Currently viewing the category: "Silkworms"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unidentified caterpillar
Location: West Virginia
April 25, 2015 3:51 am
This photo is a year or two old. It was an aggressive caterpillar that raised sex black horns when the branch he was on moved, so I’d call it defensive or aggressive.
Signature: Vanna

Hickory Horned Devil Hatchling

Hickory Horned Devil Hatchling

Hi Vanna,
Though your image is quite blurry, the shape of this caterpillar is quite distinctive.  We are guessing it was quite small and probably found in late spring.  We believe this is a Hickory Horned Devil hatchling,
Citheronia regalis, and you can compare your image to this image on BugGuide.  Most submissions that we receive of Hickory Horned Devils arrive toward the end of summer and they are of mature caterpillars that leave the trees they are feeding upon in search of an appropriate location to dig and pupateHickory Horned Devils are the largest North American caterpillars, and despite a fierce appearance, they are perfectly harmless.  Eventually a Hickory Horned Devil will metamorphose into the gorgeous Royal Walnut Moth or Regal Moth.

Mary Lemmink Lawrence, Jess Huggins, Andrea Leonard Drummond liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillars in Costa Rica
Location: Monteverde, Costa Rica
April 24, 2015 10:28 am
What are these caterpillars, what are they going to turn into, why do they clump like this, and why does one (lower right) appear to have white things on it?
Signature: Ashley from the Monteverde Institute

Nymphalidae Caterpillars

Moth Caterpillars

Dear Ashley,
We believe these Caterpillars are in the Brush Footed Butterfly family Nymphalidae, and the caterpillar in question appears to have been parasitized by a Chalcid or Braconid Wasp.  We will contact Keith Wolfe to see if he can identify the caterpillars more specifically.

Nymphalidae Caterpillar parasitized by Wasp

Moth Caterpillar parasitized by Wasp

Keith Wolfe provides a correction
Hi Daniel,
Nope, these are immature moths, the scoli (spines) being much too long for any Neotropical nymphalid.
Best wishes,
Keith

After Keith Wolfe’s correction, we are now speculating that they are relatives of Buck Moths in the subfamily Hemileucinae and we will see if Bill Oehlke can provide any information.

Sue Dougherty liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Apple tree egg sack
Location: Pennsylvania, USA
April 10, 2015 6:42 am
Can you please help us to identify this egg sack looking thing we found on the apple tree? Thank you
Signature: Kyla

Cecropia Moth Cocoon

Cecropia Moth Cocoon

Dear Kyla,
This appears to be the Cocoon of a Cecropia Moth, one of the Giant Silk Moths found in North America.
  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on leaves of various trees and shrubs including alder, apple, ash, beech, birch, box-elder, cherry, dogwood, elm, gooseberry, maple, plum, poplar, white oak, willow.  may also feed on lilac and tamarack.”  The adult Cecropia Moth is a beautiful creature.  Cecropia Moths overwinter as cocoons and the adult should emerge very soon.

Cecropia Moth Cocoon

Cecropia Moth Cocoon

Thank you very much! It’s beautiful!
Much appreciated
Kyla

Jaye Ridet, Mary Lemmink Lawrence, Sue Dougherty, Rosallie Rossman liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: green catapillar with hard horns
Location: RSA
March 13, 2015 5:25 am
I found a green catapillar with grey hard horn like spike with red edges on the gras in north west RSA. can u please tell me what it is as I cant find it anywhere on the web
Signature: mail

Marbled Emperor Caterpillar

Marbled Emperor Caterpillar

This is a Marbled Emperor Caterpillar in the genus Heniocha.  There are several African species in the genus and we cannot be certain which you sighted.

Alfonso Moreno, Alisha Bragg, Andrea Leonard Drummond, Amy Gosch, Jaye Ridet, Sue Dougherty, Juliett Moth, Mary Lemmink Lawrence liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big catrepillar -moth
Location: côte d’ivoire
March 12, 2015 11:19 am
Hi,
Just found a few of these moths in my garden in Abidjan,
Close to our Ylang Ylang tree,
Size of a finger !
Thanks for helping in identifying them.
Signature: brucama

Cabbage Tree Emperor Moth Caterpillar

Cabbage Tree Emperor Moth Caterpillar

Dear brucama,
These are Cabbage Tree Emperor Moth Caterpillars,
Bunaea alcinoe, and they can be very plentiful at times.  They are considered edible.  The adult Cabbage Tree Emperor Moth which is pictured on iNaturalist is quite beautiful.

Cabbage Tree Emperor Moth Caterpillars

Cabbage Tree Emperor Moth Caterpillars

Juliett Moth, Sue Dougherty, Amy Gosch, Alfonso Moreno, Mary Lemmink Lawrence liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Giant African Caterpillars
Location: Ghana Africa
January 20, 2015 7:07 pm
I found these two beauties in Ghana Africa. They looked quite fascinating so I got a pic. Any idea what they are?
Signature: Don

Cabbage Tree Emperor Moth Caterpillars

Cabbage Tree Emperor Moth Caterpillars

Dear Don,
These distinctive caterpillars are Cabbage Tree Emperor Moth Caterpillars,
Bunaea alcinoe, and they are more typically black in coloration.  This is an edible species.

Kathleen Travis Perin, Sue Dougherty, Amy Gosch, Raokshna Yuko Ryuzaki, Mary Lemmink Lawrence liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination