Currently viewing the category: "Silkworms"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Very hungry caterpillar
Location: Deltaville, VA (Tidewater)
July 16, 2015 8:38 am
At first we thought this caterpillar was a tomato or tobacco hornworm, but it was too spiky. We found it in an open field, mid-morning on a 75* day in July. The property is on the middle peninsula of Virginia. We’re surrounded by brackish water (Chesapeake bay watershed), but there are many farms (mostly corn) in the area.
Signature: Kelli

Hickory Horned Devil

Hickory Horned Devil

Dear Kelli,
Though there is no shortage on our site, we are thrilled to be able to create a new posting of the first Hickory Horned Devil of the year.  Each summer we get numerous identification requests for the largest, and arguably most distinctive looking North American caterpillar.  Despite its fierce appearance, the Hickory Horned Devil is perfectly harmless.  Hickory Horned Devils rarely leave the host trees (hickory, walnut and other trees) where they are feeding on leaves, but this large specimen is getting ready to pupate.  It will seek a location with favorable conditions and it will bury itself before metamorphosing into a naked pupa that will pass the winter with the adult Royal Walnut Moth emerging the following year. 

Hickory Horned Devil

Hickory Horned Devil

Kingson Mendoza Maqui, Rachel Laurelle Owens, Norman Gems, Suzanne Stewart, Joani Tompkins, Mary Lemmink Lawrence, Mary Sheridan Page Fatzinger, Heather Duggan-Christensen, Sergio Vicente Naguiat liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beautiful moth
Location: West of St.Louis Missouri
July 15, 2015 6:49 pm
Hi we found this beautiful moth, it actually flew right into me when I was on my deck one evening :), the 2nd picture is a caterpillar my son found, it spun a cocoon so I know it is a moth but not what kind.
Signature: ?

Polyphemus Moth

Polyphemus Moth

Dear ?,
The moth and caterpillar are both the same species.  Thanks for providing such beautiful images of a Polyphemus Moth and a Polyphemus Caterpillar.  If you are able, we would love to include an image of the cocoon in the posting as well.  You can read more about the Polyphemus Moth on BugGuide where it states:  “Larvae feed on leaves of broad-leaved trees and shrubs, including birch, grape, hickory, maple, oak, willow, and members of the rose family.  Adults do not feed.”

Polyphemus Caterpillar

Polyphemus Caterpillar

 

Dori Wagner Eldridge, Jessica M. Schemm, J Amber Z Vartorella liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beautiful caterpillar
Location: In between Fernan Saddle and Wolf Lodge Creek
July 5, 2015 10:58 am
Sooo….were out huckleberry picking on Independence Day and my daughter says “Dad, check out this cool caterpillar I found”. I walk over to her and to my amazement find the coolest Independence Day caterpillar ever! It’s got red spikes, blue spikes, and white dots and they look like fire works too!
Signature: Joe Hitz

Ceanothus Silkmoth Caterpillar, we believe

Ceanothus Silkmoth Caterpillar, we believe

Dear Joe,
Your images are spectacular.  While we are certain your caterpillar is a Giant Silkmoth Caterpillar in the genus Hyalophora, we are not certain if it will become a Ceanothus Silkmoth or a Columbia Silkmoth as both species have very similar looking caterpillars.  We are leaning toward the Ceanothus Silkmoth Caterpillar,
Hyalophora euryalus, and according to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on a number of trees and shrubs, including Red Alder (Alnus rubra), birch, Antelope Bitterbrush (Purshia tridentata), buckthorn (Rhamnus), Buffaloberry (Sheperdia canadensis), Ceanothus species, cherry, gooseberry (Ribes), Hardhack (Spiraea douglasii), hazel, Madrone (Arbutus menziesii), manzanita (Arctostaphylos), Mountain Mahogany (Cercocarpus betuloides), Mountain Maple (Acer glabrum), rose, Saskatoon Serviceberry (Amelanchier alnifolia), willow (Salix), and occasionally Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii).”  According to BugGuide, the caterpillar:  “changes colors as it develops and molts; mid instars are the most brilliantly colored with nine pairs of dorsal yellow spines, the first three pairs with partial to complete black rings; a middorsal yellow spine on A8; two rows of lateral blue spines tipped with white along T1-A8; white-tipped blue spines also occur on the head, at the base of the true legs, and in the anal region; body ranges from green to whitish-green  later instars whitish-green with white spines.”  You can see examples of both species on BugGuide, but your individual is more brightly colored than most of the images posted there.  We will try to contact Bill Oehlke to see if he can determine the species.

Ceanothus Silkmoth Caterpillar, we believe

Ceanothus Silkmoth Caterpillar, we believe

Bill Oehlke Responds
Daniel,
Idaho is a big state. It seems most like Hyalophora [euryalus] kasloensis. A more precise location would help.
There is also a hybrid zone in Idaho.
Very nice images. My first choice would have to be kasloensis, although this may only be third instar.
Bill

Thanks Bill.  the location is:  “In between Fernan Saddle and Wolf Lodge Creek”

Daniel,
Based on location it is Hyalophora euryalus, the ceanothus silkmoth.
Please see if I can get permission to post images. I suspect it is third instar.
Bill

Ceanothus Silkmoth Caterpillar, we believe

Ceanothus Silkmoth Caterpillar, we believe

Amy Gosch, Mary Lemmink Lawrence, Jennifer Smith, Kingson Mendoza Maqui, Laura Golden, Tamara Cosgrove Grant, Heather Duggan-Christensen liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: some kind of big egg sac or coccoon
Location: Perrysburg, Ohio
May 24, 2015 10:07 pm
Do you know what this is? It is about 5 inches in length. I found it under a railing on my deck. Should I be scared of it? It is right where my family sits and relaxes. I do not like to kill anything but I am very scared of spiders. I doubt it is a spider sac because of the texture of it.
Signature: FreddieAnitaBell

Cecropia Moth Cocoon

Cecropia Moth Cocoon

Dear FreddieAnitaBell,
This is the cocoon of a Cecropia Moth, and it passed the entire winter unnoticed on your deck railing.  Now that warm weather has arrived, the adult moth should emerge soon, and if you are vigilant and lucky, you may get to witness the Cecropia Moth that emerges.

Alisha Bragg, Sue Dougherty, Claire Kooyman, Andrea Leonard Drummond liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Not sure what this is…
Location: Rowan County, NC USA
May 24, 2015 4:23 pm
I found this chrysalis buried under my leaves today and I’m not sure exactly what it is…could be a regal moth, imperial moth, black witch moth or dozens of other types of moths. I’m sure its a moth though. Is there any insight you could give me on what this actually could be?
Signature: A. Boger

Imperial Moth Pupa

Imperial Moth Pupa

Dear A. Boger,
Because of the spiny tip on the abdomen, we believe this is an Imperial Moth Pupa, and you can verify our suspicion on BugGuide.

Sue Dougherty, Ann Levitsky, Kitty Heidih liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar ID help please
Location: Manzano Mtns, New Mexico
May 24, 2015 8:06 am
A friend sent me these pics of a caterpillar, asking for ID help and I have no idea what it is. Can you help? Thank you.
Signature: A. Wakefield

Pandora Moth Caterpillar

Pandora Pine Moth Caterpillar

Dear A. Wakefield,
We originally identified your caterpillar as a Pandora Pine Moth Caterpillar,
Coloradia pandora, on the World’s Largest Saturniidae site, and then found a matching image on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on the leaves (“needles”) of various species of pine (Pinus). Particular host records include: Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), Jeffrey pine (P. jeffreyi), lodgepole pine (P. contorta), sugar pine (P. lambertiana), pinyon pine (P. edulis), and Coulter pine (P. coulteri).   Adults do not feed.”

Pandora Pine Moth Caterpillar

Pandora Pine Moth Caterpillar

Amy Gosch, Mary Lemmink Lawrence, Sue Dougherty, Kitty Heidih, Ann Levitsky liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination