Currently viewing the category: "brush footed butterfly caterpillars"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: White Caterpillar with black spots
Location: South Florida
April 11, 2014 12:58 pm
Hey bugman!
We have a few of these critters outside of our office building just hanging out in the bushes. I live in South Florida and this is my first time seeing this kind of bug. We’re not sure if it will be a moth or butterfly.
It is a white caterpillar with black spots and black spines. Any feedback would be greatly appreciated!
Thanks in advance
Signature: Amber K

Zebra Longwing Caterpillar

Zebra Longwing Caterpillar

Dear Amber K,
This distinctive caterpillar is a Zebra Longwing Caterpillar,
Heliconius charithonia, and some of the bushes outside your office building must have passionflower growing on them.  Adult Zebra Longwings are lovely brown and yellow striped butterflies with forewings nearly twice the length of the hindwings.  See BugGuide for additional information and images.

Zebra Longwing Caterpillar

Zebra Longwing Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar from Yucatan Peninsular
Location: Akumal ,Mexico
January 7, 2014 7:19 am
Hello bugman,
On a recent trip to Akumal on the Yucatan peninsular ,I spotted this striking caterpillar .It was feeding on some sort of climbing plant ,and was the only one present .Any help with ID would be much appreciated.
Signature: creaturesnapper

Brushfooted Butterfly Caterpillar

Guatemalan Cracker Caterpillar

Dear creaturesnapper,
We are pretty confident that your caterpillar is in the Brushfooted Butterfly family Nymphalidae.  We have not had any luck matching an image, so we are contacting Keith Wolfe to see if he can assist in the identification.

Keith Wolfe identifies the Guatemalan Cracker Caterpillar
Happy New Year, Daniel!  Ah yes, one of my favorite caterpillars.  This is a fourth-instar Guatemalan Cracker, Hamadryas guatemalena . . .
http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/9015108 (also from Yucatán Peninsula)
http://home.comcast.net/~bflyearlystages/Hamadryas-guatemalena-juvenile-biology.pdf (life history from El Salvador)  Download the pdf. Hamadryas-guatemalena-juvenile-biology-1.
Best wishes,
Keith

Ed. Note: 
We also have several butterfly images from our archives that we have identified as being Gray Crackers
Hamadryas februa, and now we are wondering if they might perhaps be Guatemalan Crackers.

Hi Daniel
Thankyou very much for the identification of my mystery caterpillar ,and indeed many thanks to Keith .w,also.
I did see a lot of Cracker butterflies on my trip and wasn’t sure if they were Grey or a different species ,so that question may also be resolved .
Thanks again
Paul

Hi again Paul,
Your identification request will post live to our site next week as we postdate submissions to go live daily while we are out of the office.

Ed. Note:  We wrote back to Keith to see if he could help identify what we have called a Gray Cracker.  Here is his response.

On Jan 11, 2014, at 6:25 PM
Very sorry, Daniel, but neither my expertise nor interest extends to adults.  FYI, some Hamadryas butterflies are notoriously difficult for even trained lepidopterists to identify.
Cheers,
Keith

No problem Keith.  Nice to know they are difficult to distinguish from one another.  I guess the butterflies don’t have the problem we people do or there wouldn’t be caterpillars.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Daniel – Monarch Butterfly Caterpillars
Location: Hawthorne, CA
December 3, 2013 7:34 pm
Hi Daniel,
We have seven Monarch Butterfly caterpillars as of today and wanted to share some photos with you. There were more, but we can’t figure out what happened to them. Maybe wasps, or goldfinches?
Signature: Thanks, Anna Carreon

Monarch Caterpillar

Monarch Caterpillar

Good Morning Anna,
What a nice cheerful posting you have provided for us this morning.  We believe Goldfinches are seed eaters, so if there is predation, we would suspect wasps to be the culprits.  We planted some cosmos seeds already and they are beginning to sprout.

Wonderful!  Thanks for letting me know that the goldfinches aren’t eating my caterpillars.  I so enjoy putting out Nyjer seed for them in the winter.
Anna

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Daniel – Monarch Hatchling
Location: Hawthorne, CA
October 8, 2013 5:26 pm
Hi Daniel,
We want to share this, our first hatchling of the season, with you. We are honored and excited to chronicle yet another generation of Monarch Butterfly caterpillars.
Signature: Thanks, Anna Carreon

Anna's 2013 Hatchling Monarch

Anna’s 2013 Hatchling Monarch

Congratulations on your new generation of Monarchs Anna.
Ed. Note:  See Anna’s spring female Monarch here
:

Immature [Milkweed] Assassin Bug
Subject: Daniel – Assassin Bug Nymph?
Location: Hawthorne, CA
October 8, 2013 5:23 pm
Hi Daniel,
I was out looking for Monarch Butterfly caterpillars on the Mexican Milkweed this afternoon and spotted this guy on a leaf. Looks to me to be an Assassin Bug nymph? Am I correct?
Signature: Thanks, Anna Carreon

Possibly Milkweed Assassin Nymph

Possibly Milkweed Assassin Nymph

Hi Anna,
We agree that this is an Assassin Nymph, and we believe more specifically a
Zelus Assassin.  We hope it doesn’t eat the hatchling.

Hi Daniel,
Thanks for the confirmation.  I believe this is Zelus renardii, as we’ve seen quite a few of them in past.
We have milkweed in more than one planter, and this nymph wasn’t in the same as the hatchling.  Hopefully the little guy will have a chance to build up the necessary toxins in its body before it encounters an assassin bug, nymph or adult!
Anna

Daniel,
I forgot to tell you that you crack me up!  I love your title for the posting of the Monarch caterpillar & assassin bug nymph.
Anna

Thanks Anna,
We like to have fun while attempting to provide helpful information.

UPdate:  October 15, 2013
In light of this Opinion piece from the Boston Globe sent to us by Clare Marter Kenyon, it might be critical for Monarch butterfly populations to have more people who live on migratory routes to plant milkweed.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Solomon Islands Butterfly
Location: Honiara, Solomon Islands
October 4, 2013 7:45 pm
Our family has recently enjoyed watching a couple of beautiful caterpillars make their homes and emerge as butterflies. We’re wondering if you can help us identify them. The caterpillar is black and white striped with red ”horns”. The chrysalis begins as a bright yellow but turns into a shiny gold when it matures, and the butterfly is black with a few blue spots on the lower end of the wings. Thanks!
Signature: Celloduo

Milkweed Butterfly Caterpillar

Milkweed Butterfly Caterpillar

Dear Celloduo,
We are pretty certain this is a Milkweed Butterfly Caterpillar and Chrysalis from the subfamily Danainae, but we have not had much luck identifying the species.  We thought it might be a Blue Tiger Butterfly, but when we researched the caterpillar on Butterfly House, though it looked similar, it was obviously different.  Though the caterpillar and chrysalis of
Euploea core, the Common Crow or Oleander Butterfly which is pictured on Butterfly House also looks similar, it is also obviously different.

Milkweed Butterfly Chrysalis

Milkweed Butterfly Chrysalis

Perhaps one of our readers will be able to assist in a species identification.

Milkweed Butterfly Chrysalis

Milkweed Butterfly Chrysalis

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Weird Caterpillar?
Location: Virginia
September 21, 2013 4:03 pm
Hi,
Me and my friend found this what we think is a caterpillar. I have done so much research and can not seem to figure out what is it. Please help!
Signature: Thank you, Erica

Chrysalis of a Variegated Fritillary

Chrysalis of a Variegated Fritillary

Hi Erica,
This looks to us like the Chrysalis of a Variegated Fritillary,
Euptoieta claudia, and it should eventually produce a lovely orange and black adult Variegated Fritillary.  The chrysalis is a dormant state in the metamorphosis of a butterfly.  The mobile caterpillar feeds, and when it has reached the proper size and age, it molts into a stationary chrysalis where it rests until the adult butterfly emerges.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination