Currently viewing the category: "Hornworms"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Xanthopan morgani caterpillar drawing
Location: Afrotropical area
May 1, 2016 4:08 pm
Dear Daniel,
today I’d like to contribute a drawn sketch of Xanthopan larva and pupa, which are seldom found and seen and have not yet been shown to public as photographs for quite some decennies now, a kind of mystery considering the role and popularity of the famous moth in contexts of coevolution theories and orchid pollination – and the fact that it is spread in the entire African rainforest zone including Madagascar, and not rare at all, according to reported findings of adults… Maybe it will inspire or help somebody to catch sight of one on leafs or on a twig of an Annona plant (Annona squamosa, A. muricata, A. reticulata and other Custard apple- relatives and a few vines (Xylopia, Uvaria) from the Annonaceae-family, on which the larvae reportedly feed, or eventually another plant species not yet known as its foodplant… ); it is blue-green with whitish lateral stripes and slightly hairy, similar to the neotropical Neococytius caterpillars…
Best Thanks and wishes for the wonderful and helpful site,
Bostjan
Signature: Bostjan Dvorak

Sketch of Xanthopan by Bostjan Dvorjak

Sketch of metamorphosis of  Xanthopan morgani by Bostjan Dvorak

Thanks so much Bostjan for allowing us to post your wonderful drawings of this marvelous moth whose existence was theorized by Charles Darwin many years before it was actually discovered since the great evolutionary theorist hypothesized such a moth must exist to pollinate the orchid from Madagascar with a blossom possessing a ten inch throat.  Darwin knew only a Sphinx Moth would have a proboscis long enough to extract the nectar.  We had to correct the perspective of your images and we also increased the contrast.  We hope our digital enhancements meet with your approval.  We hope that one day one of our readers will supply us with the images you so long to see.  The coiled sheath for the proboscis is amazing.

Sketch of larva and pupa of Xanthopan morgani by Bostjan Dvorak

Sketch of larva and pupa of Xanthopan morgani by Bostjan Dvorak

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar found on my Chili plant
Location: Gauteng, South Africa
April 26, 2016 12:54 am
Hi there, I found a huge caterpillar on my chili plant and tried to google it and find more information about it. I found some images that relate to the one I have – It looks like a Laurel Sphinx caterpillar, but the region and habitat it is usually found in does not correspond with mine.. So I am not sure what it is. Can you please identify this for me?
Signature: M Kruger

Death's Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Death’s Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear M Kruger,
The reason your individual resembles the Laurel Sphinx Caterpillar is that your Death’s Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar is in the same family.  Caterpillars of the Death’s Head Hawkmoth are one of our most common identification requests from South Africa.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this larve?
Location: Near Lyle, WA
April 25, 2016 6:38 pm
We found this along a trail in eastern Washington. It was as burrowing a hole in the dry dirt. I tickled its tail with a piece of grass and it turned around, half in and half out of the hole, as seen in the pic. About 3-4 inches long, as big around as my pinky finger.
Signature: Jerry

Pacific Green Sphinx Caterpillar

Pacific Green Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Jerry,
We are very excited to post your image of a Pacific Green Sphinx Caterpillar,
Arctonotus lucidus, which we identified on The Sphingidae of the Americas site.  Caterpillars of Sphinx Moths are usually easy to identify because they have a caudal horn, but some species lose the horn and only a caudal bump remains, and it is thought to afford some protection as it resembles an eye.  Though we have several images of adult Pacific Green Sphinx Moths on our site including this individual from Lyle, your caterpillar image is a first for us.  David Wikle is quoted on The Sphingidae of the Americas:  “and in the fifth [instar], the ‘eye of God’ is pasted on its arse and the horn is replaced by a raised area like Xylophanes or Eumorpha larvae.”  The larva is also pictured on BugGuide.  Since it was digging in the dirt, and it was quite large according to your description, we can deduce it was going underground in preparation for pupation.  We are going to copy Bill Oehlke as your image is so stunning, he may request permission to post it to his own site. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar Vic australia
Location: Victoria Australia- bayside
April 20, 2016 5:58 pm
Hi, I found this on the ground in Victoria Australia. It’s as long as my palm. What is it?
Signature: Thanks

Convolvulus Hawkmoth Hornworm

Convolvulus Hawkmoth Hornworm

Your Hornworm is the caterpillar of a Convolvulus Hawkmoth, Agrius convolvuli , and you can verify our identification on ButterflyHouse where it states:  “The caterpillar may walk up to 300 metres from the food plant to pupate. It pupates in a cell in the soil. The pupa has a long looped compartment for the developing haustellum.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of caterpillar is this?
Location: Sandton, South Africa
April 13, 2016 12:31 pm
Hi there!
This is Absolem, the caterpillar who is living off of my Basil plant.
I live in Sandton, just north of Johannesburg, South Africa.
It has just turned Autumn here and we went through a bit of a cold spell but it’s warming up a little bit before winter hits.
From the pictures I’ve seen it seems like Absolem may be a Death’s head Hawk moth. But I’ve never seen any of these in this area so I’m not sure.
Could you possibly kindly tell me what Absolem will turn into?
Signature: Jennifer Williamson

Death's Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Death’s Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Jennifer,
Sweet Basil is not a plant listed on African Moths as being a larval foodplant for the Death’s Head Hawkmoth.  That list includes:  “
Brugmansia suaveolens, Solanum jacquini, Solanum Jasminoides, Solanum macrocarpon, Tabebuia pallida, Clerodendrum ugandense, Mormordica charantia, Vitex, Jasminum pubigerum, Spathodea, Duranta erecta, Lantana camara.”  Absolem’s color is atypical for a Death’s Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar.  We wonder if he would prefer a different food plant.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hornworm
Location: Johannesburg, South Africa
April 12, 2016 4:53 am
Hello
I found my cat playing now with this worm/caterpillar thing and I don’t know what it is. It makes a clicking noise and lifts in horn when I touch it with something.
Please let me know what this is?
Thanks!
Signature: Regards Shae Turner

Death's Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Death’s Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Shae,
This is a more atypical coloration for a Death’s Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar.  Most individual are yellow and green.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination