Currently viewing the category: "Caterpillars and Pupa"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Not a clue what it is.

Location: Natural Bridge, VA
September 24, 2014 4:06 pm
Our family found this “caterpillar” walking across a trail near the Natural Bridge in Virginia. We don’t know what it is. It’s about 5 1/2 half inches long and as big around as a grown man’s thumb.
Signature: VS

Hickory Horned Devil

Hickory Horned Devil

Dear VS,
The Hickory Horned Devil is the largest North American Caterpillar.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Orange caterpillar (?) with face on it’s back?
Location: West Virginia
September 24, 2014 3:01 pm
Our kindergarten classes were outside on the playground at recess and found this bug. It has spots that appear to be a mouth and eyes on its head. We looked it up and thought perhaps it was a Pandora sphinx caterpillar but aren’t sure. My fellow teacher and I would love to know what it is so we can tell our classes more about it!
Signature: Welch Elementary Kindergarten

Spicebush Swallowtail Caterpillar

Spicebush Swallowtail Caterpillar

Dear Welch Elementary Kindergarten,
This distinctive caterpillar is a Spicebush Swallowtail Caterpillar.  The false eyespots might help protect the tasty caterpillar from predators like birds that may mistake a toothsome caterpillar for a much larger and potentially dangerous snake.  Spicebush Swallowtail caterpillars feed on a variety of trees, including “Spicebush (Lindera benzoin), Sassafras trees (Sassafras albidum), Pondspice (Litsea aestivalis) Red, Swamp and Silk Bays (Persea spp.); perhaps prickly ash (Zanthoxylum americanum), Tulip tree (Liriodendron tulipifera), Sweetbay (Magnolia virginiana), and Camphor (Cinnamomum camphora)” according to BugGuide.  They begin life as green caterpillars that are well camouflaged, but as the time for pupation nears, they often turn orange, leave the trees they have been feeding upon, and find an appropriate site to metamorphose into a chrysalis.  The adult Spicebush Swallowtail is a beautiful black butterfly with colorful markings.

Thank you so much!  We looked it up on the Smart Board and discussed the life cycle. We printed a picture of the butterfly so we can watch for them in the spring.
You have a great site!
Mrs. Merkle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: caterpillar?
Location: South Sudan, Jonglei State
September 23, 2014 11:58 pm
Hello,
I’ve found this bug in the Sudd of South Sudan (Jonglei State) which looks similar to a slug caterpillar.
But below (if I remember well) there were no legs, rather it was smooth like a snail.
Has this animal been identified and named yet?
Gregor Schmidt
Signature: ??

Slug Caterpillar

Slug Caterpillar

Dear Gregor,
We agree that this looks like a Slug Caterpillar in the family Limacodidae.  We will attempt to provide you with a species name.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Creepy Crawlers
Location: Lasqueti Island, South-West BC
September 22, 2014 5:00 pm
Found a couple neat caterpillars on a calla lilly. Nobody that I’ve asked has ever seen one like them. Do you know what they are?
Signature: -N

Tiger Moth Caterpillars:  Lophocampa maculata

Spotted Tussock Moth Caterpillars: Lophocampa maculata

Dear N,
This is a Tiger Moth Caterpillar and it is apparently an uncommon color variation.  We located a matching image on BugGuide with this comment:  “It looks like a rare color variant of
L. maculata.”  Another similar looking variation is also pictured on BugGuide.  The more typical coloration on the Spotted Tussock Moth Caterpillar is black and orange.

Tiger Moth Caterpillar

Spotted Tussock Moth Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Can you identify?
Location: Orrstown, PA
September 22, 2014 6:28 am
I was wondering if you could tell me what kind of caterpillar this is? Found it eating one of my pine trees. Can you help me? I am worried about my trees. Please and thank you.
Signature: Lori

Imperial Moth Caterpillar

Imperial Moth Caterpillar

Dear Lori,
This is the caterpillar of an Imperial Moth, and recent taxonomic changes have resulted in the recognition of a subspecies, the Pine Imperial Moth,
Eacles imperialis pini, with a caterpillar that feeds exclusively on conifers.  According to BugGuide:  “larvae feed exclusively on conifers, mainly White Pine and Red Pine; also recorded on Jack Pine, Scotch Pine, and White Spruce” and “uncommon and local in Ontario; rare and local in Quebec and elsewhere within its range.”  Unless they are so plentiful as to defoliate plants, caterpillars are generally not much of a problem when they feed on trees.  The few leaves, or in your case the few needles, that are lost do not have a negative impact on the health of the trees.

Thank you very much. I feel much better.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Some sort of catterpillar?
Location: Central New York
September 21, 2014 10:31 pm
Summertime in central new york. No idea what this bug is
Signature: Mac F

Tiger Swallowtail Caterpillar

Tiger Swallowtail Caterpillar

Dear Mac F,
This is the caterpillar of a Tiger Swallowtail.  Recent taxonomy has resulted in the classification of several different species based on the range, and several different species, including the Eastern Tiger Swallowtail and the Canadian Tiger Swallowtail have ranges that overlap in your vicinity.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination