Currently viewing the category: "Tussock Moth Caterpillars"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: FOR IDENTIFICATION
Location: Sitio Inamong, Arakan Valley, North Cotabato, Philippines
November 15, 2016 4:10 am
Hi Mr. BugMan! I’d like to verify if this is a White Marked Tussock Moth Caterpillar? Coz the 4 tufts toward the head are brown instead of the usual white tufts. Found this in a field of cogon grass. Thanks a lot!
Signature: -Dana

Tussock Moth Caterpillar:  Orgyia species

Tussock Moth Caterpillar: Orgyia species

Dear Dana,
Your caterpillar bears an uncanny resemblance to the White Marked Tussock Moth Caterpillar,
Orgyia leucostigma, but because of your location and the subtle differences in color, we suspect your individual is a closely related species in the same genus.   Project Noah has a dead ringer for your caterpillar posted, but alas, it is only identified to the genus level.  Project Noah indicates:  “The caterpillar, or larval, stage of these species often has a distinctive appearance of alternating bristles and haired projections. Like other families of moths, many Tussock Moth caterpillars have urticating hairs (often hidden among longer, softer hairs) which can cause painful reactions if they come into contact with skin.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unusual Bug
Location: Columbia, SC
October 10, 2016 6:22 am
Students found this bug at school and we would like to identify it.
Signature: L Adair

Whitemarked Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Whitemarked Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Dear L Adair,
This is most likely a Whitemarked Tussock Moth Caterpillar,
Orgyia leucostigma, but we would not rule out that it is a different species in a genus that has many similar looking caterpillars.  You should warn any young children to avoid handling Whitemarked Tussock Moth Caterpillars because, according to BugGuide:  “CAUTION: Avoid handling the caterpillar, as its hair is known to cause allergic reactions, especially in areas of the body with sensitive skin (e.g. back, stomach, inner arms). Seek medical treatment if a severe reaction occurs.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Insect ID, please.
Location: Cleveland, TN
August 31, 2016 5:34 am
Found this little fuzzy “thing” on the backside of a leaf on my River Birch tree. Never have seen anything like this before so would like to know exactly what it is. Can you help?
Signature: Rick McCormick

Whitemarked Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Whitemarked Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Dear Rick,
You can see by comparing your caterpillar to the one in this BugGuide image that this is a Whitemarked Tussock Moth Caterpillar,
Orgyia leucostigma.  According to BugGuide:  “CAUTION: Contact with hairs may cause an allergic reaction.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What Type of Caterpillar Is This??
Location: Columbus, Ohio
August 20, 2016 6:57 am
Dear Mr. Bugman,
I’ve seen tons of caterpillars around my house recently but I’ve never seen any like this one. What type of caterpillar is this??
Signature: Samantha

Milkweed Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Milkweed Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Dear Samantha,
Do you have milkweed plants growing near your house?  We believe this is a Milkweed Tussock Moth Caterpillar,
Euchaetes egle, and it feeds on milkweed.  Though it seems lighter in color to individuals on our site, it does match this BugGuide image pretty closely.

That looks exactly like it, thank you!!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Got bit
Location: Belleville, Ontario, Canada
June 29, 2016 10:41 am
Hi,
I got stung… bit? by this caterpillar. I tried looking online and I think it is a gypsy moth caterpillar but I have no idea if that’s correct or not. I am really hoping its not going to be anything serious. It was in Belleville, Ontario end of June. So far I am only seeing a red bump where it bit or stung me and a little rash around the area, but its only been 20 minutes. Hope you can help identify.
Signature: Melissa

Gypsy Moth Caterpillar

Gypsy Moth Caterpillar

Dear Melissa,
Based on this BugGuide image, we concur that you have correctly identified a Gypsy Moth Caterpillar,
Lymantria disparBugGuide does not mention stinging or urticating hairs, but according to the Penn State University Entomology Department:  “Some people are dermally allergic to the caterpillars. The urticating hairs cause skin rashes on some humans. This is most noticeable in May when larvae are small. Children appear to be more prone to this problem than adults.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillars
Location: On a Chiku (Sapodilla) tree in Singapore.
June 16, 2016 11:04 pm
Dear Bugman,
I found this caterpillar chomping on my Sapodilla leaves this morning. It’s about 6 cm in length. Would you be able to identify it?
Signature: Dillan

Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Dear Dillan,
This is a Tussock Moth Caterpillar in the Tribe Orgyiini. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination