Currently viewing the category: "Woolly Bears"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: SoCal larvae
Location: Los Angeles, ca
October 27, 2016 11:53 am
Hi- i’m in i’m in Silverlake Los Angeles, ca. This is on the wall of my veranda. It’s a cluster of seemingly clear eggs with tiny teeny larvae around it. It’s currently the end of October. Weather just changed to cool.
Signature: Dn

Probably Painted Tiger Moth Caterpillar Hatchlings

Probably Painted Tiger Moth Caterpillar Hatchlings

Dear Dn,
These are hatchling caterpillars and all indications are that they are Tiger Moth hatchlings.  We suspect they are Painted Tiger Moth hatchlings because we live in nearby Mount Washington and there are currently Painted Tiger Moths flying to our porch light.  Painted Tiger Moths lay clusters of eggs, frequently on walls near lights, and the caterpillars, which are general feeders known as Woolly Bears, quickly disperse.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What will this cool caterpillar be?
Location: Md
October 18, 2016 2:51 pm
How do you guy feel of this bug? Its size just like baby’s fingers. It moves very slow. Could you bug mans find out what it is?
Signature: BG

Woolly Bear

Woolly Bear

Dear BG,
This pretty Woolly Bear will become an Isabella Tiger Moth.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: caterpillars
Location: Marburg, Germany
October 16, 2016 1:24 am
Hi! I am living in central Europe (Germany), at the edge of a mixed forest. I have built up a container garden last year which attracts many different insects. In September this year I found many eggs fixed to a leaf of gladiola Acidanthera bicolor. Some time later very small caterpillars hatched which started to rope down on very thin threads. I could not find out what that is and wanted to ask for your help. Thank you very much.
Signature: Sabine

Probably Arctiid Eggs

Probably Tiger Moth Eggs

Dear Sabine,
We suspect that these are Tiger Moth Eggs from the subfamily Arctiinae.  We are reluctant to provide an actually species identification.  Many Tiger Moths are generalist feeders with caterpillars that eat plants often classified as weeds.  Tiger Moths also lay eggs on surfaces where there is no food, like the outdoor wall of a home near a light.  When the Caterpillars hatch, they begin feeding on the egg shell and then they disperse to hunt for edible plants.  Tiger Moth Caterpillars are often called Woolly Bears.

Hatchling Tiger Moth Eggs, we believe

Hatchling Tiger Moth Eggs, we believe

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Red caterpillar Blue bumps
Location: St. John US Virgin Islands
September 11, 2016 1:10 pm
In May 2016 I photographed this caterpillar and can not find any information on it. Can you help ID this caterpillar?
Signature: Michael Wojdak

Faithful Beauty Caterpillar

Faithful Beauty Caterpillar

Dear Michael,
This is the caterpillar of a Tiger Moth,
Composia fidelissima, that commonly goes by the names Faithful Beauty and Uncle Sam Moth.

THANK YOU SO VERY MUCH. Now I can label the photo on my wall, this really helps. Be well!!!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What Type of Caterpillar Is This??
Location: Columbus, Ohio
August 20, 2016 6:57 am
Dear Mr. Bugman,
I’ve seen tons of caterpillars around my house recently but I’ve never seen any like this one. What type of caterpillar is this??
Signature: Samantha

Milkweed Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Milkweed Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Dear Samantha,
Do you have milkweed plants growing near your house?  We believe this is a Milkweed Tussock Moth Caterpillar,
Euchaetes egle, and it feeds on milkweed.  Though it seems lighter in color to individuals on our site, it does match this BugGuide image pretty closely.

That looks exactly like it, thank you!!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is it?
Location: Jackson, Wyoming
June 19, 2016 4:57 pm
Can you identify this?
Signature: Don’t care

Fall Webworms

Fall Webworms

These are Fall Webworms, Hyphantria cunea.  According to BugGuide:  “Weblike tents in branch tips where clusters of caterpillars strip foliage (by contrast, eastern tent caterpillar nests are built in tree crotches)” and “Larvae feed on foliage throughout their development, and secrete silk which they spin into small webs. As they grow, they enlarge the webs, which can sometimes enclose the entire tree. Even severe infestations have little impact on trees because the damage occurs near the end of the annual growing season. Except in the case of ornamental trees, control is seldom necessary because the damage is generally of aesthetic rather than economic importance.”  BugGuide also notes:  “About 120 species of hardwood trees have been recorded as larval hosts in the north, common hosts include alder, apple, ash, birch, Box-Elder (Acer negundo), cherry, elm, mulberry, poplar, willow in the south, common hosts include ash, hickory, maple, mulberry, oak, pecan, poplar, redbud, sweetgum, walnut, willow; preferences for different host plant species appear to be regional and seasonal.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination