Currently viewing the category: "brush footed butterfly caterpillars"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: caterpillar
Location: Boyce, VA, US
July 21, 2014 10:02 am
Can you help me identify this caterpillar? Found it on some violet family plants.
Signature: Emelford

Variegated Fritillary Caterpillar

Variegated Fritillary Caterpillar

Dear Emelford,
This pretty little caterpillar is a Variegated Fritillary Caterpillar,
Euptoieta claudia, and we quickly identified it thanks to this image posted to BugGuide.  The adult Variegated Fritillary is a lovely orange butterfly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spiky caterpillar,
Location: central MO, USA
April 28, 2014 7:03 pm
I took a picture of this caterpillar in early September 2006, he was on my tomato plants… I plucked the leaf he was on and put it on a chair so I could try to figure out what he was… never did find out. Here’s the picture, It looks similar to the Mourning Cloak Caterpillar which is on here, but different enough that I think it is a different caterpillar, maybe the spiny elm caterpillar?
Signature: jaelle62

Questionmark Caterpillar

Questionmark Caterpillar

Dear jaelle62,
You actually got quite close with your identification attempt.  We believe this is the caterpillar of a Questionmark,
Polygonia interrogationis, a butterfly in the same tribe as the Mourning Cloak, Nymphalini.  You can compare your image to this image from Bugguide.  Are you growing hops in your garden?  According to BugGuide, the “Caterpillars feed on nettle, false nettle, elms, hackberry, Japanese hops.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What are these
Location: Burkburnett, TX
April 28, 2014 9:43 pm
I have 5 of these hanging in my back patio. Can you tell me what they are?
Signature: Curious in Texas

Mourning Cloak Chrysalides

Mourning Cloak Chrysalides

Dear Curious in Texas,
Do you have an elm or willow tree nearby?  These are the Pupae or Chrysalides of Mourning Cloak Butterflies.  The spiny caterpillars feed on the leaves of elm and willow as well as a few other tree species.  They often migrate away from the food source to begin the metamorphosis process.  Adult Mourning Cloak butterflies are quite pretty with velvety dark wings, cream wing edges and bright blue spots.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: White Caterpillar with black spots
Location: South Florida
April 11, 2014 12:58 pm
Hey bugman!
We have a few of these critters outside of our office building just hanging out in the bushes. I live in South Florida and this is my first time seeing this kind of bug. We’re not sure if it will be a moth or butterfly.
It is a white caterpillar with black spots and black spines. Any feedback would be greatly appreciated!
Thanks in advance
Signature: Amber K

Zebra Longwing Caterpillar

Zebra Longwing Caterpillar

Dear Amber K,
This distinctive caterpillar is a Zebra Longwing Caterpillar,
Heliconius charithonia, and some of the bushes outside your office building must have passionflower growing on them.  Adult Zebra Longwings are lovely brown and yellow striped butterflies with forewings nearly twice the length of the hindwings.  See BugGuide for additional information and images.

Zebra Longwing Caterpillar

Zebra Longwing Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar from Yucatan Peninsular
Location: Akumal ,Mexico
January 7, 2014 7:19 am
Hello bugman,
On a recent trip to Akumal on the Yucatan peninsular ,I spotted this striking caterpillar .It was feeding on some sort of climbing plant ,and was the only one present .Any help with ID would be much appreciated.
Signature: creaturesnapper

Brushfooted Butterfly Caterpillar

Guatemalan Cracker Caterpillar

Dear creaturesnapper,
We are pretty confident that your caterpillar is in the Brushfooted Butterfly family Nymphalidae.  We have not had any luck matching an image, so we are contacting Keith Wolfe to see if he can assist in the identification.

Keith Wolfe identifies the Guatemalan Cracker Caterpillar
Happy New Year, Daniel!  Ah yes, one of my favorite caterpillars.  This is a fourth-instar Guatemalan Cracker, Hamadryas guatemalena . . .
http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/9015108 (also from Yucatán Peninsula)
http://home.comcast.net/~bflyearlystages/Hamadryas-guatemalena-juvenile-biology.pdf (life history from El Salvador)  Download the pdf. Hamadryas-guatemalena-juvenile-biology-1.
Best wishes,
Keith

Ed. Note: 
We also have several butterfly images from our archives that we have identified as being Gray Crackers
Hamadryas februa, and now we are wondering if they might perhaps be Guatemalan Crackers.

Hi Daniel
Thankyou very much for the identification of my mystery caterpillar ,and indeed many thanks to Keith .w,also.
I did see a lot of Cracker butterflies on my trip and wasn’t sure if they were Grey or a different species ,so that question may also be resolved .
Thanks again
Paul

Hi again Paul,
Your identification request will post live to our site next week as we postdate submissions to go live daily while we are out of the office.

Ed. Note:  We wrote back to Keith to see if he could help identify what we have called a Gray Cracker.  Here is his response.

On Jan 11, 2014, at 6:25 PM
Very sorry, Daniel, but neither my expertise nor interest extends to adults.  FYI, some Hamadryas butterflies are notoriously difficult for even trained lepidopterists to identify.
Cheers,
Keith

No problem Keith.  Nice to know they are difficult to distinguish from one another.  I guess the butterflies don’t have the problem we people do or there wouldn’t be caterpillars.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Daniel – Monarch Butterfly Caterpillars
Location: Hawthorne, CA
December 3, 2013 7:34 pm
Hi Daniel,
We have seven Monarch Butterfly caterpillars as of today and wanted to share some photos with you. There were more, but we can’t figure out what happened to them. Maybe wasps, or goldfinches?
Signature: Thanks, Anna Carreon

Monarch Caterpillar

Monarch Caterpillar

Good Morning Anna,
What a nice cheerful posting you have provided for us this morning.  We believe Goldfinches are seed eaters, so if there is predation, we would suspect wasps to be the culprits.  We planted some cosmos seeds already and they are beginning to sprout.

Wonderful!  Thanks for letting me know that the goldfinches aren’t eating my caterpillars.  I so enjoy putting out Nyjer seed for them in the winter.
Anna

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination