Currently viewing the category: "Caddisflies"
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Subject: Help!
Location: Central Texas
March 26, 2016 4:48 pm
Can you please help us identify this bug?
Signature: Abby

Possibly Scorpionfly

Possibly Scorpionfly

Dear Abby,
We believe this is a Scorpionfly in the order Mecoptera, but we cannot find any images of individuals with black wings and an orange body on BugGuide other than
Panorpa lugubris, which is definitely not your species.  We are requesting assistance from Eric Eaton.  If possible, can you send additional images showing the insect from a lateral view that would show details of the head and mouthparts?  Thanks.

Eric Eaton poses another possibility
Daniel:
I am thinking this is a caddisfly of some kind.
Eric

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Subject: Water hermit insect
Location: British Columbia, Canada
April 8, 2016 5:34 pm
Hi,
Found this bug in the water. It likes to flap it’s long body to get around as if someone tied it to a chair. It’s quite hilarious. Wondering what it’s diet is as well. It seems to have a long body and white (mini legs) along its body which is noticeable when it comes out to swing itself around. Kind of reminds me like a wormlike-roach in water but I really don’t have an idea what this creature is. Thanks!
Signature: R.

Caseworm

Caseworm

Dear R.,
This is a Caseworm, the aquatic larva or naiad of a Caddisfly, a mothlike insect from the order Trichoptera.  According to BugGuide:  “The aquatic larvae have three pairs of legs and a soft, elongate, segmented abdomen usually hidden inside a case; head well-developed with chewing mouthparts in most species.  Most species live in a mobile case constructed from plant material, algae, grains of sand, pieces of snail shells, or entirely of silk. The case is held together with strands of silk secreted by the larva. In some species the case is attached to a rock, log, or other underwater surface; a few species have no case and are free-living.  The case’s particular shape and construction material is distinctive of the family and/or genus, and can be used in identification. Example: Helicopyschidae larvae use sand grains to build spiral cases that resemble small snail shells.”

Caseworm

Caseworm

Wow, neat. Thanks for your response Daniel!

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Subject: Garden bug
Location: Dorset uk
April 8, 2016 4:15 am
Found this in Dorset UK , it’s spring
Signature: Karen

Caddisfly

Caddisfly

Dear Karen,
This is a Caddisfly, a member of the insect order Trichoptera, a group of mothlike insects with aquatic larvae known as Caseworms.  Because their larvae are aquatic, and because Caddisflies are not strong fliers, they are generally found not far from a source of fresh water.

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Subject: Moth?
Location: Vermilion County, Illinois
September 3, 2015 9:41 am
Hello Bugman,
I found this insect on my office window – I work at a park in East Central Illinois. At first, I thought it could have been a species of snout butterfly, but realized after getting up close – they were antennae. But I don’t know if I’ve ever noticed moths/butterflies having their antennae closed together. It was a cool morning, dew on the grass, light low-laying fog, but he appeared dry and content on my window. Any idea what this could be so I can learn more about this species? Thanks so much!!!
Signature: Lara the NatureNerd

Caddisfly

Caddisfly

Dear Lara the NatureNerd,
Though you were wrong about the identification, you were quite astute to notice the morphological similarities between this Caddisfly and some moths.  Caddisflies begin life as aquatic Caseworms.  Though it is not in a natural setting, we really love your Caddisfly image because of its simplicity, but we did adjust the levels and rotate.

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Subject: ID help
Location: Stamford, CT
May 22, 2015 7:47 am
Walking along a small river with a thin line of trees/shrubs on both sides in Stamford, CT on May 22, 2014, I saw this insect repeatedly on various tree and shrub leaves. There was no sign of leaf damage in the area of the insect. I was amazed by the length of the antennae – almost 2 times the body length.
Your help on ID would be appreciated!!
Signature: Patty

Black Winged Flying Insect

Black Dancer Caddisfly

Dear Patty,
We do not recognize your insect, but it looks to us like it might have an aquatic nymph.  We have contacted Eric Eaton for input and we will begun researching this after we finish cooking.

What's That Bug?  Caddisfly perhaps???

Black Dancer Caddisfly

Hi, Daniel:
This is a caddisfly called the “Black Dancer,” Mystacides sepulchralis.  The thick, leg-like things in front are actually the palps, part of its mouthparts.  They do not bite or anything, though.
Eric
author, Kaufman Field Guide to Insects of North America
http://bugeric.blogspot.com/

Thanks Eric,
We thought it was probably a Caddisfly, but didn’t have the time to research it before requesting assistance.  According to BugGuide:  “Only two species of
Mystacides occur in the east and the other one has brownish wings. … Males have red eyes.”

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Caddisfly

Caddisfly

Subject: We think it is a…
Location: Wilkes-Barre, PA
October 13, 2014 6:43 pm
Hello Bugman!
My son and I found this interesting critter on our back porch this evening. We believe it is a Northern Caddisfly, but wanted an expert opinion to let us know if we are right or wrong. From a decription we found online, we are happy to find this Caddisfly. We live along the Susquehanna River in Northeastern Pennsylvania. The river has developed a reputation for not being very clean, but if this Caddisfly is any indicator, as it is purported to be, the river is starting to heal. Thanks for your advice!
Michael Raub
Wilkes-Barre, PA
Signature: Michael Raub

Dear Michael,
We believe your identification of this Caddisfly is spot on, though we are very reluctant to attempt a species identification with most Caddisflies.  You are correct about Caddisflies being an indicator species for clean water.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination