Currently viewing the category: "butterfly caterpillars"
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Subject: identification of 2 caterpillars.
Location: Bangalore , Karnataka, INDIA
December 12, 2014 2:11 am
Dear sir,
I like to photograph nature ,in particular flora fauna around our campus,making it useful for our Bioscience faculty to use it for teaching the students in an excited way.
While doing so i came across 2 caterpillars with strange textures:

2.Second one i will upload in my next mail.
One important thing – These pictures from India – I hope you will be able to accommodate and identify. I am mentioning this because the 2/3 sites where I tried ,INDIA is not on the list of areas to be covered.
Kindly let me know.It will excite the Boys!!
Thanking you.
Signature: Nanda Gopal

Unknown Caterpillar

Giant Redeye Skipper Caterpillar

Hi Nanda,
We are finally getting around to posting your second caterpillar.  We were unable to identify this creature.  It appears to be covered with a substance that is unusual, like the waxy substance secreted by some Lanternflies and by the North American Butternut Wooly Worm which is a Sawfly Larva.

Unknown Caterpillar

Giant Redeye Skipper Caterpillar

Identification courtesy of Karl
Hi Daniel and Nanda:
The comment from Steve is correct – this is a skipper butterfly (Hesperiidae: Hesperiinae). It looks like a Giant Redeye (Gangara thirsts); click on “Early stages” for caterpillar photos. It is found through most of southern India. Regards.  Karl

Thanks as always Karl.  There is also an image on Butterfly Circle where it states:  “The Giant Redeye is the largest Hesperiid in Singapore. It is very rare and has so far been observed only within the Central Catchment Nature Reserves. “

Sue Dougherty, Amy Gosch liked this post
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Subject: Daniel – Monarch Caterpillars
Location: Hawthorne, CA
December 4, 2014 6:40 pm
Hi Daniel,
Hope all is well with you and yours. I haven’t been able to get out in the back much lately, but things are looking up and I want to share with you some late season Monarch Butterfly caterpillar shots. We have many Monarch Butterflies out there right now also, which tends to brighten the mood!
Signature: Anna Carreon

Monarch Caterpillar

Monarch Caterpillar

Thanks for an update on your Monarch population Anna.  We cannot remember a year when we have seen more Monarchs in our Mount Washington neighborhood than we have this past year.

Julieta Stangaferro, Amy Gosch liked this post
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Subject: Can’t quite identify this caterpillar
Location: Florida
December 2, 2014 1:19 pm
Hello, I found this guy sitting outside my house and decided to take a picture, upon trying to identify him I ran into some trouble as the closest I could find was the Buck Moth Larvae or the Spiny Elm Caterpillar but both of these describe spots as the primary pattern and my buddy here has what seem to be long white and orange stripes, which is a feature neither have mentioned! I live in central Florida.
Signature: -Curiouser and Curiouser

Gulf Fritillary Caterpillar

Gulf Fritillary Caterpillar

Dear Curiouser and Curiouser,
This looks like a Gulf Fritillary Caterpillar,
Agraulis vanillae, a species that feeds on the leaves of passionflower vines, and it is generally not found far from the food plants.  This is a color variation with lavendar stripes and according to BugGuide:  “Larvae are generally orange with black branched spines and greenish-black stripes. There is a larval variant with purple/lavender stripes, seen mostly in Texas.”  Adult Gulf Fritillaries are pretty orange butterflies with silver spots.

Sue Dougherty, Amy Gosch liked this post
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Swallowtail Caterpillar Aggregation

Swallowtail Caterpillar Aggregation

Subject: Caterpillar orgy
Location: Antigua, Guatemala
October 13, 2014 8:40 am
Hey Bugman,
I was planting a bunch of ginger in my garden here in Antigua, Guatemala yesterday and noticed an odd discoloration on the base of my lime tree.
When I went in a bit closer I realized it was about three dozen of these caterpillars, who decided to crop dust me en masse with their osmeterium (or as I prefer to call them, Angry Caterpillar Fart Getaway Tubes®.)
What gives? Did the Caligula of caterpillars suddenly move in, or is this some kind of protective herd behavior against predators?
Also, any help in identifying these little hedonists would be appreciated.
Thanks!
Signature: Ornery Regarding Gassy Youths

Swallowtail Caterpillar Aggregation

Swallowtail Caterpillar Aggregation

Dear Ornery,
These sure look like Ruby Spotted Swallowtail Caterpillars to us, a species in which the caterpillars are social, often being found in large aggregations.
  According to the Butterflies and Moths of North America, the caterpillars of the Ruby Spotted Swallowtail, Papilio anchisiades, feed on the leaves of:  “Trees in the citrus (Rutaceae) family including Citrus, Casimiroa, and Zanthoxylum species” and “Caterpillars rest in clusters on host plant during the day and feed at night; they all feed and molt at the same time.”  This communal activity must have some survival benefit for the species, and the group effect of the olfactory defense mechanism must be more effective than the smell produced by a single individual.  The adult Ruby Spotted Swallowtail is a pretty butterfly.

Thanks so much for the rapid reply! The Ruby Spotted Swallowtail is indeed quite beautiful. I have been a big fan of WTB for years and it has helped me identify dozens of critters. Keep up the great work.

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Subject: Orange caterpillar (?) with face on it’s back?
Location: West Virginia
September 24, 2014 3:01 pm
Our kindergarten classes were outside on the playground at recess and found this bug. It has spots that appear to be a mouth and eyes on its head. We looked it up and thought perhaps it was a Pandora sphinx caterpillar but aren’t sure. My fellow teacher and I would love to know what it is so we can tell our classes more about it!
Signature: Welch Elementary Kindergarten

Spicebush Swallowtail Caterpillar

Spicebush Swallowtail Caterpillar

Dear Welch Elementary Kindergarten,
This distinctive caterpillar is a Spicebush Swallowtail Caterpillar.  The false eyespots might help protect the tasty caterpillar from predators like birds that may mistake a toothsome caterpillar for a much larger and potentially dangerous snake.  Spicebush Swallowtail caterpillars feed on a variety of trees, including “Spicebush (Lindera benzoin), Sassafras trees (Sassafras albidum), Pondspice (Litsea aestivalis) Red, Swamp and Silk Bays (Persea spp.); perhaps prickly ash (Zanthoxylum americanum), Tulip tree (Liriodendron tulipifera), Sweetbay (Magnolia virginiana), and Camphor (Cinnamomum camphora)” according to BugGuide.  They begin life as green caterpillars that are well camouflaged, but as the time for pupation nears, they often turn orange, leave the trees they have been feeding upon, and find an appropriate site to metamorphose into a chrysalis.  The adult Spicebush Swallowtail is a beautiful black butterfly with colorful markings.

Thank you so much!  We looked it up on the Smart Board and discussed the life cycle. We printed a picture of the butterfly so we can watch for them in the spring.
You have a great site!
Mrs. Merkle

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Subject: Some sort of catterpillar?
Location: Central New York
September 21, 2014 10:31 pm
Summertime in central new york. No idea what this bug is
Signature: Mac F

Tiger Swallowtail Caterpillar

Tiger Swallowtail Caterpillar

Dear Mac F,
This is the caterpillar of a Tiger Swallowtail.  Recent taxonomy has resulted in the classification of several different species based on the range, and several different species, including the Eastern Tiger Swallowtail and the Canadian Tiger Swallowtail have ranges that overlap in your vicinity.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination