Currently viewing the category: "Woolly Bears"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What Type of Caterpillar Is This??
Location: Columbus, Ohio
August 20, 2016 6:57 am
Dear Mr. Bugman,
I’ve seen tons of caterpillars around my house recently but I’ve never seen any like this one. What type of caterpillar is this??
Signature: Samantha

Milkweed Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Milkweed Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Dear Samantha,
Do you have milkweed plants growing near your house?  We believe this is a Milkweed Tussock Moth Caterpillar,
Euchaetes egle, and it feeds on milkweed.  Though it seems lighter in color to individuals on our site, it does match this BugGuide image pretty closely.

That looks exactly like it, thank you!!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is it?
Location: Jackson, Wyoming
June 19, 2016 4:57 pm
Can you identify this?
Signature: Don’t care

Fall Webworms

Fall Webworms

These are Fall Webworms, Hyphantria cunea.  According to BugGuide:  “Weblike tents in branch tips where clusters of caterpillars strip foliage (by contrast, eastern tent caterpillar nests are built in tree crotches)” and “Larvae feed on foliage throughout their development, and secrete silk which they spin into small webs. As they grow, they enlarge the webs, which can sometimes enclose the entire tree. Even severe infestations have little impact on trees because the damage occurs near the end of the annual growing season. Except in the case of ornamental trees, control is seldom necessary because the damage is generally of aesthetic rather than economic importance.”  BugGuide also notes:  “About 120 species of hardwood trees have been recorded as larval hosts in the north, common hosts include alder, apple, ash, birch, Box-Elder (Acer negundo), cherry, elm, mulberry, poplar, willow in the south, common hosts include ash, hickory, maple, mulberry, oak, pecan, poplar, redbud, sweetgum, walnut, willow; preferences for different host plant species appear to be regional and seasonal.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar
Location: Camp Royeneh, CA
May 18, 2016 8:02 pm
Could this be a silver spotted tiger moth caterpillar? I’ve read they are poisonous but the Boy Scout leader said this one wasn’t. It was found near Guerneville, CA. There were coastal redwoods, Douglas firs and Bay Laurels in the area.
Signature: Toni

Possibly Silver Spotted Tiger Moth Caterpillar

Possibly Silver Spotted Tiger Moth Caterpillar

Dear Toni,
We agree that this might be the Caterpillar of a Silver Spotted Tiger Moth,
Lophocampa argentata, based on this and other BugGuide images.  According to BugGuide:  “Note of Caution: Like several kinds of wooly-bear-type caterpillars, these have venomous, stinging hairs, which can cause a burning sensation and/or a rash in sensitive people- look, but don’t touch!”  We believe the key words are “sensitive people” meaning most folks, including tough, young children, are not affected.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What are these?!?
Location: Coral Springs, Florida
April 8, 2016 4:15 am
Dear Bugman, what are these little guys?They were on a wall inside my house this morning. At first I thought they were ants buy they are about half the size. They appear to be some kind of worm – with legs? Until I took the picture I couldn’t see the legs at all. They weren’t really moving, except to rear up at me when I got close.
Signature: Squirmy Wormies!

Probably Woolly Bear Hatchlings

Probably Woolly Bear Hatchlings

Dear Squirmy Wormies,
These are newly hatched Caterpillars, probably from the subfamily Arctiinae, the Tiger Moths.  The caterpillars of Tiger Moths are frequently called Woolly Bears because of their furry appearance.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please identify this caterpillar :)
Location: Missouri, U.S.A.
April 1, 2016 5:35 pm
I was searching in my yard for any type of bug I could possibly find, so I picked up and old pipe, tipped it over and out rolled a black and orange fuzz ball! I was very exited by this, because I love caterpillars, which I am pretty sure this is. I think it is a pretty common type. Pretty please with cherry’s on top help me identify it!
Signature: Gracie S.

Woolly Bear

Woolly Bear

Dear Gracie,
This Woolly Bear is the caterpillar of the Isabella Tiger Moth.  According to BugGuide:  “The second brood overwinters as a caterpillar and pupates in Spring.”
  That means your caterpillar should make a cocoon very soon.

Dear Daniel,
Thank you very much for writing me back! I am looking very forward to seeing the cocoon. At first when I found the caterpillar I was very worried it was dead, because it wasn’t moving. It took a little while for it to do anything, but when it did I was very exited! Thanks again!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Orange caterpillar with black spike-like hairs
Location: Córdoba, Argentina
March 2, 2016 1:41 pm
I would like your help in identifying this species of caterpillar. Has you can see in the photos, is body is bright orange with some sort of clack spikes and little black hair all over the body.
They appeared on a creeper-weed like plant, and seems to be quite the number on them in a small area.
Its summer in here, with days with high temperature and high humidity and rains, so it’s possible the plant and/or the bugs are travelers of these stormy weather.
Thanks a lot for any input in the mater.
Signature: López, Eduardo

Caterpillar

Caterpillar

Dear Eduardo,
We have not had any luck finding any matching images online from Argentina, but your caterpillar reminds us of the Polka Dot Wasp Moth Caterpillar or Oleander Caterpillar, Syntomeida epilais, a species found in the Caribbean and in Florida.  We believe your individuals are either members of the same genus, the same subtribe Euchromiina or a member of the Tiger Moth tribe Arctiini, depending upon how closely they are related.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to assist in this identification.  Knowing the name of the “creeper-weed” upon which they were feeding might help.

Caterpillar

Caterpillar

Update:  March 16, 2016
Today we got a comment from Eduardo that included these two images.  Our general identification remains unchanged, and this is most definitely a Wasp Moth in the subtribe Euchromiina.  We will check with Julian Donahue to see if he can provide an identification.

Wasp Moth

Wasp Moth

Wasp Moth

Wasp Moth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination