Currently viewing the category: "butterfly caterpillars"
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Subject: weird big thing
Location: south eastern Pennsylvania
August 27, 2016 6:01 pm
this was found on my neighbors house, we live in the suburbs and her house is backed up against the woods, I don’t know if any of that helps… but if you could identify this for me I’m quite curious!
Signature: Karen

Probably Spicebush Swallowtail Chrysalis

Probably Spicebush Swallowtail Chrysalis

Dear Karen,
This is the chrysalis of a Swallowtail Butterfly, and we believe it belongs to a Spicebush Swallowtail based on comparing your image to this BugGuide image.  According to Featured Creatures:  “Pupae: Pupae have two anterior “horns”. Pupae from larvae developing under long photoperiods may be either green (Figure 9) or brown (Figure 10). All pupae from short photoperiod larvae (diapause pupae) are brown. Within the last 24 hours prior to adult emergence, the pre-adult gradually becomes visible through the transparent pupal cuticle.”

Spicebush Swallowtail Chrysalis

Spicebush Swallowtail Chrysalis

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar
Location: Florianopolis, SC, Brazil
August 21, 2016 8:39 pm
Dear Mr. Bugman,
I live on the Island of Florianopolis,SC, Brazil. I went out in the garden today and when I came back in I found this psychedelic caterpillar on me. I was fiddeling with a rose bush and a brugmansia. But honestly there are so many different plants in our garden, it could have fallen from anywhere😬. Do you know what bug this is? Today is Sunday August 21st, and the season is winter. But we have a very mild winter and it feels springy already with lots of rain in the last two days after some very dry winter weather.
Thank you!
Signature: Carolina

Owl Butterfly Caterpillar

Scalloped Owl Butterfly Caterpillar

Dear Carolina,
After some research, we are quite certain we have identified your caterpillar as an Owl Butterfly Caterpillar in the genus
Opsiphanes, but we do not feel confident providing a species identification.  Our search began with this similar looking caterpillar on FlickR that is identified as Opsiphanes invirae.  We continued to research and found more similar looking images of Opsiphanes tamarindi on Parasitoid-Caterpillar-Plant Interactions in the Americas.  According to Insects.org:  “Belonging to the same family of butterflies as the famous Owl Butterflies, this Opiphanes genus contains about ten different species which can be challenging to differentiate. This group is characteristically crepuscular, being most active during the dawn and dusk hours and patrolling the dark forest interior so their cryptic coloration optimally blends with the dark shadow. They can be attracted to fermenting fruit bait during daylight hours … .”  We will contact Keith Wolfe to see if he can provide a species identification.  

Owl Butterfly Caterpillar

Scalloped Owl Butterfly Caterpillar

Keith Wolfe provides a species identification:  Scalloped Owl Butterfly
Olá Carolina,
This is an immature Scalloped Owl-butterfly (Opsiphanes quiteria).  It needs to still grow further, so please put it on a nearby palm, which are the natural hostplants.  Here is a short report about your lagarta in Portuguese . . .
http://www.scielo.br/pdf/rbent/v49n3/26596.pdf
Let me know if you would like to see a more detailed paper in English.  Daniel, regrettably the larvae shown at the above “Parasitoid-Caterpillar-Plant Interactions in the Americas” link are all misidentified.
Abraços,
Keith

Hello Daniel and Ola Keith,
Thank you so much! You are so kind! And thank you for the link.  I would love a more detailed paper in English.
I didn’t know where to put it, so I put it in the garden. Now it’s gone. Lots of these Jeriva palm trees everywhere, so hopefully it has found it’s way to one.
Obrigada! Abraços
Carolina

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What type of swallowtail?
Location: Eagle Point, Oregon 9752r
August 18, 2016 3:19 pm
Hi, I just spotted this caterpillar this morning. I live in Eagle Point Oregon (southern oregon). I think it is maybe a western tiger swallowtail but am not sure due to the orange coloring.
Signature: Lara

Western Tiger Swallowtail Caterpillar

Possibly Two-Tailed Swallowtail Caterpillar

Dear Lara,
Based on the caterpillar’s appearance, and your location, the only other possible species are the Pale Tiger Swallowtail and the Two-Tailed Swallowtail, so we turned to BugGuide where the comparison between two are described as:  “Larvae very similar to those of Pale Tiger Swallowtail, but black pupil of false eye-spot larger, and yellow spot inside eyespot entirely separated from it, not just notched.”  You may visually compare the difference in the eyespots by comparing this BugGuide image of the Caterpillar of a Western Tiger Swallowtail with this BugGuide image of the Caterpillar of a Pale Tiger Swallowtail Caterpillar,
Papilio eurymedon.  Between the two, we are inclined to agree with you that this is the caterpillar of a Western Tiger Swallowtail, but we still haven’t considered the Two-Tailed Swallowtail.  The Two-Tailed Swallowtail Caterpillar is described on BugGuide as:  “Caterpillars resemble those of Eastern Tiger Swallowtail” which isn’t much help, nor is comparing your image to that of a Two-Tailed Swallowtail Caterpillar, Papilio multicaudatus, on BugGuide.  We have a very difficult time distinguishing between the species, so we are contacting Keith Wolfe for his opinion.  We are guessing it is a Two-Tailed Swallowtail Caterpillar based on image comparison of the eye spots.  One thing we can address is the orange color, which means your caterpillar is pre-pupal.  It has left its food source and is searching for a place to pupate.

Western Tiger Swallowtail Caterpillar

Possibly Two-Tailed Swallowtail Caterpillar

Keith Wolfe Responds
Hello Lara and Daniel,
Caterpillars of the Pale, Two-tailed, and Western swallowtails are indeed difficult to distinguish by appearance alone, thus their somewhat differing preference of Oregonian hostplants — or in this case, shrubs/trees growing nearby — is probably the best indicator . . .
* Pale Swallowtail (Papilio eurymedon): Mainly various wild lilacs (Ceanothus).
* Two-tailed Swallowtail (Papilio multicaudata): Mostly wild cherries (Prunus), ash (Fraxinus), and hoptree (Ptelea).
* Western Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio rutulus): Many species of aspen and poplar (Populus), willow (Salix), and maple (Acer).
Hopefully the above isn’t too “scientific”.
Best wishes,
Keith

Lara Responds
Thank you.  Nearby to where I found it are Ash and Oak trees primarily.

Ed. Note:  Based on the information provided by Keith Wolfe and the response from Lara, we can speculate this is most likely the caterpillar of a Two-Tailed Swallowtail.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this
Location: Castle Hayne,N.C. USA
August 11, 2016 10:08 pm
This critter was found in my flower garden in May or June in Castle Hayne, N.C. I am unable to find any info to ID it even though I have seen pictures of it somewhere. Do you know what it is?
Signature: James

Possibly Baltimore Checkerspot Chrysalis

Possibly Baltimore Checkerspot Chrysalis

Dear James,
Can you possibly send another image with a different angle, like a lateral view?  Since it was in your flower garden, are you able to provide the name of the plant upon which it was found?  How large was it?  To us, this appears to be a Baltimore Checkerspot Chrysalis, but something does not look right.  It appears to be either deformed, or damaged.  You can also see this BugGuide image of a Baltimore Checkerspot Chrysalis.

This was the only pic. It was on a cone flower or black-eyed susan. It was small. Less than 3/8 of an inch.
thanks,
James

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Butterfly
Location: philippines
July 27, 2016 12:18 am
May i ask the Family/Genus of this butterfly if that is ok;) coz i like to collect pupa of butterflies and excited to see what it looks like as it emerge…thanks…
Signature: karyl

Common Jay Chrysalis

Common Jay Chrysalis

Dear Karyl,
This butterfly is in the family Papilionidae a group that includes swallowtails, birdwings and Apollos.  We believe we have correctly identified your butterfly as a Common Jay,
Arisbe doson gyndes, thanks to images posted to the Philippine Lepidoptera site.  Insect Designs also has a nice image. 

Common Jay

Common Jay

thank you so much for the identification;)

Common Jay ventral surface

Common Jay ventral surface

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Orange Dog Caterpillar?
Location: Southern Orange County, CA
July 23, 2016 10:56 am
I found two caterpillars on my navel orange tree on July 22, 2016. Are these Giant Swallowtail Butterfly caterpillars?
Signature: Julie Macy

Orange Dogs

Orange Dogs

Dear Julie,
You are absolutely correct.  These are Orange Dogs, the caterpillars of Giant Swallowtails.  Interestingly, though they are native to North America, Giant Swallowtails were first reported in Southern California in the 1990s.  Their range expanded as citrus cultivation moved across the country.  Even though citrus is not native to North America, once cultivation of oranges and other citrus fruits gained popularity in the southeast, the native Giant Swallowtails adapted to them as a host plant.

Thank you!  I found another yesterday.  I’ve never seen them before.  It will be fun to watch them as they change.
Julie

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination