Currently viewing the category: "moth caterpillars"
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Subject: Possible Silkworm or Hornworm?
Location: Marquette, MI
June 23, 2016 5:03 pm
I had come across a very plump caterpillar when letting my dogs outside. It was on a beach tree, and looked to be in the process of forming a chrysalis, as it was hanging upside-down. It was/ is approximately between 1- 2 long, and is green. It’s face is also green, and has: a continuous white stripe on each side of its body; yellow dashes on it’s back; and three prominent yellow dashed lines going down it’s back. It does have a tail, and has an end that looks similar to a tail-less Silkworm and/ or Hornworm. Overall, this Caterpillar seems to have a build similar to a Silkworm and Hornworm.
I live in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, which mostly consists of rain forests, and is surrounded by Lake Superior, Lake Michigan, and Lake Huron. Because of these factors, we get a lot of bugs
Signature: – Sam

Humped Green Fruitworm

Humped Green Fruitworm

Dear Sam,
This is neither a Silkworm nor a Hornworm.  This is a Humped Green Fruitworm, the larva of the Copper Underwing,
Amphipyra pyramidoides.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Colorado Caterpillar
Location: 11 mile Canyon outside of Lake George, Colorado
June 23, 2016 8:10 am
Hey Bugman!
I have no idea what kind of caterpillar this is! Or what kind of moth/butterfly it will become. I tried all of my bug books and online resources.
This little guy was found in 11 mile Canyon in Colorado.
Thank you!
Signature: Frankie

Barberry Geometer

Colorful Inchworm:  Meris alticola perhaps

Dear Frankie,
Because of the reduced number of prolegs, your caterpillar is easily identified as an Inchworm or Spanworm in the family Geometridae, though its colorful markings make it unusual in that family, most of whose members have caterpillars that are green or brown and effectively mimic twigs.  At first we thought we had correctly identified your Inchworm as a Barberry Looper or Barberry Geometer,
Coryphista meadii, based on this BugGuide image, but we remembered identifying a similar Inchworm in the past and we could not find one in our archives.  We searched our archives for “colorful Inchworm” and we found this posting of Meris paradoxa that looks possible as well, but the species is only reported from Southern Arizona according to BugGuide.  The related and similar looking Meris alticola is also pictured on BugGuide, and it is reported on BugGuide from Colorado, so of the three, our money is on Meris alticola

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is it?
Location: Jackson, Wyoming
June 19, 2016 4:57 pm
Can you identify this?
Signature: Don’t care

Fall Webworms

Fall Webworms

These are Fall Webworms, Hyphantria cunea.  According to BugGuide:  “Weblike tents in branch tips where clusters of caterpillars strip foliage (by contrast, eastern tent caterpillar nests are built in tree crotches)” and “Larvae feed on foliage throughout their development, and secrete silk which they spin into small webs. As they grow, they enlarge the webs, which can sometimes enclose the entire tree. Even severe infestations have little impact on trees because the damage occurs near the end of the annual growing season. Except in the case of ornamental trees, control is seldom necessary because the damage is generally of aesthetic rather than economic importance.”  BugGuide also notes:  “About 120 species of hardwood trees have been recorded as larval hosts in the north, common hosts include alder, apple, ash, birch, Box-Elder (Acer negundo), cherry, elm, mulberry, poplar, willow in the south, common hosts include ash, hickory, maple, mulberry, oak, pecan, poplar, redbud, sweetgum, walnut, willow; preferences for different host plant species appear to be regional and seasonal.”

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Subject: Caterpillars
Location: On a Chiku (Sapodilla) tree in Singapore.
June 16, 2016 11:04 pm
Dear Bugman,
I found this caterpillar chomping on my Sapodilla leaves this morning. It’s about 6 cm in length. Would you be able to identify it?
Signature: Dillan

Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Dear Dillan,
This is a Tussock Moth Caterpillar in the Tribe Orgyiini. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: caterpillar
Location: pretoria
May 30, 2016 4:53 am
Halo bugman :-)
I found 3 of these on a daisy type flower bush. sorry I’m a keen gardener but don’t remember the plant names. can you identify this and what kind of buuterfly does it become. is it a pest?
Signature: René

Hooded Owlet Moth Caterpillar

Hooded Owlet Moth Caterpillar

Dear René,
It was not until we searched through North American species of Hooded Owlet Moth Caterpillars from the genus
Cucullia on BugGuide that we realized you were writing from South Africa.  BugGuide describes the caterpillars as:  “usually smooth (hairless) and very colorful, with mixed patterns of spots, stripes, and/or patches of mostly yellow, red, green, blue, and black – the range of variation between species is too complex to describe in general terms.”  We did find an excellent visual match to your Caterpillar on iSpot, but it is only identified to the genus level.  Adult Moths from the genus Cucullia are generally drab and brown, and it seems the caterpillars are the beautiful stage of development.  Your submission will not go live to our site until mid-June while we are away from the office. 

Good morning
Thank you for your prompt reply. I just assumed it’s a South African website. Where are you guys situated?
I asked all of our nurseries in the area and nobody knew that such a beautiful caterpillar turns into such a dull moth. I relocated all of them into the fields close to my house. Now they can leave my flowers alone!!! I’m a very novice gardener and plants EVERYTHING that looks pretty. I did not appreciate these guys ravishing a WHOLE bush in 3 days!!! So far it looks like only the earthworms are welcome in my garden.
Thanks again for the help!
Vriendelike groete / Kind regards
René

Our offices are in Los Angeles, but we are a global website.

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Subject: What is this?
Location: Maui
June 7, 2016 2:11 pm
Please ID
Thanks!
Signature: Jason

Caterpillar eating Marijuana Leaf

Caterpillar eating Marijuana Leaf

Dear Jason,
This appears to be a Caterpillar eating a Marijuana Leaf.

Yeah I’ve seen plenty of caterpillars eating cannabis flowers… I did not realize they also ate/attacked leaves.
Thanks

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination