Currently viewing the category: "brush footed butterfly caterpillars"
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Subject: Caterpillar identification
Location: Southern Wisconsin
June 8, 2015 2:19 pm
Just wondering what this is and what it will be
Signature: Curious

Mourning Cloak Caterpillar

Mourning Cloak Caterpillar

Dear Curious,
This is the caterpillar of a Mourning Cloak, sometimes called a Spiny Elm Caterpillar.  The adult Mourning Cloak is a lovely butterfly that hibernates over the winter, and they are sometimes seen flying on warm, sunny, winter days, even when there is still snow on the ground.  Before flowers begin to bloom, they take nourishment by drinking sap that flows from the trees in the spring.

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Subject: Beautiful chrysalis
Location: Belleville, MI
May 24, 2015 4:17 pm
Dear Bugman: Wanted to share my son’s photo of a beautiful chrysalis he found. It was on a sign in an area park. Never seen one so beautifully patterned. We looked it up and found similar pictures and believe this will become a Baltimore Checkerspot butterfly.
Signature: MI Bugmama

Baltimore Checkerspot Chrysalis

Baltimore Checkerspot Chrysalis

Dear MI Bugmama,
We are in total agreement with you that this is the chrysalis of the Baltimore Checkerspot,
Euphydryas phaeton, and you can see that it is a perfect match for this BugGuide image.

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Subject: Gold speckled caterpillar?
Location: Puerto Lopez, Ecuador
April 5, 2015 7:39 pm
This beautiful creature was climbing on a bamboo pole about 4 feet off the ground near our house. The pictures don’t do it justice; the gold specks on it’s back looked like they were reflecting – almost mineral like. It’s about one inch long.
We saw it at about 11:00a EDT on Easter Sunday (April 5th), and it didn’t move in the 20 or so minutes that we were watching it. Tonight (9:30p), it is no longer there.
Our house is 49m above sea level and about one km to the ocean. After two years of drought, we’ve had rain almost nightly during the past week. This morning, about three hours before seeing this guy, we had three inches of rain in four hours.
(I don’t know if all of this information is useful, but I thought I’d provide as much detail as possible.)
Signature: Scott Bloomquist

Nymphalidae Chrysalis

Nymphalidae Chrysalis

Dear Scott,
This is not a caterpillar, but rather a Chrysalis, and in our opinion, it is classified in the Brush Footed Butterfly family Nymphalidae.  It resembles the chrysalis of a Variegated Fritillary,
Euptoieta claudia, a North American species that is also found in South America, according to BugGuide.  We suspect your chrysalis is closely related.  We will contact Keith Wolfe to get his opinion.

Thank you, Daniel.  It was still there today, 24 hours later.
I’ll look up the names that you provided; I appreciate the information.

Keith Wolfe Responds
Buenas tardes Scott and Daniel,
Good eye/memory, Bugman!  This is indeed a fritillary-in-waiting, specifically a pupa of the Mexican Fritillary (Euptoieta hegesia).  Here are two links of hopeful interest . . .
http://www.butterfliesofamerica.com/euptoieta_hegesia_meridiania_immatures.htm
http://leps.thenalls.net/content2.php?ref=Species/Heliconiinae/hegesia/life/hegesia_life.htm
Best wishes,
Keith

Thanks Keith,
I have updated the posting with the links you provided.  I thought it looked like the genera-mate Variegated Fritillary.
Daniel

 

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Subject: Cocooned????
Location: Columbus, GA
March 27, 2015 7:11 pm
Saw this on my porch railing. Pretty sure that it’s a moth or a butterfly. Don’t even know if that’s right. Will continue to watch to see if I can capture it’s release. I took video but couldn’t load that so I’m doing pics.
Signature: Jami S

Red Spotted Purple Chrysalis

Red Spotted Purple Chrysalis

Dear Jami,
This is a very exciting posting for us.  We recognized your Chrysalis (proper term for the pupa of a butterfly) as a member of the Brush Footed Butterfly family Nymphalidae, but we did not recognize the species.  We quickly located what appeared to be a match to a Red Spotted Purple chrysalis on BugGuide, but since the angle of view is different, we could not be certain.  We found a similar camera angle on Nature Search, so we are now quite confident that we have properly identified the species as
Limenitis arthemis astyanax.  Adult Red Spotted Purples are well represented on our site, but we do not have any images of chrysalides.  We especially love that your two images document the mobility of the chrysalis, which is generally thought of as an immobile stage of metamorphosis.  We hope you are able to document the eclosion of this beautiful butterfly and can send us additional images in the near future.

Red Spotted Purple Chrysalis

Red Spotted Purple Chrysalis

This is so cool. Thanks so much.

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Subject: Caterpilar with feathers
Location: Hyderabad
February 24, 2015 3:21 am
Hi,
I found this Caterpillar in my garden and was curious to know what is the name of this bug.
Thanks
Signature: Jacinta

Baron Butterfly Caterpillar

Baron Butterfly Caterpillar

Dear Jacinta,
We remember posting a similar image in the past and we located this posting of a Baron Butterfly Caterpillar, Euthalia aconthea, from our archives.

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Subject: Daniel – Queen Butterfly Chrysalis?
Location: Hawthorne, CA
January 13, 2015 8:10 pm
Hi,
A while back you identified a Queen Butterfly caterpillar for me, and I’m wondering if the pictures I’ve included are the chrysalis of these caterpillars.
Today’s count in the back is 13 Monarch Butterfly chrysalides and five “hanging J’s” as I call them. This excludes the chrysalides I’ve included here. We know there are many, many more that we haven’t or will not be able to spot as there are some overgrown spots this year. There’s still a smattering of caterpillars on the milkweed but they are fast running out of food.
We know you’ve been away from the office for a while, so no hurry should you be able to help with identification on this submission!
Signature: Thanks, Anna Carreon

Queen Butterfly

Queen Butterfly

Hi Anna,
This is most definitely a Chrysalis of a Milkweed Butterfly, and since it looks different from the chrysalis of a Monarch, we are confident that it is the chrysalis of a Queen, probably the Queen Caterpillar you submitted earlier in the month.

Queen Chrysalis

Queen Chrysalis

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