Currently viewing the category: "Tent Caterpillars and Kin"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mystery caterpillar
Location: Dubai UAE
November 27, 2016 10:57 pm
Hello,
Students found this caterpillar in Dubai UAE. We are having a difficult time identifying it. Do you recognize it?
Signature: Nichole and grade 3

Lappet Moth Caterpillar

Lappet Moth Caterpillar

Dear Nichole and grade 3,
This appears to be a Lappet Moth Caterpillar from the family Lasiocampidae.  We will attempt to locate potential species in the UAE.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown caterpillar
Location: Mapungubwe National Park, South Africa
November 15, 2016 4:24 am
Hi everybody!
I’m busy making photo album of my trip in South Africa in 2015, and I’m missing the name of a fluffy caterpillar!
Hope you can help me!
Thanks a lot!
Signature: Virginia, Association NARIES

Lappet Moth Caterpillar

Lappet Moth Caterpillar

Dear Virginia,
We are confident that this is a Lappet Moth Caterpillar from the family Lasiocampidae, but we are uncertain of the species.  There are some similar looking images on iSpot.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: FOR IDENTIFICATION
Location: Sitio Inamong, Arakan Valley, North Cotabato, Philippines
November 15, 2016 4:10 am
Hi Mr. BugMan! I’d like to verify if this is a White Marked Tussock Moth Caterpillar? Coz the 4 tufts toward the head are brown instead of the usual white tufts. Found this in a field of cogon grass. Thanks a lot!
Signature: -Dana

Tussock Moth Caterpillar:  Orgyia species

Tussock Moth Caterpillar: Orgyia species

Dear Dana,
Your caterpillar bears an uncanny resemblance to the White Marked Tussock Moth Caterpillar,
Orgyia leucostigma, but because of your location and the subtle differences in color, we suspect your individual is a closely related species in the same genus.   Project Noah has a dead ringer for your caterpillar posted, but alas, it is only identified to the genus level.  Project Noah indicates:  “The caterpillar, or larval, stage of these species often has a distinctive appearance of alternating bristles and haired projections. Like other families of moths, many Tussock Moth caterpillars have urticating hairs (often hidden among longer, softer hairs) which can cause painful reactions if they come into contact with skin.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unusual Bug
Location: Columbia, SC
October 10, 2016 6:22 am
Students found this bug at school and we would like to identify it.
Signature: L Adair

Whitemarked Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Whitemarked Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Dear L Adair,
This is most likely a Whitemarked Tussock Moth Caterpillar,
Orgyia leucostigma, but we would not rule out that it is a different species in a genus that has many similar looking caterpillars.  You should warn any young children to avoid handling Whitemarked Tussock Moth Caterpillars because, according to BugGuide:  “CAUTION: Avoid handling the caterpillar, as its hair is known to cause allergic reactions, especially in areas of the body with sensitive skin (e.g. back, stomach, inner arms). Seek medical treatment if a severe reaction occurs.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Caterpillar
Location: Palominas, AZ, Cochise County
September 26, 2016 4:15 pm
This caterpillar was found on a Mesquite tree in Palominas, Arizona, Cochise County, on or around September 24, 2016, by Jessica Ray. She requested that I submit her photos for identification.
Signature: Delores

Lappet Moth Caterpillar

Lappet Moth Caterpillar

Dear Delores,
This is definitely a Lappet Moth Caterpillar in the family Lasiocampidae, but we cannot say for certain which species or even definitively which genus.  According to a posting entitled Living Illusions on the Lappet Moth 
Phyllodesma americana on the Beautiful Nightmares blog:  “The caterpillars munch on leaves by night, hiding on twigs and bark by day. They are also well-hidden, but because they have to be able to live on a variety of different trees, each of which has a differently-colored bark, lappet caterpillars don’t have a color that matches a particular background. Instead they, like their parent moths, have bodies with distorted outlines, specifically a lateral fringe of long hairs.  On bark, this helps a caterpillar “merge” with the bark on which it rests. …  Animals that depend on camouflage have to stay very still to avoid detection, but if they are spotted, staying still quickly becomes futile. Many animals use color to startle predators as a backup plan, the best-known example being the red-eyed tree frog. At rest, the frogs appear a solid leafy-green, but if disturbed, they quickly open their eyes. The sudden appearance of two giant, bright red eyes can be enough to startle a predator, which might give the frog time enough to make a hasty escape.”  Discover Life has images that support that might be a correct species identification, however, based on this BugGuide image, we would not rule out that it might be in the genus Tolype.  At any rate, your marvelous images clearly depict both the camouflage and the flash of warning colors.    

Lappet Moth Caterpillar

Lappet Moth Caterpillar

Thank you Daniel for identifying the Lappet moth caterpillar.  I searched high and low trying to identify it myself and finally gave up.  Again, many thanks.
Delores

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Insect ID, please.
Location: Cleveland, TN
August 31, 2016 5:34 am
Found this little fuzzy “thing” on the backside of a leaf on my River Birch tree. Never have seen anything like this before so would like to know exactly what it is. Can you help?
Signature: Rick McCormick

Whitemarked Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Whitemarked Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Dear Rick,
You can see by comparing your caterpillar to the one in this BugGuide image that this is a Whitemarked Tussock Moth Caterpillar,
Orgyia leucostigma.  According to BugGuide:  “CAUTION: Contact with hairs may cause an allergic reaction.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination