Currently viewing the category: "butterfly caterpillars"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar found in Penang Butterfly Farm
Location: Penang, Malaysia
February 6, 2016 4:20 am
Hello, I took this picture in 2011 at Penang Butterfly Farm, Malaysia, early February. I would be ever so grateful if you could identify it. I’ve been searching online and can’t find one that looks like it.
Kind regards,
Signature: Aeve Pomeroy

Caterpillars

Leopard Lacewing Caterpillars

Dear Aeve,
We found your species of caterpillar, also taken at the Penang Butterfly Farm, pictured on the Tennyson Lee blog, but alas, it is not identified.  Onewayticketmsia also has an unidentified image from the Penang Butterfly Farm.  We eventually found the entire life cycle of the Leopard Lacewing,
Cethosia cyane, pictured on the Butterflies of Singapore site, and we are satisfied that is a correct identification.  According to the site:  “The local host plant adopted by Leopard Lacewing as it spread quickly across the island is Passiflora foetida, a member of the Passifloraceae family commonly found in wastelands. In captive setting, the Leopard Lacewing has also been breed succesfully on another plant in the same family, Adenia macrophylla var. singaporeana, a plant which only occurs naturally within the catchment reserves. This might account for the sightings of Leopard Lacewing in some areas of the nature reserves.  The caterpillars of the Leopard Lacwing feed on the leaves, young shoots and outer surface of older stems of the host plant. The Leopard Lacewing caterpillars are gregarious throughout all five instars, often eating (leaves and stems), resting and moulting together in groups.”  According to Butterfly Circle:  “the larvae and adult butterflies display a distinct warning coloration that advertises their unpalatable nature to potential predators. When handled, they often exude a noxious odor generated from the ingested passion vine organic compounds.”

Dear Daniel,
That’s wonderful you have found it! Thank you so much for taking time to do this, and for the information given.
You are welcome to keep the photo and use freely if it is useful for your website, or anything else. I also have a photo of the adult Leopard Lacewing if that might be useful too.
Have a great weekend,
Aeve

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: UNKNOWN PUPAE
Location: Juiz de Fora-MG – BRAZIL
January 8, 2016 12:48 pm
Hi Mr. Bugman, I found this beautiful butterfly´s pupae in a bamboo grove. It’s much prettier in person than in the picture. I tried to create it, but it was with parasites. Can you help me? Thanks from Brazil!
Signature: Marcelo Brito de Avellar

Chrysalis

Red Cracker Chrysalis

Dear Marcelo,
We are sorry to hear this Chrysalis did not produce a butterfly.  We have not had any luck with an identification in our initial web search, so we are contacting Keith Wolfe who we hope will be able to provide us with an identification.

Chrysalis

Red Cracker Chrysalis

Olá Marcelo and Bugman,
Your striking pupa is that of Hamadryas amphinome (Biblidinae, Nymphalidae) — here is the same chrysalis from nearby Belo Horizonte . . .
https://scontent.fsnc1-1.fna.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xft1/t31.0-8/11059576_1559548584297177_2724688993340720252_o.jpg
This species’ stacked eggs (https://scontent.fsnc1-1.fna.fbcdn.net/hphotos-frc3/t31.0-8/10710357_10152775841212071_3424914565754101300_o.jpg) and gregarious caterpillars (here separated https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8209/8162660091_da1315cbe0_k.jpg) are equally impressive.
Um abraço,
Keith

Thanks so much Keith,
It appears the common name for
Hamadryas amphinome, according to the Learn About Butterflies site, is the Red Cracker.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: caterpillar from Western Mexico
Location: Lo De Marcos, Nayarit, Mexico
December 14, 2015 11:00 am
I’ve found 4 caterpillars like this on the leaves of a potted Areca Palm. It seems quite flat, has a split tail and has a shield-shaped head with 2 horns at the back. It it is green with a pronounced orange stripe in the center of the back and paler light green strips on either side. This biggest one has very pale orange-ish patterns on the sides as well.
Signature: Sally Vedder

Orange Owl Butterfly Caterpillar

Owl Butterfly Caterpillar

Dear Sally,
We have identified your caterpillar as that of an Orange Owl Butterfly,
Opsiphanes boisduvallii, a species that feeds on palms in the caterpillar stage.

December 14, 2015 1:35 pm
Thanks so much for identifying this caterpillar for me.  We have the Opsiphanes Cassina (Split-Banded Owl Butterfly) here in Nayarit.  I have found several empty pupa cases on the same palms and have seen the butterfly fluttering around that palm.  Thanx again!  Sally V
Signature: Sally Vedder

At least we had the genus correct.

You DID help me to look again into my Wildlife Book of Nayarit and see that yes indeed it was the Cassina.  The photograph in the book was very dark & hard to use.  So thank you VERY MUCH!  This is a great website & as I find puzzling insects & things around my house, I may well visit you again! Thanx again.  Sally V

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What the heck is this bug with a forked tongue?
Location: Culver City, California
December 13, 2015 5:20 pm
Hello bugman,
we just discovered this bug that looks like a reptile/caterpillar with a brown/greenish body with white on it & an orange forked tongue that’s on our little baby orange tree?
Signature: Cyn & Tony

Orange Dog

Orange Dog

Dear Cyn & Tony,
This is the caterpillar of a Giant Swallowtail, commonly called an Orange Dog.  Caterpillars feed on the leaves of citrus trees, but they are not known to cause significant damage to a healthy tree.  The orange forked tongue you mentioned is a scent organ called the osmeterium that releases an odor that might help to deter predators.  Adult Giant Swallowtails are the largest butterflies found in Los Angeles.  This is a species native to the eastern portion of North America, but with the cultivation of citrus crops in the west, there has been a significant range expansion.  The Giant Swallowtail was first reported in Southern California in the 1990s.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Anise Swallowtail Caterpillar in WTB? garden
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
December 7, 2015 11:30 AM
Today while digging in the dirt in preparation for planting onions, we noticed this Anise Swallowtail Caterpillar munching on carrot greens.  Though we have grown carrots for ten years, and though Anise Swallowtails are relatively common in the area, this is our first sighting of a Caterpillar in the vegetable garden.

Anise Swallowtail Caterpillar

Anise Swallowtail Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: It’s a caterpillar ,but which species.
Location: India,Maharashtra, Mumbai
November 23, 2015 2:44 am
A couple of weeks ago a beautiful butterfly layed her eggs on my plany of curry leaves.
They where 7-8 but only 1 survived due to weak condition of weather and plant .
But these beautiful caterpillar is of which species and how will it look after becoming a butterfly I want to know.
Signature: Sahil

Swallowtail Caterpillar

Common Mormon Caterpillar

Dear Sahil,
This is the caterpillar of a Swallowtail Butterfly and there are several species that look quite similar, but we are relatively confident that this is a Lime Butterfly Caterpillar, based on this description provided to us by Keith Wolfe in a previous posting on our site:  “I’ve seen hundreds of Lime Butterfly and Common Mormon larvae all across Asia, the two being easily separable by a coffee-colored band between the “eyes” (Lime Butterfly) and prominent blue spots on the head and body (Common Mormon).”  We don’t normally link to Wikipedia, but there is a beautiful set of images documenting the metamorphosis of the Lime Butterfly posted there.  Fluttery has a nice comparison of the similar looking Swallowtail caterpillars.  Just to be certain, we are writing to Keith Wolfe to get verification on our identification.

Correction Courtesy of Keith Wolfe
Hi Sahil and Daniel,
Sorry Bugman, this is in fact a Common Mormon (Papilio polytes, http://www.ifoundbutterflies.org/sp/603/Papilio-polytes/early-stages).  Its caterpillar and those of the Lime Butterfly (P. demoleus, http://www.ifoundbutterflies.org/sp/602/Papilio-demoleus/early-stages) are frequently confused, but a careful check reveals several distinctions.
Best wishes,
Keith

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination