Currently viewing the category: "butterfly caterpillars"
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Subject: Beautiful chrysalis
Location: Belleville, MI
May 24, 2015 4:17 pm
Dear Bugman: Wanted to share my son’s photo of a beautiful chrysalis he found. It was on a sign in an area park. Never seen one so beautifully patterned. We looked it up and found similar pictures and believe this will become a Baltimore Checkerspot butterfly.
Signature: MI Bugmama

Baltimore Checkerspot Chrysalis

Baltimore Checkerspot Chrysalis

Dear MI Bugmama,
We are in total agreement with you that this is the chrysalis of the Baltimore Checkerspot,
Euphydryas phaeton, and you can see that it is a perfect match for this BugGuide image.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identify Chrysalis
Location: Australia
May 2, 2015 6:14 pm
I hope that you can help me to identify this chrysalis. It was photographed by a friend in Australia and he has no idea. I was asked to help but find most search engines take me off at a tangent and I have been unable to get a decent photographic library from which to identify this one. I really appreciate any help you might be able to give.
Signature: Corrie

Swallowtail Chrysalis

Cabbage WhiteChrysalis

Dear Corrie,
We were mistaken into thinking that the silken girdle supporting this chrysalis in an upright position indicates that it is a Swallowtail in the family Papilionidae.  We are not certain of the exact species, but you may compare this image to images of Australian Swallowtail Chrysalides posted to Butterflyhouse.  We received a comment with a correction from Ben indicating that this is the chrysalis of a Cabbage White.

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Subject: never seen one
Location: mobile, al
May 1, 2015 1:36 pm
Found this eating camphor leaves. What in the world?
Signature: nathan

Spicebush Swallowtail Caterpillar

Spicebush Swallowtail Caterpillar

Dear Nathan,
This is the Caterpillar of a Spicebush Swallowtail,
Papilio troilus, and most of the images on our site are more mature caterpillars, including many that are turning orange just prior to pupation.  Your earlier instar can be compared to this image on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, preferred food plants include:  “Spicebush (Lindera benzoin), Sassafras trees (Sassafras albidum), Pondspice (Litsea aestivalis) Red, Swamp and Silk Bays (Persea spp.); perhaps prickly ash (Zanthoxylum americanum), Tulip tree (Liriodendron tulipifera), Sweetbay (Magnolia virginiana), and Camphor (Cinnamomum camphora).”  The adult Spicebush Swallowtail is a beautiful butterfly.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Catapillars
Location: Vacaville, ca
April 3, 2015 12:33 pm
Please identify this catapillar in the attached pix. Location Vacaville, ca
Signature: Robin

Pipevine Swallowtail Caterpillar

Pipevine Swallowtail Caterpillar

Dear Robin,
It seems it has been years since we posted a new image of a Pipevine Swallowtail Caterpillar,
Battus philenor.

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Subject: Gold speckled caterpillar?
Location: Puerto Lopez, Ecuador
April 5, 2015 7:39 pm
This beautiful creature was climbing on a bamboo pole about 4 feet off the ground near our house. The pictures don’t do it justice; the gold specks on it’s back looked like they were reflecting – almost mineral like. It’s about one inch long.
We saw it at about 11:00a EDT on Easter Sunday (April 5th), and it didn’t move in the 20 or so minutes that we were watching it. Tonight (9:30p), it is no longer there.
Our house is 49m above sea level and about one km to the ocean. After two years of drought, we’ve had rain almost nightly during the past week. This morning, about three hours before seeing this guy, we had three inches of rain in four hours.
(I don’t know if all of this information is useful, but I thought I’d provide as much detail as possible.)
Signature: Scott Bloomquist

Nymphalidae Chrysalis

Nymphalidae Chrysalis

Dear Scott,
This is not a caterpillar, but rather a Chrysalis, and in our opinion, it is classified in the Brush Footed Butterfly family Nymphalidae.  It resembles the chrysalis of a Variegated Fritillary,
Euptoieta claudia, a North American species that is also found in South America, according to BugGuide.  We suspect your chrysalis is closely related.  We will contact Keith Wolfe to get his opinion.

Thank you, Daniel.  It was still there today, 24 hours later.
I’ll look up the names that you provided; I appreciate the information.

Keith Wolfe Responds
Buenas tardes Scott and Daniel,
Good eye/memory, Bugman!  This is indeed a fritillary-in-waiting, specifically a pupa of the Mexican Fritillary (Euptoieta hegesia).  Here are two links of hopeful interest . . .
http://www.butterfliesofamerica.com/euptoieta_hegesia_meridiania_immatures.htm
http://leps.thenalls.net/content2.php?ref=Species/Heliconiinae/hegesia/life/hegesia_life.htm
Best wishes,
Keith

Thanks Keith,
I have updated the posting with the links you provided.  I thought it looked like the genera-mate Variegated Fritillary.
Daniel

 

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Subject: Cocooned????
Location: Columbus, GA
March 27, 2015 7:11 pm
Saw this on my porch railing. Pretty sure that it’s a moth or a butterfly. Don’t even know if that’s right. Will continue to watch to see if I can capture it’s release. I took video but couldn’t load that so I’m doing pics.
Signature: Jami S

Red Spotted Purple Chrysalis

Red Spotted Purple Chrysalis

Dear Jami,
This is a very exciting posting for us.  We recognized your Chrysalis (proper term for the pupa of a butterfly) as a member of the Brush Footed Butterfly family Nymphalidae, but we did not recognize the species.  We quickly located what appeared to be a match to a Red Spotted Purple chrysalis on BugGuide, but since the angle of view is different, we could not be certain.  We found a similar camera angle on Nature Search, so we are now quite confident that we have properly identified the species as
Limenitis arthemis astyanax.  Adult Red Spotted Purples are well represented on our site, but we do not have any images of chrysalides.  We especially love that your two images document the mobility of the chrysalis, which is generally thought of as an immobile stage of metamorphosis.  We hope you are able to document the eclosion of this beautiful butterfly and can send us additional images in the near future.

Red Spotted Purple Chrysalis

Red Spotted Purple Chrysalis

This is so cool. Thanks so much.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination