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Subject: Imperial Moth?
Location: South Central Pa
August 24, 2015 5:03 pm
My husband found this on his maple tree.
8.24.15
We’ve never seen a caterpillar this big.
Our neighbor said it’s a monarch but your page is looking like imperial moth
Signature: Amy Jo

Imperial Moth Caterpillar

Imperial Moth Caterpillar

Dear Amy Jo,
Your identification of this magnificent Imperial Moth Caterpillar is correct, and judging by its size, it will soon spin its cocoon.

Thank you.     Its the prettiest caterpillar I’ve ever seen.  I’m checking our trees for more!  Lol

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Subject: Large Green Caterpillar
Location: Gatineau, Qc (just north of Ottawa)
August 21, 2015 6:35 pm
Hello. I observed and photographed this amazing specimen on August 7th at our cottage. It was 4-5 inches long. I searched and I searched the web to try to ID what type of moth this is, but without any success (but I did learned about many other beautiful large green caterpillars!!). I’ll be able to sleep better and smarter once I know what this is :-)
Signature: Daniel C.

Imperial Moth Caterpillar

Imperial Moth Caterpillar

Dear Daniel,
This is an Imperial Moth Caterpillar, and you are correct that it will eventually metamorphose into a large and beautiful Imperial Moth.

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Subject: Ziggy Stardust Caterpillar!
Location: Arabela, New Mexico
August 21, 2015 3:01 pm
Oh, this spectacular being is going to turn into something fabulous, I just know it! But what????? He is absolutely INCREDIBLE! Found on an oak tree, wondering what it is and if oak is source of food?
Signature: don’t understand this ?

Zephyr Eyed Silkmoth Caterpillar

Zephyr Eyed Silkmoth Caterpillar

Your amazing caterpillar is a Zephyr Eyed Silkmoth Caterpillar, Automeris zephyria, a species found, according to BugGuide, in “Central New Mexico mountains south into the Guadalupe Mountains of west Texas. Only known from east of the Rio Grande.”  BugGuide also notes the caterpillars eat:  “Primarily Oaks (Quercus) and Mountain Mohogany (Cercocarpus), also occasionally found on Willows (Salix sp.), Rose (Rosa sp.), Plum & Cherry (Prunus sp.), and occasionally on several other deciduous woody genera. Will readily accept a variety of genera and species in captivity, including Apple (Malus sp.), Redbud (Cercis sp.), etc.”  The adult Zephyr Eyed Silkmoth is truly a lovely moth.

Zephyr Eyed Silkmoth Caterpillar

Zephyr Eyed Silkmoth Caterpillar

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Orange caterpillar with gray stripes and black horns
Location: Winterville, GA
August 16, 2015 8:48 pm
This was enjoying a leaf on an oak sapling in my woodland garden in the yard this afternoon, August 16th. I hope it’s something native because I left it to eat.
Signature: Stephanie

Spiny Oakworm Moth Caterpillar

Spiny Oakworm Moth Caterpillar

Dear Stephanie,
This is one of the native Oakworms in the genus Anisota, and we believe the closest match we can find on BugGuide is the Spiny Oakworm Moth Caterpillar,
Anisota stigma.  According to BugGuide, the caterpillars feed on the leaves of:  “Oak; also reported from hazel and basswood.”  Your individual appears to be on a willow leaf.  Can you please provide the name of the tree the caterpillar was feeding upon as it does not look like an oak to us. 

Dear Daniel, That is VERY Interesting. Thank you for getting back to me! Ok, the oak tree is a youngster, a little sapling so it’s tough for me to tell but I would say it is in the red oak family…do oaks every hybridize? Don’t they sometimes…it’s hard to tell because it’s young but if I had to guess I’d say maybe a Trukey Oak or a Southern Red oak…or maybe even a hybrid with a water oak or maybe a Laurel oak. I am just very skeptical about it being a willow because I have to acres, and this little woodland section of the yard is what I wouldn’t hesitate to call “dry woods.” I have no bodies of water on my property and all the other things that have sprung up naturally out there (Amer Beauty Berry, White oaks, Willow Oak, Hickory, Serviceberry, Mulberry) are things associated with dry woods I think. I could take some better pictures of the tree tomorrow (and maybe even the caterpillar–she was still there today, and bigger) assuming she’s still out there, if you think that would help. I also live in the part of GA where we have Oglethorpe oaks, for whatever that’s worth.
Thanks for getting back to me!
Stephanie

You do not need to send us images of the tree Stephanie.  You have confirmed that there are plenty of oaks in the vicinity.

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Subject: Catapillar
Location: South central New York state
August 14, 2015 8:19 am
Found crawling up th side of a house. 5 inches long and 1 inch wide. Beautiful yellow and blue spikes.
Signature: Bart

Cecropia Moth Caterpillar

Cecropia Moth Caterpillar

Dear Bart,
This beauty is a Cecropia Moth Caterpillar, and many folks would argue that the adult Cecropia Moth is even lovelier.

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Subject: Caterpillars
Location: Minnesota
August 9, 2015 8:42 pm
Found this on our Apple tree her in Minnesota. He was munching on a leaf. It was a little fatter than my thumb and about 3 inches long.
Signature: Cindy

Cecropia Caterpillar

Cecropia Caterpillar

Hi Cindy,
This is a Cecropia Moth Caterpillar, and according to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on leaves of various trees and shrubs including alder, apple, ash, beech, birch, box-elder, cherry, dogwood, elm, gooseberry, maple, plum, poplar, white oak, willow.  may also feed on lilac and tamarack.”  The adult Cecropia Moth is a magnificent creature.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination