Currently viewing the category: "Hornworms"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar
Location: Central coast of Australia
January 30, 2016 3:23 pm
I found what i think being a caterpillar this morning but don’t know what kind. Could you help me
Signature: Amy

Hornworm:  Theretra latreillii

Hornworm: Theretra latreillii

Dear Amy,
Thanks for writing back that you are in Australia.  This is a Hornworm in the family Sphingidae.  We turned to Butterfly House where we identified your Hornworm as
Theretra latreillii, a species with no common name.  Unlike the individuals pictured there, your Hornworm has secondary white spots behind the primary oculi.  Nature Love You pictures individuals with the additional white spots and provides the common name Pale Brown Hawk Moth. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large 3inch caterpillar
Location: Madeira
January 30, 2016 9:38 am
Dear Sir or Madam, I live on the Portuguese island of Madeira in Ponto do Sol – a sheltered spot at about 450 meters. I came across the caterpillar in the attached photograph this morning munching happily on a leaf. I would love to know what it is and more importantly what it will become. Can you help please?
Thank you
Signature: Mike M

Death's Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Death’s Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Mike,
This Hornworm is the caterpillar of a Death’s Head Hawkmoth,
Acherontia atropos, in its brown variation.  More typically the species has bright yellow and green caterpillars.  The adult Death’s Head Hawkmoth gets its name from the pattern on the thorax which is likened to a human skull.  This moth gained worldwide recognition when it was used to illustrate the movie poster for The Silence of the Lambs, though we just learned on Verbicide that the poster designers accentuated the typical pattern on moth by replacing the detail with an photo of a sculpture created of living nude female models entitled “In Voluptas Mors” conceived by Salvador Dali and photographed by Philippe Halsman.

Thank you very much Daniel.  I have just watched a number of youtube videos – what a fascinating process from caterpillar to moth.  What an impressive moth!!
Thanks for the information it is nice to know a little about what is happening around us.
Regards
Mike Muir

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Caterpilar
Location: Tanzania
January 19, 2016 8:43 am
Hi,
A friend of mine from Arusha-Tanzania has posted this picture on his FB account wondering witch
species this is. Been searching the internet and i can only find pictures but no description of the species.
So in order to help him and solve my own curiosity ;P i’m asking The bugman or help.
Friendly greetings from a Belgian in France 😛
Signature: Kurt Vogeleer

Oleander Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Oleander Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Kurt,
This is the caterpillar of an Oleander Hawkmoth,
Daphnis nerii, and its color indicates it is getting ready to pupate.  We found the species listed on African Moths and this wide ranging species is reported throughout much of Africa.  The adult Oleander Hawkmoth is a stunning green moth.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What Caterpillar is this?
Location: Negev, Israel
January 12, 2016 8:04 am
Found this caterpillar crossing the street, haven’t been able to find out what exactly this is.
It has a yellow belly and black, spike shaped legs.
Signature: Michael

Deathshead Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Deathshead Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Michael,
This distinctive caterpillar is a Deathshead Hawkmoth Caterpillar,
Acherontia atropos, and though this example from Israel has different coloration and markings, they are the same species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large Green Caterpillar
Location: Apache Junction, AZ
January 11, 2016 9:30 pm
From all my research it appears this baby is lost, and shouldn’t be this far West!! I caught my dogs playing with it and I need to know if there is any harm it could cause to them from either skin secretions or if ingested???
Signature: Apache Junction, AZ

Possibly Rustic Sphinx Caterpillar

Possibly Rustic Sphinx Caterpillar

Since you did not provide your suspected identification on this Sphinx Caterpillar, we started our research from scratch.  We believe this is a Rustic Sphinx Caterpillar, Manduca rustica, or another member of the genus.  We made our identification using the Sphingidae of the Americas site, and BugGuide sightings include the entire southern portion of the United States, from the Pacific ocean to the Atlantic ocean, and as far north as Pennsylvania.  To the best of our knowledge, there are no known toxins associated with the Rustic Sphinx.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Caterpillar
Location: Corozal, Belize, Central America 18° 22’29.81″W 88° 23′ 59.71″W
January 9, 2016 3:25 pm
Hi Bugman,
The other day, we were working under our parking palapa, and upon moving a tarp, out popped this fellow.
He’s about 3/4″ to 1″ in diameter, and when extended, abut 6″ to 7″ long.
We’ve lived here for nine years and have never seen one like him, or even close.
If you could identify him for us that would be super.
Thank you.
Signature: David Rider

Fig Sphinx Caterpillar

Fig Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear David,
Your submission is quite timely, because we just posted an image of an adult Fig Sphinx.  Your Fig Sphinx Caterpillar represents one color variation for this variable species, and we are surmising there is a fig tree in the genus
Ficus somewhere near your parking palapa.

Fig Sphinx Caterpillar

Fig Sphinx Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination