Currently viewing the category: "Silkworms"
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Subject: Green Caterpillar with Red-Tipped Scales
Location: Southwest Texas (Val Verde County)
September 23, 2016 7:29 am
The following caterpillar was found on a nature trail at the Amistad National Recreation area in Del Rio, Texas (a semi-arid environment in Southwest Texas with influences by the Chihuahuan desert, Edwards plateau, and South Texas plains). The creature was found in the morning (~10 am) in September. It is predominately green in color, with a darker olive green dorsal side and lighter green belly. It appears to have 10 segments. Each of the first two segments behind the head has 4 green spine-like structures on the dorsal side (two per side). Most of the following segments had 4 scale-like spines that were predominately white with red tips. The head was predominately green with two yellow-ish vertical stripes. A dark green postabdominal spine was located on the dorsal side of the 10th segment.
Signature: n/a

Sphingicampa Caterpillar

Sphingicampa Caterpillar

Dear n/a,
This is a Silkmoth Caterpillar from the genus
Sphingicampa, and there are several similar looking species found in Texas, according to BugGuide

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fat Weird Caterpillar
Location: Maryland
September 11, 2016 5:27 pm
Hey!
Apparently this fell on my cousin out of a tree (no worries she put it back and it was NOT harmed in anyway) and I’m not quite sure what it is, perhaps you may know? I’ve never seen one like it around here, but maybe it’s common? Let me know when you get the chance and thank you for all you do!
Signature: Rochelle

Imperial Moth Caterpillar

Imperial Moth Caterpillar

Dear Rochelle,
This is the caterpillar of an Imperial Moth, and its size and color indicate that it is getting ready to transform into a pupa, which it does underground.  When that time approaches, the normally green caterpillar changes color and loses interest in eating leaves.  It falls or descends to the ground and find a suitable place to dig.  While your cousin had good intentions to place it back in the tree, this individual most likely immediately set upon getting back on the ground.  Because of your cousins kind intentions, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

Hello Daniel!
Thank you so much for getting back to me, you literally made my day! I work at a bagel shop where we have a dry erase board where we put fun facts and trivia for people to look at while they eat and I’m going to make the caterpillar of the Imperial Moth the Animal of the day! Ill send you a picture when it’s done! Thank you again, you and your team are truly great people and its awesome to know that there are other bug friendly enthusiasts out there! Have a wonderful evening,
Rochelle

Female Imperial Moth

Female Imperial Moth

In honor of you and your peeps and for the magnificent creature that is the Imperial moth. I’m actually a decent artist but its hard to draw with dry erase markers.. Also I just saved an Imperial Moth from the hallway of my apartment a few weeks ago and I’m pretty mad at myself for not knowing what the pre-pupa form looked like… Either way, thank you again for the response and keep up the good work!
Rochelle

Imperial Moth Art

Imperial Moth Art  (click to enlarge)

Wow, thanks for the awesome update.

No problem! I’m honestly just thrilled that you took the time to write back and now that I know you have a book for sale… 😀

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this bug from Sierra Leone
Location: Sierra Leone
September 11, 2016 12:00 am
Hi Bugman,
I visited a rice farm in Makare, Sierra Leone this week and found this bug crawling around? It looks like something from a cartoon but what is it?
Signature: Jonathan

Cabbage Tree Emperor Moth Caterpillar

Cabbage Tree Emperor Moth Caterpillar

Dear Jonathan,
This is a Cabbage Tree Emperor Moth Caterpillar,
Bunaea alcinoe, and this red form is not as common as a black morph with yellow spikes.  The Caterpillars are edible, and the adult Cabbage Tree Emperor Moth is a beautiful creature.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this caterpillar?
Location: South central Wisconsin
September 10, 2016 6:15 am
Found this 3 to 4 inch long, 1 inch wide caterpillar crawling out of the grass and onto the driveway. We live in south central Wisconsin. What is it?
Signature: Brandy

Prepupal Luna Moth Caterpillar

Prepupal Luna Moth Caterpillar

Dear Brandy,
The orange color of this Luna Moth Caterpillar indicates it is prepupal.  You can verify our identification by comparing your image to this BugGuide image.

Thanks! I think you are right. It has cocooned now.
Brandy Wasvick

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identifying Large Cocoon
Location: Western Pennsylvania, USA
September 4, 2016 3:59 pm
Hi, My kids & I found this cocoon & we’ve never seen anything like it , it was laying on the ground underneath a large oak tree, looked like a leaf or leaves that are kinda stringy/fuzzy almost rope like, & tightly wrapped/rolled up into a very hard &solid cocoon that’s about 3 & 1/2inches long, & 2inches in diameter, &has 2small holes, each about as big as a pencil, & there appears to be something in it, but I’m not sure what it is, if it’s alive, how to tell, we are always discovering creatures of every kind, occasionally have come across some rare & endangered species, even thought to possible be extinct in our area, & through out all of adventures in exploring I have never seen a cocoon this large or looking anything like this, & the only insect that I could think of even close to this size is a cicada, &tho I’m not certain it’s a cocoon, maybe an eggsack or nest of some sort, we are very interested to learn about what’s around us & what this new discovery beholds, thank you for your time, knowledge, expertise, &information on this matter
Signature: Bugeyes3

Luna Moth Cocoon

Luna Moth Cocoon

Dear Bugeyes3,
This cocoon belongs to either a Luna Moth or a Polyphemus Moth, and the two holes are not a good sign because they may mean the cocoon was parasitized.  Gently shaking the cocoon should produce a sound like a heavy marble or something is inside.  If it sounds more like a rustle, it probably means that a wasp or fly has parasitized the cocoon.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Can’t identify this caterpillar
Location: Athens Georgia
August 28, 2016 10:07 pm
Ok so I have spent about an hour and a half trying to I this caterpillar and the closest thing I can find is an orange striped oak worm BUT this is not orange, has a tighter paternity and is smoother. The top lines are white and turn yellow towards the legs. It has one set of horns and multiple small pounds on its tail. Also it has a red marking on both sides of the tail at the bottom near legs. These things are devouring my maple tree and have turned the concrete on my patio black
Signature: Tony Bowers

Green Striped Mapleworm

Green Striped Mapleworm

Dear Tony,
We found an image of a Green Striped Mapleworm on the Post and Courier website, and we then researched that on BugGuide where we learned this is the caterpillar of the lovely Rosy Maple Moth,
Dryocampa rubicunda.  According to the Forest Insect & Disease Leaflet 77:  “The green-striped mapleworm (Anisota rubicunda (Fab.) ), a native of North America, is distributed widely throughout the eastern half of the United States and the southern parts of adjacent Canadian Provinces. Its southern range extends from the Carolina coast to the gulf coast in Alabama and Mississippi. It has been recorded as far west as Nebraska and Kansas.  The insect causes heavy defolia­tion throughout its range but is most destructive near its southwestern limits.”  You should note that the genus name is incorrect in the latter link.  Though we have numerous images of the adult Rosy Maple Moth on our site, we believe this may be a first for the Green Striped Mapleworm.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination