Currently viewing the category: "Caddisflies"
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Subject: Moth?
Location: Vermilion County, Illinois
September 3, 2015 9:41 am
Hello Bugman,
I found this insect on my office window – I work at a park in East Central Illinois. At first, I thought it could have been a species of snout butterfly, but realized after getting up close – they were antennae. But I don’t know if I’ve ever noticed moths/butterflies having their antennae closed together. It was a cool morning, dew on the grass, light low-laying fog, but he appeared dry and content on my window. Any idea what this could be so I can learn more about this species? Thanks so much!!!
Signature: Lara the NatureNerd

Caddisfly

Caddisfly

Dear Lara the NatureNerd,
Though you were wrong about the identification, you were quite astute to notice the morphological similarities between this Caddisfly and some moths.  Caddisflies begin life as aquatic Caseworms.  Though it is not in a natural setting, we really love your Caddisfly image because of its simplicity, but we did adjust the levels and rotate.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: ID help
Location: Stamford, CT
May 22, 2015 7:47 am
Walking along a small river with a thin line of trees/shrubs on both sides in Stamford, CT on May 22, 2014, I saw this insect repeatedly on various tree and shrub leaves. There was no sign of leaf damage in the area of the insect. I was amazed by the length of the antennae – almost 2 times the body length.
Your help on ID would be appreciated!!
Signature: Patty

Black Winged Flying Insect

Black Dancer Caddisfly

Dear Patty,
We do not recognize your insect, but it looks to us like it might have an aquatic nymph.  We have contacted Eric Eaton for input and we will begun researching this after we finish cooking.

What's That Bug?  Caddisfly perhaps???

Black Dancer Caddisfly

Hi, Daniel:
This is a caddisfly called the “Black Dancer,” Mystacides sepulchralis.  The thick, leg-like things in front are actually the palps, part of its mouthparts.  They do not bite or anything, though.
Eric
author, Kaufman Field Guide to Insects of North America
http://bugeric.blogspot.com/

Thanks Eric,
We thought it was probably a Caddisfly, but didn’t have the time to research it before requesting assistance.  According to BugGuide:  “Only two species of
Mystacides occur in the east and the other one has brownish wings. … Males have red eyes.”

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Caddisfly

Caddisfly

Subject: We think it is a…
Location: Wilkes-Barre, PA
October 13, 2014 6:43 pm
Hello Bugman!
My son and I found this interesting critter on our back porch this evening. We believe it is a Northern Caddisfly, but wanted an expert opinion to let us know if we are right or wrong. From a decription we found online, we are happy to find this Caddisfly. We live along the Susquehanna River in Northeastern Pennsylvania. The river has developed a reputation for not being very clean, but if this Caddisfly is any indicator, as it is purported to be, the river is starting to heal. Thanks for your advice!
Michael Raub
Wilkes-Barre, PA
Signature: Michael Raub

Dear Michael,
We believe your identification of this Caddisfly is spot on, though we are very reluctant to attempt a species identification with most Caddisflies.  You are correct about Caddisflies being an indicator species for clean water.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: brown buggy
Location: Southeastern Michigan
August 15, 2014 8:29 pm
I found this floating in a casserole dish in my sink today. I just can’t pinpoint it! I recently found a masked hunter adult in my house and am on edge about all our six legged and more friends.
Signature: confused

Caddisfly

Caddisfly

Dear confused,
This Caddisfly in the order Trichoptera is perfectly harmless.  Adult Caddisflies are sometimes confuse with moths which they superficially resemble.  Caddisflies have aquatic larvae known as Caseworms because they build shelters.

Caddisfly

Caddisfly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknoown Bugs
Location: Charlotte area (Ft. Mill, SC)
August 15, 2014 11:19 am
Hi. I know your busy, but I have two bugs I just can identify.
Image #1 is a brown turtle-shaped bug. Found at the edge of a pond. It is about nickel size.
Image #2 is a bug that was attracted to a naight light.
Both were photographed in the Jul-Aug period this year in the Charlotte (NC) area.
Thanks. No rush in geting an answer.
Signature: Dr. Danny O. Crew

Zebra Caddisfly

Zebra Caddisfly

Dear Dr. Crew,
Your first bug is some species of Stink Bug, and we will attempt to be more specific in the future, but your second image has us very excited.  We did not know how to begin to classify this winged insect with such extremely long antennae, but diligent searching eventually led us to the Zebra Caddisfly,
Macrostemum zebratum, on BugGuide.  Caddisfly larvae are aquatic, and the adults are not strong fliers, so they are generally found near water.  As you indicated, adult Zebra Caddisflies are attracted to light.  This is a new species for our site.

Thanks. I do live on a large pond.  As for the stink bug?, that was my first thought; however, it looked more like a beetle/turtle and was thick with a very round shell. I’ve never seen a stink bug like that. Also it was larger than most I’ve seen. I’ll await your research.

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Subject: Just bit me!!
Location: Medford, NJ
July 28, 2014 10:33 am
This bug bit me get I see no pincers or stingers. It has long antenna, long skinny wings, a short body and is greyish in color.
Signature: Anne Marie

Caddisfly

Caddisfly

Dear Anne Marie,
This looks to us like a Caddisfly in the order Trichoptera, and we would challenge your belief that it stung or bit you.  Most Caddisflies do not have functional mouthparts, and they do not feed as adults.  According to BugGuide:  “Some adults take liquid food, such as nectar, others do not feed.”  They do not possess stingers either.  Is it possible that you have mistaken this Caddisfly for the creature that bit you?

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination