Currently viewing the category: "Silkworms"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Just Curious
Location: Summerville South Carolina
July 6, 2016 2:22 pm
I found this snacking on a wicker rocking chair in my front yard. It measures roughly 4 inches in length. It is summer and 100+ degrees outside. Just wondering what it is because I have never seen a caterpillar that big in real life.
Signature: K. W. Hibbs

Pine Devil

Pine Devil

Dear K.W. Hibbs,
This marvelous caterpillar is a Pine Devil,
Citheronia sepulcralis.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar with Horns-ID?
Location: Painter, VA
July 3, 2016 11:06 am
Location of this creature is Painter, VA. Found 7/3/16. Would love to know what he is.
Signature: Evelyn Wolfer

Pine Devil

Pine Devil

Dear Evelyn,
The Pine Devil,
Citheronia sepulcralis, is not nearly as colorful as its close relative the Hickory Horned Devil.  According to BugGuide it is found in:  “Eastern United States: Previously north to Maine but now likely extirpated north of Pennsylvania and New Jersey, common southward to Florida along Gulf Coast west to Louisiana. Found inland from eastern Louisiana northeast through central Tennessee, eastern Kentucky, to Southern Ohio. Single report from Illinois erroneous.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Ed. Note:  It was not until after we prepared a response for this query that we noticed what we consider to be a rude (as well as incoherent) retort to our automated response.  Though it seems ? was upset at not receiving the requested product, we did not feel that our free internet service should have received such a terse comment, hence we are tagging this posting with the Nasty Reader Award, despite it being not quite as toxic as some other postings with that tag.  Perhaps the original product order contained similar grammatical errors and truncated sentences which resulted in shipping the wrong product.

Subject: identification
Location: bellingham wa
May 9, 2016 7:39 am
I ordered a REAL LIVE BLUE PHILENOR PIPEVINE SWALLOWTAIL BUTTERFLY CHRYSALIS PUPA COCOON. in the description it said the pupa would be brown or green but this is what they sent. do you have any idea what this is?
Signature: ?

Our Automated Response:
Thank you for submitting your identification request.
Please understand that we have a very small staff that does this as a labor of love. We cannot answer all submissions (not by a long shot). But we’ll do the best we can!

Why do you say you will if you do not? I would not of given my email address if.I would of known that you don’t answer back

Moth Pupae

Moth Pupae

These are definitely not the Chrysalides of any Swallowtail Butterfly.  They are Moth Pupae.  If you purchased from a North American supplier, they might be Regal Moth Pupae.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: New Otleans caterpillar
Location: New Orleans
May 1, 2016 2:04 pm
We’re walking down a sidewalk in the Garden District of New Orleans and there are tons of these caterpillars falling out of a tree. One got on my friend’s sock and when she pulled it off, she got stung. Any clues what it is?
Signature: Joelle

Buckmoth Caterpillar

Buckmoth Caterpillar

Dear Joelle,
Thanks so much for resubmitting using our standard form.  It really helps us to format postings correctly.  This is a Buck Moth Caterpillar in the genus Hemileuca, and many caterpillars in the genus look similar.  This is most likely
Hemileuca maia, a species found in much of eastern North America.  According to BugGuide:  “Caution, caterpillars can inflict painful sting.”  Since they were falling from the trees, they are most likely getting ready to pupate.  Adult Buck Moths emerge and fly in the autumn.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Photos African Emperor Caterpillars
Location: Pietermaritzburg. Kwa Zulu Natal
March 7, 2016 8:53 am
Found these climbing my Cabbage tree Sunday morning. Poor tree is now completely stripped
Signature: George Roberts

Cabbage Tree Emperor Caterpillar

Cabbage Tree Emperor Caterpillar

Dear George,
We are going back through unanswered mail from March to post submissions we think our readership may find interesting.  Though your tree has been stripped of leaves by these Cabbage Tree Emperor Moth Caterpillars, the leaves will grow back and the tree will survive.  You can always eat the caterpillars.

Cabbage Tree Emperor Caterpillars

Cabbage Tree Emperor Caterpillars

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Caterpillar
Location: Juiz de Fora-MG – BRAZIL
March 6, 2016 7:43 am
Hello Mr. Bugman, How are you? I´m fine. Today I´m sending this beautiful caterpillar that I found feeding of Heliocarpus appendiculatus. I don’t know if it is Arsenura orbignyana, but I´m accompanying the cycle finish. What is your opinion?
Thanks so much. Greetings from Brazil! Marcelo Brito
Signature: Marcelo Brito de Avellar

Giant Silkworm: Arsenura species we believe

Giant Silkworm: Arsenura angulatus

Dear Marcelo,
These are gorgeous images of a positively gorgeous caterpillar that is probably from the family Saturniidae.  Upon doing some research on the genus
Arsenura, images available online look quite similar, including these images of Arsenura drucei on Caterpillar Eyespots.  The closest match we could find is of Arsenura angulatus pictured on FlickR.  An even closer match is a poor quality image of Arsenura xanthopus pictured on the World’s Largest Saturniidae site.  We will contact Bill Oehlke to get his opinion, and we suspect he may request permission to post your excellent images that document at least two instars.  The earlier instar possesses the caudal horn, which is shed during molting, leaving a caudal bump, a phenomenon that is common in some Hornworms from the family Sphingidae.

Giant Silkworm: Arsenura species we believe

Giant Silkworm: Arsenura angulatus

Bill Oehlke Responds
Daniel,
I am pretty sure they are Arsenura xanthopus. I do not think there is such a species as Arsenura ungulates. I think ungulates is a term for hooved animals that travel in herds, and probably the term ungulates was used in reference to prominent false legs or that these often travel and feed in large groups. Thanks.  I realize it is extra work for you, but having dates and food plant are often very useful. Sometimes the local residents know the foodplant, and that is very useful information to anyone who wants to try to rear this species. Sometimes it can also help with ids.
Thanks for thinking of me
Bill

Thanks Bill,
We suspect our email program autocorrected “angulatus” into “ungulates” and the food plant was listed as
Heliocarpus appendiculatus.

Daniel,
Yes, I think they are of Arsenura angulatus, probably 4rth and 5th instars. Thanks for the fodplant. I figured out there must have been a mistake with the spelling after I hit the send button.
Bill

Giant Silkworm: Arsenura species we believe

Giant Silkworm: Arsenura angulatus

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination