Currently viewing the category: "Hornworms"
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Subject: Caterpillar
Location: Johannesburg, South Africa
February 27, 2015 3:44 am
We found this caterpillar in our garden today -late summer in Johannesburg, South Africa. I have never seen anything like it. Would love to know what it is. Many thanks!
Signature: Elizabeth

Death's Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Death’s Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Elizabeth,
Though you may have never seen one before, the Death’s Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar,
Acherontia atropos, is a relatively common species in South Africa.

Daniel, thank you so much for your help!  Just to let you know, we carefully relocated the creature to an uncultivated verge further down our road so it is safe and well and not tempted to eat any more Arum Lilies.  Best regards, Elizabeth.

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Subject: Sphingidae, Hawkmoth, possibly Hemaris? caterpillar
Location: Nagoya, Japan
February 12, 2015 6:22 am
Here is a hornworm, found in November in Nagoya, Japan, which I have been trying in vain to identify for a few months. I thought it might be a Hummingbird Clearwing Hawk-Moth, but it has slightly different coloration. It was found on a night time walk near a thickly wooded and planted city park. It was across the street from any foliage and walking down the sidewalk toward a noodle restaurant. Assuming it was looking (in the wrong direction) for a place to pupate, I picked it up and carried it back into the park. It tried to ‘burrow’ between my fingers until I gave it a leaf.
I apologize for the night flash photos, but I didn’t have anything to carry it home in, and I wanted it to have a chance to pupate if possible. I placed it under a bush and when it lay passively, I gave it a poke with a leaf. It immediately displayed a defensive flail that gave us both a heart attack! I have been searching through Sphingidae of Japan, but there is very little information and I have only found one other photo that matches the pale green sides with darker green stripes, tiny red lateral spots and blue ‘horn’. Any hints would be greatly appreciated!
Signature: James

Hornworm

Hornworm

Dear James,
We have posted your Hornworm image, and we hope to be able to provide you with an identification very soon.

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Subject: please identify the caterpiller
Location: guwahati, Assam
January 25, 2015 11:15 am
one of m friend found this caterpillar in he garden…by looking at the photo, i van assume that it is a fifth instar larva..which is a mature one..ready to form coccon…but i couldnot identify it…so please help me in knowing its common name and also its scientific name if possible.
Signature: Trishna sarma

Oleander Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Oleander Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Trishna,
We are speculating that your friend has an oleander plant growing near where this caterpillar was found.  The caterpillar is an Oleander Hawkmoth Caterpillar, a species that is listed under two different scientific names: 
Deilephila nerii or Daphnis nerii.

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Subject: huge caterpillars
Location: little brak river south Africa
January 8, 2015 9:05 am
Hi there,
I found some peculiar caterpillars in my garden in littlrebrak river, South Africa. There was a pair and they seemed to be fighting possibly? They were huge and had tails much like a sausage dogs, along with large heads and small horns.
I moved them to a bush in an open field near by.
I would love to know what they were!!
Signature: Julia Neethling

Hornworm

Coelonia fulvinotata Hornworm

Dear Julia,
This is a Hornworm, the caterpillar of a Hawkmoth in the family Sphingidae, but we are not certain of the species.  We will attempt some research and hopefully we will be able to provide you with a species name soon.  We did not locate any matching images on iSpot, however, we began to have trouble after page 4.

Hornworm

Coelonia fulvinotata Hornworm

Update:  Coelonia fulvinotata
Thanks to a comment from Bostjan Dvorak, we have been informed that this is a
Coelonia fulvinotata Hornworm, a species we already have represented in our archive.  More information is available on African Moths.

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Subject: Caterpiller in Uberlandia, MG Brasil
Location: Uberlandia, Minas Gerias, Brasil
December 24, 2014 11:09 am
I just found this catepiller on the wall of my office. It is huge, 10cm to 12cm in length, with a red head. See the attached photos.
Signature: Craig Snively

Pachylia syces syces Caterpillar

Pachylia syces syces Caterpillar

Dear Craig,
This is a caterpillar of a Sphinx Moth,
Pachylia syces syces, and it does not have a common name.  According to the Sphingidae of the Americas site, the caterpillars feed on the leaves of various plants in the genus Ficus, which includes figs.

Thanks Daniel. Happy Holidays and thanks for the information.
Abraço from Brasil
Craig

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Subject: identification of 2 caterpillars.

Location: Bangalore , Karnataka, INDIA
December 12, 2014 2:11 am
Dear sir,
I like to photograph nature ,in particular flora fauna around our campus,making it useful for our Bioscience faculty to use it for teaching the students in an excited way.
While doing so i came across 2 caterpillars with strange textures:
1. one had a greyish blue texture with ‘eye like’ spots at regular intervals running right from its snout like mouth till its tail in two parallel lines on the top of its body.
The mouth underneath revealed tooth like structures.This was revealed when it wanted to sense its way forward with its front end extended like a snout of a mouse. It also had a stinger at the end ,but more like a tail.
The area in which it was discovered had bushes of cactii,Aster flowers,Pine tree plants and the general wlid growth of weeds.
2.Second one i will upload in my next mail.
One important thing – These pictures from India – I hope you will be able to accommodate and identify. I am mentioning this because the 2/3 sites where I tried ,INDIA is not on the list of areas to be covered.
Kindly let me know.It will excite the Boys!!
Thanking you.
Signature: Nanda Gopal

Elephant Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Elephant Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Nanda,
This is a Hornworm, and we believe it might be the Caterpillar of the Chitral Elephant Hawkmoth, Deilephila rivularis, or a closely related species in the genus.  Our first clue is this posting of the Elephant Hawkmoth Caterpillar on Totally Nailed It, which led us to a nice matching caterpillar image on Sphingidae of the Western Palaearctic.  Also on the Sphingidae of the Western Palaearctic site, Caterpillars of  Deilephila elpenor look nearly identical.

Elephant Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Elephant Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Daniel,
Thank you so much for responding and thank you also for the wealth of
information you have supplied along with it.
I also have a small video clip of the movement of the Elephant
Hawkmoth Caterpillar.If it is of importance i can upload it.But
then,how do i do it.?
Please guide.
Thank you once again.

Thanks for the video offer Nanda, but we are not currently featuring videos on our site.  Our tiny staff resizes, crops and formats all imagery for the site, hopefully improving the quality of the images sent to us, and we do not have the time to “edit” video footage.

 

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