Currently viewing the category: "brush footed butterfly caterpillars"
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Subject: Daniel – Monarch Caterpillars
Location: Hawthorne, CA
December 4, 2014 6:40 pm
Hi Daniel,
Hope all is well with you and yours. I haven’t been able to get out in the back much lately, but things are looking up and I want to share with you some late season Monarch Butterfly caterpillar shots. We have many Monarch Butterflies out there right now also, which tends to brighten the mood!
Signature: Anna Carreon

Monarch Caterpillar

Monarch Caterpillar

Thanks for an update on your Monarch population Anna.  We cannot remember a year when we have seen more Monarchs in our Mount Washington neighborhood than we have this past year.

Julieta Stangaferro, Amy Gosch liked this post
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Subject: Can’t quite identify this caterpillar
Location: Florida
December 2, 2014 1:19 pm
Hello, I found this guy sitting outside my house and decided to take a picture, upon trying to identify him I ran into some trouble as the closest I could find was the Buck Moth Larvae or the Spiny Elm Caterpillar but both of these describe spots as the primary pattern and my buddy here has what seem to be long white and orange stripes, which is a feature neither have mentioned! I live in central Florida.
Signature: -Curiouser and Curiouser

Gulf Fritillary Caterpillar

Gulf Fritillary Caterpillar

Dear Curiouser and Curiouser,
This looks like a Gulf Fritillary Caterpillar,
Agraulis vanillae, a species that feeds on the leaves of passionflower vines, and it is generally not found far from the food plants.  This is a color variation with lavendar stripes and according to BugGuide:  “Larvae are generally orange with black branched spines and greenish-black stripes. There is a larval variant with purple/lavender stripes, seen mostly in Texas.”  Adult Gulf Fritillaries are pretty orange butterflies with silver spots.

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Subject: What’s this Caterpillar
Location: Lundar Beach, Manitoba, Canada
August 11, 2014 9:49 pm
Can you please help me identify this caterpillar? It was one of five found feeding on some Johnny-Jump-Ups /mini pansies. I saw one moult the skin around its head and antennae.nnHow long will it feed as a caterplillar before making a chrysalis, and then how long to be a butterfly or moth. Thank you for your help. I also found a milkweed bug nearby. It looks like a hex bug. I really like insects, spiders, snakes and frogs. My Noni photographs them for me.
Thank you.
Jayden
8 yrs old
Signature: Jayden

Variegated Fritillary Caterpillar

Variegated Fritillary Caterpillar

Dear Jayden,
This pretty caterpillar is a Variegated Fritillary Caterpillar, and it appears to be nearly fully grown, meaning it will soon metamorphose into a lovely metallic Variegated Fritillary ChrysalisBugGuide has some valuable information, including:  “Permanent resident in south. Annually spreads and colonizes northwards usaully to southern Canada. Rarely encountered north of Great Basin west of Rockies, and north of southern California near Pacific Coast.”  BugGuide also states:  “Multiple generations per year (up to two or three in north, and four or more overlapping broods in south). Only overwinters in southern states. Overwintering stage is debated, but definitely as larvae, which are often found under logs, boards, and rocks during cold, and will wander around looking for food on warm mid-winter days. Perhaps can overwinter in all stages, depending upon the climate of a particular region.”  We interpret all that to mean that the lovely Variegated Fritillary may not be a permanent resident in your area, perhaps because the winters are too harsh for overwintering caterpillars to survive, though with global warming, things may be changing.  BugGuide data indicates sightings for Saskatchewan and Manitoba to be September and October, so perhaps this individual will emerge as an adult in the next two months, and that any progeny may not survive your winter.

THANK YOU!  Yes. That is the caterpillar for sure. My Noni and I thought it was a Crescent Butterfly larva.  But that caterpillar wasn’t an exact match.  Now I want to put one of the caterpillars in my bug keeper to watch it make it’s chrysalis.
Jayden

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Subject: Morning Cloak Caterpillars?
Location: Saint John, NB Canada
July 30, 2014 6:40 am
I found this congregation of caterpillars on the branch of my willow tree last night. This morning they had abandoned that branch, leaving clumps of black, and had relocated to a higher branch. I am located in Saint John, NB Canada and have never encountered these before. Based on what I’ve seen on the internet, I believe they are Mourning Cloak Caterpillars but I was hoping someone could confirm that makes sense. I’m also wondering if these are dangerous and should heed any warnings. I’m not a creepy crawly fan so I haven’t gotten too close but I’ve taken a couple of photos zoomed in as much as possible.
Signature: Jennifer

Mourning Cloak Caterpillar Aggregation

Mourning Cloak Caterpillar Aggregation

Hi Jennifer,
Though you image lacks critical detail, there are enough similarities to presume these are Mourning Cloak Caterpillars.  Your very descriptive account of the sighting supports that supposition as willow is a common food plant.  Mourning Cloak Caterpillars frequently feed in a group, known as an aggregation, a more accepted term for a group of caterpillars than the term congregation.  Mourning Cloak Caterpillars are not considered dangerous, but the spines can cause a painful prick if they are carelessly handled.

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Subject: butterflies
Location: Middleville, Michigan
July 25, 2014 12:01 pm
These Beauties are new to my yard this year. I believe they belong to a checkerspot.
Signature: Teri

Baltimore Checkerspot Caterpillar

Baltimore Checkerspot Caterpillar

He Teri,
We agree that your caterpillar looks exactly like a Baltimore Checkerspot Caterpillar,
Euphydryas phaeton, posted to BugGuide, and the chrysalis also looks like a Baltimore Checkerspot Chrysalis posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “The primary larval food source is turtlehead (Chelone glabra), although recent studies have shown that the caterpillars will eat a larger variety of plant species including English plantain (Plantago lanceolata), a common yard weed.”  The plant you have documented with the caterpillar appears to be plantain, based on the images on the USDA site. 

Baltimore Checkerspot Chrysalis

Baltimore Checkerspot Chrysalis

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Subject: caterpillar
Location: Boyce, VA, US
July 21, 2014 10:02 am
Can you help me identify this caterpillar? Found it on some violet family plants.
Signature: Emelford

Variegated Fritillary Caterpillar

Variegated Fritillary Caterpillar

Dear Emelford,
This pretty little caterpillar is a Variegated Fritillary Caterpillar,
Euptoieta claudia, and we quickly identified it thanks to this image posted to BugGuide.  The adult Variegated Fritillary is a lovely orange butterfly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination