Currently viewing the category: "Caterpillars and Pupa"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what is this?
Location: Putnam, CT 06260
August 26, 2015 1:20 pm
We found 2 of these caterpillars today (August 26,2015) in Putnam, CT while we were trimming bushes. The crew is very curious what they are as none of us had ever seen anything like it before. Each one was about 5 inches long and they were eating a vine-like weed growing inside a forsythia bush. We found them between 11:00 AM and 1:00PM.
Everyone also wanted to know if they were poisonous. It looks like there are barbs or stingers on the body, guessing for protection?
Thank you do your help! Hope to hear back from you.
Signature:  Steve Gallant and The Crew at Eclipse Landscaping

Cecropia Moth Caterpillar

Cecropia Moth Caterpillar

Dear Steve and Crew,
Your impressive caterpillars are Cecropia Moth Caterpillars, and the fleshy protuberances are not barbs or stingers.  Cecropia Moth Caterpillars pose no threat to humans.  Your large individuals have probably attained maximum growth and they will soon spin a cocoon and molt into a pupa that will overwinter, with the adult Cecropia Moth emerging next spring.  We are very curious what vine they were feeding upon, because according to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on leaves of various trees and shrubs including alder, apple, ash, beech, birch, box-elder, cherry, dogwood, elm, gooseberry, maple, plum, poplar, white oak, willow. may also feed on lilac and tamarack.”

Cecropia Moth Caterpillar

Cecropia Moth Caterpillar

 

Brooklynn Claire, Katie Pasulka Casas, Melissa Cooley, Aundrea Murillo-Faynik, Mary Lemmink Lawrence, Melanie Conover, Mike Maxwell, Sue Dougherty, Jessica M. Schemm, Garden Geek, LLC, Claire Kooyman liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Swallowtail?
Location: Milpa Alta, Mexico
August 28, 2015 1:26 pm
About 4 inches long
Picture taken Aug 14, 2015
Signature: Leo Perez

Hornworm from Mexico

Hornworm from Mexico

Hi Leo,
This is not a Swallowtail caterpillar.  It is a Hornworm, the caterpillar of a Sphinx Moth in the family Sphingidae, but we have still not been able to identify it to the species level.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s that caterpillar
Location: North Carolina
August 27, 2015 7:19 am
Hi Bugman! I love your site! I used you years ago and remembered you today when my daughter found this caterpillar. I was pleasantly suprised that you are still online. Thank you! She found this in Chapel Hill, North Carolina when weeding her garden. She only noticed it because it jagged or stung her arm. Not sure what it was feeding on. Thank you for your time.
Signature: Marsha

Saddleback Caterpillar

Saddleback Caterpillar

Dear Marsha,
The stinging capabilities of the Saddleback Caterpillar,
Acharia stimulea, are well documented online including on Featured Creatures where it states:  “The saddleback caterpillar is encountered most frequently as a medically significant pest, and has minor effects in landscaping and agriculture.”

Jen Nay, Mary Lemmink Lawrence, Sandra Elsner liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Are these wasp larvae on a laurel sphinx caterpillar?
Location: Michigan
August 27, 2015 6:21 pm
I found this intriguing caterpillar today, and I think it is a laurel sphinx caterpillar. But what are those things on its back? Could those be wasp larvae?
Signature: J. McGuire

Laurel Sphinx Caterpillar with Parasites

Laurel Sphinx Caterpillar with Parasites

Dear J. McGuire,
We agree that this is a Laurel Sphinx Caterpillar, and it does appear to have parasites, however, the parasitoid looks very different from the typical Braconid infestation pictured on Featured Creatures that is typically seen on the Laurel Sphinx and other Hornworms.  We will continue to try to locate a similar looking image and try to identify the species of Parasitoid.

Kimberly Wochele, Tynisha Koenigsaecker, Sue Dougherty, Mary Lemmink Lawrence liked this post
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Subject: Striped caterpillar
Location: Prince Edward County, Ontario, Canada
August 26, 2015 6:11 am
Any clue as to what this is going to turn into?
Signature: Susan

Black Swallowtail Caterpillar

Black Swallowtail Caterpillar

Dear Susan,
This is a Black Swallowtail Caterpillar, and we suspect that parsley, carrots or some other related plant was found in the immediate vicinity of the sighting.

Many thanks – what wonderful service.  I’m so glad I moved the caterpillar out of harm’s way!  We have lots of Queen Anne’s Lace nearby….
Goddess of Chuckery Hill

Aundrea Murillo-Faynik, Sue Dougherty, Ann Levitsky, Paula Mullen, Mary Lemmink Lawrence liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar
Location: southern ontario
August 25, 2015 6:41 pm
thought this might be a eastern swallowtail tiger but it’s black. Any help much appreciated.
Signature: Susan

Tiger Swallowtail Caterpillar

Tiger Swallowtail Caterpillar

Dear Susan,
We cannot begin to speculate if this is an Eastern Tiger Swallowtail Caterpillar or a Canadian Tiger Swallowtail Caterpillar, and we suspect DNA analysis might be needed to determine its exact taxonomy.  Tiger Swallowtail Caterpillars often change from green to orange or purple as they are getting ready to transform into a chrysalis, and they also leave the trees whose leaves they were feeding upon in search of an ideal location for pupation.  In light of the variation in color of Tiger Swallowtails, from light to dark and in between, and even more strangely because of the presence of gynandromorphs, the correct term for an hermaphrodite, we can’t help but to wonder if the especially dark coloration of your individual might lead to a variation in the adult Tiger Swallowtail.

A duplicate sighting
Subject: Caterpillar
Location: MacTier, Ontario, Canada
August 25, 2015 10:19 am
Found this caterpillar on the greens at Rocky Crest Golf Course in MacTier, Ontario (CANADA). Would like to know what it is. Thanks.
Signature: Tricia McLelland

Dear Tricia,
This exact image was submitted by Susan and we responded.

Funny, as it was me who discovered it and took the photo. I have no idea who Susan is. Thanks.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination