Currently viewing the category: "brush footed butterfly caterpillars"
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Subject: Centipede? In SoCal
Location: southern california
March 23, 2016 5:58 pm
Hi! my wife and I just got a new puppy, and as we were taking him out to the restroom he saw the attached bugs in our tree. we have noticed them dead on our front porch and crawling on our fence as well. Theres ~100 in the tree. We just need it identified to see if its poisonous and how to rid them of our yard so our pup doesn’t have the opportunity to eat them! Its spring, in southern california, been hot the past week.
Signature: kg

Mourning Cloak Caterpillar

Mourning Cloak Caterpillar

Dear kg,
While we do have Centipedes in southern California, your images depict Mourning Cloak Caterpillars, and though they may deliver a slight sting if carelessly handled, they are harmless.  There is no need to eradicate them from your tree.  They may climb to the eaves of your home in groups to form chrysalides.  Mourning Cloak Caterpillars will eventually metamorphose into lovely adult Mourning Cloak butterflies.  Some years, when conditions are favorable, the Mourning Cloak Caterpillars can be quite numerous.  Their local native host is willow, but they have adapted to feeding on the leaves of Chinese elm in California.

Mourning Cloak Caterpillars

Mourning Cloak Caterpillars

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Painted Lady?
Location: Cuernavaca, Mexico, alt: 1580 m
February 25, 2016 9:45 pm
Hi, I’m hoping you can help me again.
All three of the photos below were taken in October 2014, in the same plant in Cuernavaca, Mexico (altitude 1580 m). Those caterpillars were all over that plant for several seasons, until eventually there were enough to kill it. The butterflies are also very common. We believe they’re the same species, but obviously are not 100% sure.
From the caterpillar I thought a Painted Lady or Red Admiral, but the chrysalis and butterfly don’t match.
Thanks for any help you can provide.
Signature: Peculiarist

White Rayed Patch

White Rayed Patch

Dear Peculiarist,
This lovely little Brush Footed Butterfly is a White Rayed Patch,
Chlosyne ehrenbergii, which we identified on Learn About Butterflies where it states:  “The eggs are pale yellow in colour, and laid in batches of up to 200, on the underside of leaves of the foodplant, Buddleia.”  We believe the leaves in your images are of butterfly bush or Buddleia, so the caterpillar and chrysalides are most likely the immature stages of the White Rayed Patch.  We will check with Keith Wolfe for verification as we cannot seem to locate images of the immature stages, though the appearance of the caterpillar and chrysalides are consistent with other members of the genus.

Chrysalides of a White Rayed Patch

Chrysalides of a White Rayed Patch

Keith Wolfe verifies Chrysalis and Imago, but questions Caterpillar
Hola Daniel,
Would you please ask “Peculiarist” to kindly send me (OK to share my email address) ONLY the caterpillar photo at FULL size?  The pupae look good for C. ehrenbergii, but the larva appears a little different.  Muchas gracias!
Saludos,
Keith

Caterpillar of a White Rayed Patch

Caterpillar of a White Rayed Patch

Peculiarist Corrects Attachments
Hi Daniel,
As I was updating my page I noticed that this is the same caterpillar I sent before (my photo folders are a bit of a mess, and I had this duplicated in another folder), that was tentatively identified as a Pine Moth caterpillar. They do look alike, but I think with the extra information you have in these three photos White-rayed Patch is a more likely match. The food tree matches.
Thanks for your help, and I’ll be more careful in sending the most complete information I can in the future.
James

Keith Wolfe supplies some links.
Buenas noches James and Daniel,
Muchas gracias for the corroborating larval image.  Being endemic to Mexico, life-history photos of “Mariposa parche negra” are difficult to find online, so here are some examples . . .
Eggs > http://static.inaturalist.org/photos/1425291/large.jpg
Young cats > http://static.inaturalist.org/photos/2065941/large.jpg
Midsize cats > https://scontent-sjc2-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xtp1/v/t1.0-9/11138108_765723383556971_4136080445991029828_n.jpg?oh=700346af33d15330a4f48de964ad98ed&oe=5756EA21
Mature cat > http://lh3.ggpht.com/NPtIzQX0McHT9D-BdUFwuXNz6U14-xNAXmrVI-ouMnGlXZFSR67Gj29RsDEYXVcrBkWFhXpHvMEhLlz6UbAX=s1200
Chrysalises > https://scontent-sjc2-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn2/v/t1.0-9/1920361_696343820407963_1558468250_n.jpg?oh=c6b7a068d1e9f21e960bc0fd521aad08&oe=575DEF8D
Hostplant > http://lh4.ggpht.com/YeXdxZfu6nyU4EpfKorYTOGjzDrarIGaHwdnujnAIsA_nDLoS8nlcel9FK7zsTlY0ohON_masMW0py-53XowBQ=s1200
Adults > http://butterfliesofamerica.com/chlosyne_ehrenbergii_live1.htm
Mil felicidades,
Keith

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

http://www.whatsthatbug.com/ask-whats-that-bug/Subject: Golden caterpillar
Location: Corozal Belize
February 10, 2016 10:21 am
Hi Bugman,
We found another caterpillar. This time, it one about an inch and a quarter long and about a quarter inch wide. But what is really cool is its coloration – shiny, bright gold. My photo just doesn’t do it justice. I hope you can tell us what kind a caterpillar it is.
Cheers,
Signature: Winjama

Nymphalidae Chrysalis

Mexican Fritillary Chrysalis

Dear Winjama,
This was once a caterpillar, but now it is a Chrysalis of a butterfly in the family Nymphalidae.  We have not had any luck finding any matching images.  We will contact Keith Wolfe to see if he can provide a species name.

Nymphalidae Chrysalis

Mexican Fritillary Chrysalis

Keith Wolfe Responds
Greetings Winjama and Bugman,
This is the very beautiful pupa of the Mexican Fritillary (Euptoieta hegesia) . . .
http://www.butterfliesofamerica.com/euptoieta_hegesia_meridiania_immatures.htm
http://www.butterfliesofamerica.com/images/Nymphalidae/Argynnini/Euptoieta_hegesia_meridiana/Euptoieta_hegesia_meridiania_pupa_PANAMA_PANAMA_PROV_San_Jose_01-VII-2011.JPG
. . . a fairly common butterfly in disturbed habitats throughout Belize.
Best wishes,
Keith

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar found in Penang Butterfly Farm
Location: Penang, Malaysia
February 6, 2016 4:20 am
Hello, I took this picture in 2011 at Penang Butterfly Farm, Malaysia, early February. I would be ever so grateful if you could identify it. I’ve been searching online and can’t find one that looks like it.
Kind regards,
Signature: Aeve Pomeroy

Caterpillars

Leopard Lacewing Caterpillars

Dear Aeve,
We found your species of caterpillar, also taken at the Penang Butterfly Farm, pictured on the Tennyson Lee blog, but alas, it is not identified.  Onewayticketmsia also has an unidentified image from the Penang Butterfly Farm.  We eventually found the entire life cycle of the Leopard Lacewing,
Cethosia cyane, pictured on the Butterflies of Singapore site, and we are satisfied that is a correct identification.  According to the site:  “The local host plant adopted by Leopard Lacewing as it spread quickly across the island is Passiflora foetida, a member of the Passifloraceae family commonly found in wastelands. In captive setting, the Leopard Lacewing has also been breed succesfully on another plant in the same family, Adenia macrophylla var. singaporeana, a plant which only occurs naturally within the catchment reserves. This might account for the sightings of Leopard Lacewing in some areas of the nature reserves.  The caterpillars of the Leopard Lacwing feed on the leaves, young shoots and outer surface of older stems of the host plant. The Leopard Lacewing caterpillars are gregarious throughout all five instars, often eating (leaves and stems), resting and moulting together in groups.”  According to Butterfly Circle:  “the larvae and adult butterflies display a distinct warning coloration that advertises their unpalatable nature to potential predators. When handled, they often exude a noxious odor generated from the ingested passion vine organic compounds.”

Dear Daniel,
That’s wonderful you have found it! Thank you so much for taking time to do this, and for the information given.
You are welcome to keep the photo and use freely if it is useful for your website, or anything else. I also have a photo of the adult Leopard Lacewing if that might be useful too.
Have a great weekend,
Aeve

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: caterpillar from Western Mexico
Location: Lo De Marcos, Nayarit, Mexico
December 14, 2015 11:00 am
I’ve found 4 caterpillars like this on the leaves of a potted Areca Palm. It seems quite flat, has a split tail and has a shield-shaped head with 2 horns at the back. It it is green with a pronounced orange stripe in the center of the back and paler light green strips on either side. This biggest one has very pale orange-ish patterns on the sides as well.
Signature: Sally Vedder

Orange Owl Butterfly Caterpillar

Owl Butterfly Caterpillar

Dear Sally,
We have identified your caterpillar as that of an Orange Owl Butterfly,
Opsiphanes boisduvallii, a species that feeds on palms in the caterpillar stage.

December 14, 2015 1:35 pm
Thanks so much for identifying this caterpillar for me.  We have the Opsiphanes Cassina (Split-Banded Owl Butterfly) here in Nayarit.  I have found several empty pupa cases on the same palms and have seen the butterfly fluttering around that palm.  Thanx again!  Sally V
Signature: Sally Vedder

At least we had the genus correct.

You DID help me to look again into my Wildlife Book of Nayarit and see that yes indeed it was the Cassina.  The photograph in the book was very dark & hard to use.  So thank you VERY MUCH!  This is a great website & as I find puzzling insects & things around my house, I may well visit you again! Thanx again.  Sally V

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Chrysalis
Location: Veracruz, Mexico, 4,500 ft a.s.l.
November 8, 2015 10:11 pm
Spotted this beauty yesterday morning.
Any idea what it is?
Signature: Bianca Delfosse

Brush Footed Butterfly Chrysalis: Adelpha species????

Butterfly Chrysalis: Adelpha species

Dear Bianca,
We wish you had sent a higher resolution image.  We were relatively certain that this is the Chrysalis of a butterfly in the family Nymphalidae, so we began a web search with that information.  We found a very similar looking chrysalis identified on FlickR as that of a Common Sergeant,
Athyma perius, but alas, it is from China.  Thinking your individual might be a New World relative, we searched its taxonomy and learned that it is in the tribe Limenitidini which included Admirals, Sisters and Sailors.  We then located a very similar looking chrysalis belonging to the Arizona Sister on Butterflies of America, and then we hit a block with additional similar looking images.  Meanwhile we have contacted Keith Wolfe to see if he can provide any information.  We would still like a higher resolution image.

Hi Daniel,
Sorry about the small file size. Hope these are better (1.1 Mb). Tomorrow I’ll try to get a shot of the back of the chrysalis.
Wow! That’s great progress. I hope the two 1.1 Mb images I sent got through. I’ll try to get one of its back tomorrow.
Bianca

Chrysalis of a Sister Butterfly

Chrysalis of a Sister Butterfly

Keith Wolfe Confirms ID
Hola Bianca and Daniel,
Good job, Bugman!  Indeed a member of the Limenitidini, more specifically Adelpha sp. (A. serpa-group).  With a handful of possibilities for Veracruz, here is one example from further south . . .
http://butterfliesofamerica.com/adelpha_serpa_celerio_immatures3.htm
Saludos,
Keith

…and here’s the best shot I could get of the back of the chrysalis. Let me know if you need a different angle.
B

Sister Chrysalis

Sister Chrysalis

Hi again Bianca,
Thanks for going through all the trouble to get us a view of the other side.  We would love an image of the adult butterfly if you are lucky enough to get a few.

No problem Daniel! I will do my best. I’m curious to see what emerges. 😄
Bianca

Update:  November 30, 2015
Hi Daniel,
I’m sorry to say, I missed it. It was either preyed upon or destroyed by the storm we had a week ago. I skipped two days checking on it because of the storm (high winds, about 8″ of rain, low temps: 40-50F) and when I checked again, the chrysalis was broken in the middle, there was nothing inside  and what was left of it looked a bit rotten. So disappointing!! :(
Hope I spot another one so we can see who’s in there!!
Many thanks for all your help.
Bianca

We are sorry to hear that Bianca.  Keep us posted if there are any future sightings.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination