Currently viewing the category: "Woolly Bears"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: unusual cattepillar
Location: Charlottesville, VA
August 9, 2014 6:05 am
never saw this before. 3/4″ long, on deck and steps. suburban type back yard with lots of native and non-native plants and vegetable garden.
thank you!!
Signature: Wendy Roberman

Milkweed Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Milkweed Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Hi Wendy,
The Milkweed Tussock Moth Caterpillar or Milkweed Tiger Moth Caterpillar,
Euchaetias egle, is frequently found feeding on milkweed, and it sounds like you may have some among your native plants.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: HELP
Location: Oregon
July 26, 2014 10:48 am
We have a caterpillar that is going to turn into a cinnabar moth, we already know what bug it is but it just went into a cocoon (yay!). How long will it be in a cocoon?
Signature: Seriously bugged

Cinnabar Moth Caterpillar

Cinnabar Moth Caterpillar

Dear Seriously bugged,
According to Bug Life:  “Caterpillars are feeding from July – early September and are initially pale yellow but soon develop bright yellow and black stripes to deter predators. … The caterpillars overwinter as pupa in a cocoon under the ground. The adult moths emerge around mid May and are on the wing up until early August, during which time males and females will mate and eggs are laid.”
  If that is accurate, you will not experience eclosion until next spring.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What type of caterpillar?
Location: Central Connecticut
July 18, 2014 5:00 pm
Wondering what type of caterpillar these are? Found on milkweed about 75 or so in a group. I’ve seen and photographed monarchs, but these little guys have hair. I didn’t see any eggs and don’t believe monarchs come out in large batches. I know there are limited caterpillars who eat milkweed. Photo taken July 18th in central Connecticut.
Signature: Thanks, Steve

Milkweed Tussock Caterpillar Hatchlings

Milkweed Tussock Caterpillar Hatchlings

Hi Steve,
You are correct that not many caterpillars feed on milkweed, and we had a hunch as to the identity of your caterpillars, but we wanted to find documentation to support our inkling.  Though it is a generalization, butterflies usually lay eggs singly while moths often lay eggs in large clusters.  We could telll that these were moth caterpillars, and we suspected them to be Milkweed Tussock Moth Caterpillars,
Euchaetes egle, though we do not have any images of hatchlings in our own archive.  We found an image on BugGuide that matches your hatchling Milkweed Tussock Moth Caterpillars.

Milkweed Tussock Moth Caterpillars

Milkweed Tussock Moth Caterpillars

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar on PC
Location: Atlanta, GA
July 10, 2014 1:01 pm
Thought you might enjoy this one. I was looking up a caterpillar on your site on while it crawled across my monitor.
Signature: Chris Davis

Tussock Caterpillar

Tussock Caterpillar

Dear Chris,
We are incredibly amused with your image of this Tussock Caterpillar crawling across our homepage.  We believe your individual is in the genus
Halysidota, and it might be a Banded Tussock Moth Caterpillar, Halysidota tessellaris, based on its resemblance to this individual on BugGuide.

Tussock Caterpillar

Tussock Caterpillar

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar identification
Location: Athens, GA
July 3, 2014 6:12 pm
Caterpillars are difficult for me to identify, even with a key. This one was found in a wooded subdivision in Northeast, GA.. (Athens area) A river with creek tributaries is close by. They seem to be more numerous this year. My friends are asking me, but I am clueless. I have answered them, “moth”.
Signature: Another Ed in Athens

Banded Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Banded Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Dear Ed,
One of the best clues for identifying caterpillars is knowing the plant upon which it was feeding.  We believe this is a Banded Tussock Moth Caterpillar or Pale Tussock Moth Caterpillar,
Halysidota tessellaris, and you can compare your image to those posted on BugGuide

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big caterpillar – black with orange
Location: SW Austin TX
May 5, 2014 5:14 am
Found this big guy on our front porch in Austin. Fuzzy and almost 2″ in length. Thought he might be an asp but doesn’t match images I could find. I know you’ll know right away. Thank you!
Signature: Dana

Giant Leopard Moth Caterpillar

Giant Leopard Moth Caterpillar

Hi Dana,
This is definitely NOT and Asp.  This is a Woolly Bear, a caterpillar of a Tiger Moth in the subfamily Arctiinae.  We believe it is the Caterpillar of a Giant Leopard Moth,
Hypercompe scribonia, and you can compare you individual to the images posted to BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination