Currently viewing the category: "swallowtails"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What butterfly is this?
Location: Sao Paulo, Brazil
January 21, 2016 5:15 pm
Hello everyone!
I’ve taken this photo today on my garden. I’m from São Paulo, Brazil, and I’ve never seen this here.
Could someone please identify it?
Signature: David Lynch

Papilio thoas

Papilio thoas

Dear David,
We believe we have correctly identified your swallowtail as
Heraclides (formerly Papilio) thoas which you can verify by comparing your individual to the image on Butterflies of America or on FlickR.  As Wikipedia demonstrates, this lovely Swallowtail was commemorated on a Brazilian stamp in 1971.  According to the Butterflies of America, the larval food plant is  Piper auritum, commonly called hoja santa in Spanish speaking countries.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Papilio on Tanzania Highlands
Location: Loliondo Highlands, see above.
January 15, 2016 11:38 pm
Dearr WTB!
I have not yet learned wat you include in the expression BUG. I just received an id-ed Idolomantis diabolica, I´m grateful for that. I guess you include butterflies.
During eco-safai in northern Tanzania I studied mainly birds, mammals and reptiles but photographed a few butterflies.
In the genus Papilio. there is a fair number of species with the common name Green-banded Swallowtaul. They were not easy to get fair photos of since they were rather cautious (- for good reasons). Iam pretty sure I saw at least three species during my trip. None of them I caught on fair photos. Yet I believe you can identify at least some of them by their geographic location + habitat. I´m ready to pit it to a test. The encolsed animal I photographed in a forest patch at about 2500 metres a.s.l. on Lolliondo Highlands, Tanzania almost at the botrder of Kenya.
To me it seems like a very long shot to get a name on that, but it´s worth a try,
The animal was photographed nexst to a small stream, revived by the last days rain on Nov 13.
From what I have learned, the subterminal white spots on upper hind wings are rather clear for a Green-banded Swallowtail on this individual. (- barely visible on this photo)
Best regards
Signature: slit

Swallowtail

Swallowtail

Dear slit,
In our most loose interpretation, a “bug” is a creature that crawls, so we include worms, amphibians and lizards on our site, though we are mainly concerned with Arthropods of all kinds.  We are not prepared to go on record with your Swallowtail identification beyond the genus, and we know first hand how difficult it can be to get a good image of a Swallowtail that is soaring, but refusing to land.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Dark Swallowtail, Gorgeous
Location: Coryell County, TX
October 18, 2015 11:08 am
Hello!
Here is a beautiful dark swallowtail. You’ve helped me with identifying a Black Swallowtail before, thank you!
I looked at your site and at Bug Guide, and I’m thinking that this beauty may be a Pipevine Swallowtail, but I’m far from certain.
It visited the Autumn Sage for the longest time, fluttering like mad almost the entire time.
Thank you so much for your help!
Signature: Ellen

Pipevine Swallowtail

Pipevine Swallowtail

Dear Ellen,
You are correct that this is a Pipevine Swallowtail, and it is not as iridescent as other individuals, which means either the light did not strike it directly, or more likely that it is a female.  According to BugGuide:  “Male has very iridescent upper surfaces of hindwings. Female has less striking iridescence. Underside has a single median row of orange spots which do not touch each other.”  BugGuide also notes:  “The Pipevine flutters its wings incessantly while nectaring–I suspect this is part of its mechanisms for advertising distastefulness. (This is original speculation by the author–PC.) Some others in its complex, notably the Black Swallowtail, seem to do this too.”  That is very consistent with your observations.

Pipevine Swallowtail

Pipevine Swallowtail

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Puddling Butterfly
Location: Coryell County, TX
September 4, 2015 1:10 pm
Hello! I think this beautiful butterfly may be another Giant Swallowtail (Papilio cresphontes). It was puddling in a drainage area. So gorgeous! The wind was buffeting it about somewhat; today is partly cloudy and quite warm, 90 degrees. No significant rain for over a month, so any moisture is appreciated by wildlife.
Best wishes!
Signature: Ellen

Puddling Giant Swallowtail

Puddling Giant Swallowtail

Hi Ellen,
How nice to hear from you again.  Your puddling Giant Swallowtail is an excellent addition to our archives.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Lots of Butterflies!!!
Location: Powell, Ohio
August 4, 2015 11:13 am
Two yellow swallowtails (I think), and a monarch, visited our garden today!!!! One swallowtail was noticeably bigger than the other and a bit raggedy. The monarch wasn’t cooperating for pictures, kept flirting about, but I got one off when it rested in a tree. The monarch was very interested in the milkweed plant we let grow by the patio! So pretty!
Signature: Amber

Female Tiger Swallowtail

Female Tiger Swallowtail

Dear Amber,
Thanks for sending us documentation of your day of butterfly watching.  The tattered Tiger Swallowtail is a female who can be distinguished from the male by the dusting of blue scales on the hind wings.

Tiger Swallowtail

Tiger Swallowtail

Monarch

Monarch

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Western Tiger Swallowtail
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
July 31, 2015 9:46 AM
Several years ago we lamented that we were not able to capture any images of the Western Tiger Swallowtails that fly around the garden.  Today we got some early morning images of this individual.  The morning haze cleared and the sun had just begun to shine.  The Swallowtail was warming in the sun on the cypress, and it appears that it had narrowly escaped at least one predator since not only the swallowtail, but fully half of each of the hind wings is missing.

Western Tiger Swallowtail

Western Tiger Swallowtail

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination