Currently viewing the category: "Prominent Moth Caterpillars"
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Subject: we found sonething
Location: in the backyard in blackpool lancs uk
July 21, 2015 12:28 pm
My son found a bug and we don’t know what it is. We would like u to look at our picture and let is know what it is please.
Signature: normal

Puss Moth Caterpillar

Puss Moth Caterpillar

Dear normal,
Thanks an image on FlickR, we were able to identify this Prominent Moth Caterpillar as
Cerura vinula, the Puss Moth Caterpillar.  According to UK Moths:  “Named after the cat-like appearance of the adult moth, this species is fairly common throughout most of Britain.  The striking caterpillar feeds on aspen (Populus tremula) as well as poplar (Populus spp.) and willow (Salix spp.). When disturbed, it raises its head and waves the twin tails, which have pinkish extendable flagellae.”  This species should not be confused with the North American Puss Moth, which is in a different family, the Flannel Moths, but we embarked upon our identification based on the resemblance your caterpillar has to the North American Prominent Moth Caterpillars in the genus Heterocampa.

Jessica M. Schemm, Sue Dougherty, Andrea Leonard Drummond liked this post
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Subject: caterpillar
Location: south louisiana
July 10, 2015 12:38 pm
what is the name of a black & white caterpillar that has a red head and red feet
Signature: valentine

Azalea Caterpillars

Azalea Caterpillars

Dear Valentine,
These gregarious caterpillars are Azalea Caterpillars,
Datana major, and according to Bugguide:  “larvae feed mainly on leaves of azalea (Rhododendron spp.) but have also been recorded on apple, blueberry, Red Oak, and Bog Rosemary (Andromeda polifoloa).”  The Blue Jay Barrens blog has a very nice posting on the Azalea Caterpillar which includes this information:  “The hairs on this caterpillar serve no defensive purpose.  When threatened, the caterpillar raises its head and tail with thoracic legs thrust upward like horns.  In addition to the threatening appearance, a bit of ingested material is regurgitated at the mouth and a droplet of liquid is released from the anus.  I’m assuming that both of these substances are unappealing in some way to predators.  The anal droplet is visible in the photo as a honey colored sphere on the end of the upraised tail.  Quite an interesting little creature.”

Amy Gosch liked this post
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Subject: what is this….
Location: Davis, CA
November 1, 2014 5:08 pm
Hello, Do you know what these are? They were found in our persimmon tree. Thanks.
Signature: No need

Red Humped Caterpillars

Red Humped Caterpillars

Dear No need,
These Red Humped Caterpillars,
Schizura concinna, ” feed on a wide range of woody plants, from many different families” according to BugGuide.

Ito Fernando liked this post
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Subject: help caterpillers eating my tree
Location: northern cali- roseville, Ca
May 19, 2014 9:23 am
Hi. I sent a previous request. Didnt know if it went thru. No confirmation saying my pics were uploaded. So im trying again. I have these caterpillers eating my tree. I dont want to hurt them…but I dont want my tree to die or an ugly bald tree either. They just eat everything! And they poop alot too! I took a branch to the kids in my classroom to observe and it was fasinating how quickly they devour a whole branch. They are on my ornamental plum tree. Thanks for your help
Signature: Alma

Red Humped Caterpillar

Red Humped Caterpillar

Hi Alma,
Because of the red head and red hump, these Red Humped Caterpillars,
Schizura concinna, are quite distinctive.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on a wide range of woody plants, from many different families.”

Red Humped Caterpillars

Red Humped Caterpillars

Thank you Daniel for your e-mail!  The kids are loving watching them and now  we know exactly what they are.    We are hoping they will form chrysalis soon! Although the moth is not very pretty.
Alma

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Subject: What is this caterpillar?
Location: Similkameen valley British Columbia canada
October 18, 2013 7:09 pm
This caterpillar was found on young apple trees at the beginning of August in the Similkameen valley, British Columbia, Canada. We are wondering what it is. Please help.
Signature: Orchardist

Red Humped Caterpillar

Red Humped Caterpillar

Dear Orchardist,
Is that an apple leaf?  this appears to be a Red Humped Caterpillar,
Schizura concinna.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on a wide range of woody plants, from many different families.”

Red Humped Caterpillar

Red Humped Caterpillar

thank you so much.
Yes it was on apple leaves…several neighbours have found them too and as
much as I tried I cold not identify it. Now we know!

 

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Subject: What a monster!
Location: Sabione, Lugaggia, Switzerland
September 20, 2013 7:27 am
My friends and I found this awesome bug in a forest in Sabione, a mountainous region in Switzerland near the Italian border. We found it in early September in a lush, green woodland forest, next to a river in a valley between some steep granite (?) mountains. When we found it, it remained flat, but it curled itself in defense as we got closer, rearing up its cricket-like head and legs, resting on the portion of it which looked more like a catepillar. It was the most bizzare bug I have ever seen. About 2 – 2.5 inches long. Something nightmares are made of! :) Any ideas?
Signature: Fiona Sheridan and Warren

Lobster Caterpillar

Lobster Caterpillar

Hi Fiona and Warren,
This bizarre caterpillar is commonly called a Lobster Caterpillar,
Stauropus fagi, and when we first posted an image of one in 2005, we were amazed at its unusual appearance.  The Learn About Butterflies website has some nice photos of its life cycle.

Lobster Caterpillar

Lobster Caterpillar

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