Currently viewing the category: "Stinging Slug Caterpillars"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar
Location: Northeastern Houston TX
October 17, 2016 5:29 pm
I trimmed some branches off my small oak tree and when picking up the branches I felt a sting similar to a wasp sting in my hand. Within 30 minutes I was in blinding pain raidiating up my arm like my hand was on fire and broken and pain in the armpit. Pain lasted about 12 hours and 2 days later my arm is still sore. I’ve begun searching the oak for possible culprits, I’m leaning towards and asp caterpillar but haven’t found one yet. Instead I have found these two beauties. I’m going to keep searching. I’m thinking the one is a Polyphemus caterpillar. The other maybe a spiny oak slug?
Signature: Theresa in TX

Spiny Oak Slug Caterpillar

Spiny Oak Slug Caterpillar

Dear Theresa,
While one of your caterpillars is a harmless Polyphemus Moth Caterpillar, which you can verify by comparing to this BugGuide image, your other caterpillar is definitely a Spiny Oak Slug Caterpillar,
Euclea delphinii, which is also pictured on BugGuide.  There are many species of Stinging Slug Caterpillars in the family Limacodidae, and of the Spiny Oak Slug Caterpillar, BugGuide indicates:  “Caution, this is a stinging caterpillar. ”

Polyphemus Caterpillar

Polyphemus Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: pretty picture
Location: Chapel Hill, NC
October 12, 2016 6:30 pm
I am an amateur bug collector & cannot figure out what in the world this one is.
Found it on a leaf on a sidewalk in the autumn (I believe) of 2013. Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Soft, domed body.
The photo was taken with a camera phone through a simple microscope. Ignored the bug for a little bit, noticed it wasn’t on the microscope, & found it working its way up my nearby brass lamp. Placed back outside on the leaf.
Signature: LT

Crowned Slug

Crowned Slug

Dear LT,
This is a Crowned Slug Caterpillar,
Isa textula, and we verified its identity on BugGuide.  You should exercise caution in handling the Crowned Slug as it is a member of the Stinging Slug Caterpillar family Limacodidae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What could this alien be?
Location: Atlanta, Georgia
September 11, 2016 9:10 am
This attached itself to my friends car and rode the whole way home. Moved at the pace of a snail.
Signature: From, Zan

Monkey Slug

Monkey Slug

Dear Zan,
This is a Stinging Slug Caterpillar commonly called a Monkey Slug.  Monkey Slugs and other Stinging Slug Caterpillars should be handled with extreme caution because contact may result in a painful sting, and possibly an allergic reaction.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar found in Sepilok Borneo
Location: Sepilok Borneo
August 16, 2016 5:05 am
Can you help my little boy find out what this caterpillar will turn into? We found it in Sepilok Borneo yesterday.
Signature: Thanks amy

Stinging Slug Caterpillar

Stinging Slug Caterpillar

Dear Amy,
This is a Stinging Slug Caterpillar in the family Limacodidae.  We have not had any luck identifying the species, but the moths are relatively drab and unassuming looking.  Many of the moths are pictured on the Moths of Borneo site.  You should warn your family that carelessly handling the caterpillar may result in a painful sting.   

Thank you so much for your reply.  Fred was thrilled to know the answer.
Amy Crook

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: leaf looking with no legs
Location: Auburn, NY
August 15, 2016 6:07 pm
I live in Auburn, NY and this was on the table underneath a black walnut tree. We thought it was a shriveled leaf, but it was soft and moved.. Looking closer, it has a soft whitish underbelly and no visible legs, just star like legs of the leaf looking back.. But they don’t move. Very slow moving, What is it?
Signature: Pat P

Monkey Slug

Monkey Slug

Dear Pat P,
The Monkey Slug is the caterpillar of the Hag Moth.  Handle the Monkey Slug with caution.  It is a stinging caterpillar.

Thanks so much. We were all surprised by it and did not touch. Are they a nuisance moth  should they not be killed ?
Thanks again.
Have a truly wonderful day!
Pat

This is a native species, not a pest species.  We do not support killing either the Monkey Slug caterpillar of adult Hag Moth.

Thanks again. I was careful to let it go in the brush. I don’t kill critters unless they are a danger. Good to know they aren’t harmful. It was very interesting to watch.
Have a truly wonderful day!
Pat

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this cat spiller?
Location: Benchley N Brazis county
August 9, 2016 9:45 pm
Found this bug on. My feed cam
Signature: Betsy

Spiny Oak Slug Caterpillar

Spiny Oak Slug Caterpillar

Dear Betsy,
With all due respect, are you in North Brazos (not Brazis) County in Texas?  Also, please clarify what you mean by “Found this bug on. My feed cam” because we don’t understand.  This appears to be a Spiny Oak Slug Caterpillar,
Euclea delphinii, based on this BugGuide image, though BugGuide notes:  “BugGuide photos from the southeastern states previously identified as Spiny Oak-Slug Moth (Euclea delphinii) have been moved to the genus page because we have no information (as of December 2006) on how to distinguish adults or larvae of delphinii from the virtually identical Euclea nanina.”  DNA analysis might be required for precise species identification, so we would not rule out another member of the genus as three species seemingly have overlapping ranges in Texas.  Stinging Slug Caterpillars, including the Spiny Oak Catepillar, should be handled with caution as they are capable of inflicting a painful sting as well as a bad reaction in some individuals.

Thank you. I hadn’t seen an “asp” in many years. The ones I remember were gray or cream color. The colors on this little guy, were so vivid.
I live in the Benchley area off the OSR. It was on chicken’s Feed can. “Gotta” keep the raccoons out.
Thank you for your time.
Betsy

Hi again Betsy,
Thanks for clarifying that.  Asps are actually a different family of stinging Caterpillar, also called Puss Moth Caterpillars in the Flannel Moth family Megalopygidae while Stinging Slug Caterpillars are in the family Limacodidae.  There are other families with stinging caterpillars including Io Moth Caterpillars in the family Saturniidae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination