Currently viewing the category: "butterfly caterpillars"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Swallowtail caterpillar?
Location: San Gabriel , california
April 26, 2016 9:12 pm
I bought a pepper tree bonsai and I found this caterpillar attached to it. I believe it is a swallowtail caterpillar but I don’t know what variety. I was hoping to find out what is was since I want to care for it. Can I feed it lemon leaves instead of my poor bonsai?
Signature: Thank you, Meena

Probably Giant Swallowtail Caterpillar

Probably Giant Swallowtail Caterpillar

Dear Meena,
This sure looks like an Orange Dog, the caterpillar of a Giant Swallowtail  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on leaves of plants in the Citrus family (Rutaceae), including Citrus (Citrusspecies), Pricklyash(Zanthoxylum species), Hoptree (Ptelea trifoliata), Rue (Ruta graveolens), etc. Adults take flower nectar from a variety of herbaceous plants and shrubs.”
  We do not recognize your particular Pepper Tree and we would be curious to learn if it is in the citrus family.  You can try to feed your caterpillar leaves of an orange tree, but if it rejects those leaves, you may need to return it back to your bonsaii.  Caterpillars are not like dogs or pet fish.  They do not immediately begin eating if food is placed in front of them.  You may need to transfer your caterpillar to a citrus tree to see if it will accept the leaves.  Though lemon is a citrus tree, we cannot recall getting any reports of Orange Dogs feeding on lemon trees, but we have gotten reports of them feeding on lime, tangerine, grapefruit and the always popular orange tree.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Centipede? In SoCal
Location: southern california
March 23, 2016 5:58 pm
Hi! my wife and I just got a new puppy, and as we were taking him out to the restroom he saw the attached bugs in our tree. we have noticed them dead on our front porch and crawling on our fence as well. Theres ~100 in the tree. We just need it identified to see if its poisonous and how to rid them of our yard so our pup doesn’t have the opportunity to eat them! Its spring, in southern california, been hot the past week.
Signature: kg

Mourning Cloak Caterpillar

Mourning Cloak Caterpillar

Dear kg,
While we do have Centipedes in southern California, your images depict Mourning Cloak Caterpillars, and though they may deliver a slight sting if carelessly handled, they are harmless.  There is no need to eradicate them from your tree.  They may climb to the eaves of your home in groups to form chrysalides.  Mourning Cloak Caterpillars will eventually metamorphose into lovely adult Mourning Cloak butterflies.  Some years, when conditions are favorable, the Mourning Cloak Caterpillars can be quite numerous.  Their local native host is willow, but they have adapted to feeding on the leaves of Chinese elm in California.

Mourning Cloak Caterpillars

Mourning Cloak Caterpillars

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth Chrysalis
Location: Boulder, CO
March 20, 2016 3:03 pm
Hello,
We found a chrysalis tucked away in a lonely shoe about 3-4 months ago (Sept or Oct). A friend had left her leather dancing shoe under our couch, and when I picked it up, out fell this little guy. It was attached up near the toe by two silk anchors.
Sadly he fell quite a ways, I’m rather tall so he got the brunt of a 3 foot drop to our hardwood. The Chrysalis is currently hanging in a mason jar with ventilation, but I’m rather curious for more information about it. Thank you for your time!
Signature: -FC

Swallowtail Chrysalis

Swallowtail Chrysalis

Dear FC,
This chrysalis belongs to a butterfly, not a moth.  We believe it is a Swallowtail Chrysalis.  Most Swallowtails produce upright chrysalides, that are held in that position by a silken girdle.  This Tiger Swallowtail Chrysalis from BugGuide looks similar.

Swallowtail Chrysalis

Swallowtail Chrysalis

Swallowtail Chrysalis

Swallowtail Chrysalis

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Cloudless Sulphur Caterpillar in Mount Washington
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
February 28, 2016
We were shocked to see this bright yellow caterpillar meandering across the patio.  We immediately recognized a Cloudless Sulphur Caterpillar,
Phoebis sennae, but we do not have any Cassia growing anywhere near.  Where did it come from?  We checked BugGuide and learned:  “Caterpillar: usually pale green and marked by a yellow stripe on each side and black spots in rows across each abdominal segment.  Above and below the yellow stripe there are usually small areas marked with blue.   There is also a yellow form that occurs when it feeds on yellow flowers of its host plants. The later instars of the yellow form have a dark transverse band across each segment” which means our Caterpillar was feeding on yellow blooms.  According to BugGuide:  “Caterpillar feeds most commonly on Cassia and some other woody and herbaceous legumes” and we do have an Acacia in the garden, another legume in the family Fabaceae , so we will check it out to see if there are any additional Cloudless Sulphur Caterpillars feeding upon it.

Cloudless Sulphur Caterpillar

Cloudless Sulphur Caterpillar

Cloudless Sulphur Caterpillar

Cloudless Sulphur Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Painted Lady?
Location: Cuernavaca, Mexico, alt: 1580 m
February 25, 2016 9:45 pm
Hi, I’m hoping you can help me again.
All three of the photos below were taken in October 2014, in the same plant in Cuernavaca, Mexico (altitude 1580 m). Those caterpillars were all over that plant for several seasons, until eventually there were enough to kill it. The butterflies are also very common. We believe they’re the same species, but obviously are not 100% sure.
From the caterpillar I thought a Painted Lady or Red Admiral, but the chrysalis and butterfly don’t match.
Thanks for any help you can provide.
Signature: Peculiarist

White Rayed Patch

White Rayed Patch

Dear Peculiarist,
This lovely little Brush Footed Butterfly is a White Rayed Patch,
Chlosyne ehrenbergii, which we identified on Learn About Butterflies where it states:  “The eggs are pale yellow in colour, and laid in batches of up to 200, on the underside of leaves of the foodplant, Buddleia.”  We believe the leaves in your images are of butterfly bush or Buddleia, so the caterpillar and chrysalides are most likely the immature stages of the White Rayed Patch.  We will check with Keith Wolfe for verification as we cannot seem to locate images of the immature stages, though the appearance of the caterpillar and chrysalides are consistent with other members of the genus.

Chrysalides of a White Rayed Patch

Chrysalides of a White Rayed Patch

Keith Wolfe verifies Chrysalis and Imago, but questions Caterpillar
Hola Daniel,
Would you please ask “Peculiarist” to kindly send me (OK to share my email address) ONLY the caterpillar photo at FULL size?  The pupae look good for C. ehrenbergii, but the larva appears a little different.  Muchas gracias!
Saludos,
Keith

Caterpillar of a White Rayed Patch

Caterpillar of a White Rayed Patch

Peculiarist Corrects Attachments
Hi Daniel,
As I was updating my page I noticed that this is the same caterpillar I sent before (my photo folders are a bit of a mess, and I had this duplicated in another folder), that was tentatively identified as a Pine Moth caterpillar. They do look alike, but I think with the extra information you have in these three photos White-rayed Patch is a more likely match. The food tree matches.
Thanks for your help, and I’ll be more careful in sending the most complete information I can in the future.
James

Keith Wolfe supplies some links.
Buenas noches James and Daniel,
Muchas gracias for the corroborating larval image.  Being endemic to Mexico, life-history photos of “Mariposa parche negra” are difficult to find online, so here are some examples . . .
Eggs > http://static.inaturalist.org/photos/1425291/large.jpg
Young cats > http://static.inaturalist.org/photos/2065941/large.jpg
Midsize cats > https://scontent-sjc2-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xtp1/v/t1.0-9/11138108_765723383556971_4136080445991029828_n.jpg?oh=700346af33d15330a4f48de964ad98ed&oe=5756EA21
Mature cat > http://lh3.ggpht.com/NPtIzQX0McHT9D-BdUFwuXNz6U14-xNAXmrVI-ouMnGlXZFSR67Gj29RsDEYXVcrBkWFhXpHvMEhLlz6UbAX=s1200
Chrysalises > https://scontent-sjc2-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn2/v/t1.0-9/1920361_696343820407963_1558468250_n.jpg?oh=c6b7a068d1e9f21e960bc0fd521aad08&oe=575DEF8D
Hostplant > http://lh4.ggpht.com/YeXdxZfu6nyU4EpfKorYTOGjzDrarIGaHwdnujnAIsA_nDLoS8nlcel9FK7zsTlY0ohON_masMW0py-53XowBQ=s1200
Adults > http://butterfliesofamerica.com/chlosyne_ehrenbergii_live1.htm
Mil felicidades,
Keith

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

http://www.whatsthatbug.com/ask-whats-that-bug/Subject: Golden caterpillar
Location: Corozal Belize
February 10, 2016 10:21 am
Hi Bugman,
We found another caterpillar. This time, it one about an inch and a quarter long and about a quarter inch wide. But what is really cool is its coloration – shiny, bright gold. My photo just doesn’t do it justice. I hope you can tell us what kind a caterpillar it is.
Cheers,
Signature: Winjama

Nymphalidae Chrysalis

Mexican Fritillary Chrysalis

Dear Winjama,
This was once a caterpillar, but now it is a Chrysalis of a butterfly in the family Nymphalidae.  We have not had any luck finding any matching images.  We will contact Keith Wolfe to see if he can provide a species name.

Nymphalidae Chrysalis

Mexican Fritillary Chrysalis

Keith Wolfe Responds
Greetings Winjama and Bugman,
This is the very beautiful pupa of the Mexican Fritillary (Euptoieta hegesia) . . .
http://www.butterfliesofamerica.com/euptoieta_hegesia_meridiania_immatures.htm
http://www.butterfliesofamerica.com/images/Nymphalidae/Argynnini/Euptoieta_hegesia_meridiana/Euptoieta_hegesia_meridiania_pupa_PANAMA_PANAMA_PROV_San_Jose_01-VII-2011.JPG
. . . a fairly common butterfly in disturbed habitats throughout Belize.
Best wishes,
Keith

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination