Currently viewing the category: "Sulphur and White Caterpillars"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Yellow caterpillar Tucson AZ
Location: Oro Valley, AZ on Narana Road
October 9, 2015 11:50 am
What does this caterpillar become?
Signature: Curious

Cloudless Sulphur Caterpillar

Cloudless Sulphur Caterpillar

Dear Curious,
This is the caterpillar of a Cloudless Sulphur butterfly,
Phoebis sennae, and the caterpillars have both green and yellow forms.  The adult Cloudless Sulphur is a beautiful yellow butterfly.  According to BugGuide:  “Caterpillar feeds most commonly on Cassia and some other woody and herbaceous legumes.”  Interestingly, the yellow caterpillars are quite well camouflaged when feeding on the yellow flowers of the plants and the green caterpillars are well camouflaged when feeding on the leaves.  It is our theory that the green caterpillars feeding on the flowers were eaten by birds and the yellow caterpillars feeding on leaves were eaten by birds, and not that the caterpillars are able to change color when feeding on either flowers or leaves.  We have a nice series of images of the metamorphosis of the Cloudless Sulphur in our archives.

Thank you
Liane Futch

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Need to identify this bug please
Location: Reading, UK
July 28, 2015 4:04 am
I have them on my nasturtium and I suspected they hatched from yellow eggs.
Signature: Ahmed

Large White Caterpillars

Large White Caterpillars

Dear Ahmed,
The easiest way to identify an unknown caterpillar is to know the food plant and the location, both of which you provided for us.  We quickly found the answer to be Caterpillars of the Large White,
Pieris brassicae, and the Hortographical site has an excellent posting on these Large White Caterpillars.

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Subject: Cocoon?
Location: Southern California (South Orange County)
July 23, 2015 11:16 am
We noticed this strange creature on our pro shop window. Any help identifying it would be wonderful.
Signature: TGC

Cabbage White Chrysalis

Cabbage White Chrysalis

Dear TGC,
This is the chrysalis of a Cabbage White.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Found cocoon
Location: Livermore, California
July 19, 2015 7:16 pm
Found it attached inside my dish glove. I have it hanging inside a cup with a top with holes. Would like to know what it is, how long it will take to hatch, and what to do with it once it hatches. It will be fascinating to look after. Thanks so much!
Signature: Shawna Jarnagin

Cabbage White Chrysalis

Cabbage White Chrysalis

Dear Shawna,
We quickly identified your chrysalis because we recently misidentified a Cabbage White Chrysalis, being thrown off by the silken girdle that helps to support the pupa.  We are speculating that you garden and that your garden includes plants in the cabbage family, the food source for the caterpillars of the Cabbage White, a European species that was naturalized in North America centuries ago.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identify Chrysalis
Location: Australia
May 2, 2015 6:14 pm
I hope that you can help me to identify this chrysalis. It was photographed by a friend in Australia and he has no idea. I was asked to help but find most search engines take me off at a tangent and I have been unable to get a decent photographic library from which to identify this one. I really appreciate any help you might be able to give.
Signature: Corrie

Swallowtail Chrysalis

Cabbage WhiteChrysalis

Dear Corrie,
We were mistaken into thinking that the silken girdle supporting this chrysalis in an upright position indicates that it is a Swallowtail in the family Papilionidae.  We are not certain of the exact species, but you may compare this image to images of Australian Swallowtail Chrysalides posted to Butterflyhouse.  We received a comment with a correction from Ben indicating that this is the chrysalis of a Cabbage White.

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Subject: Parasite chain!
Location: Israel
May 13, 2014 4:09 am
Hi Bug people!
My son and I were witness to a great story unfolding a few days ago. It started with someone eating my son’s colrabi plants, and upon close inspection we collected several cabbage white caterpillars and put them in a large glass jar, along with a few cabbage leaves (from the store but they didn’t complain), and covered with gauze.
Within a couple days, the caterpillars (all of them) climbed up the sides of the jar, anchored themselves to the glass, and died. Numerous small yellow maggots emerged from each one and pupated, so each corpse was surrounded by what looked like yellow woolly rice.
We took some pictures and waited a few more days, and walla! Wasps! (I’m guessing braconids of some sort, but I can’t be sure).
The colrabi – caterpillar – wasp cycle was complete!
I’m attaching some of the pictures so you and your viewers can enjoy.
Signature: Ben, from Israel

Cabbage White with Wasp Pupae

Cabbage White with Wasp Pupae

Hi Ben,
Thanks for sending us these wonderful images of the life cycle of a Parasitic Wasp.  We cannot say for certain what family of Parasitoids this wasp is classified into.  We located an image on Visuals Unlimited of a similarly parasitized Cabbage White Caterpillar, and the parasitoid is identified as
Cotesia glomerata.  Cotesia glomerata is classified as a Braconid on BugGuide, and the adult wasp pictured on BugGuide also looks like your individual, so we are concluding that you are most likely correct.

Parasitic Wasp

Parasitic Wasp

Parasitic Wasps

Parasitic Wasps

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination