Currently viewing the category: "Tent Caterpillars and Kin"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Stunning and Curious Grasshopper
Location: Marloth Park, South Africa
April 18, 2014 3:49 am
Hello bugpeople!
… And would it, by any chance, leave a hard yellow, white and black striped “shell” when it dies? I recently found one on the ground that looks similar to his body. But we’ve also seen a lot of furry yellow black and white striped caterpillars that I’ve been unable to identify (last pic)
I appreciate your help! Thank you!
Tomorrow I’ll go outside and see if I can find that “skin” and take a photo. It looks like it has little feet attached to it.Almost like what a millipede would have but it’s striped – yellow, black, white.
Cheers,
Signature: Kenda

Possibly Lappet Moth Caterpillar

Possibly Lappet Moth Caterpillar

Sat, Apr 19, 2014 at 5:27 AM
I took two photos of the caterpillar “shell” thingy. It has lost a lot of color since I last saw it. It’s now become a dull grayish, and it’s falling apart. All the little rings are coming loose. I wonder if it’s not the shell of the caterpillar we’ve been seeing around here (3rd pic). Should I be posting this on your site? I’ll gladly do so.
No pressure about getting back with me. I imagine you all receive tons of emails.
Many thanks!
Cheers,
Kenda

Millipede Exoskeleton

Millipede Exoskeleton

The exoskeleton is unrelated to either the caterpillar or the grasshopper.  This is a millipede exoskeleton.

Goodness. Thank you!  I’m working on my next blog post. I will send you an email when it’s published. Hopefully it will help drive some traffic to your site, but then again, maybe you have too much traffic already!
Thank you, kindly, Mr. Marlos!
Cheers,
Kenda

Hi again Kenda,
The caterpillar might be a Lappet Moth Caterpillar in the family Lasiocampidae, though we were unable to locate a matching image on ISpot.
  The Millipede might have fallen prey to Millipede Assassin Bugs or a Glowworm.

Oh wow. I didn’t even realize you were working on this one!  Thank you. We’ve seen about 6 of these caterpillars around the house (3 coming inside), and they are moving fast. I’ve taken them all out and watched 2 climb the outside wall and disappear in the rafters. I figured they were looking for a place to hang and pupate, but they disappeared.
Thank you again, SO much for your help!
Cheers,
Kenda

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: caterpillar
Location: Tulum, Yucatan, Jungle
March 17, 2014 7:18 am
We have lots of these in Tulum, Yucatan right now. Can you tell me what is is and what it turns into please.
Signature: tulum

Caterpillar

Caterpillar

Dear tulum,
The best we can do at this time is to eliminate this as a Butterfly Caterpillar.  It is the caterpillar of a Moth.

thank you very much for your response!
april

Karl Identifies a Lappet Moth Caterpillar
Hi Daniel and tulum:
It looks like the caterpillar of a Lappet moth in the genus Euglyphis (Lasiocampidae Macromphaliinae).  There are several potential species but the best match I was able to find was E. maria, which ranges from Mexico to Panama. The Area de Conservación Guanacaste (ACG) has several images from Costa Rica, including this one. The long urticating hairs cause a skin rash if contacted. Regards. Karl

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unidentifiable Hairy Caterpillar
Location: East London, South Africa
December 25, 2013 5:27 am
Hello WTB. My dad and I came across this hairy caterpillar in my garden in South Africa. Unfortunately none of the insect guides offer pictures of butterfly and moth larvae, and as a result I am familiar with adult butterflies and moths, but know very few of their respective larvae. We found this caterpillar on our Bauhinia gaupinii and I was wondering if you could identify it or give me a rough idea of what it could be so I can research it further. Thanks in advance.
Signature: Simon Robinson

Lappet Moth Caterpillar

Cape Lappet Moth Caterpillar

Hi Simon,
We believe this is a Lappet Moth Caterpillar in the family Lasiocampidae, but we have not had any luck matching its markings to any South African species online.  There are many similar looking Caterpillars on the ISpot website, and the Cape Lappet
, Eutricha capensis, pictured there looks close, but the coloration and markings are different.  We would not discount that this might be individual variation, or perhaps there are changes that occur during the various instars the caterpillars undergo during metamorphosis.  Interestingly, the moment we wrote that comment and returned to ISpot, we followed a link that revealed an example of the Cape Lappet that looks exactly like your individual.

Cape Lappet Moth Caterpillar

Cape Lappet Moth Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Nest
Location: Southwestern Pennsylvania 18mi north of Pittsburgh
May 19, 2013 10:17 pm
Today I photographed and interesting cocoon like nest, with a bunch of something(maybe insects) inside.
I’ve never seen a nest like this in the trees. It may, for all I know, it may be a small, tent caterpillar’s nest.
But the ones I’ve always seen are much larger.
I didn’t dig into the nest to find out ’cause I didn’t want to intrude on the bugs. Any Ideas?
Signature: Rich

Nest might belong to Tent Caterpillars

Nest might belong to Tent Caterpillars

Dear Rich,
We agree with you that this might be the newly started nest of a recently hatched colony of Eastern Tent Caterpillars.  We will try to get a second opinion from Eric Eaton.  More information on the Eastern Tent Caterpillar can be found on BugGuide.  As an aside, we will be flying into Pittsburgh in a few weeks to visit family.

Possibly Tent Caterpillar Nest

Possibly Tent Caterpillar Nest

Eric Eaton provides another possibility
Daniel:
Tough call.  I’m thinking Fall Webworm, as they tend to make webs on the outer reaches of branches, whereas tent caterpillars build webs in the crotches of branches, often several “tents” to one tree, or in a series of trees close to each other.  Fall Webworm tends to have more isolated colonies.
Eric

Thank you so much for the return email.
Have a good trip and a great stay at, “Da Burgh”.
Thank you both again for the rapid response and ID.
Isn’t it a bit early for webber caterpillars to appear?
Richard Rich

Once we received Eric’s response, we pondered the time of year.  Tent Caterpillars already have established nests in the spring and Fall Webworms are most noticeable later in the season, but they do begin hatching earlier.  Your “nest” might be the beginning of what will become a substantial “web” later this year.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: caterpillar
Location: Cyprus mediterranean ocean
November 18, 2012 2:44 am
i owned 4 of these before all the way to moth stage and i know they’re some kind of southern or western tent caterpillar, the moths are almost exactly the same but i just cant find anything on the internet that looks exactly like it
Signature: tatiana h

Oak Eggar Caterpillar

Hi Tatiana,
By taking a circuitous route, we believe we have identified this caterpillar as an Oak Eggar Caterpillar,
Lasiocampa quercus.  We started with the Insects of Cyprus website and found this photo of a moth and then searched its scientific name until we found this image of the caterpillar on a French website that looks identical to your individual.  More photos can be found on the Moths and Butterflies of Europe and North Africa website and more photos and information are available on the UK Mothswebsite which states:  “The larvae change considerably in appearance during development, and care should be taken not to confuse early instars with the larvae of other eggars (Trichiura, Eriogaster and Lasiocampa species). Fox moth (Macrothylacia rubi) and the Drinker (Euthrix potatoria) should be checked when identifying last instar larvae. Early instar larvae from moorlands are often duller, especially on the dorsum, than larvae from other habitats.”  We suspect there is much local variability in the coloration and markings of the caterpillars.  

Oak Eggar Caterpillar

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Need help with caterpillar
Location: Northwest Oregon
September 25, 2012 11:18 pm
Hi there,
I am a photographer and I would like to know what kind of caterpillar I photographed.
It is about 2 inches long and is a little hairy. I attached a picture to help you figure out what it is.
Best regards,
S.D.
Signature: S.D.

American Lappet Moth Caterpillar

Hi S.D.
In our opinion, this is the caterpillar of the American Lappet Moth,
Phyllodesma americana.  You may read about the American Lappet Moth Caterpillar on BugGuide where it states:  “Caterpillars feed on leaves of alder, birch, oak, poplar, willow, snowbrush (Ceanothus velutinus), chinquapin (Chrysolepis chrysophylla), and members of the rose family; larvae rest longitudinally along a twig during the day, and feed at night” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination