Currently viewing the category: "Stinging Slug Caterpillars"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What could this alien be?
Location: Atlanta, Georgia
September 11, 2016 9:10 am
This attached itself to my friends car and rode the whole way home. Moved at the pace of a snail.
Signature: From, Zan

Monkey Slug

Monkey Slug

Dear Zan,
This is a Stinging Slug Caterpillar commonly called a Monkey Slug.  Monkey Slugs and other Stinging Slug Caterpillars should be handled with extreme caution because contact may result in a painful sting, and possibly an allergic reaction.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar found in Sepilok Borneo
Location: Sepilok Borneo
August 16, 2016 5:05 am
Can you help my little boy find out what this caterpillar will turn into? We found it in Sepilok Borneo yesterday.
Signature: Thanks amy

Stinging Slug Caterpillar

Stinging Slug Caterpillar

Dear Amy,
This is a Stinging Slug Caterpillar in the family Limacodidae.  We have not had any luck identifying the species, but the moths are relatively drab and unassuming looking.  Many of the moths are pictured on the Moths of Borneo site.  You should warn your family that carelessly handling the caterpillar may result in a painful sting.   

Thank you so much for your reply.  Fred was thrilled to know the answer.
Amy Crook

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: leaf looking with no legs
Location: Auburn, NY
August 15, 2016 6:07 pm
I live in Auburn, NY and this was on the table underneath a black walnut tree. We thought it was a shriveled leaf, but it was soft and moved.. Looking closer, it has a soft whitish underbelly and no visible legs, just star like legs of the leaf looking back.. But they don’t move. Very slow moving, What is it?
Signature: Pat P

Monkey Slug

Monkey Slug

Dear Pat P,
The Monkey Slug is the caterpillar of the Hag Moth.  Handle the Monkey Slug with caution.  It is a stinging caterpillar.

Thanks so much. We were all surprised by it and did not touch. Are they a nuisance moth  should they not be killed ?
Thanks again.
Have a truly wonderful day!
Pat

This is a native species, not a pest species.  We do not support killing either the Monkey Slug caterpillar of adult Hag Moth.

Thanks again. I was careful to let it go in the brush. I don’t kill critters unless they are a danger. Good to know they aren’t harmful. It was very interesting to watch.
Have a truly wonderful day!
Pat

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this cat spiller?
Location: Benchley N Brazis county
August 9, 2016 9:45 pm
Found this bug on. My feed cam
Signature: Betsy

Spiny Oak Slug Caterpillar

Spiny Oak Slug Caterpillar

Dear Betsy,
With all due respect, are you in North Brazos (not Brazis) County in Texas?  Also, please clarify what you mean by “Found this bug on. My feed cam” because we don’t understand.  This appears to be a Spiny Oak Slug Caterpillar,
Euclea delphinii, based on this BugGuide image, though BugGuide notes:  “BugGuide photos from the southeastern states previously identified as Spiny Oak-Slug Moth (Euclea delphinii) have been moved to the genus page because we have no information (as of December 2006) on how to distinguish adults or larvae of delphinii from the virtually identical Euclea nanina.”  DNA analysis might be required for precise species identification, so we would not rule out another member of the genus as three species seemingly have overlapping ranges in Texas.  Stinging Slug Caterpillars, including the Spiny Oak Catepillar, should be handled with caution as they are capable of inflicting a painful sting as well as a bad reaction in some individuals.

Thank you. I hadn’t seen an “asp” in many years. The ones I remember were gray or cream color. The colors on this little guy, were so vivid.
I live in the Benchley area off the OSR. It was on chicken’s Feed can. “Gotta” keep the raccoons out.
Thank you for your time.
Betsy

Hi again Betsy,
Thanks for clarifying that.  Asps are actually a different family of stinging Caterpillar, also called Puss Moth Caterpillars in the Flannel Moth family Megalopygidae while Stinging Slug Caterpillars are in the family Limacodidae.  There are other families with stinging caterpillars including Io Moth Caterpillars in the family Saturniidae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this bugs name
Location: Arena, Wisconsin
August 2, 2016 11:53 am
I found this bugs all over my apple tree and I’ve never seen anything like this.
Signature: Kary

Monkey Slugs

Monkey Slugs

Dear Kary,
These Caterpillars are commonly called Monkey Slugs and they should be handled with caution as they are capable of delivering a painful sting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Seems to have horns but slides like a snail…
Location: Columbus, Georgia, United States
January 22, 2016 6:07 pm
Coworker found this on her truck, last summer…maybe end of July. We are in Columbus, Georgia, United States.
She said this bug was in the process of forming a web; it was leaving some sort of sticky substance. It ‘slid’ like a slug but moved sideways, it had no legs. It looks as if it has some sort of horns above what she thinks are the eyes. She saw a smaller one the next day but never saw anymore and hasn’t been able to find out what it is online or in any book she’s researched.
Signature: Monica Edmonds

Monkey Slug

Monkey Slug

Dear Monica,
This is a Monkey Slug, one of the Stinging Slug Caterpillars in the family Limacodidae.  It appears to be missing several of its “arms” and it is described on BugGuide as being:  “Bizarre, brown, hairy creature that resembles some sort of aquatic creature more than a caterpillar. Three pairs of long arms and three pairs of short arms, which are “deciduous” – often one or more is missing.”  It is capable of stinging and it should be handled with caution.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination