Currently viewing the category: "Caterpillars and Pupa"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Brown striped caterpiller
Location: SW Ohio
May 9, 2016 6:48 am
I live near Dayton, OH, and found this caterpiller on my patio table. I have never seen one like this. Can you help ID it?
Thank you.
Signature: Jennifer

Forest Tent Caterpillar

Forest Tent Caterpillar

Dear Jennifer,
This distinctive caterpillar is a Forest Tent Caterpillar,
Malacosoma disstria.  According to BugGuide:  “larvae feed on leaves of alder, basswood, birch, cherry, oak, poplar, willow.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillars unknown?
Location: Florida central
May 8, 2016 8:52 pm
I’d love to find out what kind of beautiful butterfly or moth this is 😁 I have looked all over hope you can help!
Signature: Sure

Filament Bearer

Filament Bearer

This Inchworm or Spanworm in the family Geometridae is commonly called a Filament Bearer or Horned Spanworm, Nematocampa resistaria, because of the unusual protrusions on its body.  Your individual has much more exaggerated markings than most of the individuals pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, the caterpillar is:  “Strange! Eversible tentacles extend from the dorsal surface of A2 and A3. In the first photo (below, left) they are in the ‘relaxed’ condition; when the caterpillar is alarmed these tentacles can be extended to 2x their resting length. These same structures probably occur in other species in the genus; but otherwise I believe they may be unique.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar
Location: San Mateo, CA
May 7, 2016 6:49 pm
Found this in San Mateo, Ca. Is this caterpillar poisonous? What does it eat?
Signature: Vera

Western Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Western Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Dear Vera,
This appears to be the caterpillar of a Western Tussock Moth,
Orgyia vetusta, which is pictured on BugGuide.  BugGuide makes no mention of irritation caused by the hairs, but other members of the genus including the White Marked Tussock Moth are known for having urticating hairs.  Of that species, BugGuide notes:  “CAUTION: Contact with hairs may cause an allergic reaction.”  According to the Moth Photographers Group:  “Dozens if not hundreds of these caterpillars have been busy eating leaves on a Coast Live Oak.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Xanthopan morgani caterpillar drawing
Location: Afrotropical area
May 1, 2016 4:08 pm
Dear Daniel,
today I’d like to contribute a drawn sketch of Xanthopan larva and pupa, which are seldom found and seen and have not yet been shown to public as photographs for quite some decennies now, a kind of mystery considering the role and popularity of the famous moth in contexts of coevolution theories and orchid pollination – and the fact that it is spread in the entire African rainforest zone including Madagascar, and not rare at all, according to reported findings of adults… Maybe it will inspire or help somebody to catch sight of one on leafs or on a twig of an Annona plant (Annona squamosa, A. muricata, A. reticulata and other Custard apple- relatives and a few vines (Xylopia, Uvaria) from the Annonaceae-family, on which the larvae reportedly feed, or eventually another plant species not yet known as its foodplant… ); it is blue-green with whitish lateral stripes and slightly hairy, similar to the neotropical Neococytius caterpillars…
Best Thanks and wishes for the wonderful and helpful site,
Bostjan
Signature: Bostjan Dvorak

Sketch of Xanthopan by Bostjan Dvorjak

Sketch of metamorphosis of  Xanthopan morgani by Bostjan Dvorak

Thanks so much Bostjan for allowing us to post your wonderful drawings of this marvelous moth whose existence was theorized by Charles Darwin many years before it was actually discovered since the great evolutionary theorist hypothesized such a moth must exist to pollinate the orchid from Madagascar with a blossom possessing a ten inch throat.  Darwin knew only a Sphinx Moth would have a proboscis long enough to extract the nectar.  We had to correct the perspective of your images and we also increased the contrast.  We hope our digital enhancements meet with your approval.  We hope that one day one of our readers will supply us with the images you so long to see.  The coiled sheath for the proboscis is amazing.

Sketch of larva and pupa of Xanthopan morgani by Bostjan Dvorak

Sketch of larva and pupa of Xanthopan morgani by Bostjan Dvorak

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: New Otleans caterpillar
Location: New Orleans
May 1, 2016 2:04 pm
We’re walking down a sidewalk in the Garden District of New Orleans and there are tons of these caterpillars falling out of a tree. One got on my friend’s sock and when she pulled it off, she got stung. Any clues what it is?
Signature: Joelle

Buckmoth Caterpillar

Buckmoth Caterpillar

Dear Joelle,
Thanks so much for resubmitting using our standard form.  It really helps us to format postings correctly.  This is a Buck Moth Caterpillar in the genus Hemileuca, and many caterpillars in the genus look similar.  This is most likely
Hemileuca maia, a species found in much of eastern North America.  According to BugGuide:  “Caution, caterpillars can inflict painful sting.”  Since they were falling from the trees, they are most likely getting ready to pupate.  Adult Buck Moths emerge and fly in the autumn.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Swallowtail caterpillar?
Location: San Gabriel , california
April 26, 2016 9:12 pm
I bought a pepper tree bonsai and I found this caterpillar attached to it. I believe it is a swallowtail caterpillar but I don’t know what variety. I was hoping to find out what is was since I want to care for it. Can I feed it lemon leaves instead of my poor bonsai?
Signature: Thank you, Meena

Probably Giant Swallowtail Caterpillar

Probably Giant Swallowtail Caterpillar

Dear Meena,
This sure looks like an Orange Dog, the caterpillar of a Giant Swallowtail  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on leaves of plants in the Citrus family (Rutaceae), including Citrus (Citrusspecies), Pricklyash(Zanthoxylum species), Hoptree (Ptelea trifoliata), Rue (Ruta graveolens), etc. Adults take flower nectar from a variety of herbaceous plants and shrubs.”
  We do not recognize your particular Pepper Tree and we would be curious to learn if it is in the citrus family.  You can try to feed your caterpillar leaves of an orange tree, but if it rejects those leaves, you may need to return it back to your bonsaii.  Caterpillars are not like dogs or pet fish.  They do not immediately begin eating if food is placed in front of them.  You may need to transfer your caterpillar to a citrus tree to see if it will accept the leaves.  Though lemon is a citrus tree, we cannot recall getting any reports of Orange Dogs feeding on lemon trees, but we have gotten reports of them feeding on lime, tangerine, grapefruit and the always popular orange tree.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination