Currently viewing the category: "Stinging Slug Caterpillars"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: green bug we found
Location: Jacksonville, FL
September 8, 2013 3:53 pm
Dear Bugman,
My friend found this green bug on the windshield of his car in Jacksonville, Florida this week,( early September). We’re wondering if you know what kind of bug it is?
Thanks so much,
Signature: Curious

Crowned Slug Caterpillar

Crowned Slug Caterpillar

Dear Curious,
This is a Crowned Slug Caterpillar,
Isa textula.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what the heck is this
Location: fuquay varina nc
September 2, 2013 12:55 pm
Walked past a branch and felt this awful pain in my leg followrd by whelps and redness then very sore. Took this pic. Holy moly what is it
Signature: glenn

Saddleback Caterpillar

Saddleback Caterpillar

Hi Glenn,
The stinging capabilities of the Saddleback Caterpillar,
Acharia stimulea, are well documented online.  According to BugGuide:  “Caterpillars are capable of inflicting lasting and painful stings with their spines.”  According to Featured Creatures:  “Acharia stimulea is best known as a medically significant species. The large spines and potent hemolytic venom rank it as one of the most important North American species of urticating caterpillars, with larvae from the moth family Megalopygidae being the only lepidopterans considered more dangerous (Scott 1963, 1964; Durden and Mullen 2009; Hossler 2010).  The spines of A. stimulea are strong, acutely pointed, and hollow. They embed deeply into tissue and break off, and can interrupt healing as the protoplasm from the venom glands dries into the tissue area (Gilmer 1925). The venom itself can cause a systemic condition called erucism or acute urticaria, for which severe symptoms may include migraines, gastrointestinal symptoms, asthma complications, anaphylactic shock, rupturing of erythrocytes, and hemorrhaging (USAF 1982, Hossler 2009).  Physically manifested symptoms may or may not be present with erucism (Hossler 2009). Contact dermatitis caused by A. stimulea includes immediate intense burning sensations around the contact zone, arector pili muscles tightening causing hair to stand on end, increased perspiration in the affected area, red blanching of the skin, and blistering (Edwards et al. 1986; Hossler 2009, 2010). Symptoms can last for five hours, and leave red blotches in the envenomation site (Hossler 2009).”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: strange caterpillar
Location: Rolla, MO
August 24, 2013 12:07 pm
Hi, I found this on my Japanese Maple tree this a.m. It’s beautiful but scary all at once. I live in Central Missouri.
Thanks so much!
Signature: Sarah Farmer

Stinging Rose Caterpillar

Stinging Rose Caterpillar

Dear Sarah,
Handle the Stinging Rose Caterpillar,
Parasa indetermina, with caution, as it is capable of producing a painful sting.  Interestingly, BugGuide does not list maple among the food plants, which are listed as:  “Hosts of the stinging rose caterpillar include apple, cottonwood, dogwood, hickory, oak, redbud, sycamore and rose bushes.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ugandan Rainforest Caterpillars
Location: Budongo Forest Reserve, Uganda
March 18, 2013 9:11 am
Hi guys,
We work in the Budongo Forest Reserve in northwest Uganda (on the edge of the rift valley). These three chaps have all at some time in the past been responsible for some pretty nasty stings in the forest (the gummi-bear looking green chap in particular!), but they’re all so pretty we had to forgive them – do you have any idea what they might be? They’re all between 4-7cm long. Cheers!
Signature: Surfingpigeon

Stinging Slug Caterpillar

Stinging Slug Caterpillar

Dear Surfingpigeon,
Stinging Caterpillars can be quite unpleasant and some are even considered dangerous.  The green gummi bear Caterpillar is a member of the Stinging Slug Caterpillar family Limacodidae in our opinion, but we will need to try to research the species.

Possibly Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Possibly Tussock Moth Caterpillar

  We believe the other two caterpillars might be in the Tussock Moth subfamily  Lymantriinae, many of which have utricating hairs that cause irritation when contact occurs.  We will attempt to do additional research after posting a few more submissions.

Possibly Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Possibly Tussock Moth Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I think it is a slug
Location: -19.779536, -44.444815
January 24, 2013 9:54 am
Can you help me with this one?
Signature: Landon

Slug Caterpillar

Dear Landon,
We do not know how to calculate your location, but we are guessing Brazil.  Please confirm.  This is a Slug Moth Caterpillar in the family Limacodidae, and it looks very similar to a North American species, the Monkey Slug, and we suspect it might be in the same genus
Phobetron.

Monkey Slug

Thank you!
Yes I live in Brazil.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar
Location: Ulu Yam, Selangor, Malaysia
January 2, 2013 8:03 pm
What is this?
found it at Ulu Yam, Selangor, Malaysia.
shoot at 5 a.m
Signature: Asyraf

Stinging Slug Caterpillar

Dear Asyraf,
This is a Stinging Slug Caterpillar in the family Limacodidae, but it appears different from this Malaysian Stinging Slug Caterpillar from our archives or this Blue Striped Nettle Grub, also from Malaysia.  While we can provide a family name, we are unable to provide you with a species at this time.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination