Currently viewing the category: "moth caterpillars"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: So unusual
Location: Central PA
August 30, 2014 11:04 am
I have never seen this before but such unusual color and pattern. Quite lovely.
Taken 8-29-14 in Central, PA not far from a lake in early afternoon.
It was about 3 inches long.
Signature: Abby

Hooded Owlet Caterpillar

Hooded Owlet Moth Caterpillar

Dear Abby,
This is a Hooded Owlet Moth Caterpillar in the genus
Cucullia, and after browsing through the species represented on BugGuide, we believe the closest match is to Cucullia omissa, which according to BugGuide goes by the common names Omitted Cucullia or Alberta Falconer.  This image from BugGuide depicts an individual with coloration that matches the Hooded Owlet Moth Caterpillars in your image, though other examples indicate the coloration of the caterpillar may be variable.  Another strong possibility is the Gray Hooded Owlet, Cucullia florea, and there are several images on BugGuide with a similar color pattern including this one from Maine and this one from New Hampshire.  It might even be a Goldenrod Hooded Owlet, Cucullia asteroides, based on the coloration of this individual from BugGuide.  There are also some individuals pictured on BugGuide that look like your caterpillars that are not identified to the species level.  The genus as a whole is described on BugGuide as:  “Adult: mostly drab gray moths with some fine black streaking; forewing long and narrow; tuft of hairs projecting from thorax forms a large pointed hood over the head, giving adults a streamlined “aerodynamic” appearance (a distinctive feature).  Larva: usually smooth (hairless) and very colorful, with mixed patterns of spots, stripes, and/or patches of mostly yellow, red, green, blue, and black – the range of variation between species is too complex to describe in general terms.”  BugGuide also notes:  “larvae feed on flowers of composite plants (family Asteraceae) and leaves of several trees – varies according to species,” and the individuals in your images appear to be feeding on a plant in the Asteraceae family.  Hooded Owlet Moth Caterpillars are among the most beautiful caterpillars we have represented on our site, and for that reason we have selected your submission as our Bug of the Month for September 2014.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Can you name this bug?
Location: Xalapa, Veracruz, Mexico. Google maps: 19.522574, -96.927901
August 30, 2014 5:09 pm
Hello, I found this bug. It has at least one week living at the same leaf. Here is the raining season. It does not move even when is raining. However it’s alive because when I was taking some photographs it moved a bit. Could you help me to identify this bug?
Signature: J. A. K.

Cochineal, possibly

Parasitized Slug Caterpillar

Dear J.A.K.,
This appears to be a Slug Caterpillar in the family Limacodidae, and it has fallen victim to parasitic wasps, most likely in the family Braconidae.  This image from BugGuide depicts a Slug Caterpillar infested with Braconids.

Dear Daniel,
Thank you for your help. It’s a shame I can’t help this small caterpillar, c’est la vie!.
This “bug world” is amazing, I hope I can learn more.
Cheers,
J Ko.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bugman Help!
Location: Singapore
August 28, 2014 3:11 am
Hello! I love reading your page! Its so informative! :) I found this 2cm long, thin green caterpillar with 1 horn at the end on an unknown plant. Im from Singapore, a tropical country with hot, humid and seasonal rain. Hope you can enlighten me on its species because i have searched it on the net but to no avail. Thanks n God bless! :)
Signature: EmikoJ

Hornworm

Hornworm

Dear EmikoJ,
The best we can do for you at this time is provide a family.  This is a Hornworm, the larva of a Sphinx Moth in the family Sphingidae, a family that contains many large spectacular species found around the world.  It is young, which makes identifications more difficult.  Like all caterpillars, Hornworms molt and grow, passing through five instars or stages.  The fifth instar is the largest and the one most commonly pictured for identification purposes.  Earlier instars like this individual are generally more difficult to find documented.  This individual is green with no pronounced markings to help differentiate it from other species.  Knowing the plant it was feeding on might help with the identification.  If you have the time and inclination, you can try searching the Sphingidae of the Eastern Palaearctic to attempt an identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Eggs on our screen doors
Location: Northern Lower Michigan
August 27, 2014 11:28 am
Greetings bug people. We have something that lays eggs on our screens every summer. Can you help identify?
Signature: Thank you!

Moth Eggs

Moth Eggs

Do you keep a light on at night near this screen?  These look like Moth Eggs, and if you look carefully in the lower left corner, there is a tiny, recently hatched caterpillar.We will attempt to identify the eggs, but we are guessing a member of the family Saturniidae or the subfamily Arctiinae.  Both possibilities we mentioned are groups with many large and colorful species, and we would imagine that if you find the eggs every summer, you must also have seen the adult moths before as well.

Newly hatched Caterpllar

Newly hatched Caterpllar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: strange caterpillar
Location: Baddeck,N.S, Canada
August 25, 2014 8:12 am
We found this caterpillar in our yard. We didn’t touch but we moved it to a wooded area. What is it?
Signature: Tera C

Luna Moth Caterpillar

Luna Moth Caterpillar

Hi Tera,
This sure looks like a Luna Moth Caterpillar getting ready to pupate.  When pupation time nears, the typically green caterpillar turns pink.  See this BugGuide image for comparison.

Luna Moth Caterpillar

Luna Moth Caterpillar

Great that is exactly what we saw today. Thanks

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Green Caterpillar on my azalea
Location: Maryland
August 24, 2014 7:37 am
Hello,
I find this bright green caterpillar on my azalea this morning – 8/24/2014 in Maryland. It looks like it has tiny pine trees growing on it (almost).
Signature: Susan

Io Moth Caterpillar

Io Moth Caterpillar

Dear Susan,
This is the caterpillar of an Io Moth, and azalea is only one of numerous possible host plants for the caterpillar.  According to Featured Creatures:  “The io moth has a long list of host plants, with over 100 recorded plant genera in North America, including such diverse plants as azaleas, blackberry, clover, cotton, current, hackberry, hibiscus, mesquite, palms, rear, redbud, roses and willows. In Florida, io moth larvae are commonly found on oaks and other hardwoods.”  You should handle the Io Caterpillars with extreme caution as the spines can deliver a painful sting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination