Currently viewing the category: "Caterpillars and Pupa"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: pink & green horned caterpillar
Location: Colorado
July 29, 2015 3:43 pm
Well hes mostly green and pink on top, his face is scary looking haha. He has a spike or horn on his tail side. He dosnt have anything else. No spots or stripes. I wanna take a pic with him on my face but im scared hes poisonous. Please hurry haha and i probably wont check my email if that applys at all.
Signature: idk

Waved Sphinx Hornworm

Waved Sphinx Hornworm

Dear idk,
This is a Hornworm, the caterpillar of a Sphinx Moth in the family Sphingidae, and we believe it is a Waved Sphinx Hornworm,
Ceratomia undulosa, that has turned pink as a sign it is preparing to pupate.  See the image on the Sphingidae of the Americas site, scrolling down.  It is not poisonous, and we eagerly await the image of you posing with this juicy guy.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this catapillar
Location: Vestal center ny
July 27, 2015 8:49 am
My kids saw this yesterday in vestal center, New York, which is near Binghamton n y. It was four inches long, brown in color violet dots like a collar yellow giant eyes with a violet dot in the middle,a forked yellow tongue and funky psychedelic colors down its back
Signature: Abby binder

Tiger Swallowtail Caterpillar with Osmeterium

Tiger Swallowtail Caterpillar with Osmeterium

Dear Abby,
This is a Tiger Swallowtail Caterpillar and it has extracted its osmeterium, a forked organ that produces a foul odor to deter predators.  What you have mistaken for “yellow giant eyes” are actually spots that resemble eyes, another defense mechanism to protect the docile caterpillar against predators.

Thank you so much….kids thrilled!

Ann Levitsky, Andrea Leonard Drummond, Sue Dougherty, Mary Lemmink Lawrence, Kitty Heidih liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: ID Stinging Slug Caterpillar, MD, USA
Location: Northern Baltimore County, Maryland, USA
July 25, 2015 5:09 pm
Can someone ID this caterpillar found this week in northern Baltimore County, MD, USA? It was found on a winterberry holly bush (Ilex species). I suspect that it’s a stinging slug caterpillar of some kind, but I can’t find a species that that matches the coloration.
Signature: K Smith

Spiny Oak Slug Caterpillar

Spiny Oak Slug Caterpillar

Dear K Smith,
The coloration of the Spiny Oak Slug Caterpillar,
Euclea delphinii, appears to have considerable variation.  This image from BugGuide is quite close to your individual.

Ann Levitsky, Mary Lemmink Lawrence, Sue Dougherty, Kitty Heidih liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug Identification
Location: Central Victoria, Australia
July 24, 2015 7:54 pm
Hi, just curious about what this little guy might be – and I do mean little – I could barely see him with the naked eye. It is maybe 3mm long, and was found on a gum leaf, with what MIGHT have been eggs embedded in the leaf. Or not. Thanks :-)
Signature: Ann Jeffree

Painted Cup Moth Caterpillar

Painted Cup Moth Caterpillar

Dear Ann,
This is a Painted Cup Moth Caterpillar,
Doratiphora oxleyi, one of the Slug Caterpillars in the family Limacodidae.  Many members of this family have stinging spines and there is a really nice image on FlickR.  You can read more about the Painted Cup Moth Caterpillar on the Butterfly House website where it states:  “Each shield bears four tubercles. Yellow stinging hairs are protruded from these when the Caterpillar is disturbed. These fold into triangular pockets when the Caterpillar is relaxed.  Along the sides of the caterpillar are fleshy spikes, like a skirt. There is also a flap covering the head. The spikes are translucent, and can be reddish or yellowish. The front pair are especially likely to be red. The caterpillars move like slugs because their legs are reduced.  The caterpillars feed on a variety of: Gum Trees.”  Though we have no shortage of family members on our site, your image is a new species for our archives.

Thanks very much for your reply Daniel. I’m pleased to have been able to send
you a new family member for your files. I will look out for a Painted Moth in
the Spring and see if I can add further to your database.

:-) Ann

Melanie Conover, Alisha Bragg, Andrea Leonard Drummond, Kitty Heidih, Sue Dougherty, Mary Lemmink Lawrence liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cocoon?
Location: Southern California (South Orange County)
July 23, 2015 11:16 am
We noticed this strange creature on our pro shop window. Any help identifying it would be wonderful.
Signature: TGC

Cabbage White Chrysalis

Cabbage White Chrysalis

Dear TGC,
This is the chrysalis of a Cabbage White.

Sue Dougherty liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: we found sonething
Location: in the backyard in blackpool lancs uk
July 21, 2015 12:28 pm
My son found a bug and we don’t know what it is. We would like u to look at our picture and let is know what it is please.
Signature: normal

Puss Moth Caterpillar

Puss Moth Caterpillar

Dear normal,
Thanks an image on FlickR, we were able to identify this Prominent Moth Caterpillar as
Cerura vinula, the Puss Moth Caterpillar.  According to UK Moths:  “Named after the cat-like appearance of the adult moth, this species is fairly common throughout most of Britain.  The striking caterpillar feeds on aspen (Populus tremula) as well as poplar (Populus spp.) and willow (Salix spp.). When disturbed, it raises its head and waves the twin tails, which have pinkish extendable flagellae.”  This species should not be confused with the North American Puss Moth, which is in a different family, the Flannel Moths, but we embarked upon our identification based on the resemblance your caterpillar has to the North American Prominent Moth Caterpillars in the genus Heterocampa.

Jessica M. Schemm, Sue Dougherty, Andrea Leonard Drummond liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination