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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this
Location: Charlotte, NC
September 6, 2014 8:55 am
Found this caterpillar near my oak tree. It is as round as my thumb which is a size 8 and about 3″ long or more. The photo in Mason jar does not give it justice. I have mist grass and leaves in the jar. Small eggs are on it.
Signature: PG Forney

Hickory Horned Devil

Hickory Horned Devil

Dear PG Forney,
Had you captured a less distinctive caterpillar, attempting an identification through this distorted glass bottle probably would have been impossible, but the red horns of this Hickory Horned Devil are clearly visible.  Hickory Horned Devils ” feed on leaves of ash, burning bush, butternut, cotton, gum, hickory, lilac, pecan, persimmon, sumac, sycamore, and walnut” according to BugGuide, so unless you add some of those to the jar instead of the grass, it will surely starve unless it is preparing to pupate.  Often caterpillars leave the plants they are feeding upon when the time for metamorphosis nears.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Orange Grub in woodsy area
Location: Woods in Adirondack Mtns. near Saranac Lake, NY
September 1, 2014 9:50 am
This grub was found while camping in the woods near a pond in the Adirondacks in northern New York a few days ago. It’s color was what stood out the most. Its legs had super suction capabilities and it crawled around the ground at a very fast paced. I almost think it’s a Scarab Beetle Grub but the color doesn’t match most. We watched the grub crawl across the ground, up a dead tree stump and come down the other side. It found it’s way to an area of the ground covered in pine needles, dead leaves, twigs. It looked like it was going into some sleep mode where it began to coil into itself, covering itself with the surroundings on the ground. As time went on it looked as if it cacooned itself in a hard sticky shell covered by the leaves, twigs, and pine needles. Left before seeing what happened after. Thought it was a very interesting little bug.
Signature: Lauren

Luna Caterpillar ready to Pupate

Luna Caterpillar ready to Pupate

Hi Lauren,
This is a Luna Moth Caterpillar, and it has turned from green to orange as it is ready to pupate, a transformation that you observed.  Many people agree that the Luna Moth is one of the loveliest North American moths.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: strange caterpillar
Location: Baddeck,N.S, Canada
August 25, 2014 8:12 am
We found this caterpillar in our yard. We didn’t touch but we moved it to a wooded area. What is it?
Signature: Tera C

Luna Moth Caterpillar

Luna Moth Caterpillar

Hi Tera,
This sure looks like a Luna Moth Caterpillar getting ready to pupate.  When pupation time nears, the typically green caterpillar turns pink.  See this BugGuide image for comparison.

Luna Moth Caterpillar

Luna Moth Caterpillar

Great that is exactly what we saw today. Thanks

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Green Caterpillar on my azalea
Location: Maryland
August 24, 2014 7:37 am
Hello,
I find this bright green caterpillar on my azalea this morning – 8/24/2014 in Maryland. It looks like it has tiny pine trees growing on it (almost).
Signature: Susan

Io Moth Caterpillar

Io Moth Caterpillar

Dear Susan,
This is the caterpillar of an Io Moth, and azalea is only one of numerous possible host plants for the caterpillar.  According to Featured Creatures:  “The io moth has a long list of host plants, with over 100 recorded plant genera in North America, including such diverse plants as azaleas, blackberry, clover, cotton, current, hackberry, hibiscus, mesquite, palms, rear, redbud, roses and willows. In Florida, io moth larvae are commonly found on oaks and other hardwoods.”  You should handle the Io Caterpillars with extreme caution as the spines can deliver a painful sting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: catepillar
Location: Woodstock Vermont
August 12, 2014 5:43 pm
what kind of a catepillar is this
Signature: Jae

Luna Moth Caterpillar

Luna Moth Caterpillar

Dear Jae,
This is a Luna Moth Caterpillar, which is described on BugGuide as:  “Larva lime-green with pink spots and weak subspiracular stripe on abdomen. Yellow lines cross the larva’s back near the back end of each segment (compare Polyphemus moth caterpillars, which have yellow lines crossing at spiracles). Anal proleg edged in yellow.(2) Sparse hairs.”
  The very similar looking Polyphemus Moth Caterpillar is described on BugGuide as being:  “Larva: body large, bright green, with red and silvery spots below setae, and oblique yellow lines running through spiracles on abdomen; diagonal streak of black and silver on ninth abdominal segment; head and true legs brown; base of primary setae red, subdorsal and lateral setae have silver shading below; end of prolegs with yellow ring, and tipped in black”

Thank you oh so very much… I will support you and your effort it is worth it  JAE

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar ID
Location: Daru , Sierra Leone
August 5, 2014 5:13 am
Hi Bugman
I think this is an Emperor Moth Caterpillar …can you confirm that for me>?
Signature: Don Thomson

Possibly Bunaea alcinoe:  red form

Possibly Bunaea alcinoe: red form

Hi Don,
First we apologize for not responding to your initial request.  We opened the attached file and knew we needed to do some research, and then we forgot to get back to it.  Emperor Moth Caterpillar is a somewhat generic name for caterpillars from the family Saturniidae, the Giant Silkmoths.  We did some research on the members only World’s Largest Saturniidae site, which breaks out sightings according to countries.  Interestingly, Sierra Leone and its neighbors Liberia and Guinea are not represented on the site.  We did find an image that matches your caterpillar and it is identified as a “
Bunaea alcinoe larva (red form), Ghana” and we are satisfied with that.  That species is represented on our site under the common name Cabbage Emperor Moth Caterpillar, and we only have the typical black form.  The caterpillars are edible and the common name Emperor Moth is used for this species as well.  We are going to contact Bill Oehlke to see if he can verify that identification.  Do you have a higher resolution image?

Thanks Daniel
I don’t have a higher resolution image but will try find another one to photograph.
Any further info would be appreciated
Thanks and regards
Don Thomson

Bill Oehlke confirms identification
Yes, Daniel,
It appears to be B. alcinoe, the red form, but interestingly it has two sets
of black horns near head instead of the single row mentioned by Oberprieler.
I suspect alcinoe is also in Guinea and Liberia.
Please find out from photographer if I can have permission to post image. I
would also need photographer’s name.
Bill

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination