Currently viewing the category: "Hornworms"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this?
Location: Thailand
December 3, 2016 6:03 am
This csme from a friend on Thailand.
Signature: Klr

Oleander Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Oleander Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Klr,
This Oleander Hawkmoth Caterpillar is a very wide ranging species that feeds on the leaves of oleander.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar
Location: Hollywood, fl
November 30, 2016 3:15 pm
What type of catetpillar is this
Signature: Dave

Pluto Sphinx Caterpillar

Pluto Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Dave,
Your Caterpillar is the Hornworm of a Pluto Sphinx,
Xylophanes pluto, and according to the Sphingidae of the Americas site:  “There are three known colour morphs: green, brown, and purple/brown. The false eyes are rather striking in this purple/brown form.  Larvae feed beginning at dusk and through the night, hiding during the day at the base of their host plant or in nearby surrounding vegetation. The caterpillars usually either consume entire leaves or half of a leaf.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s that bug?
Location: Lagos, Nigeria, West Africa
November 21, 2016 9:58 pm
Hello,
My name is Abiodun. I live in Lagos, Nigeria, West Africa. I was at work one day and saw this caterpillar. After searching online and seeing similar pictures, I think it looks like a Tersa Sphinx Moth Caterpillar. It’s actually the start of autumn here. Could you please confirm this. Thank you.
Signature: Abiodun Afolabi

Hornworm

Hornworm

Dear Abiodun,
While your individual is a look-alike of the Caterpillar of a Tersa Sphinx, it is a different species in the same family Sphingidae.  We will attempt a species identification for you.  Many caterpillars have evolved with large fake eyespots as a camouflage defense mechanism.

Identification:  A special thanks to Bostjan Dvorak for identifying this Hornworm as Basiothia medea.  There is an image of the Hornworm on INPN.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar
Location: Tucson, AZ
October 24, 2016 3:15 pm
Found this guy or gal on my front door mat, it flips and flops if you touch it. I’m in Tucson Arizona
Signature: Dianne Lopez

Rustic Sphinx Caterpillar

Rustic Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Dianne,
The pink coloration of this Hornworm indicates it is probably pre-pupal, which is also why you did not find it feeding.  We believe it is a Rustic Sphinx based on this Featured Creatures image and this BugGuide image. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar – Manu Reserve Zone, Peru
Location: Manu Reserve Zone, Peru
October 16, 2016 12:19 pm
We found this lovely caterpillar just off a river bank. It was pretty large and eating the plant it was on.
Signature: Andy

Banded Sphinx Caterpillar

Banded Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Andy,
This is the Caterpillar of a Banded Sphinx,
Eumorpha fasciatus, and because it is a species also found in North America, we quickly recognized it.  The caterpillars of the Banded Sphinx are quite variable, and this is probably the most dramatic color pattern.  We verified its identity by matching it to this BugGuide image, and we verified on Sphingidae of the Americas that the species if found in Peru.  Duty calls us away from the office for a few days, so we will be post-dating your submission to go live during our absence later in the week.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this caterpillar
Location: Paphos Cyprus
October 12, 2016 4:02 am
There are a lot of these very mobile caterpillars in the hedges around our villa in Cyprus – we guess they are Hawk Moths but something more specific would be appreciated. They are light green over 30mm long with a ponounced rear face with yellow horn , longitudinal stripes either side and light coloured almost illuminous vertical stripes. The front face has small whitish eyes st back along the head.
Signature: Regards Ray

Oleander Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Oleander Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Ray,
As you noticed, the backward facing yellow horn is quite distinctive, and also indicative that this is a Hawkmoth caterpillar or Hornworm in the family Sphingidae.  Is there much oleander growing in the vicinity where they were discovered?  This is a very green Oleander Hawkmoth Caterpillar,
Daphnis nerii, and according to Wildscreen Arkive:  “As they get older, the larvae become green to brown with a large blue-and-white eyespot near the head and a yellow ‘horn’ on the rear. There is also a white band along the side of the body, with a scattering of small white and bluish dots alongside it. The spiracles on the sides of the body are black.  Older oleander hawk-moth larvae measure around 7.5 to 8.5 centimetres in length.  Just before it pupates, the oleander hawk-moth larva becomes browner in colour. ”  Most images of Oleander Hawkmoth Caterpillars on our site are pre-pupal and browner in color.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination