Currently viewing the category: "Caddisflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: brown buggy
Location: Southeastern Michigan
August 15, 2014 8:29 pm
I found this floating in a casserole dish in my sink today. I just can’t pinpoint it! I recently found a masked hunter adult in my house and am on edge about all our six legged and more friends.
Signature: confused

Caddisfly

Caddisfly

Dear confused,
This Caddisfly in the order Trichoptera is perfectly harmless.  Adult Caddisflies are sometimes confuse with moths which they superficially resemble.  Caddisflies have aquatic larvae known as Caseworms because they build shelters.

Caddisfly

Caddisfly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknoown Bugs
Location: Charlotte area (Ft. Mill, SC)
August 15, 2014 11:19 am
Hi. I know your busy, but I have two bugs I just can identify.
Image #1 is a brown turtle-shaped bug. Found at the edge of a pond. It is about nickel size.
Image #2 is a bug that was attracted to a naight light.
Both were photographed in the Jul-Aug period this year in the Charlotte (NC) area.
Thanks. No rush in geting an answer.
Signature: Dr. Danny O. Crew

Zebra Caddisfly

Zebra Caddisfly

Dear Dr. Crew,
Your first bug is some species of Stink Bug, and we will attempt to be more specific in the future, but your second image has us very excited.  We did not know how to begin to classify this winged insect with such extremely long antennae, but diligent searching eventually led us to the Zebra Caddisfly,
Macrostemum zebratum, on BugGuide.  Caddisfly larvae are aquatic, and the adults are not strong fliers, so they are generally found near water.  As you indicated, adult Zebra Caddisflies are attracted to light.  This is a new species for our site.

Thanks. I do live on a large pond.  As for the stink bug?, that was my first thought; however, it looked more like a beetle/turtle and was thick with a very round shell. I’ve never seen a stink bug like that. Also it was larger than most I’ve seen. I’ll await your research.

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Subject: Just bit me!!
Location: Medford, NJ
July 28, 2014 10:33 am
This bug bit me get I see no pincers or stingers. It has long antenna, long skinny wings, a short body and is greyish in color.
Signature: Anne Marie

Caddisfly

Caddisfly

Dear Anne Marie,
This looks to us like a Caddisfly in the order Trichoptera, and we would challenge your belief that it stung or bit you.  Most Caddisflies do not have functional mouthparts, and they do not feed as adults.  According to BugGuide:  “Some adults take liquid food, such as nectar, others do not feed.”  They do not possess stingers either.  Is it possible that you have mistaken this Caddisfly for the creature that bit you?

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: unknown caddisfly
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
June 2, 2014 6:14 pm
I know that this is a caddisfly, any idea what genus or even species? Do you have any good resources that are user friendly in regards to identifying caddisflies?
Signature: Gary Yankech

Caddisfly

Caddisfly

Dear Gary,
This is a marvelous image of a mothlike Caddisfly, but we don’t know its species, we find the identification of Caddisflies to the species level to be something outside of the range of our present abilities, and we don’t know a Trichopterist.  We will do a quick look on BugGuide to see if anything jumps out at us.  Both this similar looking individual on BugGuide and this similar looking individual on BugGuide are only identified to the order Trichoptera.

Update and Offer to identify Caddisflies:  July 27, 2014
Subject: trichoptera ID
Website: ncwildlife.com
July 27, 2014 6:40 am
Hi bug people!
I love your site, just stumbled on to it trying to get info in phoretic mites on a Holoptera beetle I found yesterday.
While perusing your site, I noticed several partially IDed caddisflies and the statement that you don’t currently know a trichopterist.  Well, I don’t lay claim to the title trichoperist these days, but I’ve spent many years studying them, have many identification resources on hand, and still quite a bit of personal memory about many caddisflies.  I’m also still personally connected to and correspond with many of the the few working trichoperists in the US.  I also co-authored a checklist of caddisflies of Tennessee several years ago (Etnier, D.A., J.T. Baxter, S.J. Fraley, and C.R. Parker. 1998. A checklist of the caddisflies of Tennessee. Journal of the Tennessee Academy of Science 73:53–72.).  I’m currently a working aquatic biologist focussed mainly on the conservation and restoration of native fishes, mussels, and crayfishes, but continue to pay attention to bugs, if not study them any more.
The upshot is I’d be glad to take a whack at IDing caddisflies for folks, if you still need some help.
Best to you,
Steve
Signature: Steve Fraley

Hi Steve,
We would gladly welcome any family, genus or species identifications on Caddisflies in our archives.  Please post comments on anything you are able to identify.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Help us identity this bug
Location: Sedro Woolley, WA
January 9, 2014 4:57 pm
What’s this bug? Can’t tell from the picture, but it has 3 white lines on it’s wings. The picture was taken, 1/9/14 which is winter for us in the Pacific Northwest.
Signature: Elizabeth

Caddisfly

Caddisfly

Dear Elizabeth,
This is a Northern Caddisfly or Snow Sedge.  Caddisflies are often mistaken for moths, and according to BugGuide:  “Adults resemble moths, but wings are hairy instead of scaly.”  Caddisflies also share some behavioral characteristics with moths.  According to BugGuide:  “flight activity begins at dusk. Adults are attracted – sometimes in great numbers – to artificial light.”  Larvae, which are commonly called Caseworms, are aquatic, and of the habitat, BugGuide notes:  “Species most diverse in well-aerated streams, but also occur in lakes, ponds, and marshes.”

Thank you so much, Daniel Marlos!!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug?
Location: Near Darrington, WA
October 20, 2013 6:55 pm
Hello!
I found this bug near the Sauk River in Washington State. If you are able to identify it, I’d be very happy.
Signature: Darcy

Caddisfly

Caddisfly

Hi Darcy,
We hope an insect order will suffice.  This is a Caddisfly in the order Trichoptera.  According to BugGuide, there are:  “>1,350 spp. in ~150 genera of 22 families in NA” and we haven’t the necessary skills to provide a more specific taxonomy than the order.  Caddisflies are feeble fliers and they are often confused with moths.  Because they cannot fly great distances, they are generally found not far from water where the aquatic larvae develop.  Caddisfly larvae often build distinctive shelters from pebbles, shells, twigs and other aquatic detritus, and for that reason they are frequently called Casemakers or Caseworms.  Freshwater anglers use Caddisfly larvae as bait. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination