Currently viewing the category: "Stinging Slug Caterpillars"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: ID Stinging Slug Caterpillar, MD, USA
Location: Northern Baltimore County, Maryland, USA
July 25, 2015 5:09 pm
Can someone ID this caterpillar found this week in northern Baltimore County, MD, USA? It was found on a winterberry holly bush (Ilex species). I suspect that it’s a stinging slug caterpillar of some kind, but I can’t find a species that that matches the coloration.
Signature: K Smith

Spiny Oak Slug Caterpillar

Spiny Oak Slug Caterpillar

Dear K Smith,
The coloration of the Spiny Oak Slug Caterpillar,
Euclea delphinii, appears to have considerable variation.  This image from BugGuide is quite close to your individual.

Ann Levitsky, Mary Lemmink Lawrence, Sue Dougherty, Kitty Heidih liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug Identification
Location: Central Victoria, Australia
July 24, 2015 7:54 pm
Hi, just curious about what this little guy might be – and I do mean little – I could barely see him with the naked eye. It is maybe 3mm long, and was found on a gum leaf, with what MIGHT have been eggs embedded in the leaf. Or not. Thanks :-)
Signature: Ann Jeffree

Painted Cup Moth Caterpillar

Painted Cup Moth Caterpillar

Dear Ann,
This is a Painted Cup Moth Caterpillar,
Doratiphora oxleyi, one of the Slug Caterpillars in the family Limacodidae.  Many members of this family have stinging spines and there is a really nice image on FlickR.  You can read more about the Painted Cup Moth Caterpillar on the Butterfly House website where it states:  “Each shield bears four tubercles. Yellow stinging hairs are protruded from these when the Caterpillar is disturbed. These fold into triangular pockets when the Caterpillar is relaxed.  Along the sides of the caterpillar are fleshy spikes, like a skirt. There is also a flap covering the head. The spikes are translucent, and can be reddish or yellowish. The front pair are especially likely to be red. The caterpillars move like slugs because their legs are reduced.  The caterpillars feed on a variety of: Gum Trees.”  Though we have no shortage of family members on our site, your image is a new species for our archives.

Thanks very much for your reply Daniel. I’m pleased to have been able to send
you a new family member for your files. I will look out for a Painted Moth in
the Spring and see if I can add further to your database.

:-) Ann

Melanie Conover, Alisha Bragg, Andrea Leonard Drummond, Kitty Heidih, Sue Dougherty, Mary Lemmink Lawrence liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: caterpillar
Location: central Florida (Bushnell)
June 6, 2015 6:00 pm
found this on the ground… fell from tree… Have yet to see one like this! can you tell me what kind it is? It’s only about 2-2.5 cm long. Help! Thanks!
Signature: Stephen Keszey

Skiff Moth Caterpillar

Skiff Moth Caterpillar

Dear Stephen,
Congratulations on recognizing this as a caterpillar.  This is a Slug Moth Caterpillar in the family Limacodidae, and after a bit of searching on BugGuide, we identified it as a Skiff Moth Caterpillar,
Prolimacodes badia.  According to BugGuide, the Skiff Moth is “Common; sometimes abundant in Florida … larvae feed on leaves of wide variety of trees and shrubs, including birch, blueberry, cherry, chestnut, Hophornbeam (Ostrya virginiana), oak, poplar, Sweetgale (Myrica gale), willow, and others.”  We will be post-dating your submission to go live toward the end of June as we will be away from the office.

Linda Kirk, Charlene Movaghar, Lori Ledeboer, Sue Dougherty, Andrea Leonard Drummond, Amy Gosch, Jessica M. Schemm, Kitty Heidih liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Green, yellow and blue caterpillar?
Location: West of Merriwa, NSW, Australia.
April 10, 2015 11:31 pm
Hi,
Is this a caterpillar?
It was about 30mm long, sitting on a Lomandra leaf.
It was in a brigalow forest , about 400m altitude.
Signature: lsbth

Slug Moth Caterpillar, we believe

Slug Moth Caterpillar, we believe

Dear lsbth,
We believe this is a Slug Moth Caterpillar or Cup Moth Caterpillar in the family Limacodidae, but we have not been able to locate a matching image to substantiate that belief.  This species does not appear to be pictured on the quite comprehensive Butterfly House websitePerhaps one of our readers will have more luck than we have had.

 

Amy Gosch, Mary Lemmink Lawrence liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spiny larva
Location: Thailand, Chiang Mai
March 2, 2015 5:36 am
Found that larva eating a leave in my garden.
No good idea to touch it – seems to have a light poison (acetic acid or so) in his spines.
Any idea what the adult bug would be?
Signature: Regards from the sunny Thailand

Stinging Slug Caterpillar

Stinging Slug Caterpillar

We believe this is a Stinging Slug Caterpillar in the family Limacodidae.

Alfonso Moreno, Sue Dougherty, Amy Gosch, Mary Lemmink Lawrence, Kathy Haines liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: caterpillar ID
Location: Zambia
February 10, 2015 1:02 pm
Please identify this caterpillar or it may be a slug caterpillar or some kind of saddleback.
Just after rainy season close to Zambezi river at a lodge near Livingstone, Victoria Falls.
Thank you
Signature: Marc

Stinging Slug Caterpillar

Stinging Slug Caterpillar

Dear Marc,
We agree that this is a Stinging Slug Caterpillar in the family Limacodidae, and we will attempt to make a species identification.

Dear Daniel,
Thank you for your prompt response. I really appreciate it. The little horns flare when the caterpillar is disturbed. It reminds me of the nudibrancs you see under the water if you scuba dive… brilliant.
Kind regards

And is not the common name of a nudibranc a Sea Slug?

Sue Dougherty, Alfonso Moreno, Alisha Bragg, Mary Lemmink Lawrence, Andrea Leonard Drummond, Kyla Gunter Gatlin, Melinda Lutz Ledsome liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination