Currently viewing the category: "Caterpillars and Pupa"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What are these?
Location: Elwood, IL
July 13, 2015 6:10 am
I found these caterpillar/larva on my dill and am not able to identify them. Can you help? I have swallowtaill caterpillars on my dill and am hoping these won’t kill the caterpillars.
Signature: Penny

Unknown Caterpillars on Dill

Unknown Caterpillars on Dill

Dear Penny,
We are still working on this identification.  The internet is filled with Black Swallowtail Caterpillars feeding on dill, but we are having problems identifying your caterpillars.  They remind us of the Sophora Worm, but we cannot find any record of them feeding on dill, their diet being confined to members of the legume family.  We suspect this is some species of moth, and we don’t believe you need to worry about them killing Swallowtail caterpillars.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug ID
Location: Cheektowaga, N.Y.
July 18, 2015 5:04 pm
Have not seen this bug before. Have searching to ID but no luck, but will keep trying.
Took the picture of bug on my rose bush eating small inch worm. My roses have not been good this year. Lot’s of chewy leaf insects & started spraying to late. I don’t like pesticides but was contemplating till seen this. Do not want to kill good insects.
Anyway any info would be appreciated.
I live in Cheektowaga, N.Y. 14043 just outside of Buffalo, N.Y.
Signature: Butch

Predatory Stink Bug eats Caterpillar

Predatory Stink Bug eats Caterpillar

Dear Butch,
Your reservations concerning pesticides are deserved because broad spectrum pesticides do not discriminate between pest species and beneficial insects.  Several years ago we were amused that Ortho Bug-B-Gone illustrated their product with an image of a Monarch Caterpillar.  Your predator is an immature Predatory Stink Bug in the subfamily Asopinae, and we believe we have matched it to a BugGuide image of an immature Stink Bug in the genus
Podisus, commonly called Spined Soldier Bugs.  One member of the genus is profiled on Featured Creatures.

Ann Levitsky, Jessica M. Schemm, Mary Sheridan Page Fatzinger liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of bug is this?
Location: Cebu, Philippines
July 17, 2015 6:01 am
I don’t know what this bug is and I’m dying to find out. My curiosity is killing me. It’s a very tiny bug supporting a huge shell of some kind of wood shavings , if you will. Hoping for an answer!!
Signature: What

Bagworm

Bagworm

This is a Bagworm, the caterpillar of a moth in the family Psychidae.  Bagworms construct shelters from bits of plant that act as camouflage as well as protection.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ugliest caterpillar
Location: Southeast Michigan
July 17, 2015 8:38 am
I found this in someone’s garden while i was working. What type of moth or butteffly might it be? I have never seen anything like it before.
Signature: – ruth the gardener

Spanworm

Spanworm

Dear Ruth the gardener,
This is an Inchworm or Spanworm in the family Geometridae, and larvae can often be very difficult to identify to the species level.  One of the most noticeable features on your Spanworm is the red color of the spiracles or breathing openings on the side.  We thought that might lead us to an identification, but alas, it did not.  Knowing the plant the Spanworm was feeding upon might help.  Though we can make out a leaf on the right, we cannot tell the identity of the plant.  If you can supply us with the plant, we might have better luck.

Andrea Leonard Drummond, Lauren Fay, Sue Dougherty, Ann Levitsky, Mary Lemmink Lawrence liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Very hungry caterpillar
Location: Deltaville, VA (Tidewater)
July 16, 2015 8:38 am
At first we thought this caterpillar was a tomato or tobacco hornworm, but it was too spiky. We found it in an open field, mid-morning on a 75* day in July. The property is on the middle peninsula of Virginia. We’re surrounded by brackish water (Chesapeake bay watershed), but there are many farms (mostly corn) in the area.
Signature: Kelli

Hickory Horned Devil

Hickory Horned Devil

Dear Kelli,
Though there is no shortage on our site, we are thrilled to be able to create a new posting of the first Hickory Horned Devil of the year.  Each summer we get numerous identification requests for the largest, and arguably most distinctive looking North American caterpillar.  Despite its fierce appearance, the Hickory Horned Devil is perfectly harmless.  Hickory Horned Devils rarely leave the host trees (hickory, walnut and other trees) where they are feeding on leaves, but this large specimen is getting ready to pupate.  It will seek a location with favorable conditions and it will bury itself before metamorphosing into a naked pupa that will pass the winter with the adult Royal Walnut Moth emerging the following year. 

Hickory Horned Devil

Hickory Horned Devil

Kingson Mendoza Maqui, Rachel Laurelle Owens, Norman Gems, Suzanne Stewart, Joani Tompkins, Mary Lemmink Lawrence, Mary Sheridan Page Fatzinger, Heather Duggan-Christensen, Sergio Vicente Naguiat liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beautiful moth
Location: West of St.Louis Missouri
July 15, 2015 6:49 pm
Hi we found this beautiful moth, it actually flew right into me when I was on my deck one evening :), the 2nd picture is a caterpillar my son found, it spun a cocoon so I know it is a moth but not what kind.
Signature: ?

Polyphemus Moth

Polyphemus Moth

Dear ?,
The moth and caterpillar are both the same species.  Thanks for providing such beautiful images of a Polyphemus Moth and a Polyphemus Caterpillar.  If you are able, we would love to include an image of the cocoon in the posting as well.  You can read more about the Polyphemus Moth on BugGuide where it states:  “Larvae feed on leaves of broad-leaved trees and shrubs, including birch, grape, hickory, maple, oak, willow, and members of the rose family.  Adults do not feed.”

Polyphemus Caterpillar

Polyphemus Caterpillar

 

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination