Currently viewing the category: "moth caterpillars"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: please identify the caterpiller
Location: guwahati, Assam
January 25, 2015 11:15 am
one of m friend found this caterpillar in he garden…by looking at the photo, i van assume that it is a fifth instar larva..which is a mature one..ready to form coccon…but i couldnot identify it…so please help me in knowing its common name and also its scientific name if possible.
Signature: Trishna sarma

Oleander Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Oleander Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Trishna,
We are speculating that your friend has an oleander plant growing near where this caterpillar was found.  The caterpillar is an Oleander Hawkmoth Caterpillar, a species that is listed under two different scientific names: 
Deilephila nerii or Daphnis nerii.

Sue Dougherty, Alfonso Moreno liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large moth caterpillar in Australia
Location: Canberra, Australia
January 22, 2015 4:05 am
Hi, we found this on the side of our house about a year ago (5th January 2014) in Canberra, Australia. It was a huge caterpillar, about 5″ (15cm) long, for size reference you can see standard house bricks it’s resting on.
Signature: Dug

Batwing Gum Moth Caterpilar

Batwing Gum Moth Caterpilar

Hi Dug,
We believe we have correctly identified your Caterpillar as a White Stemmed Gum Moth Caterpillar or Batwing Gum Moth Caterpillar,
Chelepteryx collesi, in the family Anthelidae thanks to the Butterfly House website where it states:  “This Caterpillar is a great hazard to people climbing Gum trees. Scattered over its skin are tufts of long stiff reddish hairs, which are strong enough to penetrate human skin. When they do, they are very painful, and difficult to remove because they are barbed and brittle. if one should lodge in the eye, it can cause serious sight problems.” The site also notes:  “It is also one of the largest Caterpillars in Australia, growing in length to about 12 cms. Some trees where they may be found most years in Leichhardt are known by local school-children as ‘sausage trees’ because the Caterpillars look from the ground like sausages growing in the trees.”  According to Zip Code Zoo:  “Anthelidae is a family of Australian lappet moths in the Lepidoptera order. It was previously included in the Lasiocampoidea superfamily, but a recent study resulted in reincluding the family in the superfamily Bombycoidea.”

Sue Dougherty, Julieta Stangaferro, Andrea Leonard Drummond, Amy Gosch liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Giant African Caterpillars
Location: Ghana Africa
January 20, 2015 7:07 pm
I found these two beauties in Ghana Africa. They looked quite fascinating so I got a pic. Any idea what they are?
Signature: Don

Cabbage Tree Emperor Moth Caterpillars

Cabbage Tree Emperor Moth Caterpillars

Dear Don,
These distinctive caterpillars are Cabbage Tree Emperor Moth Caterpillars,
Bunaea alcinoe, and they are more typically black in coloration.  This is an edible species.

Kathleen Travis Perin, Sue Dougherty, Amy Gosch, Raokshna Yuko Ryuzaki, Mary Lemmink Lawrence liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Stinging Slug Caterpillar
Location: Johannesburg, South Africa
January 20, 2015 12:01 pm
Hi Mr Bugman,
Please could you clarify exactly what these demon spawn are… and more precisely how toxic/dangerous they are?
I was pruning a bush and was stung by 5-6 (out of around 100) of these devil bugs! An extremely painful sting that has left an itchy rash…
Any information is appreciated.
Thank you
Signature: Twice bitten, thrice shy.

Stinging Slug Caterpillars

Stinging Slug Caterpillars

Dear Twice bitten, thrice shy,
We just posted several images of identical Stinging Slug Caterpillars that also appeared in large numbers in Johannesburg, but we were only able to identify them to the family level of Limacodidae, but we did not search our own archives at that time.  Back in 2011, Karl identified an image of a Stinging Slug Caterpillar as
 Latoia vivida,  and he provided us with this link to Photo Camel and this link to Outdoor Photo.  The adult is pictured on African Moths.

Sue Dougherty, Kathleen Travis Perin, Amália Nunes, Andrea Leonard Drummond, Amy Gosch liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Green Spiky hair catepillar
Location: Johannesburg suburbs, South Africa
January 10, 2015 2:28 am
Hi There,
I have lived in Johannesburg, South Africa my whole life & I have never seen these caterpillar before. There seem to be loads of them in our garden – every where you look. It is currently the peak of summer here. I have attached a picture of one of them.
Could you please help me identify this & if it is dangerous in anyway to humans, pets or plants? And should they be something we need to try get rid of? If so, is there a way to do this & even a way to rather deter them than killing them – I dont like the idea of having to kill them.
Thanks,
Signature: Kind regards Katie Francis

Stinging Slug Caterpillar

Stinging Slug Caterpillar

Dear Katie,
We do not provide extermination advice.  We believe these are Stinging Slug Caterpillars in the family Limacodidae, and though we did not locate an exact match to your individuals, this image from iSpot is quite similar looking.  Careless handling or accidentally brushing up against a Stinging Slug Caterpillar may result in a painful reaction to the spines and the symptoms may last several days.

Stinging Slug Caterpillars

Stinging Slug Caterpillars

Kathleen Travis Perin liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Weird worm creature
Location: Singapore
January 17, 2015 9:47 am
Hi there… I hope you can help identify this creature in my bathroom… It’s only seen in my bathroom. It freaks me out. Please help identify this.
About 1.5cm long. Has a leaf shaped soft shell it can crawl out from both ends.
Signature: Sandra from Singapore

Case Bearing Moth Larva

Case Bearing Moth Larva

Dear Sandra,
The Case Bearing Moth Larva or Household Casebearer,
Phereoeca fallax, is a common household pest that is found in many parts of the world.  You individual has a very distinctly marked case.  According to BugGuide:  “The larval case is silk-lined inside and open at both ends. The case is constructed by the earliest larval stage (1st instar) before it hatches, and is enlarged by each successive instar. In constructing the case, the larva secretes silk to build an arch attached at both ends to the substrate. Very small particles of sand, soil, iron rust, insect droppings, arthropod remains, hairs and other fibers are added on the outside. The inside of the arch is lined exclusively by silk, and is gradually extended to form a tunnel, while the larva stays inside. The tunnel is closed beneath by the larva to form a tube free from the substrate, and open at both ends. After the first case is completed, the larva starts moving around, pulling its case behind. With each molt, the larva enlarges its case. Later cases are flattened and widest in the middle, allowing the larva to turn around inside.”  The bold black and white spiral pattern on your individual’s case is likely due to fibers that were incorporated in the making of the case.

Andrea Leonard Drummond, Sue Dougherty liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination