Currently viewing the category: "Caterpillars and Pupa"
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Subject: Got bit
Location: Belleville, Ontario, Canada
June 29, 2016 10:41 am
Hi,
I got stung… bit? by this caterpillar. I tried looking online and I think it is a gypsy moth caterpillar but I have no idea if that’s correct or not. I am really hoping its not going to be anything serious. It was in Belleville, Ontario end of June. So far I am only seeing a red bump where it bit or stung me and a little rash around the area, but its only been 20 minutes. Hope you can help identify.
Signature: Melissa

Gypsy Moth Caterpillar

Gypsy Moth Caterpillar

Dear Melissa,
Based on this BugGuide image, we concur that you have correctly identified a Gypsy Moth Caterpillar,
Lymantria disparBugGuide does not mention stinging or urticating hairs, but according to the Penn State University Entomology Department:  “Some people are dermally allergic to the caterpillars. The urticating hairs cause skin rashes on some humans. This is most noticeable in May when larvae are small. Children appear to be more prone to this problem than adults.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillars
Location: Anvik, Alaska
June 24, 2016 3:32 am
Hello im from Alaska and we just noticed all these caterpillars everything eating up all the leaves off of willows and trees.. It’s very on common for these to be around here. There trillions of them everything I mean every where. Please let us know if u know what they are. This spring there were millions of Moths flying around that was very weird and wasn’t common at all.
Signature: Kelly Kruger

Sawfly Larvae or Caterpillars???

Sawfly Larvae or Caterpillars???

Dear Kelly,
Alas, there is not enough detail in your images to tell for certain if these are Caterpillars, or as we suspect, Sawfly Larvae.  According to Insects.About.com:  “Caterpillars are the larvae of butterflies and moths, which belong to the order Lepidoptera. Sawfly larvae look similar to caterpillars, but are an entirely different kind of insect. Sawflies are related to bees and wasps, and belong to the order Hymenoptera. Like caterpillars, sawfly larvae usually feed on plant foliage.  How can you tell the difference between a sawfly larva and a caterpillar? Count the prolegs. Caterpillars may have up to five pairs of abdominal prolegs (see parts of a caterpillar diagram), but never have more than five pairs.  Sawfly larvae will have six or more pairs of abdominal prolegs*. Another notable difference, though it requires a closer look, is that caterpillars have tiny hooks called crochets, on the ends of their prolegs. Sawflies don’t.  Another, less obvious difference between caterpillars and sawfly larvae is the number of eyes.  Caterpillars almost always have 12 stemmata, 6 on each side of the head. Sawfly larvae usually have just a single pair of stemmata.”  In two of your images, the camera is entirely too far away to see individual detail in these larvae.  In the one close-up image, the largest larva is partially out of focus, and the only other larva that can be viewed clearly is half cut off at the top of the frame.  We wish we could count the prolegs, though it really seems to us that there appears to be six pairs, which would make these Sawfly Larvae and not Caterpillars, but again, the image is too blurry at that critical part of the anatomy that we cannot be certain.  Additionally, we can find no images online of either Caterpillars or Sawfly Larvae that have this particular coloration and markings.  The jury is still out on your identification request.  Can you return to the willows and get a higher resolution, sharper image? or can you count the prolegs and get back to us?

Sawfly Larvae or Caterpillars???

Sawfly Larvae or Caterpillars???

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Subject: Possible Silkworm or Hornworm?
Location: Marquette, MI
June 23, 2016 5:03 pm
I had come across a very plump caterpillar when letting my dogs outside. It was on a beach tree, and looked to be in the process of forming a chrysalis, as it was hanging upside-down. It was/ is approximately between 1- 2 long, and is green. It’s face is also green, and has: a continuous white stripe on each side of its body; yellow dashes on it’s back; and three prominent yellow dashed lines going down it’s back. It does have a tail, and has an end that looks similar to a tail-less Silkworm and/ or Hornworm. Overall, this Caterpillar seems to have a build similar to a Silkworm and Hornworm.
I live in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, which mostly consists of rain forests, and is surrounded by Lake Superior, Lake Michigan, and Lake Huron. Because of these factors, we get a lot of bugs
Signature: – Sam

Humped Green Fruitworm

Humped Green Fruitworm

Dear Sam,
This is neither a Silkworm nor a Hornworm.  This is a Humped Green Fruitworm, the larva of the Copper Underwing,
Amphipyra pyramidoides.

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Subject: Colorado Caterpillar
Location: 11 mile Canyon outside of Lake George, Colorado
June 23, 2016 8:10 am
Hey Bugman!
I have no idea what kind of caterpillar this is! Or what kind of moth/butterfly it will become. I tried all of my bug books and online resources.
This little guy was found in 11 mile Canyon in Colorado.
Thank you!
Signature: Frankie

Barberry Geometer

Colorful Inchworm:  Meris alticola perhaps

Dear Frankie,
Because of the reduced number of prolegs, your caterpillar is easily identified as an Inchworm or Spanworm in the family Geometridae, though its colorful markings make it unusual in that family, most of whose members have caterpillars that are green or brown and effectively mimic twigs.  At first we thought we had correctly identified your Inchworm as a Barberry Looper or Barberry Geometer,
Coryphista meadii, based on this BugGuide image, but we remembered identifying a similar Inchworm in the past and we could not find one in our archives.  We searched our archives for “colorful Inchworm” and we found this posting of Meris paradoxa that looks possible as well, but the species is only reported from Southern Arizona according to BugGuide.  The related and similar looking Meris alticola is also pictured on BugGuide, and it is reported on BugGuide from Colorado, so of the three, our money is on Meris alticola

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Subject: What is it?
Location: Jackson, Wyoming
June 19, 2016 4:57 pm
Can you identify this?
Signature: Don’t care

Fall Webworms

Fall Webworms

These are Fall Webworms, Hyphantria cunea.  According to BugGuide:  “Weblike tents in branch tips where clusters of caterpillars strip foliage (by contrast, eastern tent caterpillar nests are built in tree crotches)” and “Larvae feed on foliage throughout their development, and secrete silk which they spin into small webs. As they grow, they enlarge the webs, which can sometimes enclose the entire tree. Even severe infestations have little impact on trees because the damage occurs near the end of the annual growing season. Except in the case of ornamental trees, control is seldom necessary because the damage is generally of aesthetic rather than economic importance.”  BugGuide also notes:  “About 120 species of hardwood trees have been recorded as larval hosts in the north, common hosts include alder, apple, ash, birch, Box-Elder (Acer negundo), cherry, elm, mulberry, poplar, willow in the south, common hosts include ash, hickory, maple, mulberry, oak, pecan, poplar, redbud, sweetgum, walnut, willow; preferences for different host plant species appear to be regional and seasonal.”

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Subject: Caterpillar
Location: Pennsylvania
June 14, 2016 3:49 pm
Found these in our garden on a dill plant, there’s about 10 of them and we don’t know what they are or if they will harm the plants. Thanks!
Signature: Marissa

Black Swallowtail Caterpillars

Black Swallowtail Caterpillars

Dear Marissa
These are Black Swallowtail Caterpillars,
Papilio polyxenes, and they are sometimes called Carrot Worms or Parsley Worms because they feed on the foliage of carrots and related plants, including parsley and dill.  They will eventually mature into gorgeous Black Swallowtail Butterflies.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination