Currently viewing the category: "Caterpillars and Pupa"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Can’t identify this caterpillar
Location: Athens Georgia
August 28, 2016 10:07 pm
Ok so I have spent about an hour and a half trying to I this caterpillar and the closest thing I can find is an orange striped oak worm BUT this is not orange, has a tighter paternity and is smoother. The top lines are white and turn yellow towards the legs. It has one set of horns and multiple small pounds on its tail. Also it has a red marking on both sides of the tail at the bottom near legs. These things are devouring my maple tree and have turned the concrete on my patio black
Signature: Tony Bowers

Green Striped Mapleworm

Green Striped Mapleworm

Dear Tony,
We found an image of a Green Striped Mapleworm on the Post and Courier website, and we then researched that on BugGuide where we learned this is the caterpillar of the lovely Rosy Maple Moth,
Dryocampa rubicunda.  According to the Forest Insect & Disease Leaflet 77:  “The green-striped mapleworm (Anisota rubicunda (Fab.) ), a native of North America, is distributed widely throughout the eastern half of the United States and the southern parts of adjacent Canadian Provinces. Its southern range extends from the Carolina coast to the gulf coast in Alabama and Mississippi. It has been recorded as far west as Nebraska and Kansas.  The insect causes heavy defolia­tion throughout its range but is most destructive near its southwestern limits.”  You should note that the genus name is incorrect in the latter link.  Though we have numerous images of the adult Rosy Maple Moth on our site, we believe this may be a first for the Green Striped Mapleworm.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pretty Worm
Location: Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic
August 29, 2016 5:46 am
I saw this huhe worm in the park in the Colonial Zone of Santo Domingo Dominican Republic. It was about the length of my large hand and a bout as fat as my fat thumb. It also had a decent weight to it. I moved t under a tree so it would be some what safe. Do you know what it is?
Signature: Dominican Gringa

Fig Sphinx Caterpillar

Fig Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Dominican Gringa,
This impressive caterpillar is a Fig Sphinx Caterpillar,
Pachylia ficus , a species that can be quite variable in coloration.  According to the Sphingidae of the Americas “Larvae pupate in cocoons spun amongst leaf litter” and finding it on the ground indicates it is probably seeking an appropriate location to begin metamorphosis.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Green caterpillar
Location: Brentwood Bay, south Vancouver Island
August 24, 2016 7:28 pm
This green beauty is about 3 inches long.
Just happened to see it on japanese maple.
We dont know how long it been there….August 24, 2016
Signature: R Laird

Polyphemus Caterpillar

Polyphemus Caterpillar

Dear R Laird,
This magnificent caterpillar is a Polyphemus Moth Caterpillar, one of the Giant Silkmoths.  It is the most wide ranging North American species, and it is reported from all 48 continental United States as well as much of Canada.  The adult Polyphemus Moth is one of the species with eyespots on the underwings that have evolved to fool predators into perceiving a much larger, and potentially threatening creature.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Help identify this caterpillar
Location: Cranberry Portage, Manitoba
August 25, 2016 7:05 pm
My husband took this photo of a caterpillar in Cranberry Portage, Manitoba. I’m not sure if its a type of Tussock Caterpillar. Wondering what type of caterpillar and if you have a photo of the moth or butterfly it will turn into. This photo was taken in August 2016. Thank you :)
Signature: Wildlife Lover

Fingered Dagger Caterpillar

Fingered Dagger Caterpillar

Dear Wildlife Lover,
We are certain your caterpillar is that of the Fingered Dagger Moth,
Acronicta dactylina, based on this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “larvae feed on alder, birch, poplar, hawthorn, willow.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Camouflage Looper?
Location: Tulsa, Oklahoma
August 25, 2016 10:43 pm
Hi — Love your site — thanks for all your work. I found this little guy while I was taking photos at a pond near Tulsa, OK, a few weeks ago. At first I couldn’t figure out what it was because it was in the pink tufts of the flower. But then, I used a blade of grass to coax it out on to a leaf. Once it stretched out, I could see it was an inchworm. I’d never seen one like this before!!
Do you know if the “camouflage” bits get stuck on passively as the inchworm crawls around, or does the worm actively attach them?
Thanks,
Signature: Terrie

Camouflaged Looper

Camouflaged Looper

Dear Terrie,
Thanks for the compliment and thanks for sending in your awesome images of a Camouflaged Looper,
Synchlora aerata, or another member of the genus.  According to BugGuide:  “Caterpillar adorns its body with plant fragments, usually flower petals, to camouflage it as it feeds. It is the only widespread species to do so(2), but from Maryland southwards other Synchlora spp. are also present and only raising to adulthood can yield a definite caterpillar ID.”  We suspect the caterpillar uses silk to attach the flower bits to its body.

Camouflaged Looper

Camouflaged Looper

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: weird big thing
Location: south eastern Pennsylvania
August 27, 2016 6:01 pm
this was found on my neighbors house, we live in the suburbs and her house is backed up against the woods, I don’t know if any of that helps… but if you could identify this for me I’m quite curious!
Signature: Karen

Probably Spicebush Swallowtail Chrysalis

Probably Spicebush Swallowtail Chrysalis

Dear Karen,
This is the chrysalis of a Swallowtail Butterfly, and we believe it belongs to a Spicebush Swallowtail based on comparing your image to this BugGuide image.  According to Featured Creatures:  “Pupae: Pupae have two anterior “horns”. Pupae from larvae developing under long photoperiods may be either green (Figure 9) or brown (Figure 10). All pupae from short photoperiod larvae (diapause pupae) are brown. Within the last 24 hours prior to adult emergence, the pre-adult gradually becomes visible through the transparent pupal cuticle.”

Spicebush Swallowtail Chrysalis

Spicebush Swallowtail Chrysalis

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination