouflage defense mechanism.

Identification:  A special thanks to Bostjan Dvorak for identifying this Hornworm as Basiothia medea.  There is an image of the Hornworm on INPN.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillars in the Yacatan jungle
Location: Coba ruins , tulum area
November 21, 2016 12:29 pm
Hello,
Please take a look at this Catapillar. We found clusters of these in the jungle at the coba ruins in the tulum area. At the base of the tree , directly below them was a whole bunch of little pellets. We’re curious what this Catapillar is and what it turns into. I hope you can help.
Signature: Petra

Arsenura armida aggregation

Arsenura armida aggregation

Dear Petra,
This Project Noah image gives us confidence that this is an aggregation of Caterpillars of the Giant Silkmoth
Arsenura armidaWe have several images in our archives that look similar.  Thanks so much for including the image of the droppings.  This Cortland Faculty website has some nice information including:  “This large Neotropical silkmoth is the only species in the genus Arsenura that exhibits sociality.  Other Arsenura are solitary and cryptic, but A. armida has adopted an aposematic and gregarious lifeyle.  It may be the only social representative of the subfamily Arsenurinae which occurs from tropical Mexico to northern Argentina and contains approximately 57 spp., very few of which are known from the early stages (Lemaire, 1980; Hogue, 1993).
Arsenura armida occurs from tropical Mexico to Bolivia and southeastern Brazil.  In the tropical dry forest of Pacific Mexico and Central America, its caterpillars are found on Guazuma ulmifolia (Sterculiaceae), Rollinia membranacea (Annonaceae), and Bombacopsis quinatum (Bombacaceae) (Janzen and Hallwachs, 2002).  Larvae emerge shortly after the rainy season in May, after passing the long dry season as a solitary and dormant pupa in a chamber excavated 2-10 cm below the soil surface.  Part of the first generation enters a dormant pupal stage and part ecloses about 35-55 days after pupation, to create a second generation in November-December.  All of the second generation pupae become dormant until the following start of the rainy season.
The young larvae are brightly aposematically ringed yellow and black with red heads, and remain together diurnally feeding side by side in large masses on the leaves.  Costa, Fitzgerald, and Janzen (2001) studied this species in Santa Rosa National Park, Costa Rica, and showed that the larvae use a trail pheromone to maintain group cohesion. Larval trail-following can be elicited by surface cuticular material collected by wiping from the venter and dorsum of the abdomen of A. armida caterpillars, as well as crude extracts of homogenated somatic tissue.  The long-lived trail marker appears to be a component of the cuticle passively deposited from the posterio-ventral region of the abdomen as larvae travel over the host plant.
In the fourth instar,
A. armida larvae dramatically change their foraging strategy, switching from nomadic to central place foraging.  Costa, Gotzek, and Janzen (in review) documented the details of this behavioral shift: in central place foraging mode the caterpillars begin to rest diurnally in large conspicuous masses on the lower trunk and underside of larger branches, mobilizing at dusk to forage nocturally as solitary larvae in the canopy.  They return to the lower trunk at dawn, using tree architecture and their trail pheromone to relocate conspecifics (which are generally confamilials) upon descending.  Although larvae often reuse the same resting (bivouac) sites, individual caterpillars do not exhibit strict site fidelity and may shift among sites once descended.  This shift in foraging behavior entails a concomitant change in reaction to the information content of their trail pheromone, from maintaining groups as the caterpillars move from patch to patch, to relocating distant resting sites.”  Based on that information, your individuals are fourth or fifth instars, meaning more mature caterpillars.

Droppings from Aggregation of Arsenura armida Caterpillars

Droppings from Aggregation of Arsenura armida Caterpillars

Thank you very much Daniel.
You have been so helpful. What a cool resource you are.
Petra

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: strange catapillar
Location: outside Houston
November 19, 2016 12:36 pm
Attached are a couple pics of a catapillar that I have never seen before outside of Houston, TX. My wife has been bitten/stung by these twice in the last 2 weeks. They are very slow moving. It is a very painful bite/sting that lasts several days and leaves a good size welt. I have lived in this house for 15 years and never seen one. This fall alone I’ve seen about a dozen.
Signature: at your descretion

White Asp

White Asp

The Asp is the stinging caterpillar (which you already learned) of the Southern Flannel Moth or Puss Moth.  Asps come in a variety of colors, but white Asps do not seem as common as other colors like orange and brown.

White Asp

White Asp

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown caterpillar
Location: Mapungubwe National Park, South Africa
November 15, 2016 4:24 am
Hi everybody!
I’m busy making photo album of my trip in South Africa in 2015, and I’m missing the name of a fluffy caterpillar!
Hope you can help me!
Thanks a lot!
Signature: Virginia, Association NARIES

Lappet Moth Caterpillar

Lappet Moth Caterpillar

Dear Virginia,
We are confident that this is a Lappet Moth Caterpillar from the family Lasiocampidae, but we are uncertain of the species.  There are some similar looking images on iSpot.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination