Currently viewing the category: "moth caterpillars"
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Subject: Unknown Bug
Location: Limbazi, Latvia
May 20, 2015 6:56 am
We found this bug last year in our garden.
I’d be really interested to know what it is.
Signature: Andrew Doxsey

Probably Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Probably Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Dear Andrew,
This appears to be some species of Tussock Moth Caterpillar, and there is an image of a Scarce Vapourer Caterpillar on UK Moths that looks very similar.

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Subject: big crowd of caterpillars.
Location: Phuket, southern Thailand
May 16, 2015 4:08 am
Found these motionless near the foot of a tree. About 100 of them. they are about 2 inches/5 cm long and were all facing in the same direction. Though they were well camouflaged, a big pile if droppings below was a bit of a giveaway.
Signature: Alasdair

Possibly Lappet Moth Caterpillar Aggregation

Possibly Lappet Moth Caterpillar Aggregation

Dear Alasdair,
We found what appears to be a good visual match to your caterpillars on Shutterstock, but alas, it is only identified as a “blue spotted caterpillar”.  We believe your images depict an aggregation of Lappet Moth Caterpillars from the family Lasiocampidae, but we have not had any luck with a conclusive identification.  Several similar looking caterpillars identified only as Lasiocampidae are pictured on Thai Bugs

Aggregation of Caterpillars:  Possibly Lappet Moth Caterpillars

Aggregation of Caterpillars: Possibly Lappet Moth Caterpillars

Update from Alasdair
Dear Daniel,
Thai friends have identified it. Eupterote tertacea (Walker). Not much on the web and all of it in Thai. It’s a well known pest here – moves in gangs, infests and destroys sugar cane. When touched can cause severe itching.
Cheers.
Alasdair

Thanks for that information Alasdair.  We found a few listings in Thai with that spelling, including this Thai site, but there are more hits with the spelling Eupterote testacea.   We do not believe that is the correct identification.  We found images of the Caterpillar of Eupterote testacea on Insects of Thailand and they look nothing like those in your images, and images on Stock Photo appear to be an even different species.  An image on Guzjung Story does resemble your caterpillars.  Since we cannot really locate a reputable site with images, we are still classifying this as unidentified.

Wise decision!
Thanks for trying. Really impressed by the work you chaps are doing.
Alasdair

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Subject: Some kind of larva?
Location: Lubbock, Texas.
May 9, 2015 6:19 pm
Hi.
Shortly after sunset I found this cluster right about eye level on the brick entry way to my home.
Any idea what they are?
Signature: Dan

Woollybear Hatchlings

Woollyb  Bear Hatchlings

Dear Dan,
These are hatchling Woolly Bears, the common name for caterpillars of Tiger Moths in the subfamily Arctiinae.  We cannot state for certain which species you encountered, but good candidate is the Eyed Tiger Moth or Giant Leopard Moth,
Hypercompe scribonia, and when fully grown, the Giant Leopard Moth Caterpillars are about two inches long and dark in coloration.

Woollybear Hatchlings

Woolly Bear Hatchlings

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Subject: Identification request
Location: North central Florida, USA
May 5, 2015 5:18 am
Are you able to identify this caterpillar for me? I think they are dropping out of our pecan trees. They are about 3 inches long. I am located in north central Florida. Thank you for any help you can provide.
Signature: Janet

Possibly Underwing Caterpillar

Possibly Underwing Caterpillar

Dear Janet,
We believe this might be the Caterpillar of an Underwing Moth in the genus
Catocala.  According to Entoweb.OKstate:  “Pecan catocala commonly feed on pecan, hickory, and other trees.”

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Subject: Inchworm Mayhem
Location: Mumbai, India
April 29, 2015 7:34 am
Dear Bugman,
These inchworms have wreaked havoc in my tiny balcony garden, fairly shredding my spider-plants to bits. Could you help id? I understand from your site that inchworms are geometrid moths caterpillars. It’s full summer now in India, and the photos are today’s (April 29). Another couple of days and it would’ve been ‘May’hem quite literally and figuratively 😀
Regards,
Signature: Ankush

Inchworms

Inchworms

Dear Ankush,
Is your Spider Plant a Chlorophytum species like that posted on Wikipedia?  Knowing the food plant is often a big help with identifying caterpillars and other plant feeding insects.  We attempted a search with the genus name of the Spider Plant and the family name Geometridae, but to no avail.  You image is stunning and clearly shows the looping action the Inchworm uses to move about, a result of having fewer sets of prolegs than the typical caterpillar.

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Subject: Smurfapillar?
Location: San Miguel de Allende, Guanajuato, Mexico
April 27, 2015 4:09 pm
Hi,
I found this bright blue little guy in San Miguel de Allende, Guanajuato, Mexico. I tried to look him up online, and couldn’t seem to find anything remotely similar. He was crawling on the ground in a high desert area where I was walking my dog and taking pictures of Prickly Pear blossoms. The area had been fired, to kill weeds and pests, probably in January or February. The grasses and weeds are coming back pretty well, now, but there’s still a lot of ash and charred ground. I took a bunch of photos, but the guy was moving at a good clip…head and tail going like crazy.
Thanks for your time!
Signature: Tabitha

Unknown Blue Caterpillar

Unknown Blue Caterpillar

Dear Tabitha,
Like you, we were unable to locate any images of blue caterpillars from Mexico.  We believe this is a moth caterpillar.  Perhaps one of our readers will have more luck than we have had regarding an identity.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination