Currently viewing the category: "swallowtail caterpillars"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Orange Dog Caterpillar?
Location: Southern Orange County, CA
July 23, 2016 10:56 am
I found two caterpillars on my navel orange tree on July 22, 2016. Are these Giant Swallowtail Butterfly caterpillars?
Signature: Julie Macy

Orange Dogs

Orange Dogs

Dear Julie,
You are absolutely correct.  These are Orange Dogs, the caterpillars of Giant Swallowtails.  Interestingly, though they are native to North America, Giant Swallowtails were first reported in Southern California in the 1990s.  Their range expanded as citrus cultivation moved across the country.  Even though citrus is not native to North America, once cultivation of oranges and other citrus fruits gained popularity in the southeast, the native Giant Swallowtails adapted to them as a host plant.

Thank you!  I found another yesterday.  I’ve never seen them before.  It will be fun to watch them as they change.
Julie

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this
Location: Ohio
July 16, 2016 5:14 am
This was found in a garden in eastern Ohio. I’m curious as to what it is.
Signature: Ron

Spicebush Swallowtail Caterpillar

Spicebush Swallowtail Caterpillar

Dear Ron,
This is the Caterpillar of a Spicebush Swallowtail, and it is widely accepted that the caterpillar has evolved so that the false eyespots on the caterpillar act as a form of protective mimicry by potentially fooling predators into thinking that their prey might actually be a larger and potentially threatening predator itself.  According to BugGuide:  “Caterpillar hosts: Spicebush (
Lindera benzoin), Sassafras trees (Sassafras albidum), Pondspice (Litsea aestivalis) Red, Swamp and Silk Bays (Persea spp.); perhaps prickly ash (Zanthoxylum americanum), Tulip tree (Liriodendron tulipifera), Sweetbay (Magnolia virginiana), and Camphor (Cinnamomum camphora).”  Do you have any of those plants in your garden?

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar
Location: Pennsylvania
June 14, 2016 3:49 pm
Found these in our garden on a dill plant, there’s about 10 of them and we don’t know what they are or if they will harm the plants. Thanks!
Signature: Marissa

Black Swallowtail Caterpillars

Black Swallowtail Caterpillars

Dear Marissa
These are Black Swallowtail Caterpillars,
Papilio polyxenes, and they are sometimes called Carrot Worms or Parsley Worms because they feed on the foliage of carrots and related plants, including parsley and dill.  They will eventually mature into gorgeous Black Swallowtail Butterflies.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug
Location: Hong Kong
May 16, 2016 2:39 am
Hi,
I’m a teacher in Hong Kong and one of my students and I have discovered a sort of caterpillar on campus and we would like to know what kind of bug it is.
We are south of HK, near a beach. The weather is warm and muggy, verging on summer.
Signature: Candice

Possibly Brush Footed Butterfly Caterpillar

Common Mime Caterpillar

Dear Candice,
We believe this is a Caterpillar of a Butterfly from the family Nymphalidae.  We will check with Keith Wolfe to see if he can provide us with a species name.

Keith Wolfe provides a correction.
Hello Candice 老師 and Daniel,
Don’t let those fleshy projections fool you, Bugman.  This is actually an immature butterfly in the family Papilionidae, specifically a Common Mime (Chilasa clytia) . . .
http://butterflycircle.blogspot.com/2009/01/life-history-of-common-mime.html
. . . which is probably searching for a safe place to pupate.
Best wishes,
Keith

Karl Concurs
Hi Daniel and Candice:
It looks like looks like a caterpillar of the Common Mime (Papilionidae: Chilasa [Papilio] clytia. It is native to south and southeast Asia.  Regards. Karl

Thank you very much! There are indeed many butterflies around here.
Sincerely,
Candice

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Swallowtail caterpillar?
Location: San Gabriel , california
April 26, 2016 9:12 pm
I bought a pepper tree bonsai and I found this caterpillar attached to it. I believe it is a swallowtail caterpillar but I don’t know what variety. I was hoping to find out what is was since I want to care for it. Can I feed it lemon leaves instead of my poor bonsai?
Signature: Thank you, Meena

Probably Giant Swallowtail Caterpillar

Probably Giant Swallowtail Caterpillar

Dear Meena,
This sure looks like an Orange Dog, the caterpillar of a Giant Swallowtail  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on leaves of plants in the Citrus family (Rutaceae), including Citrus (Citrusspecies), Pricklyash(Zanthoxylum species), Hoptree (Ptelea trifoliata), Rue (Ruta graveolens), etc. Adults take flower nectar from a variety of herbaceous plants and shrubs.”
  We do not recognize your particular Pepper Tree and we would be curious to learn if it is in the citrus family.  You can try to feed your caterpillar leaves of an orange tree, but if it rejects those leaves, you may need to return it back to your bonsaii.  Caterpillars are not like dogs or pet fish.  They do not immediately begin eating if food is placed in front of them.  You may need to transfer your caterpillar to a citrus tree to see if it will accept the leaves.  Though lemon is a citrus tree, we cannot recall getting any reports of Orange Dogs feeding on lemon trees, but we have gotten reports of them feeding on lime, tangerine, grapefruit and the always popular orange tree.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth Chrysalis
Location: Boulder, CO
March 20, 2016 3:03 pm
Hello,
We found a chrysalis tucked away in a lonely shoe about 3-4 months ago (Sept or Oct). A friend had left her leather dancing shoe under our couch, and when I picked it up, out fell this little guy. It was attached up near the toe by two silk anchors.
Sadly he fell quite a ways, I’m rather tall so he got the brunt of a 3 foot drop to our hardwood. The Chrysalis is currently hanging in a mason jar with ventilation, but I’m rather curious for more information about it. Thank you for your time!
Signature: -FC

Swallowtail Chrysalis

Swallowtail Chrysalis

Dear FC,
This chrysalis belongs to a butterfly, not a moth.  We believe it is a Swallowtail Chrysalis.  Most Swallowtails produce upright chrysalides, that are held in that position by a silken girdle.  This Tiger Swallowtail Chrysalis from BugGuide looks similar.

Swallowtail Chrysalis

Swallowtail Chrysalis

Swallowtail Chrysalis

Swallowtail Chrysalis

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination