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Subject: some kind of big egg sac or coccoon
Location: Perrysburg, Ohio
May 24, 2015 10:07 pm
Do you know what this is? It is about 5 inches in length. I found it under a railing on my deck. Should I be scared of it? It is right where my family sits and relaxes. I do not like to kill anything but I am very scared of spiders. I doubt it is a spider sac because of the texture of it.
Signature: FreddieAnitaBell

Cecropia Moth Cocoon

Cecropia Moth Cocoon

Dear FreddieAnitaBell,
This is the cocoon of a Cecropia Moth, and it passed the entire winter unnoticed on your deck railing.  Now that warm weather has arrived, the adult moth should emerge soon, and if you are vigilant and lucky, you may get to witness the Cecropia Moth that emerges.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Not sure what this is…
Location: Rowan County, NC USA
May 24, 2015 4:23 pm
I found this chrysalis buried under my leaves today and I’m not sure exactly what it is…could be a regal moth, imperial moth, black witch moth or dozens of other types of moths. I’m sure its a moth though. Is there any insight you could give me on what this actually could be?
Signature: A. Boger

Imperial Moth Pupa

Imperial Moth Pupa

Dear A. Boger,
Because of the spiny tip on the abdomen, we believe this is an Imperial Moth Pupa, and you can verify our suspicion on BugGuide.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar ID help please
Location: Manzano Mtns, New Mexico
May 24, 2015 8:06 am
A friend sent me these pics of a caterpillar, asking for ID help and I have no idea what it is. Can you help? Thank you.
Signature: A. Wakefield

Pandora Moth Caterpillar

Pandora Pine Moth Caterpillar

Dear A. Wakefield,
We originally identified your caterpillar as a Pandora Pine Moth Caterpillar,
Coloradia pandora, on the World’s Largest Saturniidae site, and then found a matching image on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on the leaves (“needles”) of various species of pine (Pinus). Particular host records include: Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), Jeffrey pine (P. jeffreyi), lodgepole pine (P. contorta), sugar pine (P. lambertiana), pinyon pine (P. edulis), and Coulter pine (P. coulteri).   Adults do not feed.”

Pandora Pine Moth Caterpillar

Pandora Pine Moth Caterpillar

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unidentified caterpillar
Location: West Virginia
April 25, 2015 3:51 am
This photo is a year or two old. It was an aggressive caterpillar that raised sex black horns when the branch he was on moved, so I’d call it defensive or aggressive.
Signature: Vanna

Hickory Horned Devil Hatchling

Hickory Horned Devil Hatchling

Hi Vanna,
Though your image is quite blurry, the shape of this caterpillar is quite distinctive.  We are guessing it was quite small and probably found in late spring.  We believe this is a Hickory Horned Devil hatchling,
Citheronia regalis, and you can compare your image to this image on BugGuide.  Most submissions that we receive of Hickory Horned Devils arrive toward the end of summer and they are of mature caterpillars that leave the trees they are feeding upon in search of an appropriate location to dig and pupateHickory Horned Devils are the largest North American caterpillars, and despite a fierce appearance, they are perfectly harmless.  Eventually a Hickory Horned Devil will metamorphose into the gorgeous Royal Walnut Moth or Regal Moth.

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Subject: Caterpillars in Costa Rica
Location: Monteverde, Costa Rica
April 24, 2015 10:28 am
What are these caterpillars, what are they going to turn into, why do they clump like this, and why does one (lower right) appear to have white things on it?
Signature: Ashley from the Monteverde Institute

Nymphalidae Caterpillars

Moth Caterpillars

Dear Ashley,
We believe these Caterpillars are in the Brush Footed Butterfly family Nymphalidae, and the caterpillar in question appears to have been parasitized by a Chalcid or Braconid Wasp.  We will contact Keith Wolfe to see if he can identify the caterpillars more specifically.

Nymphalidae Caterpillar parasitized by Wasp

Moth Caterpillar parasitized by Wasp

Keith Wolfe provides a correction
Hi Daniel,
Nope, these are immature moths, the scoli (spines) being much too long for any Neotropical nymphalid.
Best wishes,
Keith

After Keith Wolfe’s correction, we are now speculating that they are relatives of Buck Moths in the subfamily Hemileucinae and we will see if Bill Oehlke can provide any information.

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Subject: Apple tree egg sack
Location: Pennsylvania, USA
April 10, 2015 6:42 am
Can you please help us to identify this egg sack looking thing we found on the apple tree? Thank you
Signature: Kyla

Cecropia Moth Cocoon

Cecropia Moth Cocoon

Dear Kyla,
This appears to be the Cocoon of a Cecropia Moth, one of the Giant Silk Moths found in North America.
  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on leaves of various trees and shrubs including alder, apple, ash, beech, birch, box-elder, cherry, dogwood, elm, gooseberry, maple, plum, poplar, white oak, willow.  may also feed on lilac and tamarack.”  The adult Cecropia Moth is a beautiful creature.  Cecropia Moths overwinter as cocoons and the adult should emerge very soon.

Cecropia Moth Cocoon

Cecropia Moth Cocoon

Thank you very much! It’s beautiful!
Much appreciated
Kyla

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination