Currently viewing the category: "Woolly Bears"
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Subject: Caterpillar identification.
Location: El Paso county colorado manitou spring 80829
January 27, 2016 11:26 am
I have posted this picture to many websites and know one can Identify it here is the information on it. I am in El Paso county colorado manitou spring at 8000 feet. I found it crawling on the rocks I do not know the host. It was August 16 2015.
Signature: Zack vogel

Woolly Bear

Woolly Bear

Dear Zack,
This is a Woolly Bear, the caterpillar of a Tiger Moth in the subfamily Arctiinae, but we are having a problem with its species identity.  We scoured BugGuide and we found an image of
Hypocrisias minima posted to BugGuide that is the closest match, but we are not satisfied that is a correct ID.  The Caterpillar of the Virginia Ctenucha pictured on BugGuide also looks similar, and it is reported from Colorado, but again, it does not look like an ideal match.  This Tiger Moth Caterpillar from Colorado posted to the Life of Your Time blog is also somewhat similar.  We are going to contact Julian Donahue, a Lepidopterist specializing in Arctiids in the hope he can provide some information.

Julian Donahue Responds
 The caterpillar may just be a color form of Pyrrharctia isabella, the “standard” woolly bear.
I suggest you contact the caterpillar guy, David Wagner at Univ. of Conn., who is publishing books on the subject.
Julian

David Wagner Responds
I am not sure I have seen it before and am very, very intrigued.
I am writing a book on caterpillars of western North America and I don’t think I have seen this one before.  It is possible it is the very rare Alexicles aspersa.  If not something in the genus Hypercompe.
Was the individual saved?  I would be quite interested in learning more about the elevation and location, and especially altitude of the capture.
Thanks for sharing.
David L. Wagner Professor
University of Connecticut

Thanks for the information Dave.
I run the pop culture website What’s That Bug? and the photo was sent to my site.
I will write back and request additional information and get back to you.
Daniel Marlos

Zack Responds
Unfortunately I did not save it because I did not want it to starve. I am around 7500 in Crystal park Manitou Springs Colorado In a mountain community. The mountain Is covered in pine, fer and blue spruce with large spots of Scrub Oak. It get up to the 90 degree weather in the summer time and get down to the 4 degrees and lower in the winter. Thank you if you need more in formation please let me know and can I have David Wagner email in case he whats to talk to me.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar
Location: Vieques, Puerto Rico
January 19, 2016 9:19 am
Can someone please identify these caterpillars. They are infesting one of my plants :(
Signature: Playacofi

Spotted Oleander Caterpillar

Spotted Oleander Caterpillar

Dear Playacofi,
Knowing the plant host is often a great help in identifying caterpillars and other herbivorous insects.  This is a Spotted Oleander Caterpillar,
Empyreuma affinis, and it is commonly found feeding on oleander.  According to Featured Creatures:  “It is a native of the Caribbean region and has been recorded from Guadeloupe, Martinique, Haiti, Dominican Republic, and Cuba.”  The plant in your image does not appear to be oleander, which is the food plant identified on BugGuide.  You can compare your image to this image on BugGuide for verification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar in Brazil
Location: Holambra – São Paulo – Brazil
January 6, 2016 6:25 pm
Hello,
I found this caterpillar in Holambra – São Paulo State – Brazil in orchid. It eats the flower, when flowers are starting to grow.
Could you help me to identify this caterpillar?
Thank you so much.
Regards,
Valeria
Signature: VFM

Woolly Bear we believe

Woolly Bear we believe

Dear Valeria,
We have not had any luck identifying your Caterpillar, but we suspect it is a Woolly Bear, the caterpillar of a Tiger Moth in the subfamily Arctiinae.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck identifying this orchid eating caterpillar.  You can also try writing to Cesar Crash who runs Insetologia, our sister site from Brazil.  Should Cesar provide you with a species name, please write back to us so we can update your posting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: caterpillar
Location: NJ coast on a picnic table
December 19, 2015 10:39 am
I haven’t been able to ID this one
Signature: DaveN

Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Dear DaveN,
This is a Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillar,
Halysidota harrisii, and you can verify its identity on BugGuide.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this fuzzy guy?
Location: NE PA
December 6, 2015 10:42 pm
Hello! I found this guy inside an old deer skull in Northeast PA. Is this a wooly bear?
Signature: Erin

Woolly Bear Cocoon

Woolly Bear Cocoon

Dear Erin,
This is the cocoon of a moth that has incorporated the caterpillar hairs into the spinning of the cocoon.  A Woolly Bear in the subfamily Arctiinae is a very likely candidate.  Your individual looks very much like this Spotted Tussock Moth Cocoon from our archives.

Thank you! I put it outside in a container just in case it is alive and breaks out in the spring :) how exciting!
Erin

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Walk Through Natural Area Turns Up Interesting Critters
Location: Juno Beach, Florida
December 2, 2015 12:06 pm
Hello Whats That Bug!
Love your site – use it all the time to identify the small creepy crawlies we find on Palm Beach County natural areas. Usually I can successfully find the critters name while looking through the photos on your web site. I am having a bit of trouble with a pesky caterpillar which defies identification. It was found at Juno Dunes Natural Area in Juno Beach, Florida. There were several on the same plant. Any help in naming this guy (I’m calling him Harry for now) will be appreciated. … Thanks for all you do to ensure the proper identification of insects and arachnids!
Signature: Ann Mathews

Unknown Moth Caterpillar

Scarlet Bodied Wasp Moth Caterpillar

Hi Again Ann,
Our quick attempt to identify this Moth Caterpillar did not produce any results.  For now, we are posting it as unidentified, and perhaps one of our readers will have some luck scouring the internet for a positive identification.

Update Courtesy of Karl:  Scarlet Bodied Wasp Moth Caterpillar
Hello Daniel and Ann:
It looks like a Scarlet-bodied Wasp Moth caterpillar (Erebidae: Arctiinae: Arctiini: Cosmosoma myrodora) [see Featured Creatures]. You can also check it out on the ‘Butterflies and Moths of North America’ site. Regards.  Karl

OH YEAH! “Harry” has been identified! Thank you Karl and What’s That Bug for identifying this caterpillar. Now I want to see that moth in person – spectacular coloration! Thanks again for all your hard work making sure bugs and other creepy crawlies are correctly identified.
Ann Mathews
Palm Beach County
Department of Environmental Resources Management

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination