Currently viewing the category: "Hornworms"
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Subject: unknown bug
Location: marsh creek ca
August 23, 2015 12:17 pm
A friend found this bug/ catapilar in marsh creek california.
Signature: with a signature

Early Instar Achemon Sphinx Caterpillar

Early Instar Achemon Sphinx Caterpillar

We believe your Hornworm is an early instar Achemon Sphinx that has not yet shed its caudal horn, which is a typical part of the maturing of the species.  As they grow and age, Achemon Sphinx Caterpillars lose the horn, leaving a caudal bump as the only evidence a horn once existed.  See this BugGuide image for comparison.

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Subject: No clue what this is.
Location: Ontario Canada
August 20, 2015 2:52 pm
We’ve found this guy in our back yard in Ontario Canada and we have no idea what it is.
Signature: Brendon

Achemon Sphinx Caterpillar

Achemon Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Brendon,
This is an Achemon Sphinx Caterpillar, a species that feeds on grape, Virginia creeper and other vines.

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Subject: blue horned caterpillar
Location: Glenwood Springs Colorado
August 18, 2015 10:25 am
found this in the parking lot in glenwood springs colorado when my dog sniffed it and reared back then i noticed that it had a horn and was wondering if it was poisonous
Signature: Jeremy

Great Ash Sphinx Caterpillar

Great Ash Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Jeremy,
We have determined that your caterpillar is a Great Ash Sphinx Caterpillar,
Sphinx chersis, based on the images and description on BugGuide which states:  “Larva – greenish or pinkish with seven long diagonal lines sometimes edged with pink. Spiracles elongate, black ringed with white. Horn blue or pink.”  While doing our research, we encountered this blog posting and we have written in with an identification.

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Subject: Green insect eggs
Location: Northern Virginia
August 16, 2015 4:48 am
What insect do you think laid these eggs? We found them in Northern Virginia, maybe 10 miles from the Washington Dulles airport. My son is extremely interested in spiders and insects. He (6 years old) can identify stinkbug eggs.
Signature: John Pfaff

Carolina Sphinx eggs on Datura

Carolina Sphinx eggs on Datura

Dear John,
When it comes to identifying immature insect stages for plant feeding species, it is very helpful to know the plant upon which the insects were found.  This leaf looks like it belongs to Jimsonweed or
Datura, and several Hornworms from the genus Manduca feed on Solanaceous plants.  We believe these eggs are those of a Carolina Sphinx, and that they will hatch into Tobacco Hornworms, a species known to feed on the leaves of tomatoes and peppers as well, though Datura and Nightshade are native plant hosts for the species.  This image from BugGuide supports our identification.

Carolina Sphinx Eggs

Carolina Sphinx Eggs

Thanks so much!!  My son is going to be a huge fan of your website.
John

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Subject: caterpillar/worm
Location: Colfax Ca USA ( Nor Cal, upper foothills of Sierra Nevada Mountain range
August 15, 2015 10:59 pm
Found this guy on our back porch two days in a row. Its sunmer time.He’s about 3 in long. As big around as an average persons pointer finger. Has texture like an oak worm. And this one creepy eye.Seems like some sort of caterpillar. In picture hes hanging over a piece of lattice. Only about 1/3 of his body showing. Any info would be greatly appreciated
Signature: thank you- Walker-Costanzo Family

Probably "tail end" of an Achemon Sphinx Caterpillar

Probably “tail end” of an Achemon Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Walker-Costanzo Family,
We are certain that this is a Caterpillar in the Sphingidae family, and it is most likely in the genus
Eumorpha.  Caterpillars in the family are typically called Hornworms because they have a caudal horn, but the genus Eumorpha is unusual because when the caterpillars mature, they shed the horn, and all that remains is a caudal bump that often resembles an eye.  According to BugGuide, the only member of the genus reported in California is the Achemon Sphinx, and the complete Achemon Sphinx caterpillar looks close enough to your “tail end” view that we are relatively confident the identification is correct, however, three other species in the genus are reported in nearby Arizona.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on leaves of grape (Vitis), Virginia Creeper (Parthenocissus), Ampelopsis and related vining plants.”  Was there a grape vine near the sighting?

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Subject: Worm help!
Location: 32.447175,-95.130009
August 13, 2015 9:10 am
Hello Mr. Bugman! Found this little guy catching the sunset on the grass about 2 feet away from the pond. Did quite a bit of googling. All I found remotely similar is the Horn-worm, but I have only come across green horn-worms..none that are brightly colored like this!
Signature: by the President, please. Just kidding, Kelsey is fine.

Banded Sphinx Caterpillar

Banded Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear President Kelsey,
Just out of curiosity, when you are asked where you are from, do you answer “32.447175,-95.130009?”  This is a Hornworm in the genus Eumorpha, and members of the genus often lose the horn as they molt into fully grown caterpillars.  Your individual is a Banded Sphinx,
Eumorpha fasciatus. 

Banded Sphinx Caterpillar

Banded Sphinx Caterpillar

Thank you very much! They turn into sweet moths I see. Have a good one Doc.!

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination