Currently viewing the category: "swallowtails"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: butterfly
Location: oman
July 4, 2014 7:12 am
Hi,
Could you please help me to find out what is the type of my butterfly?
Thanks a lot
Signature: Deren

Christmas Butterfly

Christmas Butterfly

Dear Deren,
Despite lacking tails on its hindwings, your butterfly is in the family Papilionidae, and most of the members of the family are commonly called Swallowtails.  Using the site Butterfly Corner, we have identified your butterfly as
Papilio demodocusa species commonly called Citrus butterfly, Orange Dog or Christmas Butterfly, though some of those common names are shared by other members of the genus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Remains of a Swallowtail Exuvia on Avocado Tree
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
June 29, 2014 12:13 PM
We noticed this shell of a Swallowtail Chrysalis in the avocado tree, and we tried to research which species of local Swallowtail has a caterpillar that will feed on the leaves of Avocado.  We have Western Tiger Swallowtails, Giant Swallowtails and Anise Swallowtails in the garden, but none of them feeds on avocado, to the best of our knowledge.  The only Swallowtail listed as eating avocado on the Easy Butterfly Garden website is the Magnificent Swallowtail,
Papilio garamus.  Perhaps this will remain a mystery.  Can the Magnificent Swallowtail have ventured this far north?  Here are additional images of the Magnificent Swallowtail from Animal PHotos.

Shell of a Swallowtail Chrysalis

Shell of a Western Tiger Swallowtail Chrysalis

Julian Donahue provides some input.
Hi Daniel,
The Spicebush Swallowtail is recorded as feeding on another species of Persea, but Tietz’s Index to Described Life Histories…. lists the only swallowtail feeding on Persea americana as Papilio rutulus, the Western Tiger Swallowtail. The BAMONA website doesn’t mention avocado as a hostplant.
Hope this helps,
Julian

The Western Tiger Swallowtails have been seen flying near that avocado tree.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Butterfly ID
Location: Tom McCall Preserve
June 1, 2014 8:24 am
These photos were all taken near Hood River, Oregon.
Signature: Randy Weatherford

Oregon Swallowtail

Male Oregon Swallowtail

Hi Randy,
Two of your butterflies are Swallowtails in the genus Papilio, and we are relatively certain one of them is a male Oregon Swallowtail,
Papilio machaon oregonius, a subspecies of the Old World Swallowtail, Papilio machaon, based on this and other images on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Distinguised from yellow form P. bairdii by having more extensive yellow, and by more northwesterly distribution.”  The other Swallowtail appears to be a female, and it is most likely also an Oregon Swallowtail.

Female Old World Swallowtail

Female Old World Swallowtail perhaps???

Daniel,
Could it be possible that the photo of the black and white butterfly be a “White Admiral”, or an admiral sub species.  I have seen many of the swallowtails, only one of the Admiral look a likes.
Thank you,
Randy

Hi Randy,
She is definitely a Swallowtail.  She is missing its tails, which might be throwing your perception off.  See this image on BugGuide of a female Old World Swallowtail, which is similar but not exactly like your individual.  The shape of the wings and the coloration of the body and wings is distinctly different from the White Admiral, though superficially similar.
  She may be an Indra Swallowtail, also pictured on BugGuide.

 

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Location: Northeast Mexico
May 16, 2014
Yes, I guess it wasn’t that caterpillar. A bird must have taken it or something. It kept coming back for that day, especially on the parsley. The first pictures is among the best I could get. It was the black swallowtail from here http://www.iwallpapersfive.com/eastern-black-swallowtail-butterfly-with-a-grateful-prayer-and-a-thankful-heart-eastern-black.html/eastern-black-swallowtail-butterfly-with-a-grateful-prayer-and-a-thankful-heart-eastern-black-2
Anyway, I later found a quite a few caterpillars on the parsley that look exactly like those of the eastern black swallowtail blog post, so maybe those will become that black and blue butterfly.
A couple of the caterpillars were good sized, some were very small, but they have all kept growing. Right now you can see many at different stages, here I send some pictures.
I found a chrysalis on a crate right by where I had found the first bigger caterpillar, the one that was possibly a tiger swallowtail, maybe that one will come out.
Signature: Alex

Female Black Swallowtail Ovipositing

Female Black Swallowtail Ovipositing

Hi Alex,
This definitely represents a different Swallowtail species than your previously submitted image.  This does appear to be a female Black Swallowtail (females have blue markings on wings) and she appears to be laying eggs.  The caterpillar does appear to be that of a Black Swallowtail feeding on parsley.  Since you are in Northeastern Mexico, it is entirely possible that you live within the range of the Black Swallowtail.
  Black Swallowtail Caterpillars are known as Parsley Worms.

Parsley Worm

Parsley Worm

Thank you Daniel! It’s been fun trying to keep up with all these bugs..

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Papilio glaucus
Location: Nathaniel Boone Forest State Park
March 19, 2014 11:01 am
These pics of Eastern Tiger Swallowtails were taken along a trail in the Nathaniel Boone Forest State Park outside of Camden TN. It was late June I believe when I took the pic. They were feeding on dung or rotting fruit.
Signature: swampyy82

Eastern Tiger Swallowtails

Eastern Tiger Swallowtails Puddling

Hi again Swampyy82,
Thanks for sending us this gorgeous image of Eastern Tiger Swallowtails congregating at a moisture spot, an activity that is commonly called mud-puddling or just puddling.  More information can be found in an Ecological Entomology article written in 1991 by Carol L. Boggs and Lee Ann Jackson called Mud puddling by butterflies is not a simple matter.  They wrote:  “Adult Lepidoptera of many families feed from puddles, carrion and excreta (Norris, 1936; Downes, 1973; Adler, 1982).  Such behavior is termed ‘puddling’, and may involve aggregations of individuals feeding at a location which is used repeatedly.  the participants are usually male and often young (e.g. Collenette, 1934; Adler, 1982; Adler & Pearson, 1982). … Sodium, which may be an otherwise scarce nutrient in the adult diet, triggers puddling behavior, at least in “
Papilio (Arms et al., 1974).”

Tiger Swallowtails Puddling

Eastern Tiger Swallowtails Puddling

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large black and red butterfly
Location: Phnom Penh, Cambodia
February 28, 2014 3:53 am
Dear WhatsThatBug.com,
I have just found this butterfly in the stairwell of my apartment building in Phnom Penh, Cambodia.
It couldn’t find it’s way out and me and my teacher were worried that someone else would kill it. So I got a bowl and some paper and set it free outside. It flew all around the building for a while before we lost track of it.
I have seen this butterfly a few times and I’m just interested in it. Hopefully you can give me an answer.
Thank you
:)
Signature: Chloe (age 14)

Swallowtail

Common Rose Swallowtail

Hi Chloe,
When someone sends us an email that indicates unusual kindness to an insect or other bug, we like to tag that posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award, and your identification request is one of those postings.
  According to The Flying Kiwi Cambodian bug page:  “This is a common rose, a type of swallowtail butterfly.   They earn their name from their wide distribution, all the way from Afghanistan to China, and from belonging to the genus Atrophaneura, the red-bodied swallowtails.   In this case, the red body indicates to birds and other predators that the butterfly is toxic and distasteful to eat.”  Because this species is poisonous, other species have evolved to mimic it, and the Confessions of a Lepidopterist site states:  “The red spots on these butterflies [Common Mormons] were actually made to mimic another species of butterfly alltogether. The Crimson Rose butterfly (another one of my favourites) that is poisonous and therefore unedible to birds and other predators. The Common Mormon female (carrying the eggs and thus, the lifeline of the butterfly species) has evolved to mimic the wings of Crimson Rose butterflies thus avoiding being eaten. To the trained eye, however, these two butterflies can be distinguished quite simply. The Crimson Rose, as its name suggests come from the family of red-bodied swallowtails that is to say their bodies are colored a brilliant red, advertising the poison that actualy runs in their blood.”  According to TrekNature:  “The Common Rose (Atrophaneura (Pachliopta) aristolochiae) is a swallowtail butterfly belonging to the Pachliopta subgenus, the Roses, of the genus Atrophaneura or Red-bodied Swallowtails. It is a common butterfly which is extensively distributed across South and South East Asia.”    

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination