Currently viewing the category: "Caterpillars and Pupa"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unkown Creepy Callapiter
Location: Florida near pensacola, cantonment. But in a country part called Molino
April 20, 2016 5:32 pm
I was sitting with my mother in our barn in cantonment. when I noticed (What i thought was fuz,) until it started moving. I have never seen anything like it, (Nor had my mom,) and i wanted to know more. It had to large thick, black antenaes. And one identical anteanae like tail. Conecting the anteanaes/tail was a black line down the middle, with little yellow hair covering the sides. It had an orange like headband, and two small red dots near its hind end. What was peculiar was the 4 white dots on its back, with a spiky black line coming out of each. Please help. We have many animals around our farm and would really like to know this type of bug, and if it is dangerous. Thankyou.
Signature: Please respond, Aden

Whitemarked Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Whitemarked Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Dear Aden,
This is a Whitemarked Tussock Moth Caterpillar,
Orgyia leucostigma, and according to BugGuide:  “CAUTION: Avoid handling the caterpillar, as its hair is known to cause allergic reactions, especially in areas of the body with sensitive skin (e.g. back, stomach, inner arms). Seek medical treatment if a severe reaction occurs.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Surprise Tenant Larva
Location: Coryell County, TX
April 19, 2016 9:22 pm
Hello, hope you are both well.
I discovered this larva living inside one of the blooming apple-blossom amaryllis plants. Its abdomen end looks remarkably like a snake’s face to me, and its body also resembles a bird dropping when curled. It curled up when I moved it gently to the petals, and when moved back it resumed its head-down, posterior snake-face-showing stance. It has gold iridescent spots along lateral (subdorsal?) lines.
As you can see, it’s eating itself out of house and home. 😀
I tried to match it to known moths and butterflies in our county, but had no luck.
Lots of rain this week, upper 60’s and cloudy.
Thank you!
Signature: Ellen

Cutworm

Cutworm

Hi Ellen,
We believe this is a Cutworm, the caterpillar of an Owlet Moth in the family Noctuidae.  We have a difficult time distinguishing different species as so many caterpillars in this large family look so similar.  You can try browsing BugGuide to see if you find any likely candidates.  Many species are not terribly particular about what plants they feed upon, which complicates identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug Identity
Location: Palmer Tx
April 15, 2016 3:46 pm
These bugs are everywhere . I need to know what kind is it please?
Signature: Does not matter

Forest Tent Caterpillar

Forest Tent Caterpillar

This is a Forest Tent Caterpillar, Malacosoma disstria, a social species that often feeds in large groups.  Periodically, there are significant population explosions, and based on this submission of Forest Tent Caterpillars we received last week, this is one of those years in Texas.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of caterpillar is this?
Location: Sandton, South Africa
April 13, 2016 12:31 pm
Hi there!
This is Absolem, the caterpillar who is living off of my Basil plant.
I live in Sandton, just north of Johannesburg, South Africa.
It has just turned Autumn here and we went through a bit of a cold spell but it’s warming up a little bit before winter hits.
From the pictures I’ve seen it seems like Absolem may be a Death’s head Hawk moth. But I’ve never seen any of these in this area so I’m not sure.
Could you possibly kindly tell me what Absolem will turn into?
Signature: Jennifer Williamson

Death's Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Death’s Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Jennifer,
Sweet Basil is not a plant listed on African Moths as being a larval foodplant for the Death’s Head Hawkmoth.  That list includes:  “
Brugmansia suaveolens, Solanum jacquini, Solanum Jasminoides, Solanum macrocarpon, Tabebuia pallida, Clerodendrum ugandense, Mormordica charantia, Vitex, Jasminum pubigerum, Spathodea, Duranta erecta, Lantana camara.”  Absolem’s color is atypical for a Death’s Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar.  We wonder if he would prefer a different food plant.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hornworm
Location: Johannesburg, South Africa
April 12, 2016 4:53 am
Hello
I found my cat playing now with this worm/caterpillar thing and I don’t know what it is. It makes a clicking noise and lifts in horn when I touch it with something.
Please let me know what this is?
Thanks!
Signature: Regards Shae Turner

Death's Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Death’s Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Shae,
This is a more atypical coloration for a Death’s Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar.  Most individual are yellow and green.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar identification
Location: Cape Town South Africa
April 11, 2016 1:39 am
Hi there. We have found 5 of these caterpillars eating our star jasmine in april in Cape Town South Africa.
Could you please identify them for us so that we can find out what moth/butterfly hey turn into for our home schooling class.
It is about 70mm long.
See attached photos.
Many thanks paige,Matt and Scott
Signature: Letter not vital

Death's Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Death’s Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Paige, Matt and Scott,
Your images of a Death’s Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar,
Acherontia atropos, are wonderful.  Though we have no shortage of this species from South Africa on our site, the coloring on your individual is especially bold and it matches this iSpot image.  The common name refers to the skull-like pattern on the thorax of the adult Death’s Head Hawkmoth.

Death's Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Death’s Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Death's Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Death’s Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination