Currently viewing the category: "Bagworm"
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Subject:  Pinecone-like Cocoon
Location:  Jacksonville, FL
August 27, 2015
Hi Bugman,
Today I found this
2 1/2″ long cocoon on a cedar tree.  It’s a brilliantly designed and constructed little pinecone-like structure. (It also reminds me of a log cabin.)
Would you please identify it for me?
Thank you,
L Welch

Bagworm Cocoon

Bagworm Cocoon

Dear L Welch,
This is the cocoon of a Bagworm, a species of moth in the family Psychidae.  A Bagworm Caterpillar constructs a shelter from silk and bits of the plants upon which it is feeding, enlarging the bag as the caterpillar grows.  The caterpillar never leaves the bag, and eventually pupates inside the bag.  Your Bagworm is in the pupal stage, as it is no longer mobile.

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Subject: What kind of bug is this?
Location: Cebu, Philippines
July 17, 2015 6:01 am
I don’t know what this bug is and I’m dying to find out. My curiosity is killing me. It’s a very tiny bug supporting a huge shell of some kind of wood shavings , if you will. Hoping for an answer!!
Signature: What

Bagworm

Bagworm

This is a Bagworm, the caterpillar of a moth in the family Psychidae.  Bagworms construct shelters from bits of plant that act as camouflage as well as protection.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Leafy Caterpillar
Location: Tampa, FL
May 31, 2015 11:18 am
We saw this guy crawling across the sidewalk of a strip mall in Tampa, FL and were wondering what kind of caterpillar it is.
Signature: Nikki D.

bagworm

bagworm

Dear Nikki D.,
This is some species of Bagworm in the family Psychidae.  Bagworm caterpillars construct a shelter out of the plant material upon which they are feeding that acts as camouflage as well as protection.
  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae (bagworms) construct spindle-shaped bags covered with pieces of twigs, leaves, etc., and remain in them — enlarging the bags as they grow — until they pupate (also in the bag). Adult females remain in the bag, emitting pheromones which attract adult males to mate with them.”

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Subject: psychidae oiketicus
Location: Guatemala city
October 4, 2014 1:21 pm
After a large amount of picture comparisons and forum searching, I think I have this one pegged as a basket bug. I sent an identification request this morning still thinking it was hornetsnest of some kind.
Signature: ithinki’ve got it

Bagworm

Bagworm

We agree with your identification.  Moths in the family Psychidae are commonly called Bagworms because the larva construct “bags” from silk and plant parts that they live inside as a means of protection.

bagworm

bagworm

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Subject: What made this?
Location: San Antonio, TX (west side)
July 13, 2014 11:35 pm
Noticed this yesterday while working in the yard. It’s dangling from a live-oak tree. I’ve been here 8 years and never seen one here before, or anywhere else I’ve ever lived. If you’re the size of a bug I think this is a marvel of construction. As far as I can tell those are very neatly cut or chewed twigs. Notice the hanging apparatus, it almost looks like braid, or rope.
It is approx 3″L x 14/16″ at the widest point. I showed it to a friend asking if he knew what it was, and his reply was, “Mini air-beavers?”
What’s your guess?
Signature: Sarah

Bagworm

Bagworm

Dear Sarah,
Though the thought of mini air beavers is tremendously amusing, this is actually the pupa of a Bagworm, a moth in the family Psychidae.  Construction on the bag begins with the young caterpillar and the bag is enlarged as the caterpillar grows.  The Bagworm caterpillar drags around its bag which acts as shelter and camouflage, and eventually the Bagworm caterpillar pupates within the bag after attaching the bag to a brand or fence.  Your Bagworm is in the pupal stage.  When it is mature, a winged male Bagworm moth or a flightless female Bagworm moth will emerge. 

Bagworm

Bagworm

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Subject: What is this? LOL
Location: Orangeburg, NY
July 24, 2013 5:06 pm
This was crawling on the sidewalk and inching along and appeared to be dragging the ”salad” behind it…sort of an insect Carmen Miranda …any ideas? It was about 3~4 inches long…
Just curious!
Signature: Don Slevin

Bagworm

Bagworm

Hi Don,
This is a Bagworm, a caterpillar in the family Psychidae.  We believe it is an Evergreen Bagworm,
Thyridopteryx ephemeraeformis, based on photos posted to bugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination