Currently viewing the category: "Hornworms"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: pink & green horned caterpillar
Location: Colorado
July 29, 2015 3:43 pm
Well hes mostly green and pink on top, his face is scary looking haha. He has a spike or horn on his tail side. He dosnt have anything else. No spots or stripes. I wanna take a pic with him on my face but im scared hes poisonous. Please hurry haha and i probably wont check my email if that applys at all.
Signature: idk

Waved Sphinx Hornworm

Waved Sphinx Hornworm

Dear idk,
This is a Hornworm, the caterpillar of a Sphinx Moth in the family Sphingidae, and we believe it is a Waved Sphinx Hornworm,
Ceratomia undulosa, that has turned pink as a sign it is preparing to pupate.  See the image on the Sphingidae of the Americas site, scrolling down.  It is not poisonous, and we eagerly await the image of you posing with this juicy guy.

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Subject: What is this bug?
Location: Sierra Vista , AZ
July 14, 2015 10:34 am
I found this bug on a jalapeño plant this morning. It eat the entire top of the plant overnight. Maybe a giant luna moth?
Signature: Margaret

Tobacco Hornworm

Tobacco Hornworm

Dear Margaret,
The Luna Moth is not found west of Texas and Oklahoma.  We just finished posting an image of a Tobacco Hornworm like yours.  Your individual in Arizona is eating a jalapeõ pepper plant while the one in Los Angeles is eating the leaves of a tomato plant.

Tobacco Hornworm on Jalapeño Plant

Tobacco Hornworm on Jalapeño Plant

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Subject:  Do you do Caterpillars?
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, CA
July 13, 2015
Alien on our tomato plant. About 5″ long. 😆
Sarah

Tobacco Hornworm

Tobacco Hornworm

Dear Sarah,
There are two related, similar looking caterpillars that feed on the leaves and occasionally the fruit of tomatoes.  You have the Tobacco Hornworm,
Manduca sexta, the larva of the Carolina Sphinx, which according to BugGuide, can be recognized by:  ” large green body; dorsal ‘horn’ (usually curved and orange, pink or red) on terminal abdominal segment; up to seven oblique whitish lateral lines, edged with black on upper borders.”  The caterpillar of the similar looking Tomato Hornworm, the caterpillar of the Five Spotted Hawkmoth, can be distinguished from the previous, according to BugGuide, because:  “The caterpillar has eight v-shaped stripes rather than the seven diagonal stripes of the similar Tobacco Hornworm (larva of Carolina Sphinx). The horn is also straight and blue-black rather than orange, yellow red. Unfortunately many images of these caterpillars found on the internet are misidentified. “

Melissa Covey, Kathy Jo Clark, Megan Matthews, Andrea Leonard Drummond, Tynisha Koenigsaecker, Melanie Abbott, Mary Lemmink Lawrence liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unidentified Caterpillar
Location: South Africa
April 15, 2015 1:19 am
Hello Bugman,
I found this Caterpillar on my Cape Goose Berry plant. I live in South Africa and we are now in very late Autumn. What type of caterpillar is this? Is it harmful to my plants? Does it turn into an endangered butterfly or moth after metamorphosis? Should I get rid of it or is it harmless?
Many thanks,
Signature: Andrea Joubert

Death's Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Death’s Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Andrea,
This is a Death’s Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar and it will eventually metamorphose into a Death’s Head
Hawkmoth, Acherontia atropos, a species most recognizable because it was used to illustrate the blockbuster movie poster for Silence of the Lambs.  The moth is not endangered.  A single caterpillar on a plant will eat the leaves, which does not permanently damage the plant unless it is very young or otherwise compromised.  A healthy plant will resprout leaves.

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Subject: caterpillar?
Location: Jacksonville Fl
April 11, 2015 5:10 pm
My mom found this caterpillar and was wondering what it turned into, it was found on the banks of the St. Johns river just south of Jacksonville Florida today.
Signature: Josh

Bald Cypress Sphinx Caterpillar

Cypress Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Josh,
We are very excited about your submission.  We quickly identified your Hornworm as a Cypress Sphinx Caterpillar,
Isoparce cupressi, thanks to some excellent images on the Sphingidae of the Americas site where it states:  “the rare Cypress Sphinx (Wing span: 2 3/8 – 2 9/16 inches (6 – 6.5 cm)), flies in Cypress swamps in Georgia (specimen type locality), and from Maryland to Texas. It has been reported in Mexico.  This species is threatened due to destruction of habitat.”  We are copying Bill Oehlke who runs that site and we hope you will also grant him permission to post your image.

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Subject:  a few more “bug photos” you might enjoy
Location:  Anza-Borrego Desert
March 2015
There were quite a few white-lined sphinx moth (Hyles lineata) caterpillars out in the Anza-Borrego desert during the wildflower bloom in early March of this year. We found there is quite a lot of variation in caterpillar patterns and eye color (note the green and orange-red eyes in the photo below).
Kind regards,
Lori in Altadena, CA

Whitelined Sphinx Caterpillars

Whitelined Sphinx Caterpillars

Thanks for sending us some additional images Lori.  We are posting your image of Whitelined Sphinx Caterpillars because we have been receiving numerous identification requests from Southern California in recent weeks.  In the future, please use our standard submission form located upon clicking the Ask What’s That Bug? link on our site.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination