Currently viewing the category: "Caddisflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Water Bug
Location: Western New York
October 21, 2016 3:20 pm
One of our class room got tadpoles from Africa. The water they put into the tanks was from a pond in one of the teachers backyard. This bug popped up in it yesterday it has a grass straw that it looks like it breathes out of not sure though, and it’s body is protected by this grass looking shell (I guess to camouflage it?) I’ve Googled it and can’t find it anywhere! Thank you in advanced
Signature: -school custodia

Caseworm

Caseworm

Dear school custodia,
Were we betting on the origin of this Caseworm, the aquatic larva of a Caddisfly, we would put our money on the pond in the teacher’s backyard and not that they came in with the tadpoles, but we can’t help but to wonder if one of your classrooms wanted to observe the metamorphosis of tadpoles into frogs, why didn’t they choose to observe a local species of frog rather than to import tadpoles from Africa?  This classroom experiment is going to result in frogs and we hope someone doesn’t decide to release the African frogs into the local pond at the end of the experiment.  Introduction of non-native species into the environment is one of the biggest threats to the survival of native, endemic species in our current climate of globalization.  Alas, we digress.  It was not our intention to lecture your school on the ethics of globalization when you asked about the identity of the Caseworm.  Every species of Caddisfly has a distinctly different Caseworm.  Some make their cases from sticks, some from shells of molluscs, some from pebbles and some from sand.  In our mind, a much more interesting experiment would be to observe the lives of creatures in your local ponds.  Oops, we started lecturing again.

The frogs will be sent back once project is done. They chose this species because of its fast life cycle from tadpole to frog.
And thank you it is a very interesting water bug! The class will be watching it’s life cycle as well 🙂

Thanks for the reassurance.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Stick looking bug in a stream
Location: Bridgeport, CA
August 21, 2016 10:48 am
I found this bug crawling in the water in a stream near Bridgeport, CA.
Signature: Leonard Powell

Caseworm

Caseworm

Dear Leonard,
This is a Caddisfly Larva, commonly called a Caseworm.  Each species of Caseworm constructs a case for protection that looks distinctly different from the cases of other species of Caddisfly.  The cases may be constructed of sticks, shells, sand, or other debris.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: Calgary Alberta Canada
June 20, 2016 9:10 pm
Hi, I live in Calgary Alberta Canada and now noticed the follow fly, which generally appears in swarms around the house or spruce trees. Flies are out from June to August/September. The only come out I the late afternoon or evening when the temperature begins to cool. During the day they rest on the side of the house or along the soffits. House backs onto a green space and is roughly 100 yards from the bow river. Swarms have become larger in recent years and I’d love to know what they are. They do not bite or sting. Just very annoying and unsightly.
Thanks for your help!
Signature: Angela

Caddisfly

Caddisfly

Dear Angela,
This is a Caddisfly, a member of the order Trichoptera.  Caddisflies are often described as “mothlike” and the fact that you are so close to the river explains why you have so many Caddisflies in your yard.  Immature Caddisflies, sometimes called Caseworms, are aquatic, frequently used as live bait by anglers, and according to BugGuide:  “Most caddisfly larvae are intolerant of pollution; therefore, their presence is an indication of good water quality, and their absence in areas where they previously occurred may be an indication of polluted water.”  Caseworms make cases from a variety of materials, including sticks, sand, pebbles, snail shells, bits of leaves and many other materials, however, each species is very specific about the material used and the shape of the case.  BugGuide also notes:  “Adults rest on nearby vegetation during the day; flight activity begins at dusk. Adults are attracted – sometimes in great numbers – to artificial light” and that agrees perfectly with your account.  More information on Caddisflies can be found on Aquatax where it states:  “Probably the most interesting feature to the non-fishing general public regarding this group is the cases that many of the larvae construct out of various materials. Caddisflies are found in all types of aquatic habitats throughout Saskatchewan. The majority are intolerant of pollution and, as such, are valuable tools for monitoring organic and chemical contamination of habitats.”

Caddisfly

Caddisfly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Help!
Location: Central Texas
March 26, 2016 4:48 pm
Can you please help us identify this bug?
Signature: Abby

Possibly Scorpionfly

Possibly Scorpionfly

Dear Abby,
We believe this is a Scorpionfly in the order Mecoptera, but we cannot find any images of individuals with black wings and an orange body on BugGuide other than
Panorpa lugubris, which is definitely not your species.  We are requesting assistance from Eric Eaton.  If possible, can you send additional images showing the insect from a lateral view that would show details of the head and mouthparts?  Thanks.

Eric Eaton poses another possibility
Daniel:
I am thinking this is a caddisfly of some kind.
Eric

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Water hermit insect
Location: British Columbia, Canada
April 8, 2016 5:34 pm
Hi,
Found this bug in the water. It likes to flap it’s long body to get around as if someone tied it to a chair. It’s quite hilarious. Wondering what it’s diet is as well. It seems to have a long body and white (mini legs) along its body which is noticeable when it comes out to swing itself around. Kind of reminds me like a wormlike-roach in water but I really don’t have an idea what this creature is. Thanks!
Signature: R.

Caseworm

Caseworm

Dear R.,
This is a Caseworm, the aquatic larva or naiad of a Caddisfly, a mothlike insect from the order Trichoptera.  According to BugGuide:  “The aquatic larvae have three pairs of legs and a soft, elongate, segmented abdomen usually hidden inside a case; head well-developed with chewing mouthparts in most species.  Most species live in a mobile case constructed from plant material, algae, grains of sand, pieces of snail shells, or entirely of silk. The case is held together with strands of silk secreted by the larva. In some species the case is attached to a rock, log, or other underwater surface; a few species have no case and are free-living.  The case’s particular shape and construction material is distinctive of the family and/or genus, and can be used in identification. Example: Helicopyschidae larvae use sand grains to build spiral cases that resemble small snail shells.”

Caseworm

Caseworm

Wow, neat. Thanks for your response Daniel!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Garden bug
Location: Dorset uk
April 8, 2016 4:15 am
Found this in Dorset UK , it’s spring
Signature: Karen

Caddisfly

Caddisfly

Dear Karen,
This is a Caddisfly, a member of the insect order Trichoptera, a group of mothlike insects with aquatic larvae known as Caseworms.  Because their larvae are aquatic, and because Caddisflies are not strong fliers, they are generally found not far from a source of fresh water.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination