Currently viewing the category: "Woolly Bears"
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Subject: Caterpillers – foe or friend
Location: Highland Park, ca (county of LA)
March 30, 2015 8:50 am
Hi. I have been finding lots of black furry caterpillers on the ground in Highland Park, CA. The largest that I have seen is about one and a quarter inches long. I think that they are falling from the eves from businesses on Figueroa (around the 7000 black). There is no real vegetation for them so hide out in so they just cling to the innermost edge of the street. I would like to ID them. And if they should be saved where do they need to be placed (food supply)
Signature: Patricia

Woolly Bear

Woolly Bear

Dear Patricia,
Your images are quite blurry, but there is little doubt in our mind that this is a Woolly Bear, most likely the caterpillars of the Painted Tiger Moth,
Arachnis picta, because we have seen large numbers this year in nearby Mount Washington.  They are general feeders that will eat a wide variety of plants commonly considered weeds.

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Woolly Bear found at What’s That Bug? office garden
Location: Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
March 29, 2015

Painted Tiger Moth Woolly Bear in Mount Washington

Painted Tiger Moth Woolly Bear in Mount Washington

We can’t believe we are approaching the 20,000 mark with postings, and we decided to do a countdown of sorts.  We found this Woolly Bear that will eventually metamorphose into a Painted Tiger Moth, Arachnis picta, while weeding in the front garden.  Later while walking into Elyria Canyon Park to tag Fiesta Flowers in a Vernal Stream, we noticed several smashed, dead Woolly Bears along the “dirt” Burnell path where hikers walk on a daily basis and we can only hope the dead Woolly Bears were the result of accidental stompings.  We also noticed several living Woolly Bears in Elyria Canyon Park.

Tagged Fiesta Flowers

Tagged Fiesta Flowers

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Subject: Caterpillar
Location: Granada hills
March 28, 2015 10:36 pm
Very fluffy, and about the length of my thumb ( 2 inches)
Signature: Any

Woolly Bears

Woolly Bears

Dear Any,
These are Woolly Bears, the caterpillars of Tiger Moths in the subfamily Arctiinae.  If Granada Hills is in California, the most likely candidates are Painted Tiger Moth Caterpillars,
Arachnis picta, which are pictured on the Victorian on the Move blog, but interestingly, not on BugGuide, except for newly hatched individuals.  Your individuals are getting ready to pupate based on the size you indicated.  We just encountered two in our own garden yesterday, and had we realized the dearth of images on the web, we would have pulled out the camera.

Melissa Leigh Cooley, Amy Gosch, Alisha Bragg, Tynisha Koenigsaecker, Mary Lemmink Lawrence, Ray Adkins, Andrea Leonard Drummond liked this post
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Subject: Cocoon ID please
Location: Mill Bay BC
March 14, 2015 7:13 pm
HI There,
Please help me identify robust looking cocoon ( index finger for scale) that I found under one of my gardening trays . Mid March , location Vancouver Island off the west coast of British Columbia , Canada . I enjoy this page very much and am hosting several mason bees condominiums on our property , no bees= no food. Thanks in advance…
Signature: Mhairi

Cocoon of a Tiger Moth

Cocoon of a Tiger Moth

Dear Mhairi,
This is the cocoon of a Tiger Moth in the subfamily Arctiinae, but we cannot provide you with an actual species.  Caterpillars of Tiger Moths, commonly called Woolly Bears, incorporate shed hairs with silk when constructing cocoons.

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Subject: orange puffy bug
Location: Dominican Republic
October 7, 2014 1:23 pm
Hi there,
just want to know which butterfly comes out from this bug
Signature: dunno

Spotted Oleander Caterpillar

Spotted Oleander Caterpillar

Dear dunno,
This is a Spotted Oleander Caterpillar,
Empyreuma pugione, and it will eventually metamorphose into a diurnal moth that mimics a wasp, not a butterfly.  See BugGuide for a comparison image.

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Subject: Unknown Creepy Crawlers
Location: Lasqueti Island, South-West BC
September 22, 2014 5:00 pm
Found a couple neat caterpillars on a calla lilly. Nobody that I’ve asked has ever seen one like them. Do you know what they are?
Signature: -N

Tiger Moth Caterpillars:  Lophocampa maculata

Spotted Tussock Moth Caterpillars: Lophocampa maculata

Dear N,
This is a Tiger Moth Caterpillar and it is apparently an uncommon color variation.  We located a matching image on BugGuide with this comment:  “It looks like a rare color variant of
L. maculata.”  Another similar looking variation is also pictured on BugGuide.  The more typical coloration on the Spotted Tussock Moth Caterpillar is black and orange.

Tiger Moth Caterpillar

Spotted Tussock Moth Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination