Currently viewing the category: "Caterpillars and Pupa"
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Royal Moth Caterpillar

Royal Moth Caterpillar

Subject: strange catepillar
Location: Tucson, AZ
October 9, 2014 8:30 am
Hi there, I woke up today (October 9) my birthday to find this guy wishing me happy birthday on my porch. Actually he was crawling through a semi deep puddle. I watched him go all over, then moved him to the park so my dogs wouldnt eat him. I searched a few sites but couldn’t find a match.
I have been in Tucson, AZ my entire life, 30 years todAy, and I have never run across one of these guys. About 2 in. Long and an inch in diameter. His spikes listen and reflect a silver color. He’s quite awesome and I’m considering it a happy birthday from Mother Nature! Thank you in advance!
Signature: J. Price

Happy Belated Birthday J. Price,
This magnificent caterpillar is a Royal Moth Caterpillar in the genus
Sphingicampa, and just last week we posted another example, also from Tucson.

MaryBeth Kelly liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: orange puffy bug
Location: Dominican Republic
October 7, 2014 1:23 pm
Hi there,
just want to know which butterfly comes out from this bug
Signature: dunno

Spotted Oleander Caterpillar

Spotted Oleander Caterpillar

Dear dunno,
This is a Spotted Oleander Caterpillar,
Empyreuma pugione, and it will eventually metamorphose into a diurnal moth that mimics a wasp, not a butterfly.  See BugGuide for a comparison image.

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Subject: Horny catipiller
Location: North Carolina coast
October 7, 2014 3:33 pm
What is this my daughter found it and was playing with it
Signature: Ryan

Pre-Pupal Tersa Sphinx Caterpillar

Pre-Pupal Tersa Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Ryan,
This is a Pre-Pupal Tersa Sphinx Caterpillar, and though they feed on other plants, they are especially fond of Pentas, so we suspect there are some growning nearby.  This individual is likely searching for a good place to dig beneath the surface so it can pupate.  See BugGuide images of the metamorphosis of a Tersa Sphinx Caterpillar.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Location:  Waynesville, OH
October 6, 2014
Caveats: NONE
Is this a huckleberry or walnut moth?
Kimberly Baker CIG
Park Ranger
Caesar Creek Lake
Louisville District
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Blinded Sphinx Caterpillar

Blinded Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Kimberly,
In our opinion, this is the Caterpillar of a Blinded Sphinx,
Paonias excaecata, and you can compare your image to this image on BugGuide.

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Subject: psychidae oiketicus
Location: Guatemala city
October 4, 2014 1:21 pm
After a large amount of picture comparisons and forum searching, I think I have this one pegged as a basket bug. I sent an identification request this morning still thinking it was hornetsnest of some kind.
Signature: ithinki’ve got it

Bagworm

Bagworm

We agree with your identification.  Moths in the family Psychidae are commonly called Bagworms because the larva construct “bags” from silk and plant parts that they live inside as a means of protection.

bagworm

bagworm

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Subject: Cigar Caterpillar
Location: Austria, 47°11’00.76″ N 15°29’22.96″ E
October 4, 2014 10:27 pm
Greetings from Austria!
I found this caterpillar on Sunday, September28 near Graz, Austria. The temperature was in the 60s and it seemed to be lumbering along the street, perhaps looking for a place to wrap itself up for the winter. The area is mountainous (ca. 2300 ft) with mixed deciduous and coniferous trees. The caterpillar was about four inches long, and I wondered if the spots at the head would be translated into the moth (?) it would become.
Thanks for being bug liaisons!
Signature: N. Fritz

Elephant Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Elephant Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear N. Fritz,
This interesting caterpillar is an Elephant Hawkmoth Caterpillar,
Deilephila elpenor, and according to the UK Moth site:  “The English name of this moth is derived from the caterpillar’s fanciful resemblance to an elephant’s trunk.   The adults are attractively coloured pink and green affairs, with a streamlined appearance. They fly from May to July, visiting flowers such as honeysuckle (Lonicera) for nectar.  The larvae feed mainly on rosebay willowherb (Epilobium angustifolium), but also other plants as well, including bedstraw (Galium).”  According to Made By Mother Eagle:  “When startled, the caterpillar draws its trunk into its foremost body segment. This posture resembles a snake with a large head and four large eye-like patches. Caterpillars are preyed upon by birds, but these shy away (at least for some time) from caterpillars in “snake” pose. It is not known whether the birds take the caterpillar to actually resemble a snake, or are frightened by the sudden change of a familiar prey item into an unusual and boldly-patterned shape.”

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