Currently viewing the category: "Gossamer Wings"
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Subject: Butterflies
Location: Eastern Tennessee
April 3, 2014 11:39 am
HI,
These beauties were in abundance on April 2nd in the Martha Sundquist State Forest, and I would love to know what they are.
Thank you for your time,
Signature: R.G. Marion

Puddling Lycaean Blues

Puddling Lycaean Blues

Dear R.G. Marion,
The best we can do at this moment is to provide a subfamily.  These are Lycaean Blues in the subfamily Polyommatinae, and according to BugGuide they might be considered as a tribe.
  There are many similar looking species and subspecies classified as Blues.  The Lycaean Blues were among author Vladimir Nabokov’s favorite butterflies, and he wrote about clouds of Blues gathering at puddles in the spring, exactly what your image documents.

Thank you so much for your timely reply; it is most appreciated.
R.G.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Daniel – Help with Small Butterfly ID?
Location: Hawthorne, CA
August 27, 2013 3:08 pm
Hi Daniel,
First, I must say I’ve opened your site using google chrome and like the results much better than when using my default IE browser. Hopefully your webmaster will be able to make the site more IE friendly soon?
I am pretty sure I have photographed the attached butterfly in past, but can’t find the name now. With my naked, not so good eyes, it looked like a Marine Blue but it is not. Can you help, please? The China Aster it is feeding on is a small bloom, only about 1.5” in diameter.
Signature: Thank you, Anna Carreon

Acmon Blue female

Acmon Blue female

Hi Anna,
We are happy to hear that your browser issues have improved.  This looks to us to be a female Acmon Blue and you can compare your individual to this image on BugGuide.  We used Jeffrey Glassberg’s Butterflies Through Binoculars, The West for our initial identification.

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Subject: Blue/Beige Butterfly, Perhaps a Reakirt’s Blue?
Location: Coryell County, central Texas
April 28, 2013 8:58 pm
Bright sun and a fast butterfly make this one difficult for me to identify. Its overall look in person was small and beige. The blue showed when it flew. Is it possibly a Reakirt’s Blue butterfly, an Echinargus isola? Thank you! Mostly sunny, warm day today, and this is in a field of native grasses, saplings and wildflowers. Here’s the reference from Bug Guide: http://bugguide.net/index.php?q=search&keys=reakirt%27s+blue&search=Search
Signature: Ellen

Which Blue is it???

Which Blue is it???

Hi Ellen,
While we agree that this is one of the Blues in the subfamily Polyommatinae, we cannot say for certain that it is Reakirt’s Blue.  This is a very difficult group for us to identify to the species level.

Blue, but which one???

Blue, but which one???

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Ed. Note:  We think they do.  Do you?  Let us know.

Subject: Tanzanian butterfly
Location: Arusha Tanzania
April 8, 2013 4:35 am

Mating Common Bush Blues
Mating Common Bush Blues look like Jumping Spider

Daniel,
What caught my eye with these Cacyreus lingeus is that I also saw a pair mating, and after a bit of maneuvering and jostling about, they settled down into the one position for about 5 to 10 minutes or so, and the pattern of the “eyes” on the wings of the joined butterflies, as well as the final configuration of both showed a distinct mimicry of a jumping spider.
In the brief research that I have done, I have not seen anything written anywhere of two separate insects actually using mimicry as a defense mechanism before, although they were still for quite a while so were fair game without some defense system.
Have attached the photo to see what you think?

That is an awesome and astute observation Simon.  They really do look like the face of a Jumping Spider.  Perhaps it is time for you to write a paper.  We will be adding this photo to your original submission as well as making it a unique posting that is a feature.

Jumping Spider mimics Mating Blues

Jumping Spider mimics Mating Blues

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Tanzanian butterfly
Location: Arusha Tanzania
April 8, 2013 4:35 am
Hi,
this was taken this morning, there are a number of these around at the moment, it is during the start of the long rains here. Photo from Arusha in Tanzania.
Although when resting, the wings are always closed, but the top wing colour is bluish purple as can sort of be seen in the second photo.
About 12 to 15 mm in height.
Signature: Simon

Gossamer Wing

Gossamer Wing

Hi Simon,
This is a Gossamer Wing Butterfly in the family Lycaenidae, which includes Blues, Hairstreaks and Coppers.  Sorry we cannot provide a species identification.

Gossamer Wing

Gossamer Wing

Daniel,
Thanks for the quick response, I have done some further research in the last 24 hours and I think it could be this species, cacyreus lingeus or the Common bush blue, is this a possibility?
Simon

Hi again Simon,
We found an image of the Common Bush Blue on TrekNature and Butterflies of Africa and it does look like your butterfly.  The scientific name Cacyreus lingeus should have the first word or the genus name capitalized.

Daniel,
Thanks for taking the time!
There is about 20 to 30 different butterflies in the back yard at the moment, slowly going through them all, so may send some more if I get stuck again,
Regards
Simon

You are welcome Simon.  Our identification requests are starting to pick up again as spring is hitting much of the northern hemisphere, but we would love to post additional nice photos of African butterflies, especially if you already have them identified.  Please use our standard submission form for any nice photos you have that you would like us to post.

Mating Common Bush Blues

Mating Common Bush Blues look like Jumping Spider

Daniel,
What caught my eye with these Cacyreus lingeus is that I also saw a pair mating, and after a bit of maneuvering and jostling about, they settled down into the one position for about 5 to 10 minutes or so, and the pattern of the “eyes” on the wings of the joined butterflies, as well as the final configuration of both showed a distinct mimicry of a jumping spider.
In the brief research that I have done, I have not seen anything written anywhere of two separate insects actually using mimicry as a defense mechanism before, although they were still for quite a while so were fair game without some defense system.
Have attached the photo to see what you think?

That is an awesome observation Simon.  They really do look like the face of a Jumping Spider.  Perhaps it is time for you to write a paper.  We will be adding this photo to your original submission as well as making it a unique posting that is a feature.

 


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Subject: Is it a Gray Hairstreak Butterfly?
Location: Coryell County, central Texas
February 7, 2013 3:17 pm
Wow, what a mimic! This little butterfly kept rubbing its hind wings together, making the projectiles tremble like antennae. It also tended to feed head-down, and the orange spots on the hind wings look like eyes. I’m guessing this protects its actual head as well as looking a little scary. Well played, little butterfly, well played. Is it a Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus)?
Signature: Ellen

Gray Hairstreak

Dear Ellen,
We are in 100% agreement with your hypothesis of the mimicry of the Gray Hairstreak.  These may be your finest photographs yet.

Gray Hairstreak

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination