Currently viewing the category: "Cutworms and Owlet Caterpillars"
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Subject: Identification request
Location: North central Florida, USA
May 5, 2015 5:18 am
Are you able to identify this caterpillar for me? I think they are dropping out of our pecan trees. They are about 3 inches long. I am located in north central Florida. Thank you for any help you can provide.
Signature: Janet

Possibly Underwing Caterpillar

Possibly Underwing Caterpillar

Dear Janet,
We believe this might be the Caterpillar of an Underwing Moth in the genus
Catocala.  According to Entoweb.OKstate:  “Pecan catocala commonly feed on pecan, hickory, and other trees.”

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Subject: Caterpillar Munching on Grapevine
Location: High Springs, Florida
April 18, 2015 6:00 pm
Hi! Despite numerous attempts to ID this beautiful caterpillar, its true identity continues to elude me. It sure loves my grapevine and it gets more beautiful everyday. I’d love for you to tell me what it’ll become. Thank you.
Signature: Elizabeth

Eight Spotted Forrester Caterpillar

Eight Spotted Forrester Caterpillar

Dear Elizabeth,
Your caterpillar is an Eight Spotted Forrester Caterpillar,
Alypia octomaculata, and we verified its identification on BugGuide.  The adult Eight Spotted Forrester is a pretty black and white diurnal moth that is frequently mistaken for a butterfly when it visits blossoms on sunny days.

Amy Gosch, Andrea Leonard Drummond, Alfonso Moreno, Sandra StCloud Johnson, Mary Lemmink Lawrence, Juliett Moth liked this post
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Subject: green caterpillar with beige stripes
Location: stanford dish loop, northern california
March 20, 2015 2:28 pm
I love your help IDing this beautiful caterpillar.
Signature: virusmanbob

Cutworm, we believe

Cutworm, we believe

Dear virusmanbob,
We believe this is a Cutworm or some other species of larval Owlet Moth from the family Noctuidae, which is a large and diverse family which is well represented on BugGuide.  We will attempt to provide more specific information, but that is the best generality we can offer at this moment.

Dear Daniel –
Thanks so much for your rapid reply and for the useful links!
All the best, Bob

Alisha Bragg, Sue Dougherty, Melissa Leigh Cooley, Amy Gosch, Kathy Haines, Alfonso Moreno, Mary Lemmink Lawrence, Andrea Leonard Drummond liked this post
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Subject: Strange caterpillar I cannot identify
Location: I couldn’t find the location as this was last summer but it was about 5 Km outside of Boyle, Alberta.
January 1, 2015 12:27 pm
Dear, Mr.Bugman,
I found this caterpillar in the boreal forest of Alberta, Canada. Unfortunately I learned the hard way that it does in fact sting. It’s body is mostly orange but has a stripe of white near it’s belly. When it turns left or white you can see that it is banded with black and also what three black tufts of hair. Two near it’s head and one near its rear. On both sides of it’s body it has very fine tufts of white hairs.
Signature: Sincerely, Kyle Howard

Alder Dagger Moth Caterpillar

Fingered Dagger Moth Caterpillar

Dear Kyle,
We quickly located a matching image of your caterpillar on North Coast Diaries where it is identified as Acronicta hesperida with the indication that it is “not so common on the ground, but easy to find on the branches of alder trees.
”  While we did not find that species on BugGuide, your image matches the images of the Fingered Dagger Moth or Alder Dagger Moth Caterpillars that are posted on BugGuide where it states:   “western populations formerly considered a separate species (Acronicta hesperida) are now considered synonymous with A. dactylina.”  BugGuide also notes:  “uncommon, but widely distributed.”

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Subject: What is this Western Bluebird eating?
Location: 40º18’14,10″N, 121º52’22.43″W
December 29, 2014 1:16 pm
Dear Bugpersons,
I photographed a Western Bluebird as it foraged with conspecifics in a huge oak woodland in Northern California at 783 meters elevation. It carried a larvalike thing onto the road surface and proceeded to whack it to death! The attached photo shows the unfortunate prey object pre-whacking. What bug is that?
Many thanks.
Signature: Sylvia

Western Bluebird eats Cutworm

Western Bluebird eats Cutworm

Hi Sylvia,
Thanks for submitting your excellent Food Chain image.  Our good friend lepidopterist always says that insects, including the caterpillars of butterflies and moths, exist to feed birds.  This caterpillar appears to be a Cutworm in the subfamily which you can find represented on BugGuide, possibly a Winter Cutworm.

Subject: Western Bluebird
December 30, 2014 12:34 am
Thank you for your speedy reply! Winter Cutworm looks correct. Here’s an edited photo that shows a little more detail of the caterpillar. Rather disheartening to learn that this introduced species is so widespread, but I doubt that the Bluebirds mind.
Signature: Sylvia

Western Bluebird eats Cutworm

Western Bluebird eats Cutworm

Thanks for the update Sylvia.  The nice thing about some introduced species is that they do provide food for native species.

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Subject: Caterpillar
Location: Welland ON Canada
September 21, 2014 9:04 am
The attached picture was taken in Welland Ontario on 18th September 2014.
The caterpillar was on New England Aster and was close to 50 mm long.
Signature: Rick Young

Goldenrod Hooded Owlet Moth Caterpillar

Goldenrod Hooded Owlet Moth Caterpillar

Dear Rick,
This is the caterpillar of a Hooded Owlet Moth in the genus
Cucullia, and of the species represented on BugGuide, it most closely resembles the Goldenrod Hooded Owlet Moth Caterpillar, Cucullia asteroides.  Hooded Owlet Moth Caterpillars were selected as our Bug of the Month for September 2014.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination