Currently viewing the category: "brush footed butterfly caterpillars"
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Subject: Gold speckled caterpillar?
Location: Puerto Lopez, Ecuador
April 5, 2015 7:39 pm
This beautiful creature was climbing on a bamboo pole about 4 feet off the ground near our house. The pictures don’t do it justice; the gold specks on it’s back looked like they were reflecting – almost mineral like. It’s about one inch long.
We saw it at about 11:00a EDT on Easter Sunday (April 5th), and it didn’t move in the 20 or so minutes that we were watching it. Tonight (9:30p), it is no longer there.
Our house is 49m above sea level and about one km to the ocean. After two years of drought, we’ve had rain almost nightly during the past week. This morning, about three hours before seeing this guy, we had three inches of rain in four hours.
(I don’t know if all of this information is useful, but I thought I’d provide as much detail as possible.)
Signature: Scott Bloomquist

Nymphalidae Chrysalis

Nymphalidae Chrysalis

Dear Scott,
This is not a caterpillar, but rather a Chrysalis, and in our opinion, it is classified in the Brush Footed Butterfly family Nymphalidae.  It resembles the chrysalis of a Variegated Fritillary,
Euptoieta claudia, a North American species that is also found in South America, according to BugGuide.  We suspect your chrysalis is closely related.  We will contact Keith Wolfe to get his opinion.

Thank you, Daniel.  It was still there today, 24 hours later.
I’ll look up the names that you provided; I appreciate the information.

Keith Wolfe Responds
Buenas tardes Scott and Daniel,
Good eye/memory, Bugman!  This is indeed a fritillary-in-waiting, specifically a pupa of the Mexican Fritillary (Euptoieta hegesia).  Here are two links of hopeful interest . . .
http://www.butterfliesofamerica.com/euptoieta_hegesia_meridiania_immatures.htm
http://leps.thenalls.net/content2.php?ref=Species/Heliconiinae/hegesia/life/hegesia_life.htm
Best wishes,
Keith

Thanks Keith,
I have updated the posting with the links you provided.  I thought it looked like the genera-mate Variegated Fritillary.
Daniel

 

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Subject: Cocooned????
Location: Columbus, GA
March 27, 2015 7:11 pm
Saw this on my porch railing. Pretty sure that it’s a moth or a butterfly. Don’t even know if that’s right. Will continue to watch to see if I can capture it’s release. I took video but couldn’t load that so I’m doing pics.
Signature: Jami S

Red Spotted Purple Chrysalis

Red Spotted Purple Chrysalis

Dear Jami,
This is a very exciting posting for us.  We recognized your Chrysalis (proper term for the pupa of a butterfly) as a member of the Brush Footed Butterfly family Nymphalidae, but we did not recognize the species.  We quickly located what appeared to be a match to a Red Spotted Purple chrysalis on BugGuide, but since the angle of view is different, we could not be certain.  We found a similar camera angle on Nature Search, so we are now quite confident that we have properly identified the species as
Limenitis arthemis astyanax.  Adult Red Spotted Purples are well represented on our site, but we do not have any images of chrysalides.  We especially love that your two images document the mobility of the chrysalis, which is generally thought of as an immobile stage of metamorphosis.  We hope you are able to document the eclosion of this beautiful butterfly and can send us additional images in the near future.

Red Spotted Purple Chrysalis

Red Spotted Purple Chrysalis

This is so cool. Thanks so much.

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Subject: Caterpilar with feathers
Location: Hyderabad
February 24, 2015 3:21 am
Hi,
I found this Caterpillar in my garden and was curious to know what is the name of this bug.
Thanks
Signature: Jacinta

Baron Butterfly Caterpillar

Baron Butterfly Caterpillar

Dear Jacinta,
We remember posting a similar image in the past and we located this posting of a Baron Butterfly Caterpillar, Euthalia aconthea, from our archives.

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Subject: Daniel – Queen Butterfly Chrysalis?
Location: Hawthorne, CA
January 13, 2015 8:10 pm
Hi,
A while back you identified a Queen Butterfly caterpillar for me, and I’m wondering if the pictures I’ve included are the chrysalis of these caterpillars.
Today’s count in the back is 13 Monarch Butterfly chrysalides and five “hanging J’s” as I call them. This excludes the chrysalides I’ve included here. We know there are many, many more that we haven’t or will not be able to spot as there are some overgrown spots this year. There’s still a smattering of caterpillars on the milkweed but they are fast running out of food.
We know you’ve been away from the office for a while, so no hurry should you be able to help with identification on this submission!
Signature: Thanks, Anna Carreon

Queen Butterfly

Queen Butterfly

Hi Anna,
This is most definitely a Chrysalis of a Milkweed Butterfly, and since it looks different from the chrysalis of a Monarch, we are confident that it is the chrysalis of a Queen, probably the Queen Caterpillar you submitted earlier in the month.

Queen Chrysalis

Queen Chrysalis

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Subject: Odd Monarch Butterfly Caterpillar
Location: Hawthorne, California
January 4, 2015 6:47 pm
Hi,
I spotted the odd markings on the caterpillar on top earlier today, so took a few quick shots. Imagine my surprise when I got them on the computer, zoomed in, and noticed that the rear antennae aren’t where they are supposed to be! I’m as sure as I can be that it is a Monarch Butterfly Caterpillar and that something has gone wrong. Have you ever seen this type of mutation? I’ve seen them with different markings, but not this noticeable and certainly not with rear antennae so high up on the body.
Signature: Thanks, Anna Carreon

Queen Caterpillar (above) and Monarch Caterpillar

Queen Caterpillar (above) and Monarch Caterpillar

Dear Anna,
We are thrilled to be able to tell you this exciting news.  The reason this caterpillar looks like a Monarch Caterpillar is that it is a related “royal” species in the same genus, the Caterpillar of a Queen.  Adult Queen Butterflies are darker than Monarch Butterflies and their markings are not as pronounced, but they look very similar.  Queen Butterflies also have habits very similar to those of Monarchs, including food plants, but Queens do not migrate.  Congratulations on your new species sighting.

Queen Caterpillar (upper right) and Monarch Caterpillars

Queen Caterpillar (upper right) and Monarch Caterpillars

Oh, my!  Well, I am also thrilled!  I was sure it was some sort of mutation.  I guess I really should stop believing I know what I am talking about and leave stuff like this to those who have more experience and know better.
Thank you so much for making my day!
Anna

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Subject:  Bugman Help
Location:  Singapore
January 1, 2014
Hello Daniel!
Appreciate your help to identify this beautiful caterpillar found in the hot and humid Singapore!
Thank you!
With blessings,
Signature:  Jaslin

Unknown Caterpillar

Leopard Lacewing Caterpillar

Dear Jaslin,
We have not been able to identify your caterpillar yet.  We have created a posting and perhaps one of our readers will be able to assist in the identification.

Unknown Caterpillar

Leopard Lacewing Caterpillar

Update:  January 3, 2014
Thanks to a comment from Richard Stickney, we are able to provide a link to the caterpillar of the Leopard Lacewing,
Cethosia cyane, on the Butterflies of Singapore site where it states:  “This migrant species was recently discovered in Singapore in 2005. Since then, it has established a firm foothold and can be considered a common species in Singapore. Across the island, Leopard Lacewing can be found flying in many wastelands where its host plant, Passiflora foetida, grows in relative abundance. The adults have the habit of visiting flowers for nectar and are very fast on the wings.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination