Currently viewing the category: "moth caterpillars"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Huge Orange Caterpillar
Location: Corning, New York
September 29, 2014 3:04 pm
My cat, Mr. Waffles, found this guy crawling around the gravel driveway. It looked like it was trying to burrow into the ground but it was all rocky there and couldn’t. I rubbed a leaf against it and it jumped and curled up and started to pulsate a little bit, like a defense mechanism. After a few seconds it uncurled and started to crawl away.
Signature: Stedge

Hornworm ready to pupate

Hornworm ready to pupate

Hi Stedge,
This Hornworm looks positively ripe, like a juicy piece of fruit, was the first thought in our mind when we saw your images.  This Hornworm in the family Sphingidae is getting ready to pupate, so it has turned from green to those warm, glowing colors.  We believe we have correctly identified your Hornworm as an Elm Sphinx,
Sphinx chersis, thanks to the Sphingidae of the Americas site.  We are going to write to Bill Oehlke to see if he can verify our identification.

Hornworm

Hornworm

Bill Oehlke confirm Elm Sphinx identification.
Daniel,
It is Sphinx chersis. Can you put me in contact with photographer so I can
seek  permission to post and can also find county.
Thanks for thinking of me.
Bill

Gwen Skinner, Kitty Heidih, Jessica M. Schemm, Karin Weidman, Vicki Stone liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: New Caterpillar
Location: Alexandria VA
September 29, 2014 8:37 am
Please help us identify this species, photographed in Alexandria VA. in a suburban backyard.
Signature: Paul Dunay

Luna Moth Caterpillar

Luna Moth Caterpillar

Dear Paul,
Though typically green, this Luna Moth caterpillar has turned orange because it is getting ready to pupate.  The Luna Moth Caterpillar is described on BugGuide as being:  “Larva lime-green with pink spots and weak subspiracular stripe on abdomen. Yellow lines cross the larva’s back near the back end of each segment (compare Polyphemus moth caterpillars, which have yellow lines crossing at spiracles). Anal proleg edged in yellow. Sparse hairs.”

Luna Moth Caterpillar

Luna Moth Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moscow Bug
Location: Russia
September 28, 2014 10:18 am
Hi there,
Hoping you can help identify this bug I saw, think it may be a moth larvae. I spotted it in a park in Moscow, Russia at the end of August. About three inches long, legs under body (unknown number) segmented and smooth body(no hairs or projections) and obvious head end. Saw it on the path next to grassland.
Thanks for any help
Elaine
Signature: Elaine

Beetle Larva, we believe

Goat Moth Caterpillar

Dear Elaine,
We get very few submissions from Russia, so we are thrilled to find we have at least one Russian reader.  We believe this is a beetle larva, and our best guess is that it is a Ground Beetle larva in the family Carabidae.  Caterpillar Hunters have large predatory larvae that look similar to the creature in your images.  We do not believe this is a caterpillar.
  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to supply us with more specific information.

Possibly Ground Beetle Larva

Goat Moth Caterpillar

Karl provides a correction:  Goat Moth Caterpillar
Hi Daniel and Elaine:
I believe this is a Carpenter Moth caterpillar (family Cossidae), probably a European Goat Moth (Cossus cossus). It is a little difficult to make out the markings on the front end, but they do appear very similar to a Goat Moth. A similar caterpillar ID request was submitted to WTB in 2009 from South Africa. Some information on the Goat Moth was provided in the response to that request. The behavior and size described by Elaine also match the Goat Moth caterpillar. These caterpillars do actually posses sparse, fine white hairs along their flanks, a feature that is just visible in Elaine’s photos. Regards. Karl

Thank you so much for your help, it’s really been ‘bugging’ me!
I have googled goat moth caterpillar and that is definitely what it was.
Thanks again
Elaine

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: Martinsburg, WV
September 27, 2014 4:48 pm
Caterpillar looking underneath but like a leaf or something on top? It was on my car window 9/27/14 in The a eastern panhandle of WV
Signature: Jen A.

Monkey Slug

Monkey Slug

Dear Jen A.,
This is a Monkey Slug, the caterpillar of a Hag Moth,
Phobetron pithecium.  Monkey Slugs should be handled with caution, because according to BugGuide:  “Caution, This is a stinging caterpillar.”

Monkey Slug

Monkey Slug

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this Critter?
Location: Freeport, ME (Southern Maine)
September 26, 2014 5:54 am
Hello Bugman, I spied this critter the other day – it was trying to dig a hole in the compacted dirt road. It was about 4 inches long and about the width of my little finger. I’m in Freeport, ME…southern Maine on the coast. The dirt road leads to a campground..there is also a farm — cattle, goats, chickens, turkeys….
I wish I had turned it over with a stick to see what the legs were like.
Thanks so much for your time!
Signature: Annie

Gallium Sphinx

Gallium Sphinx

Dear Annie,
We just finished posting another image from Idaho of a Gallium Sphinx Caterpillar or Bedstraw Hawkmoth Caterpillar,
Hyles gallii, and you may read more about it on the Sphingidae of the Americas website.  According to the Butterflies and Moths of North America, its range is “Newfoundland south through Maine to Pennsylvania; west to Alaska, Yukon Territory, and California. Also found in Eurasia.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: First time I have ever seen this
Location: Ashton, ID.
September 25, 2014 11:39 am
Hi, Stepped outside and almost stepped on this caterpillar? Since I have never seen this type before, just wondering what it could be. It is 3″ to 3.5″ long. It is Fall here with record high temps. Tomorrow we are headed downhill as far as temperatures and rain go. We are at about 5400 feet above sea level, just outside of Yellowstone.
Signature: Maggie

Gallium Sphinx Caterpillar

Gallium Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Maggie,
This striking caterpillar is a Gallium Sphinx Caterpillar or Bedstraw Hawkmoth Caterpillar,
Hyles gallii, and you may read more about it on the Sphingidae of the Americas website.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination