Currently viewing the category: "Gossamer Wings"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Last ID
Location:  Kings Canyon National Park, California
July 30, 3014
hi what’s that bug?
hoping you can help ID this small butterfly from july 17, 2014.
kings canyon national park, CA.
thanks very much,
clare, los angeles.

Female Acmon Blue

Female Acmon Blue

Hi Clare,
This appears to be a female Acmon Blue,
Plebejus acmon, and you can compare your individual to this mounted specimen on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Butterfly
Location:  Kings Canyon National Park, California
July 30, 2014
dear what’s that bug?
my journey to kings canyon certainly gave opportunities to see insects!
can you tell me what this small butterfly is?
and i assume that’s a honeybee?
thank you.
clare. los angeles.

Gray Hairstreak

Gray Hairstreak

Hi Clare,
The color is somewhat washed out, but this appears to be a Gray Hairstreak,
Strymon melinus, a species found throughout North America, according to BugGuide.  The Gray Hairstreak is sharing the blossom with a Honey Bee.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Grey hairstreaks puddling
Location: Baltimore Maryland
July 19, 2014 1:33 pm
While out walking in my local park I came across a puddle where some Grey hairstreak male butterflies had gathered and wanted to share the picture with you guys :)
Signature: R.W

Puddling Eastern Tailed Blues

Puddling Eastern Tailed Blues

Dear R.W.,
Your image of puddling Gossamer Winged Butterflies is quite beautiful, however we would like to correct your identification.  We believe these are Eastern Tailed Blues,
Cupido comyntas, not Gray Hairstreaks.  Compare the markings on the images of Eastern Tailed Blues on BugGuide to the images of Gray Hairstreaks on BugGuide, and we believe you will agree with our correction.

I do agree and thank you for the correction, I was going vaguely based on memory of past books I’ve borrowed from the library- I wish you guys the best and have a safe summer.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Blue Butterfly Drowning Incident
Location: Silver Lake (Los Angeles) CA
July 10, 2014 12:26 am
Hi Daniel,
These tiny butterflies never stand still long enough to get a good photo, except when they turn up in the dog’s water bowl. In the sunlight, their wings flash brilliant blue near their bodies (I thought their bodies were even blue – after reviewing the photos – I was wrong on that count.)
Wingtip to wingtip, the butterfly might measure an entire inch across. In the sun they look more gray than brown and their blue is iridescent. They particularly like the Plumbago (blue flowers) growing all over the hill.
http://redcarproperty.blogspot.com/2014/07/corralitas-drive-blue-butterfly-drowns.html
Signature: Diane E

Marine Blue

Marine Blue

Hi Diane,
The Marine Blue,
Leptotes marina, is a very common butterfly in Los Angeles, and their adaptation to cultivated plumbago as a larval food plant has undoubtedly led to the presence of the Marine Blue throughout Los Angeles.  This female has more brown on its wings than the bluer male.  The North American Butterfly Association (NABA) website has a nice comparison of the sexes.  It appears that the coloration of the Marine Blue is not because of pigment, but because of the way the scales react to light, so we will attempt additional research on this speculation.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Lycaenidae Butterfly
Location: Grete, Greece
July 4, 2014 1:47 pm
Dear “what’s the bug”
I have been for a long time trying to identify this butterfly. I tend to believe that it is a common blue (Polyommatus icarus) but I am not sure, because the spots are not that clear. Could you please help me identify it? It was photographed in the island of Crete, Greece in 16 March 2013. The habitat was brushwood under heavy grazing pressure.
Thanks a lot in advance
Signature: Thanasis

Blue

Blue

Dear Thanasis,
Blues are a very difficult group for us to identity, but we are posting your images and we will do the research.  Meanwhile, perhaps one of our readers who is more familiar with the Lycaean Blues will write in and assist in the identification.

Grecian Blue

Grecian Blue

Dear Daniel Marlos,
thank you very much for your immediate reply. I’m grateful for your help, and I hope that there will be a solution (it’s been more than a year that a have not succeeded to ID this butterfly.)
Best Regards,
Thanasis

Hi again Thanasis,
Many times we get comments that identify a species from long ago in our archives, and we are no longer able to contact the person who submitted the request, so we would advise you to place a comment on the posting to connect you to people who may write in in the future.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Western Pygmy Blue
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
June 24, 2014 5:00 PM
While taking some images of the California Harvester Ants, we noticed a butterfly so small it could only be a Western Pygmy Blue.  Our images are not as nice as Anna’s are, but they do document this lovely diminutive butterfly in Mount Washington.

Western Pygmy Blue

Western Pygmy Blue

The Western Pygmy Blue is the smallest butterfly in North America.

Western Pygmy Blue

Western Pygmy Blue

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination