Currently viewing the category: "Bagworm"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this? LOL
Location: Orangeburg, NY
July 24, 2013 5:06 pm
This was crawling on the sidewalk and inching along and appeared to be dragging the ”salad” behind it…sort of an insect Carmen Miranda …any ideas? It was about 3~4 inches long…
Just curious!
Signature: Don Slevin

Bagworm

Bagworm

Hi Don,
This is a Bagworm, a caterpillar in the family Psychidae.  We believe it is an Evergreen Bagworm,
Thyridopteryx ephemeraeformis, based on photos posted to bugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange bug – what is it?
Location: Setubal, Portugal
February 10, 2013 7:20 am
Dear WTB,
Would you tell me what this bug is? I found it while strolling in a local park. It was slowly dragging itself along the pavement. I tried poking it with a stick to see if it would come out of that ”shell”, but some kind of orange-ish blood poured out!
Signature: Luis M.

Bagworm

Dear Luis,
We believe this is a Bagworm, the caterpillar of a moth in the family Psychidae.  Bagworms construct mobile homes for themselves from the plant parts that they feed upon.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bagworm in Uruguay?
Location: Bella Vista, Maldonado, Uruguay
February 5, 2013 5:24 am
Hi, my name is Tadeo, i am 10 years old and i discovered this strange cocoon in a just planted tree. After a while i saw that the cocoon was at a different place as the previous watch…so i started to pay more attention to it. Just tonight i found out that inside the cocoon lives a big worm…but i was not sure it was a SilkWorm….I have HD pictures…Can you please help me identify it…
Thanks a lot
Signature: Tadeo

Bagworm

Hi Tadeo,
This Bagwormis most likely in the family Psychidae and it will eventually pupate within its bag when it will become a stationary cocoon.  Your photos are of a beautiful quality and they are a nice addition to our website.  We are sorry we cannot identify your Bagworm to the species level.  We don’t receive many submissions from Uruguay to our site, so thank you for sending your sighting.

Bagworm

Hi Daniel, thank you very much for your reply…. if you can…i have some other questions….
I want to know if this will be a buterfly…I want to know also how much time can take that so i can see and take pictures from all the process. Unfortunatelly the tree where it was at the beginning broke and now we put some tree leaves near him to eat…but maybe we can generate a better place…..
Thank you very much… i am really very interested and your website is very very cool.
tadeo

Hi again Tadeo,
Bagworms are actually moth caterpillars and they are not especially showy.  Interestingly, female Bagworms are wingless and they do not venture far from the bag when they eclose or emerge from the cocoon.  Once she has mated, the female Bagworm lays eggs inside her bag for the next generation.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug
Location: Singapore
August 24, 2012 1:07 am
Dear Sir,
I live in Singapore, and I found this but that look as carry pieces of wood on his back the size is +- 2-3cm crawling on the wall but have king of string connect as a spider.
I gave him a name Xpus just sound cool :-)
thanks in advance.
Frank
Signature: Bug

Bagworm

Hi Frank,
This is a Bagworm in the family Psychidae.  We located an Ecological Observations in Singapore Blog posting of Bagworms that has one image that somewhat resembles the head of your Bagworm.  We cannot be sure they are the same species.  Bagworms construct their bags from pieces of the plants they feed upon.  The bags act as camouflage and protection.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar???
Location: Portland, TN
July 30, 2012 8:02 pm
Hi there, I saw the ”bug” today I’m stumped. At first I thought it was a broken piece of a pine tree branch, then it started moving. A caterpillar started to crawl out of one side and when I touched it, it went inside the ”shell”. Any ideas? Thanks.
Signature: Jason Waldron

Bagworm

Hi Jason,
You are correct that this is a caterpillar.  It is a Bagworm, the caterpillar of a member of a family of moths with larvae that construct bags from silk and plant material.  The Bagworm drags its bag about, adding to it as the caterpillar grows.  Eventually it will pupate within the bag.  Adult males are winged and they can fly in search of a mate, but adult females are without wings and they remain inside the bag after metamorphosing into adults.  The male enters the bag of a female to mate and she lays eggs inside the bag.  The final role of the bag is to shelter the eggs over the winter when new caterpillars will emerge and spin bags of their own.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Strange moving pile of sticks
Location: Menjangan, Bali, Indonesia
May 13, 2012 5:11 pm
This photo was taken in Bali in March 2012. I noticed a very strange pile of regularly stacked sticks moving on a balustrade. I only managed to get one photo with the wrong kind of lens for the job. My first thought was that it was something that was being moved slowly by an ant from underneath. Another possibility is some kind of bizarre snail. The sticks that this ’shell’ is made from look far too regular. Have you ever seen anything like this before?
Signature: Miles

Bagworm

Hello Miles,
This appears to be a Bagworm, the larva of a family of moths that are characterized by building shelters from various types of plant material.  Here is a photo from FlickR that we believe is  from Indonesia and looks similar.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination