Currently viewing the category: "Prominent Moth Caterpillars"
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Subject: Unknown caterpillar consuming Indigobush & Serviceberry
Location: Reston VA
September 28, 2015 5:52 pm
Please identify a caterpillar for me and if it’s a butterfly or moth; 3 pictures attached. Many of the same caterpillar are consuming an Indigobush and have moved on to a nearby Serviceberry.
Signature: Margaret Grieshaber

Red Humped Caterpillar

Red Humped Caterpillar

Dear Margaret,
Your Red Humped Caterpillar,
Schizura concinna, will become a moth in the family Notodontidae.   According to BugGuide, Red Humped Caterpillars:  ” feed on a wide range of woody plants, from many different families.”

Dear Daniel – Thank you very much for a quick reply!  Believe we’ll just let it happen and not do anything to disturb them. Thanks again, Margaret

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Red caterpillar
Location: VA
September 17, 2015 4:04 pm
Pretty guy crawling in the piedmont of Virginia? What is he?
Signature: Bill

Prominent Moth Caterpillar

Prominent Moth Caterpillar

Dear Bill,
This is a Prominent Moth Caterpillar in the genus Heterocampa, and this individual identified as a White Blotched Heterocampa on BugGuide looks very similar, though many other species in the genus also look similar.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: caterpillar on live oak tree
Location: Pender County North Carolina
September 18, 2015 6:59 pm
I noticed that some of my live oak trees had almost all their leaves gone. On inspection I saw several caterpillars eating the leaves. This was in southeastern North Carolina on September 17, 2015.
Signature: Tom Maloy

Yellow Necked Caterpillar

Yellow Necked Caterpillar

Dear Tom,
You are being troubled by the Yellow Necked Caterpillar,
Datana ministra, and according to BugGuide:  “The larvae feed on Malus, Quercus, Betula and Salix species. Young larvae skeletonise the leaves of their host plant. Later, they feed on all of the leaf except the leaf stalk. They feed in groups.”

Thank you so much.  Hope my oaks recover.  I know that the catalpa caterpillars (which to me look similar to these) completely denude the catalpa trees and they come back without a problem-hope my oaks do as well.  At least I can use the catalpa caterpillars for fish bait but didn’t know if I could handle the Yellow Necked Caterpillar safely.
Tom Maloy

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: blueberry defoliator
Location: Jaffrey, New Hampshire
September 10, 2015 8:37 pm
One of my blueberry bushes had a bunch of these
Signature: Doug

Red Humped Caterpillar

Red Humped Caterpillar

Dear Doug,
Your caterpillar is
Schizura concinna and it goes by the very descriptive name Red Humped Caterpillar.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on a wide range of woody plants, from many different families.”  Interestingly, we have not found any other mention of Red Humped Caterpillars feeding on blueberries.

Thank you Daniel!  That was a bunch of very impressive caterpillars and they finished the job on that poor blueberry.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: A shiny green visitor!
Location: Near Altmar, NY
August 25, 2015 9:20 am
We live in a rural area about 40 miles north of Syracuse, New York, close to a now extinct village called Altmar. Our property borders wooded state land which surrounds a beaver pond that is also on the back of our woods. We recently had the sad experience of having to remove a large maple tree due to disease. It had started not even as tall as our home but by the time we removed it, it was towering over it. In cutting wood from the downed tree and sorting out leafy branches, this bug ended up on my husband’s pants. It is very unusual looking with a shiny light green smooth surface and it walked like a caterpillar. We’d never seen anything like it in the 20 years we’ve lived in this house. I took this picture as soon as we saw it on August 23.
Thanks for any help identifying our little green visitor!
Signature: Lisa P

Oblique Heterocampa Caterpillar

Oblique Heterocampa Caterpillar

Dear Lisa,
As two days have passed between the time you took the image and the time you wrote to us, we hope you relocated to another maple tree this Prominent Moth Caterpillar, possibly the Oblique Heterocampa due to its resemblance to the individual in this BugGuide image.

Oblique Heterocampa Caterpillar

Oblique Heterocampa Caterpillar

Our property is probably 80% maple trees and we did bring him back over to the woods after we took the picture! (My husband just told me he actually put him on a maple directly.) Thanks for the info! :)

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: pink caterpillar w front spine dorsal chevron
Location: 49°08’58.11″ N 123°10’26.48″ W
August 11, 2015 4:47 pm
My wife found this walking on paving in our back yard in Vancouver, British Columbia. May have arrived on new plants brought from nursery. We have looked at every single caterpillar pic on the web (feels like) but have failed to see anything even close. It doesn’t want to eat or spin a cocoon, but we’re hoping it will pupate so that we can see what emerges. But in case it doesn’t, we’re hoping you can tell us what it is.
30mm long (sorry for not including scale in photo)
Signature: Pierre van Aswegen

Prominent Moth Caterpillar

Prominent Moth Caterpillar

Good Morning Pierre,
This is a Prominent Moth Caterpillar in the family Notodontidae, probably in the subfamily Heterocampinae.  We have not had a chance to do a more thorough search for its species identity, but we are posting the image in the meanwhile.  Many caterpillars turn pink just prior to pupation, and the color is not necessarily diagnostic.  See BugGuide for possibly genera in the subfamily.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination