Currently viewing the category: "Caterpillars and Pupa"
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Subject: Can’t quite identify this caterpillar
Location: Florida
December 2, 2014 1:19 pm
Hello, I found this guy sitting outside my house and decided to take a picture, upon trying to identify him I ran into some trouble as the closest I could find was the Buck Moth Larvae or the Spiny Elm Caterpillar but both of these describe spots as the primary pattern and my buddy here has what seem to be long white and orange stripes, which is a feature neither have mentioned! I live in central Florida.
Signature: -Curiouser and Curiouser

Gulf Fritillary Caterpillar

Gulf Fritillary Caterpillar

Dear Curiouser and Curiouser,
This looks like a Gulf Fritillary Caterpillar,
Agraulis vanillae, a species that feeds on the leaves of passionflower vines, and it is generally not found far from the food plants.  This is a color variation with lavendar stripes and according to BugGuide:  “Larvae are generally orange with black branched spines and greenish-black stripes. There is a larval variant with purple/lavender stripes, seen mostly in Texas.”  Adult Gulf Fritillaries are pretty orange butterflies with silver spots.

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Subject: Funny looking catterpilar
Location: Randfontein South Africa
November 29, 2014 6:04 am
Hi I just found this guy under attack by a bunch of ants, saved it and placed it on a strawberry leaf to photograph. (Don’t think that is the diet of this caterpillar)
The closest pic I could find on the net is of the one eyed sphinx moth from Alaska. This however is in Randfontein South Africa. Any ideas?
Kind regards
Vic
Signature: Vic Mouton

Probably Nymphalidae Caterpillar

Moth Caterpillar

Dear Vic,
Though it has a caudal horn, we do not believe this is a Hornworm.  We believe this is a Butterfly Caterpillar, not a moth caterpillar, and we believe it is in the Brush Footed Butterfly Nymphalidae.  We have not had any luck finding any matching images online, and we have contacted butterfly caterpillar specialist Keith Wolfe to see if he can identify your caterpillar.

Probably Nymphalidae Caterpillar

Moth Caterpillar

Correction Courtesy of Keith Wolfe
Hi Daniel; I hope you had a wonderful Thanksgiving!  This is definitely not a nymphalid (butterfly) larva of any sort, but rather an immature moth.  Sorry to be of limited help.
Best wishes,
Keith

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Subject: Caterpillar
Location: Tempe, Arizona
November 23, 2014 4:29 pm
My Kung Fu teacher found this on his grapevine!
No idea what it is…
Thanks
Signature: Mike Hutchinson

Achemon Sphinx

Achemon Sphinx

Dear Mike,
This impressive caterpillar is an Achemon Sphinx,
Eumorpha achemon, and grape is a common food plant.  You can read more about the Achemon Sphinx on the Sphingidae of the Americas site.

 

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Subject: big bug?

Location: far east gippsland
November 23, 2014 3:12 pm
another job for the bugman
Signature: Az

Double Headed Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Double Headed Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Az,
Despite lacking a horn which is typical of the Hornworms in the family Sphingidae, we thought that this looked like a Hawkmoth Caterpillar, and we were correct.  We quickly identified it as the caterpillar of a Double Headed Hawkmoth,
Coequosa triangularis, which is pictured on the Butterfly House website where it states:  “This is Australia’s largest Hawk Moth” and “Its real head is an orange conical structure, but on its tail are two large raised black knobs. These look like a pair of large eyes, so that an observer or predator finds it difficult to determine which end is actually the head, hence its common name.”

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Subject: What is this bug?
Location: Houston tx
November 21, 2014 11:19 pm
We found on patio and would like to know what it is. Is it dangerous,poisonous, etc.
Signature: Cc

Asp

Asp

Dear Cc,
Your image is quite blurry, but this appears to be an Asp, the stinging caterpillar of a Southern Flannel Moth.  The Asp is notorious in the south where its sting is reported to be quite painful.
  Additional information on the Asp is available on BugGuide.

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November 13, 2014

Dear Mr. Marlos:
I found the attached, tiny cocoon-like item in my sink (of all places) the other day. When i pressed on it, out came the pictured worm. I don’t know whether to be sorry that I interrupted its chrysalis sleep or not. I suppose it depends on whether it was destined to be a beautiful butterfly or a garden pest. Can you help me to (hopefully) alleviate my guilt?
Mark Kulkis

Case Bearing Moth Larva

Case Bearing Moth Larva

Dear Mr. Kulkis,
How nice to hear from you.  This is a Case Bearing Moth Larva and it is a common household intruder.  We have one amazing image in our archives of a pack of Case Bearing Moth Larvae eating a dog biscuit.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination