Currently viewing the category: "Cutworms and Owlet Caterpillars"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Insect larva?
Location: Port Orchard, WA
November 23, 2016 10:06 pm
I found this critter on a wood fence in my garden on the west side of Puget Sound in western Washington state. I shot the attached picture during August. I tried to chase the i.d. down on the internet, but don’t have enough bug knowledge to find it. I’d love to hear your best guess. Thanks.
Signature: Jim McCausland

Underwing Caterpillar

Underwing Caterpillar

Dear Jim,
This is the Caterpillar of an Underwing Moth in the genus Catocala.  While we cannot be certain of the species, your individual does resemble this Ilia Underwing Caterpillar posted to BugGuide, and according to BugGuide, the species is found in Washington.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on leaves of oak” so we are curious if there is an oak tree near where the sighting occurred.

Hi Daniel,
Thanks so much for the i.d. Neither I nor my immediate neighbors have oak trees in the garden, but there is a native oak a few blocks away, plus some ornamental oaks the same distance. Maybe there are closer oaks in backyards that I can’t see from the street. But moths do fly, and I imagine a few blocks isn’t too far.
Thanks again.
Jim

Thanks Jim,
Other species of Underwings feed on other plants.  According to BugGuide, the Charming Underwing feeds on apple and hawthorn, and it is reported from Alberta, Canada.  Again, we are confident with the genus, not the species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar ID
Location: Kingsland, TX
October 1, 2016 4:44 pm
Found several of these on my pride of Barbados. Curious as to what they are and if I can move them before they devour the whole thing.
Signature: Lindsay C

Yellow Striped Armyworm

Yellow Striped Armyworm

Dear Lindsay,
We found an image matching your image on the University of Maryland extension website, and it is identified as a Yellow Cutworm.  When we checked BugGuide, we found an image of the Yellow Striped Armyworm,
Spodoptera ornithogalli, and it appears to be a match to your individual.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on many herbaceous plants, including alfalfa, asparagus, bean, beet, cabbage, clover, corn, cotton, cucumber, grape, grass, jimsonweed, morning glory, onion, pea, peach, peanut, pokeweed, sweet potato, tobacco, tomato, turnip, wheat, watermelon, and wild onion.”  You can read more about the Yellow Striped Armyworm on Featured Creatures.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Caterpillar
Location: Newport, Pennsylvania
September 9, 2016 2:36 pm
I have never seen this one before. Found in field of tall grass and weeds.
Signature: Jordan

Hooded Owlet Moth Caterpillar

Brown Hooded Owlet Moth Caterpillar

Dear Jordan,
This is one of the Hooded Owlet Moth Caterpillars from the genus
Cucullia, and we believe that based on this BugGuide image, it is the Brown Hooded Owlet, Cucullia convexipennis.  According to BugGuide, the caterpillar is also called the Calico Paint and “Larvae feed on the leaves and flowers of aster (Aster spp.) and goldenrod (Solidago spp.).”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black and yellow caterpillar
Location: London, Ontario Canada
August 31, 2016 1:43 pm
Hello…
I’m not sure that I’ve seen one of these around here before. Could you please be so kind as to ID it if possible?
Thanks!
Signature: Mike

Paddle Caterpillar

Paddle Caterpillar

Dear Mike,
Commonly called the Paddle Caterpillar, this is the larva of a Funerary Dagger Moth which you can verify by comparing your image to this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “larvae feed on leaves of alder, apple, birch, blueberry/huckleberry (Vaccinium spp.), cottonwood, dogwood, elm, hazel, hickory, maple, oak, willow.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Help identify this caterpillar
Location: Cranberry Portage, Manitoba
August 25, 2016 7:05 pm
My husband took this photo of a caterpillar in Cranberry Portage, Manitoba. I’m not sure if its a type of Tussock Caterpillar. Wondering what type of caterpillar and if you have a photo of the moth or butterfly it will turn into. This photo was taken in August 2016. Thank you 🙂
Signature: Wildlife Lover

Fingered Dagger Caterpillar

Fingered Dagger Caterpillar

Dear Wildlife Lover,
We are certain your caterpillar is that of the Fingered Dagger Moth,
Acronicta dactylina, based on this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “larvae feed on alder, birch, poplar, hawthorn, willow.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Caterpillar
Location: Daphne, Alabama
August 15, 2016 5:16 pm
Hello, I’ve tried in vain to ID this possible looper or inchworm, and hope you can help!
I found several of them feeding on Rattlebox plants on the eastern shore of Mobile Bay, Alabama last week. Thanks for any info you can provide!
Signature: Joe Thomassen

Legume Caterpillar

Legume Caterpillar

Dear Joe,
This was a tricky one.  Loopers or Inchworms are distinguished from most caterpillars that have five pairs of prolegs in that they only have only two pairs of prolegs, causing them to “loop” as they move.  Your caterpillar actually has two pairs of prolegs, but it also has appendages appearing to be a horn at the tip of the abdomen.  Some Owlet Moth relatives in the superfamily Noctuoidea have a similar fake horn, so we searched that superfamily, and it is a big superfamily.  We eventually discovered the Legume Caterpillar or Pale-Edged Selenis, S
elenisa sueroides, thanks to BugGuide where it is described as:  “Larva: body cream or yellow with dull reddish or yellow lateral markings and several thin black dorsal stripes; two reddish or yellowish prolegs; two long anal appendages project backward from last abdominal segment; head reddish with numerous black spots.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination