Currently viewing the category: "Sulphur and White Caterpillars"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: identification
Location: Tucson, AZ
October 6, 2016 6:04 pm
Dear Bugman,
I am submitting a few photos of insects for identification. They were taken between October 1 and 4 2016 in our community garden in Tucson, AZ.
Image 1 I believe to be a bee fly, perhaps of genus Exoprosopa.
Image 2. is a caterpillar (Sulphur of some sort?) on Lindheimers Senna
Image 3 fairly large sized ants
I would be very happy if you could identify the insets in these photos that I would like to share with my fellow gardeners.
Thanks very much!
Signature: Melody

Cloudless Sulphur Caterpillar

Cloudless Sulphur Caterpillar

Dear Melody,
Unless there is a good reason, like a predator/prey relationship, we tend to confine our postings to a single species, or closely related species for classification purposes on our site.  We will be dealing with your identification requests one at a time.  The caterpillar is that of a Cloudless Sulphur,
Phoebis sennae, which you can verify by comparing your image to this BugGuide image.  The caterpillars are found in both a yellow and green form, with the yellow caterpillars feeding on blossoms and the green ones feeding on leaves.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Cloudless Sulphur Caterpillar in Mount Washington
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
February 28, 2016
We were shocked to see this bright yellow caterpillar meandering across the patio.  We immediately recognized a Cloudless Sulphur Caterpillar,
Phoebis sennae, but we do not have any Cassia growing anywhere near.  Where did it come from?  We checked BugGuide and learned:  “Caterpillar: usually pale green and marked by a yellow stripe on each side and black spots in rows across each abdominal segment.  Above and below the yellow stripe there are usually small areas marked with blue.   There is also a yellow form that occurs when it feeds on yellow flowers of its host plants. The later instars of the yellow form have a dark transverse band across each segment” which means our Caterpillar was feeding on yellow blooms.  According to BugGuide:  “Caterpillar feeds most commonly on Cassia and some other woody and herbaceous legumes” and we do have an Acacia in the garden, another legume in the family Fabaceae , so we will check it out to see if there are any additional Cloudless Sulphur Caterpillars feeding upon it.

Cloudless Sulphur Caterpillar

Cloudless Sulphur Caterpillar

Cloudless Sulphur Caterpillar

Cloudless Sulphur Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Yellow caterpillar Tucson AZ
Location: Oro Valley, AZ on Narana Road
October 9, 2015 11:50 am
What does this caterpillar become?
Signature: Curious

Cloudless Sulphur Caterpillar

Cloudless Sulphur Caterpillar

Dear Curious,
This is the caterpillar of a Cloudless Sulphur butterfly,
Phoebis sennae, and the caterpillars have both green and yellow forms.  The adult Cloudless Sulphur is a beautiful yellow butterfly.  According to BugGuide:  “Caterpillar feeds most commonly on Cassia and some other woody and herbaceous legumes.”  Interestingly, the yellow caterpillars are quite well camouflaged when feeding on the yellow flowers of the plants and the green caterpillars are well camouflaged when feeding on the leaves.  It is our theory that the green caterpillars feeding on the flowers were eaten by birds and the yellow caterpillars feeding on leaves were eaten by birds, and not that the caterpillars are able to change color when feeding on either flowers or leaves.  We have a nice series of images of the metamorphosis of the Cloudless Sulphur in our archives.

Thank you
Liane Futch

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Need to identify this bug please
Location: Reading, UK
July 28, 2015 4:04 am
I have them on my nasturtium and I suspected they hatched from yellow eggs.
Signature: Ahmed

Large White Caterpillars

Large White Caterpillars

Dear Ahmed,
The easiest way to identify an unknown caterpillar is to know the food plant and the location, both of which you provided for us.  We quickly found the answer to be Caterpillars of the Large White,
Pieris brassicae, and the Hortographical site has an excellent posting on these Large White Caterpillars.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cocoon?
Location: Southern California (South Orange County)
July 23, 2015 11:16 am
We noticed this strange creature on our pro shop window. Any help identifying it would be wonderful.
Signature: TGC

Cabbage White Chrysalis

Cabbage White Chrysalis

Dear TGC,
This is the chrysalis of a Cabbage White.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Found cocoon
Location: Livermore, California
July 19, 2015 7:16 pm
Found it attached inside my dish glove. I have it hanging inside a cup with a top with holes. Would like to know what it is, how long it will take to hatch, and what to do with it once it hatches. It will be fascinating to look after. Thanks so much!
Signature: Shawna Jarnagin

Cabbage White Chrysalis

Cabbage White Chrysalis

Dear Shawna,
We quickly identified your chrysalis because we recently misidentified a Cabbage White Chrysalis, being thrown off by the silken girdle that helps to support the pupa.  We are speculating that you garden and that your garden includes plants in the cabbage family, the food source for the caterpillars of the Cabbage White, a European species that was naturalized in North America centuries ago.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination