Currently viewing the category: "Prominent Moth Caterpillars"
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Subject: Caterpillar
Location: Central Pennsylvania
August 21, 2016 4:20 pm
I found this caterpillar on a sidewalk in central PA today, August 21 . I’m not sure what it is, Can you help identify it? I am thinking it’s a moth larvae, but not sure what kind.
Thanks!
Signature: Dana

Heterocampa Catepillar

Heterocampa Catepillar

Dear Dana,
This is a Prominent Moth Caterpillar and we strongly suspect it is in the genus
Heterocampa.  The genus Heterocampa contains many similar looking species, but this BugGuide image of Heterocampa umbrata looks very close.  According to BugGuide:  “The larvae feed on oaks (Quercus). Two generations per year in much of range, multiple generations in Florida.”

Thank you! I thought Heterocampa too when I was searching, but wasn’t sure which species. I’m glad to know that oaks are a host. Now I now where to return it to.

Judging by the color, we believe it is pre-pupal, meaning it is not longer needing to eat, and it is searching for a suitable location to pupate.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Leaf catepillar bug?
Location: Alaska
August 7, 2016 10:00 pm
Hiking in alaska and this guy was on my shoe
Signature: Alaska

Probably Zigzag Furcula Caterpillar

Probably Zigzag Furcula Caterpillar

This is one of the Prominent Moth Caterpillars in the family Notodontidae, and we are quite certain it is in the genus Furcula.  Though BugGuide does not list any sightings in Alaska, at least three species are reported from British Columbia Canada and BugGuide describes the caterpillars as:  “body greenish-yellow to green with bluish-green or brown saddle in middle of back; anal prolegs modified into pair of long narrow tail-like projections, giving the appearance of a forked tail.”  The Zigzag Furcula, Furcula scolopendrina, is a likely species identification and this caterpillar image from BugGuide looks like a very good match, though other caterpillars in the genus look quite similar.  According to Encyclopedia of Life:  “geographic distribution includes        Alaska.”

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Subject: Unknown caterpillar consuming Indigobush & Serviceberry
Location: Reston VA
September 28, 2015 5:52 pm
Please identify a caterpillar for me and if it’s a butterfly or moth; 3 pictures attached. Many of the same caterpillar are consuming an Indigobush and have moved on to a nearby Serviceberry.
Signature: Margaret Grieshaber

Red Humped Caterpillar

Red Humped Caterpillar

Dear Margaret,
Your Red Humped Caterpillar,
Schizura concinna, will become a moth in the family Notodontidae.   According to BugGuide, Red Humped Caterpillars:  ” feed on a wide range of woody plants, from many different families.”

Dear Daniel – Thank you very much for a quick reply!  Believe we’ll just let it happen and not do anything to disturb them. Thanks again, Margaret

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Subject: Red caterpillar
Location: VA
September 17, 2015 4:04 pm
Pretty guy crawling in the piedmont of Virginia? What is he?
Signature: Bill

Prominent Moth Caterpillar

Prominent Moth Caterpillar

Dear Bill,
This is a Prominent Moth Caterpillar in the genus Heterocampa, and this individual identified as a White Blotched Heterocampa on BugGuide looks very similar, though many other species in the genus also look similar.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: caterpillar on live oak tree
Location: Pender County North Carolina
September 18, 2015 6:59 pm
I noticed that some of my live oak trees had almost all their leaves gone. On inspection I saw several caterpillars eating the leaves. This was in southeastern North Carolina on September 17, 2015.
Signature: Tom Maloy

Yellow Necked Caterpillar

Yellow Necked Caterpillar

Dear Tom,
You are being troubled by the Yellow Necked Caterpillar,
Datana ministra, and according to BugGuide:  “The larvae feed on Malus, Quercus, Betula and Salix species. Young larvae skeletonise the leaves of their host plant. Later, they feed on all of the leaf except the leaf stalk. They feed in groups.”

Thank you so much.  Hope my oaks recover.  I know that the catalpa caterpillars (which to me look similar to these) completely denude the catalpa trees and they come back without a problem-hope my oaks do as well.  At least I can use the catalpa caterpillars for fish bait but didn’t know if I could handle the Yellow Necked Caterpillar safely.
Tom Maloy

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Subject: blueberry defoliator
Location: Jaffrey, New Hampshire
September 10, 2015 8:37 pm
One of my blueberry bushes had a bunch of these
Signature: Doug

Red Humped Caterpillar

Red Humped Caterpillar

Dear Doug,
Your caterpillar is
Schizura concinna and it goes by the very descriptive name Red Humped Caterpillar.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on a wide range of woody plants, from many different families.”  Interestingly, we have not found any other mention of Red Humped Caterpillars feeding on blueberries.

Thank you Daniel!  That was a bunch of very impressive caterpillars and they finished the job on that poor blueberry.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination