Currently viewing the category: "Inchworms"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Ed. Note:  A mere ten days after making this post, it quickly rose to the fifth “most liked” posting on our site.

Ed. Note:  We haven’t awarded a Nasty Reader Award in quite some time since most folks who write to us are polite and quite understanding that our small staff is unable to respond to every question we receive.  This morning we happened upon this flurry of emails from Alexis Crowell, that came within three hours of one another.  Seems Alexis is demanding instant gratification and furthermore, (S)he has deplorable grammar.  Additionally, U.S.A. is a very broad location when it comes to trying to determine the identify of many insects that have a very localized range.  Further research into the matter revealed that Alexis did not even take the photographs, but rather pilfered them from other websites.  With that said, we are unable to even respond to this rude query with any accuracy.  It also appears that despite the poor grammar and spelling, Alexis has referred to our staff with a derogatory sexual orientation slur in the final correspondence that occurred a scant two hours and 45 minutes after the initial email.  Seems Alexis is not only rude, but a person who demands instant gratification.  For all  of the above reasons, we are pleased to award Alexis Crowell of the U.S.A. as our latest Nasty Reader Award recipient.

Subject: are they rare?
Location: U.S.A
August 14, 2012 3:08 pm
dear bugman,is the pink inchworm rare or is it not that rare. is there not that many inch worms?
Signature: sinnceraly, Alexis Crowell

Ed Note:  Our immediate automated response
Sent: Tuesday, August 14, 2012 3:08 PM
Subject: Identification Request: are they rare?
Thank you for submitting your identification request.
Please understand that we have a very small staff that does this as a labor of love. We cannot answer all submissions (not by a long shot). But we’ll do the best we can!

Alexis Crowell alexisleecrowell@yahoo.com
3:19 PM (18 hours ago)
dear bugman it is ok
you cant just try we are really curious about this unknown bug.

Alexis Crowell alexisleecrowell@yahoo.com
5:10 PM (17 hours ago)
JUST ANSWER US PLEASE I AM CRYIN RIGHT NOW AND I HAVE BEEN STARING AT THE COMPUTER!

Alexis Crowell alexisleecrowell@yahoo.com
5:53 PM (16 hours ago)
texts back faget

Pink Inchworm from dailypress.com

Alexis,
Our online submission form clearly states:  “By submitting an identification request and/or photo(s), you give WhatsThatBug.com permission to use your words and image(s) on their website and other WhatsThatBug.com publications. Also, you swear that you either took the photo(s) yourself or have explicit permission from the photographer or copyright holder to use the image.”  Both of the images you have submitted have been pilfered from other internet websites, most likely without permission which is a copyright violation.  One image came from http://www.dailypress2.com/photopost/showphoto.php?photo=111815 and the other is a photo credited to Dave Green posted on http://daylight44.net/pinkinch.html which can be accessed by clicking the Photo of Pink Inchworm link.  You have plagiarized the work of other photographers and submitted them using our online form that specifically indicates that you have taken the photos or you have permission to use the photos.  Additionally, your flurry of emails in rapid succession ending in an incorrectly spelled sexual orientation slur has gained you the distinction of being awarded the Nasty Reader Award as well as a feature on our scrolling announcement bar.  The Nasty Reader Award is a distinction we have not had the pleasure to award in over two and a half years, which is an indication that most people who write to us are polite and well mannered.  Please search elsewhere for information on Pink Inchworms.  Responding to you is not worth any more of our time which is quite precious to us.

Pink Inchworm from Daylight 44

Ed. Note:  excerpt from another response.
… so sorry you had to award your Nasty Reader award … what a jerk !
the rest of us really love what you are doing and appreciate your time, efforts, and your willingness to share your knowledge.
Donna

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Eggs on Fennel Leaf
Location: Atlanta, GA
July 8, 2012 5:17 pm
These egss were deposited a couple of days ago on a bronze fennel leaf. They are small, about the size of a pin head. Hoping you can help identify. Thanks!
Signature: Amy R

Unknown Eggs

Dear Amy,
Eggs can be very difficult to identify, and though this formation seems distinctive, it does not look familiar to us.  Our best guess is that perhaps they are either a moth or a type of True Bug.  We will continue to research this.

As an update, I’ve attached a picture of some of the hatchlings. Some kind of looper? The picture was taken, today, 07/11/2012.

Eggs on Fennel Hatch into Caterpillars

Thanks Amy,
It seems our first guess, Moth Eggs, was correct.  Also, judging by the way the caterpillars move, they are the hatchlings of a Geometrid Moth, often called Inchworms or Spanworms.  We will see if we can determine what species feeds on fennel.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: It moved!
Location: Slatington, PA
May 28, 2012 8:53 am
My mother found this thing outside of her house. She thought it was stick, and rightly so. And then it moved! EW! Please tell me what it is, I have never seen anything like this!
Signature: Mandy

Inchworm

Hi Mandy,
This is an Inchworm or Spanworm, the caterpillar of a moth in the family Geometridae.  They get their common name from the manner of locomotion.  As you can see in the photo where the Inchworm is up-side-down, there are three pairs of true legs near the head and only two pairs of false legs or prolegs near the posterior end of the body.  Most caterpillars have five pairs of prolegs and that enables them to move in an oscillating manner.  There is a drawing on the Enchanted Learning website that illustrates the anatomy of a typical caterpillar.  Inchworms need to crawl forward on their true legs and then loop the rear end of the body forward.  Many Inchworms are excellent twig mimics, and they are known to grasp a stem with the prolegs and stick the rest of the body straight out exactly like a twig.  Our Bug of the Month Posting for April 2011 was the Inchworm and the posting illustrates both the manner of locomotion and the twig mimic behavior.  

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Caterpillar
Location: East Tennessee, Great Smoky Mountains National Park
May 24, 2011 8:24 pm
I found this oddball on my shirt after walking through some trees ( mostly ironwood, sweetgum, red maple, but there were other around) near a river in Great Smoky Mountains National Park in TN – about elevation 1500’. Sorry just one picture! I couldn’t find anything like it in David Wagner’s excellent Caterpillar field guide…
Signature: John D.

Horned Spanworm

Dear John,
Most caterpillars have five pairs of prolegs at the anterior end of the body and these prolegs assist in the caterpillar locomotion.  Many caterpillars in the family Geometridae have only two pairs of prolegs, so their method of locomotion is unusual.  They crawl forward on their true legs and then loop the rear portion of the body forward.  Because of this manner of locomotion, they are commonly called Inchworms or Spanworms.  The filaments on your specimen are very unusual and immediately indicate it is a member of the genus
Nematocampa, most likely the Horned Spanworm, Nematocampa resistaria, which we identified on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on many hardwoods and several softwood species of shrubs and trees including pine, hemlock, fir, larch and spruce.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Unknown Caterpillar
Location: Sarasota, Florida. (South West Florida)
March 30, 2011 1:10 pm
I was looking through some of my books on caterpillars but couldn’t find this one and also looked on your site but also didn’t come across it and would like to know what it is! It’s a brown/grey color with red spots along the sides. Found it in my backyard. Wasn’t on a plant, but when you pick it up it goes straight like a stick. Found it on 3/30/2011; Afternoon; Currently Humid and windy.
Signature: Shelby

Inchworm

Hi Shelby,
Your caterpillar is in the family Geometridae, and it is commonly called an Inchworm, Spanworm or Measuringworm because of its unusual manner of locomotion.  It crawls forward on its six true legs and the loops the rear portion of its body forward with its two pairs of prolegs.  Inchworms are also called Loopers.  Most caterpillars have five pairs of prolegs, but Inchworms have only two which necessitates this unusual manner of locomotion.  We will try to identify your species if we have time by browsing the hundreds of possibilities on BugGuide.  Interestingly, we decided in the past few days that the featured Bug of the Month for April 2011 is the Inchworm, so your identification request is quite timely.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Looper
Location: Fairfield, California
March 28, 2011 7:09 pm
Hi,
Every spring and summer I find these in our garden and would love to know what type of insect it is. Most recent find was on 3-26-11 on a Japanese maple, but I have found them on Lantana and also just hanging out on on the fence. I never see any feeding damage on the plants the looper is on. Thanks!
Signature: Sharon

Inchworm

Dear Sharon,
At the moment, we are only going to be able to provide you with a very general Family identification, which you may already know.  This is an Inchworm or Spanworm or Measuringworm in the family Geometridae, and browsing through BugGuide will reveal many similar looking caterpillars.  Inchworms are also sometimes called Loopers, though not all Loopers are in the family Geometridae.  The Inchworm gets its common name because of its manner of locomotion, which your photo beautifully illustrates.  Most caterpillars have five pairs of prolegs, but Inchworms have only two pairs, which results in the caterpillar walking forward with the fore part of the body in a typical manner, and then looping the rear portion of the body to catch up, causing the larva to appear as though it is measuring distance as it moves.  Your second photo demonstrates the marvelous camouflage ability these caterpillars have for mimicking small twigs.  We are not certain what species of Inchworm you have submitted, but we suspect the species found on the Lantana might be different from the individual you found on the maple.  Many Inchworms look very similar and they are difficult to distinguish from other members of the family.  Since it is the end of March, it is time for us to select a Bug of the Month for April, and we love your photos so much, we have decided to give your Inchworm that honor.  With the dormant trees beginning to produce tender leaves in many parts of the country, young caterpillars will start appearing as well to feed on those leaves.  The vast majority of our caterpillar submissions occur in the fall when large fully developed Caterpillars leave their host plants to find places to pupate, but sharp eyed observers will be able to find Caterpillars in the spring as well.

Inchworm camouflaged as twig

Hi Daniel!
I am absolutely thrilled (can’t stop smiling) that you have chosen my submission as worthy for BOM! I am a “wannabe” entomologist, to the point that I lead the introduction to entomology for my county’s Master Gardener training class. I am a certified Master Gardener and photography is another of my hobbies. I hope to culture this inchworm through to its adult stage (to help in the identification). I have tried before, but my captive conditions do not seem suitable for success. Perhaps a larger terrarium with native soil will help.
And thank you for the lesson on inchworm definition (vs. caterpillar), I will share this information with my Master Gardener peers and trainees! Thank you, again!
Cheers!
Sharon Leos

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination