Currently viewing the category: "Caterpillars and Pupa"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beautiful caterpillar
Location: In between Fernan Saddle and Wolf Lodge Creek
July 5, 2015 10:58 am
Sooo….were out huckleberry picking on Independence Day and my daughter says “Dad, check out this cool caterpillar I found”. I walk over to her and to my amazement find the coolest Independence Day caterpillar ever! It’s got red spikes, blue spikes, and white dots and they look like fire works too!
Signature: Joe Hitz

Ceanothus Silkmoth Caterpillar, we believe

Ceanothus Silkmoth Caterpillar, we believe

Dear Joe,
Your images are spectacular.  While we are certain your caterpillar is a Giant Silkmoth Caterpillar in the genus Hyalophora, we are not certain if it will become a Ceanothus Silkmoth or a Columbia Silkmoth as both species have very similar looking caterpillars.  We are leaning toward the Ceanothus Silkmoth Caterpillar,
Hyalophora euryalus, and according to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on a number of trees and shrubs, including Red Alder (Alnus rubra), birch, Antelope Bitterbrush (Purshia tridentata), buckthorn (Rhamnus), Buffaloberry (Sheperdia canadensis), Ceanothus species, cherry, gooseberry (Ribes), Hardhack (Spiraea douglasii), hazel, Madrone (Arbutus menziesii), manzanita (Arctostaphylos), Mountain Mahogany (Cercocarpus betuloides), Mountain Maple (Acer glabrum), rose, Saskatoon Serviceberry (Amelanchier alnifolia), willow (Salix), and occasionally Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii).”  According to BugGuide, the caterpillar:  “changes colors as it develops and molts; mid instars are the most brilliantly colored with nine pairs of dorsal yellow spines, the first three pairs with partial to complete black rings; a middorsal yellow spine on A8; two rows of lateral blue spines tipped with white along T1-A8; white-tipped blue spines also occur on the head, at the base of the true legs, and in the anal region; body ranges from green to whitish-green  later instars whitish-green with white spines.”  You can see examples of both species on BugGuide, but your individual is more brightly colored than most of the images posted there.  We will try to contact Bill Oehlke to see if he can determine the species.

Ceanothus Silkmoth Caterpillar, we believe

Ceanothus Silkmoth Caterpillar, we believe

Bill Oehlke Responds
Daniel,
Idaho is a big state. It seems most like Hyalophora [euryalus] kasloensis. A more precise location would help.
There is also a hybrid zone in Idaho.
Very nice images. My first choice would have to be kasloensis, although this may only be third instar.
Bill

Thanks Bill.  the location is:  “In between Fernan Saddle and Wolf Lodge Creek”

Daniel,
Based on location it is Hyalophora euryalus, the ceanothus silkmoth.
Please see if I can get permission to post images. I suspect it is third instar.
Bill

Ceanothus Silkmoth Caterpillar, we believe

Ceanothus Silkmoth Caterpillar, we believe

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Space alien or slug?
Location: Western pennsylvania
July 4, 2015 2:37 pm
July 4th found crawling under grill cover.
Sewickley , PA suburb of Pittsburgh
Signature: Johnnie dex

Tiger Swallowtail Caterpillar with Osmeterium

Tiger Swallowtail Caterpillar with Osmeterium

Dear Johnnie dex,
This is a Tiger Swallowtail Caterpillar, and it will eventually become an adult Tiger Swallowtail, a large yellow and black striped butterfly.  Your individual has everted its osmeterium, the forked organ that emits a foul odor, acting as a defense mechanism when the caterpillar feels threatened.

Thank you Daniel,
I had also identified the caterpillar as that of a tiger swallowtail. Although sorta creepy
looking I’m glad I left the caterpillar alone to go its way as eventually a butterfly may result.
Thank you for your quick response.
John

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Caterpillar
Location: Independence MO (KCMO area)
July 3, 2015 6:52 pm
My family and I found this guy on our hosta plant leaf tonight (July 3rd). I’ve spent all night searching the internet looking for WHAT kind of caterpillar it is and have found nothing even similar! Can you please help?!?
Signature: Joey Phillips

Possibly Tolype Caterpillar

Possibly Tolype Caterpillar

Dear Joey,
This is a Lappet Moth Caterpillar in the family Lasiocampidae, probably in the subfamily Macromphaliinae, and possibly a Large Tolype,
Tolype vellada, based on this image posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on leaves of a variety of broadleaf trees and shrubs. Wagner lists ‘apple, ash, aspen, basswood, beech, birch, cherry, oak and other woody plants.'”  Do any of those trees grow near your Hosta?  Hosta is not a host plant and we believe the caterpillar might have fallen from the tree or that it might be searching for an ideal location to commence pupation.

Lappet Moth Caterpillar

Lappet Moth Caterpillar

Daniel,
Thank you so much for your timely response! Very interesting, although I was hoping we had discovered something here! One of our giant ash trees hang over the hosta plants, so that would explain where he may have fallen from. I have not been able to locate him this morning. Please feel free to post, as I was unable to find ANYTHING similar during my wide internet search. Is it in a certain ‘stage’ perhaps?
Joey

This looks like a large individual, and as we mentioned earlier, it may be looking for a location to pupate.

Lappet Moth Caterpillar may be Large Tolype

Lappet Moth Caterpillar may be Large Tolype

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What will emerge?
Location: Santa Cruz, CA [Latitude: 36° 58′ 16.998″ N, Longitude: 122° 2′ 36″ W]
June 11, 2015 5:07 pm
My daughter noticed the cocoon shown in the attached pictures. What will emerge?
Signature: Daniel & Sophia

Anise Swallowtail Chrysalis

Anise Swallowtail Chrysalis

Dear Daniel and Sophia,
We believe your chrysalis belongs to an Anise Swallowtail based on its similarity to this image posted to B
ugGuide.

Tonette DeGioia, Cecilia Suárez Clements, Heather Duggan-Christensen, Sue Dougherty liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large caterpillar
Location: Natural Bridge, VA
June 10, 2015 4:23 pm
Hi – saw this guy crossing our path today. Any idea what it is? Thanks in anticipation.
Signature: Andy

Tiger Swallowtail Caterpillar

Tiger Swallowtail Caterpillar

Dear Andy,
This Tiger Swallowtail Caterpillar will eventually metamorphose into a beautiful yellow and black striped Tiger Swallowtail.

Ann Levitsky, Heather Duggan-Christensen, Sandra StCloud Johnson, Tip Crawford liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this creature
Location: Atlanta,Georgia
June 5, 2015 10:36 am
I saw this in my driveway one afternoon inching crawling and I have no idea what it is it looks like a worm and has what seems like a tongue and eyes, we live in the south Atlanta,ga this occured early June.
Signature: Please help me I’d love to know

Tiger Swallowtail Caterpillar

Tiger Swallowtail Caterpillar

This is the caterpillar of a Tiger Swallowtail, and what you have mistaken for a tongue is a retractable organ called an osmeterium that gives off a foul odor.  The odor coupled with the false eyes may give predatory birds the illusion that the tasty caterpillar is actually a much larger snake that could be dangerous to a bird.  Your submission will post live to our site later in June while we are away on holiday.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination