Currently viewing the category: "swallowtails"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Eastern Tiger Swallowtail
Location: Perinton, NY
August 15, 2016 6:42 pm
Hi! Here are some pics of an Eastern Tiger Swallowtail on the right-of-way behind our home. I believe it’s a male, as I didn’t see any blue on the hind wings. We’ve had an amazing variety of butterflies here this year, more than in years past. Enjoy!
Signature: Jennifer

Tiger Swallowtail

Tiger Swallowtail

Hi Jennifer,
You surely are providing us with some wonderful eastern butterfly images.  Because of your location, we cannot say for certain that this is an Eastern Tiger Swallowtail,
Papilio glaucus glaucus, since the range of the Canadian Tiger Swallowtail, Papilio canadensis, can be as far south as Pennsylvania.  The two species look very similar and this BugGuide differentiation and description of the Canadian Tiger Swallowtail “adult: inner margin of hindwing has wide black stripe (whereas the otherwise similar – though larger – Eastern Tiger Swallowtail has a thin black stripe in that area)” seems vague, as does the comparison of images on the Canadian Biodiversity Information Facility site.  We do agree it is a male.  Perhaps one of our readers will write in with a more concrete species call than we are able to provide.

Tiger Swallowtail

Tiger Swallowtail

Thanks to a comment from Cesar Crash, we will concur that this is an Eastern Tiger Swallowtail.

Tiger Swallowtail

Tiger Swallowtail

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black or Spicebush Swallowtail?
Location: Perinton, NY
August 15, 2016 6:31 pm
Hi! This beauty was enjoying the thistles on the right-of-way behind our home. I apologize, I could only get closed wing shots, as it wouldn’t sit still for long! From what I can tell from Google, it looks like a Spicebush, but after viewing your website, I could be wrong. Thanks for any help you can give me! (Both photos are if the same individual )
Signature: Jennifer

Spicebush Swallowtail

Spicebush Swallowtail

Dear Jennifer,
This is a Spicebush Swallowtail,
Papilio troilus, which is described on BugGuide as:  “Adult: Upper surface of forewing is mostly black with ivory spots along margin. Upper surface of hindwing has orange spot on costal margin and sheen of bluish (female) or bluish-green (male) scales. Underside of hindwing with pale green marginal spots.(1) Median spotband on underside of hindwing missing one orange spot.”  The missing orange spot is visible in your image.  If you notice the inner band of spots, where the third from the bottom should exist, there is instead a dusting of blue-green scales that matches the pattern on this BugGuide image of a Spicebush Swallowtail, as opposed to this BugGuide image of a Black Swallowtail.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Butterfly
Location: philippines
July 27, 2016 12:18 am
May i ask the Family/Genus of this butterfly if that is ok;) coz i like to collect pupa of butterflies and excited to see what it looks like as it emerge…thanks…
Signature: karyl

Common Jay Chrysalis

Common Jay Chrysalis

Dear Karyl,
This butterfly is in the family Papilionidae a group that includes swallowtails, birdwings and Apollos.  We believe we have correctly identified your butterfly as a Common Jay,
Arisbe doson gyndes, thanks to images posted to the Philippine Lepidoptera site.  Insect Designs also has a nice image. 

Common Jay

Common Jay

thank you so much for the identification;)

Common Jay ventral surface

Common Jay ventral surface

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black Swallowtail – Male
Location: Toronto
July 14, 2016 3:03 pm
Hi, I am pretty sure this is a young male Black Swallowtail – but just to be sure! Thanks for all you do!
Signature: filigree

Female Black Swallowtail Butterfly

Female Black Swallowtail Butterfly

Dear filigree,
You have correctly identified the species of this Black Swallowtail butterfly, however, you have incorrectly identified its sex.  This is a female Black Swallowtail butterfly, as identified by the blue scales on the lower wings.  Male Black Swallowtail butterflies lack the blue.  This posting from our archives illustrates a pair of Black Swallowtails side by side.  See BugGuide for verification, where it states:  “Female, with its large blue patches on hindwings, is a mimic of the Pipevine Swallowtail. Some female Black Swallowtails have little yellow on wings above. Males have more extensive broken yellow band.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What butterfly is this?
Location: Sao Paulo, Brazil
January 21, 2016 5:15 pm
Hello everyone!
I’ve taken this photo today on my garden. I’m from São Paulo, Brazil, and I’ve never seen this here.
Could someone please identify it?
Signature: David Lynch

Papilio thoas

Papilio thoas

Dear David,
We believe we have correctly identified your swallowtail as
Heraclides (formerly Papilio) thoas which you can verify by comparing your individual to the image on Butterflies of America or on FlickR.  As Wikipedia demonstrates, this lovely Swallowtail was commemorated on a Brazilian stamp in 1971.  According to the Butterflies of America, the larval food plant is  Piper auritum, commonly called hoja santa in Spanish speaking countries.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Papilio on Tanzania Highlands
Location: Loliondo Highlands, see above.
January 15, 2016 11:38 pm
Dearr WTB!
I have not yet learned wat you include in the expression BUG. I just received an id-ed Idolomantis diabolica, I´m grateful for that. I guess you include butterflies.
During eco-safai in northern Tanzania I studied mainly birds, mammals and reptiles but photographed a few butterflies.
In the genus Papilio. there is a fair number of species with the common name Green-banded Swallowtaul. They were not easy to get fair photos of since they were rather cautious (- for good reasons). Iam pretty sure I saw at least three species during my trip. None of them I caught on fair photos. Yet I believe you can identify at least some of them by their geographic location + habitat. I´m ready to pit it to a test. The encolsed animal I photographed in a forest patch at about 2500 metres a.s.l. on Lolliondo Highlands, Tanzania almost at the botrder of Kenya.
To me it seems like a very long shot to get a name on that, but it´s worth a try,
The animal was photographed nexst to a small stream, revived by the last days rain on Nov 13.
From what I have learned, the subterminal white spots on upper hind wings are rather clear for a Green-banded Swallowtail on this individual. (- barely visible on this photo)
Best regards
Signature: slit

Swallowtail

Swallowtail

Dear slit,
In our most loose interpretation, a “bug” is a creature that crawls, so we include worms, amphibians and lizards on our site, though we are mainly concerned with Arthropods of all kinds.  We are not prepared to go on record with your Swallowtail identification beyond the genus, and we know first hand how difficult it can be to get a good image of a Swallowtail that is soaring, but refusing to land.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination