Currently viewing the category: "butterfly caterpillars"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown critter
Location: Galveston, Tx
November 25, 2016 10:24 am
Hi,
No, this is not a stuffed toy! Found this 1 1/2″ critter on my patio in Galveston, Texas 2 days ago. I did not touch it but my neighbor’s young daughter put in her hand and it was crawling around in her hand. Any idea what it could be??
Signature: Lonnie

Spicebush Swallowtail Caterpillar

Spicebush Swallowtail Caterpillar

Dear Lonnie,
This is a Spicebush Swallowtail Caterpillar.  The adult Spicebush Swallowtail is a large black butterfly with colorful spots and “tails” on its underwings.

Daniel,
Thank you so much, this was driving me crazy!! Glad to hear it is a butterfly as this is my first year to raise and release the Monarch butterfly.
Thank you again

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: monarchs
Location: Westhampton Beach, NY
November 13, 2016 8:47 am
Dear Bugman,
I planted lots of butterfly weed in my yard & had so many monarch caterpillars this year! But now it is cold here in the northeast (east end of Long Island, NY) and I still see some. The problem is, the plants are dying and the caterpillars don’t have much to eat. Is there a way to save the larvae? There is one chrysalis hanging on a dead leaf. You can already see the wings inside. Will this hatch successfully & fly south? Thanks.
Signature: Elaine

Prepupal Monarch Caterpillar

Prepupal Monarch Caterpillar

Hi Elaine,
Alas, we cannot state with any certainty that your soon to emerge Monarch will successfully complete its migration voyage.  In nature’s effort to preserve populations, and because of the uncertainty of weather, insects may continue to reproduce past the time that they would complete metamorphosis before inclement weather begins.  From year to year, that date changes.  Like you, we will hope for the best.  If you cannot feed the larvae on milkweed, we don’t think your existing caterpillars will survive.

Thanks so much for your quick response.  I’ll see if I can find some local “weed” to feed them!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: moth?
Location: Vancouver BC Canada
October 29, 2016 9:56 am
They seem to be stationary over 2 days, they seem not to have even moved
I am an arborist and found them on a young ash tree, could they be feeding on the sap?
They are about 2 inches or 5 cm long and the photo taken in late October 2016
Signature: Richard Lange

Swallowtail Chrysalis

Swallowtail Chrysalis

Dear Richard,
This is the Chrysalis of a Swallowtail Butterfly in the genus
Papilio.  Since you are an arborist and you were able to identify the tree, we suspect this is the Chrysalis of a Pale Swallowtail, a species with a caterpillar that feeds on the leaves of Ash and other trees, and that ranges in your area.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on foliage of woody plants in several families: Rosaceae (cherry, e.g., Prunus emarginata, Holly-leaved Cherry, Prunus ilicifolia), Rhamnaceae (California Coffee-berry, Rhamnus californica, Ceanothus spp.), Oleaceae (ash, Fraxinus) and Betulaceae. Overwinters as pupa, adults emerge in spring. Males seek hilltops for mating.”  Based on the BugGuide information, you will have to wait for spring to see the adult Pale Swallowtail emerge.

Thank you so much for your fast reply
Kind Regards
Richard Lange – Tree MD®

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: id this catepiller
Location: central AZ
October 13, 2016 10:28 am
found on an ash tree in central AZ at 5200′
Any ideas?
Signature: ??with love??

Two-Tailed Swallowtail Caterpillar

Two-Tailed Swallowtail Caterpillar

This is one of the Tiger Swallowtail Caterpillars, and there are several different species with similar looking caterpillars found in Arizona.  Since you were able to provide the food plant, the ash tree, we have determined that this is a Two-Tailed Swallowtail Caterpillar, Papilio multicaudata, and we verified the food plant on Butterflies and Moths of North America.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Catipillar identification
Location: Cape Town
October 14, 2016 2:13 am
Hi there. I have found a few of these on my lime tree. I was wondering what they are and what type of moth/butterfly they will become.
I live in Sunningdale, Cape Town. It’s October now and it’s the first time I have ever seen them.
When touched they produce a forked shaped protrusion from their head and secrete a clear liquid. They are still quite small and I’ve only found three so far.
Signature: Tamlyn

Citrus Swallowtail Caterpillars

Citrus Swallowtail Caterpillars

Dear Tamlyn,
These are Citrus Swallowtail Caterpillars, and there are several species that go by that common name.  We found this matching image on Alamy, but it is not identified to the species level.  
Papilio demodocus is one species called a Citrus Swallowtail, and it is pictured on BioDiversity Explorer, but there are no early instar caterpillars pictured. We also located a matching image on iSpot.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: identification
Location: Tucson, AZ
October 6, 2016 6:04 pm
Dear Bugman,
I am submitting a few photos of insects for identification. They were taken between October 1 and 4 2016 in our community garden in Tucson, AZ.
Image 1 I believe to be a bee fly, perhaps of genus Exoprosopa.
Image 2. is a caterpillar (Sulphur of some sort?) on Lindheimers Senna
Image 3 fairly large sized ants
I would be very happy if you could identify the insets in these photos that I would like to share with my fellow gardeners.
Thanks very much!
Signature: Melody

Cloudless Sulphur Caterpillar

Cloudless Sulphur Caterpillar

Dear Melody,
Unless there is a good reason, like a predator/prey relationship, we tend to confine our postings to a single species, or closely related species for classification purposes on our site.  We will be dealing with your identification requests one at a time.  The caterpillar is that of a Cloudless Sulphur,
Phoebis sennae, which you can verify by comparing your image to this BugGuide image.  The caterpillars are found in both a yellow and green form, with the yellow caterpillars feeding on blossoms and the green ones feeding on leaves.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination