Currently viewing the category: "moth caterpillars"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Weird bug outside my house
Location: Hialeah, Fl
February 4, 2016 2:54 pm
This is the second bug like this that I see it likes to just camp out on walls outside the house.
Signature: I don’t know

Southern Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Southern Tussock Moth Caterpillar

This is a Southern Tussock Moth Caterpillar, Dasychira meridionalis.  According to BugGuide, the caterpillar:  “Prefers Oak, but is found on a variety of deciduous trees.”  Florida Nature Photography has excellent images depicting the life cycle, including the cocoon and adult moth.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Blue caterpillar
Location: Chiloe, Chile.
February 4, 2016 5:12 pm
Hello! I was trekking in Chiloe national park, in the great island of Chiloe, Chile, and I find this beautiful caterpillar, but no one could tell me it’s species. I hope you could tell me more about it. Cheers!
Signature: Marcos Nijborg

Giant Silkmoth Caterpillar

Giant Silkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Marcos,
We believe your Giant Silkmoth Caterpillar is in the subfamily Hemileucinae, the Buck and Io Moths.  Furthermore, we believe it is in the genus Automeris because of it strong resemblance to the North American Io Moth Caterpillar.  The closest match we could find is the Caterpillar of
Automeris hamata, a species pictured on DeviantArt and found in Argentina.  We will contact Bill Oehlke to see if he can provide any information.

Giant Silkmoth Caterpillar

Giant Silkmoth Caterpillar

Bill Oehlke Responds
Daniel,
Larvae of Chilean Saturniidae are not well known. It is one of the Hemileucinae species, and I suspect of Ormiscodes genus based on spinage. There are probably six different Ormiscodes species from that area.
Bill Oehlke

Here is a link to Healthy Home Garden that contains images of a caterpillar in the genus Ormiscodes.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: Rancho Bernardo, San Diego, CA
January 31, 2016 12:39 pm
I have found a few of these in my home.
What are they.
Signature: Dave Douthett

Case Bearing Moth Larva

Case Bearing Moth Larva

Dear Dave,
This is a Household Casebearer,
Phereoeca uterella, a common household pest.  According to BugGuide:  “The larval case is silk-lined inside and open at both ends. The case is constructed by the earliest larval stage (1st instar) before it hatches, and is enlarged by each successive instar. In constructing the case, the larva secretes silk to build an arch attached at both ends to the substrate. Very small particles of sand, soil, iron rust, insect droppings, arthropod remains, hairs and other fibers are added on the outside. The inside of the arch is lined exclusively by silk, and is gradually extended to form a tunnel, while the larva stays inside. The tunnel is closed beneath by the larva to form a tube free from the substrate, and open at both ends. After the first case is completed, the larva starts moving around, pulling its case behind. With each molt, the larva enlarges its case. Later cases are flattened and widest in the middle, allowing the larva to turn around inside.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar
Location: Central coast of Australia
January 30, 2016 3:23 pm
I found what i think being a caterpillar this morning but don’t know what kind. Could you help me
Signature: Amy

Hornworm:  Theretra latreillii

Hornworm: Theretra latreillii

Dear Amy,
Thanks for writing back that you are in Australia.  This is a Hornworm in the family Sphingidae.  We turned to Butterfly House where we identified your Hornworm as
Theretra latreillii, a species with no common name.  Unlike the individuals pictured there, your Hornworm has secondary white spots behind the primary oculi.  Nature Love You pictures individuals with the additional white spots and provides the common name Pale Brown Hawk Moth. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large 3inch caterpillar
Location: Madeira
January 30, 2016 9:38 am
Dear Sir or Madam, I live on the Portuguese island of Madeira in Ponto do Sol – a sheltered spot at about 450 meters. I came across the caterpillar in the attached photograph this morning munching happily on a leaf. I would love to know what it is and more importantly what it will become. Can you help please?
Thank you
Signature: Mike M

Death's Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Death’s Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Mike,
This Hornworm is the caterpillar of a Death’s Head Hawkmoth,
Acherontia atropos, in its brown variation.  More typically the species has bright yellow and green caterpillars.  The adult Death’s Head Hawkmoth gets its name from the pattern on the thorax which is likened to a human skull.  This moth gained worldwide recognition when it was used to illustrate the movie poster for The Silence of the Lambs, though we just learned on Verbicide that the poster designers accentuated the typical pattern on moth by replacing the detail with an photo of a sculpture created of living nude female models entitled “In Voluptas Mors” conceived by Salvador Dali and photographed by Philippe Halsman.

Thank you very much Daniel.  I have just watched a number of youtube videos – what a fascinating process from caterpillar to moth.  What an impressive moth!!
Thanks for the information it is nice to know a little about what is happening around us.
Regards
Mike Muir

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar identification.
Location: El Paso county colorado manitou spring 80829
January 27, 2016 11:26 am
I have posted this picture to many websites and know one can Identify it here is the information on it. I am in El Paso county colorado manitou spring at 8000 feet. I found it crawling on the rocks I do not know the host. It was August 16 2015.
Signature: Zack vogel

Woolly Bear

Woolly Bear

Dear Zack,
This is a Woolly Bear, the caterpillar of a Tiger Moth in the subfamily Arctiinae, but we are having a problem with its species identity.  We scoured BugGuide and we found an image of
Hypocrisias minima posted to BugGuide that is the closest match, but we are not satisfied that is a correct ID.  The Caterpillar of the Virginia Ctenucha pictured on BugGuide also looks similar, and it is reported from Colorado, but again, it does not look like an ideal match.  This Tiger Moth Caterpillar from Colorado posted to the Life of Your Time blog is also somewhat similar.  We are going to contact Julian Donahue, a Lepidopterist specializing in Arctiids in the hope he can provide some information.

Julian Donahue Responds
 The caterpillar may just be a color form of Pyrrharctia isabella, the “standard” woolly bear.
I suggest you contact the caterpillar guy, David Wagner at Univ. of Conn., who is publishing books on the subject.
Julian

David Wagner Responds
I am not sure I have seen it before and am very, very intrigued.
I am writing a book on caterpillars of western North America and I don’t think I have seen this one before.  It is possible it is the very rare Alexicles aspersa.  If not something in the genus Hypercompe.
Was the individual saved?  I would be quite interested in learning more about the elevation and location, and especially altitude of the capture.
Thanks for sharing.
David L. Wagner Professor
University of Connecticut

Thanks for the information Dave.
I run the pop culture website What’s That Bug? and the photo was sent to my site.
I will write back and request additional information and get back to you.
Daniel Marlos

Zack Responds
Unfortunately I did not save it because I did not want it to starve. I am around 7500 in Crystal park Manitou Springs Colorado In a mountain community. The mountain Is covered in pine, fer and blue spruce with large spots of Scrub Oak. It get up to the 90 degree weather in the summer time and get down to the 4 degrees and lower in the winter. Thank you if you need more in formation please let me know and can I have David Wagner email in case he whats to talk to me.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination