Currently viewing the category: "Hornworms"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Catapilars
Location: France
September 25, 2016 2:35 am
Saw this South of France, Gorges dHeric.Can’t seem to find it in a general search any ideas?
Signature: Jules

Spurge Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Spurge Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Jules,
Though your image does not illustrate the caudal horn, one of the most significant physical features of the Spurge Hawkmoth Caterpillar,
Hyles euphorbiae, the coloration is unmistakable.  The Spurge Hawkmoth  is found in North America as well as Eurasia, because they were released to help control the invasive spurge plants that have become naturalized in North America.   The Sphingidae of the Western Palaearctic site has some excellent images that should substantiate our identification.

Thank you for clearing that up.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is it ?
Location: Ashford ct
September 17, 2016 7:29 am
Hello. I found this cool guy crawling along the road. He looks almost scaley. I’d love to know what it is. Thank you
Signature: Nicole Whitney

Ello Sphinx Hornworm

Hermit Sphinx Hornworm

Dear Nicole,
We believe this is the Hornworm of an Ello Sphinx,
Erinnyis ello, but according to Sphingidae of the Americas, it is only listed as a stray in Connecticut, meaning adult moths sometimes are found.  If there are caterpillars, it is naturalized.  According to Sphingidae of the Americas:  “Larvae can be quite varied.”  There is an image on BugGuide of a similarly colored Ello Sphinx Hornworm.  The Ello Sphinx Hornworm is described on BugGuide as being:  “Horn reduced to a low point, arising from an elevated angular hump.  In the last instar, the horn is reduced to a nub.  Eyespot over the third thoracic segment is hidden in the resting caterpillar.  Ornately banded thoracic and prolegs.  Length to 7cm.”  We will check with Bill Oehlke if he agrees with our identification.

Bill Oehlke Provides Correction:  Hermit Sphinx
Lintneria eremitus.
I wish permission to post

Ed. Note:  See Sphingidae of the Americas for information on the Hermit Sphinx.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what is this caterpillar
Location: southern Ohio, in my backyard on a vine
September 11, 2016 2:22 pm
I’m from southern Ohio and there’s a caterpillar in my backyard and I’m curious as to what it is. It’s about as long as my hand and was eating leaves off of a Virginia creeper, a vining plant. I’ve tried looking for it on google and the closest I could find was tersa sphinx but I’m not sure that’s it.
Signature: Lizzie

Pandorus Sphinx

Pandorus Sphinx

Dear Lizzie,
The lateral composition of your image of a Pandorus Sphinx on its food plant, Virginia Creeper, would make a perfect study for an entomological illustration.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: caterpillar
Location: Budapest, Hungary
September 8, 2016 12:10 pm
Hello! This creation was about 8 cm long and had a blue horn(?). I’ve never seen this kinda living thing before so I’d be happy to know what I met :)
Signature: beka

Hornworm

Hornworm of Linden Tree Hawkmoth

Dear Beka,
This is a Hornworm, the caterpillar of a moth in the family Sphingidae, and its color leads us to believe it is prepupal and searching for a place to dig so that it can transform into a pupa.  We are not certain of the species, but the slant of its head and the blue horn lead us to believe it might be the Hornworm of an Eyed Hawkmoth,
Smerinthus ocellatus, which is pictured on the Sphingidae of the Western Palaearctic site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: can’t find this one online
Location: Homer, AK
September 9, 2016 2:57 pm
Location Homer, Alaska, date yesterday 9/8/16. Thanks!!
Signature: T.Smith

Bedstraw Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Bedstraw Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear T. Smith,
This is a Hornworm in the family Sphingidae, and according to the Sphingidae of the Americas site, there are only five species found in Alaska.  This is a Bedstraw Hawkmoth Caterpillar,
Hyles gallii, and according to the Sphingidae of the Americas site:  “Hyles gallii ranges coast to coast in Canada (into the Yukon) and southward along the Rocky Mountains into Mexico. It is also widely distributed throughout Europe and Asia.  Ken Philip reports it in Alaska from early June until mid July in the Haines Region and also in Ivotuk Hills near Otuk Creek on the North Slope.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: It’s something new for you guys – a bug!!
Location: Yarmouth, ME
September 5, 2016 10:43 am
Hello!
Found this bug hanging out in our lawn, not on any plants, kinda maybe even trying to burrow? Not sure because my dog bothered it until it stopped trying to move :(
At that point, I moved it to the garden, tried and failed to research it, and then went back and took the attached photos.
Anyway, any help identifying this guy would be super appreciated!
Signature: Mikala

Waved Sphinx Hornworm

Waved Sphinx Hornworm

Dear Mikala,
Using the Sphingidae of the Americas site, we quickly identified your Hornworm as that of a Waved Sphinx,
Ceratomia undulosa.  According to the site:  “In the fifth instar, the spiracular ovals are decidedly red and the anal horn is off-white to pinkish laterally”  and “Just prior to pupation, larvae frequently take on a rosy hue.”  Your individual was getting ready to dig underground to pupate.  We hope it was able to realize its mission.

So neat! I’ve lived here most of my life and I’ve never seen anything like it before. Thanks for your help!
Mikala

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination