Currently viewing the category: "swallowtails"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Papilio glaucus
Location: Nathaniel Boone Forest State Park
March 19, 2014 11:01 am
These pics of Eastern Tiger Swallowtails were taken along a trail in the Nathaniel Boone Forest State Park outside of Camden TN. It was late June I believe when I took the pic. They were feeding on dung or rotting fruit.
Signature: swampyy82

Eastern Tiger Swallowtails

Eastern Tiger Swallowtails Puddling

Hi again Swampyy82,
Thanks for sending us this gorgeous image of Eastern Tiger Swallowtails congregating at a moisture spot, an activity that is commonly called mud-puddling or just puddling.  More information can be found in an Ecological Entomology article written in 1991 by Carol L. Boggs and Lee Ann Jackson called Mud puddling by butterflies is not a simple matter.  They wrote:  “Adult Lepidoptera of many families feed from puddles, carrion and excreta (Norris, 1936; Downes, 1973; Adler, 1982).  Such behavior is termed ‘puddling’, and may involve aggregations of individuals feeding at a location which is used repeatedly.  the participants are usually male and often young (e.g. Collenette, 1934; Adler, 1982; Adler & Pearson, 1982). … Sodium, which may be an otherwise scarce nutrient in the adult diet, triggers puddling behavior, at least in “
Papilio (Arms et al., 1974).”

Tiger Swallowtails Puddling

Eastern Tiger Swallowtails Puddling

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large black and red butterfly
Location: Phnom Penh, Cambodia
February 28, 2014 3:53 am
Dear WhatsThatBug.com,
I have just found this butterfly in the stairwell of my apartment building in Phnom Penh, Cambodia.
It couldn’t find it’s way out and me and my teacher were worried that someone else would kill it. So I got a bowl and some paper and set it free outside. It flew all around the building for a while before we lost track of it.
I have seen this butterfly a few times and I’m just interested in it. Hopefully you can give me an answer.
Thank you
:)
Signature: Chloe (age 14)

Swallowtail

Common Rose Swallowtail

Hi Chloe,
When someone sends us an email that indicates unusual kindness to an insect or other bug, we like to tag that posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award, and your identification request is one of those postings.
  According to The Flying Kiwi Cambodian bug page:  “This is a common rose, a type of swallowtail butterfly.   They earn their name from their wide distribution, all the way from Afghanistan to China, and from belonging to the genus Atrophaneura, the red-bodied swallowtails.   In this case, the red body indicates to birds and other predators that the butterfly is toxic and distasteful to eat.”  Because this species is poisonous, other species have evolved to mimic it, and the Confessions of a Lepidopterist site states:  “The red spots on these butterflies [Common Mormons] were actually made to mimic another species of butterfly alltogether. The Crimson Rose butterfly (another one of my favourites) that is poisonous and therefore unedible to birds and other predators. The Common Mormon female (carrying the eggs and thus, the lifeline of the butterfly species) has evolved to mimic the wings of Crimson Rose butterflies thus avoiding being eaten. To the trained eye, however, these two butterflies can be distinguished quite simply. The Crimson Rose, as its name suggests come from the family of red-bodied swallowtails that is to say their bodies are colored a brilliant red, advertising the poison that actualy runs in their blood.”  According to TrekNature:  “The Common Rose (Atrophaneura (Pachliopta) aristolochiae) is a swallowtail butterfly belonging to the Pachliopta subgenus, the Roses, of the genus Atrophaneura or Red-bodied Swallowtails. It is a common butterfly which is extensively distributed across South and South East Asia.”    

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black Swallowtail Butterfly?
Location: Coryell County, Texas
January 24, 2014 11:20 pm
Hello, I hope you’ve both been well.
I took these photos last February 7, 2013, and I never sent them because I didn’t think the quality of the photos was very sharp. I think I’ve seen Pipevine Swallowtails in our garden before, but I think this may be a Black Swallowtail? Or a dark phase of a Tiger Swallowtail? They are confusing to me! So lovely, though.
The butterflies like these native plants in the creek bed.
I’ll keep trying to get better photos of the beautiful swallowtails… the quest continues.
Thank you!
I found this reference: https://insects.tamu.edu/fieldguide/cimg266.html
Signature: Ellen

Black Swallowtail

Male Black Swallowtail:  Note orange and black spot on inner margin of hindwings

Hi Ellen,
You are correct that this is a Black Swallowtail, and it is a male as evidenced by the yellow markings.  Compare your individual to this image posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Males have more extensive broken yellow band. Note orange and black spot on inner margin of hindwings (Palamedes Swallowtail is otherwise very similar, above, but has no black center in the orange spot).”  The black center in the orange spot is clearly visible in one of your images.

Black Swallowtail

Black Swallowtail

Black Swallowtail

Black Swallowtail

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Oregon Swallowtail
Location:  Oregon
December 14, 2013
Your Welcome!
I’ll enclose the Oregon versions (it’s the state insect there). Sadly my camera then was not as good.
Signature: Curious Girl

Possibly Western Tiger Swallowtail

Possibly Western Tiger Swallowtail

Hi Curious Girl,
Thanks for sending this image of a Swallowtail you photographed in Oregon, however, it is noticeably different from the Old World Swallowtail images we posted a few days ago.  The Old World Swallowtail,
Papilio machaon, is also found in North America, and according to BugGuide:  “The various subspecies included here under the name Papilio machaon have been (and contunue to be) treated differently by different authors. The most commonly seen alternate classification would have the subspecies bairdii, dodi, oregonius, and pikei placed as subspecies of a distinct species Papilio bairdii, and the more boreal subspecies would be left under the species Papilio machaon. There are good reasons for doing this, but the majority of workers currently place them all under one species. There are also still some people who would prefer to see each name treated individually at species ranking, though this is not widely accepted practice. The result is that these butterflies may be listed under a number of different name combinations, depending upon the preferences of the individual author.”  According to State Symbols USA, the Oregon Swallowtail is the state insect of Oregon, but according to BugGuide, it is actually a subspecies of the Old World Swallowtail.  The Old World Swallowtail is easily confused with the Anise Swallowtail, Papilio zelicaon, which is also found in Oregon.  The butterfly in this photograph is neither of those species, and though we are uncertain of its exact identification because of the quality of the photo, we are guessing it is either a Western Tiger Swallowtail, Papilio rutulus, or a Pale Swallowtail, Papilio eurymedon.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Euro Version Butterfly — Old World Swallowtail (Papilio machaon)
Location: Porto, Portugal
December 11, 2013 11:44 am
Saw your posts about the Swallowtail chasing in Mt. Washington this year and thought to share the ones I was seeing in Portugal. I loved them because they are so similar to the Oregon ones I am used to seeing (but they are still so enchanting). The Euro version flits through the city especially the parks where it perches in trees and all but disappears despite their showy colors. Remarkable.
Pics were taken in April and May.
Signature: Curious Girl

Old World Swallowtail

Old World Swallowtail

Dear Curious Girl,
Thanks for sending us your lovely photos of the Old World Swallowtail in its native habitat.

Old World Swallowtail

Old World Swallowtail

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: cateplillar with eyes to scare predators?
Location: gurgaon,india
December 1, 2013 8:41 am
We found this caterpillar in our garden- Gurgaon, India…and it looked beautiful and scary at first sight!!if there is one, does it mean there will be others too in our garden? in fact we saw another green with black strips ( pic-3) caterpillars in our garden!!
Our 8 year old daughter- Arushi- clicked these pictures….and we are very keen to find out more about them( both caterpillars )
Thanks
Signature: Arushi

Swallowtail Caterpiller

Swallowtail Caterpiller

Hello again Arushi,
Your second caterpillar is a Swallowtail Caterpillar, and in our opinion it is one of the species that feeds on the leaves of citrus trees.  Your photo does not have enough detail for a definite species identification, but we believe this is one of two species.  It is either a Lime Butterfly,
Papilio demoleus malayanus, or a Common Mormon, Papilio polytes.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination