Currently viewing the category: "Brush Footed Butterflies"
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Gulf Fritillary

Gulf Fritillary

Subject: Is this a Gulf Fritillary?
Location: Coryell County, TX
October 20, 2014 11:05 am
Hello!
Unexpected beauty next to a drainage ditch. I leaned way over a fence to try to get images of this beautiful butterfly. Is it another Gulf Fritillary?
Ironic that this butterfly enjoyed the wild pink wood sorrel, and ignored the carefully planted and tended garden flowers nearby. There’s a lesson there.
Best wishes!
Signature: Ellen

Gulf Fritillary

Gulf Fritillary

Hi Ellen,
You are absolutely correct that this is a Gulf Fritillary, but we kind of believe you knew in your heart of hearts that you were correct.  The Gulf Fritillary is truly a unique butterfly, though we seem to recall similar looking members of the genus that do not range north of the Mexico/US border.
  We also have a vague recollection that the Gulf Fritillary is not native to the US, but that with the introduction of Gulf Fritillary Caterpillar’s southern food plant, the passionflower, it has expanded its range north.

Gulf Fritillary

Gulf Fritillary

Subject: Gulf Fritillary?, Part 2
Location: Coryell County, Texas
October 20, 2014 11:19 am
This may be a clearer photo…
Signature: Ellen

Thanks Ellen,
We already posted all three of your beautiful images, and though this is more in focus than your first image, we love that previously you captured the butterfly in flight.

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Female California Mantis eats Monarch

Female California Mantis eats Monarch

Subject: Preying Mantis: eat, prey, love
Location: South Pasadena, CA
October 11, 2014 6:49 pm
Hello Daniel. Although I have a good population of mantises and monarchs, these were unusual sights for me. Only time I’ve ever seen a mantis eat a monarch, and only the second time I’ve seen the headless mating. This was last month, within the same week, and I think the same female mantis.
Signature: Barbara

Mating California Mantids with headless male

Mating California Mantids with headless male

Hi Barbara,
We get numerous wonderful submissions each day, but your submission with its excellent images is one of the best we have received in quite some time.  We believe these are native California Mantids,
Stagmomantis californica, and you can compare your female to this image on BugGuide.  The headless mating is is quite some documentation.

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Possibly Field Crescent

Possibly Field Crescent

Subject: A mystery white, and a checkerspot?
Location: Larimer county, CO, 8100′
October 10, 2014 8:46 am
A couple butterflies I hope you can help with. Both taken same location. Larimer county, Colorado foothills, 8100 feet elevation. October 8, 2014. Warm day, but well past 1st frost. … The second, I believe, is Gorgone checkerspot. Chlosyne gorgone, but not 100% certain. Sorry no pic of underside of this guy.
Signature: Matt in CO

Hi again Matt,
We are not fully convinced that this is a Gorgone Checkerspot, as your individual appears to have different markings than the individuals pictured on BugGuide.  We believe this might be a Field Crescent,
Phyciodes pulchella, which is also pictured on BugGuide, or perhaps a Painted Crescent, Phyciodes picta, which is also pictured on BugGuide.  Perhaps someone with better identification skills can assist us with this identification.  We believe the fly in the image might be a Tachinid Fly.

Thanks again. You may well be right. Both look good, but I especially like field crescent. My ID was largely based on http://www.birrellfineart.com/Big%20Picture%20Pages/c57%20gorgone%20checkerspot%200017%20big.htm, which, of course, could also be wrongly ID’d

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Subject: orange and black butterfly
Location: Pantanal, Mato Grosso Brazil
September 28, 2014 8:48 pm
taken in August 2014
Thanks, Bob
Signature: Robert Siegel, MD, PhD

"Naranjanita" or Bordered Patch

“Naranjita” or Bordered Patch

Dear Bob,
We initially thought that because of the pronounced labial palps, that this might be a Snout Butterfly in the subfamily Libytheinae, but we could find no similar looking members of the subfamily from Brazil in our initial search.  While we cannot confirm the subfamily at this time, we are confident that the Brushfooted Butterfly family Nymphalidae is correct.  We could not locate a match on Insetologia, our sister site from Brazil, nor did we have any luck on the Butterflies of Amazon & Andes.  Finally, we believe we found a match in the Bordered Patch,
Chlosyne lacinia, which according to the Butterflies in Brazil and Argentina at Iguazu Falls during Focus On Nature Tours site, is called the Naranjita and “has a very variable pattern. It prefers sunny places and feeds on nectar”.  The site also states:  “the Bordered Patch, the subspecies Chlosyne lacinia saundersi  This subspecies, in southeast Brazil and the Iguazu area, has more orange in the upperwings than other subspecies, hence the common name there of ‘Naranjita’. “  Now that we had a name, we did locate the Bordered Patch on the Butterflies of Amazon & Andes where it states:  “Males are usually seen either when nectaring at Asteraceae, or when imbibing mineralised moisture from patches of damp ground. Females when freshly emerged are so heavily laden with eggs that they are barely capable of flying.”  We have examples of the Bordered Patch from North America in our archives.

Bordered Patch

Bordered Patch

Dear Daniel –
Thanks!!!
You have come through for me again.
I’m hooked.
I told my class about the ID as well.
I will post another straight away.
Or is it better to email you directly?
All the best, Bob
Robert David Siegel, M.D., Ph.D.
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Program in Human Biology, Center for African Studies, and Woods Institute for the Environment
Stanford University

Hi Bob,
Please send any new submissions using our standard form at Ask What’s That Bug?

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Subject: Bitten by a cicada
Location: Chicago IL, cir 1980
September 16, 2014 10:05 am
Hi! I’ve noticed in a few of your ID’s os of cicadas you mention the report of someone being bitten (or rather stabbed) by one. I was bitten by one when I was a boy! I always loved them and was super excited when I found one. I let this male that I found under a maple tree in Chicago climb my left index finger. About half way up it stopped and suddenly stabbed into my finger with its proboscis! It hurt like hell, much like being stabbed with a 20g needle. I don’t think it had any venom; the pain was purely from mechanical trauma. Anyway, I yanked it off my finger and tossed it into the air after which it buzzed off happily.
Random butterfly photo from the Bosque Del Apache reserve.
Signature: Mike

Western Painted Lady

Western Painted Lady

Dear Mike,
Thank you for substantiating the possibility that a person might be bitten by a Cicada if it is carelessly handled.  Your image of a Western Painted Lady,
Vanessa annabella, is beautiful.

 

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Subject: Butterfly?
Location: Nashville, Tennessee
September 8, 2014 10:07 am
It has the little balls at the end of the antenna and did flutter its wings open and closed slowly when it landed. I can’t tell what species or name for the butterfly….or perhaps it is a moth!
Signature: Lauren

Tawny Emperor

Tawny Emperor

Dear Lauren,
This is a beautiful Tawny Emperor butterfly, and its wings are so perfect and pristine, we would almost guess that you might have observed it on its maiden flight.  BugGuide pictures four subspecies of Tawny Emperors, and we believe your individual looks most like
Asterocampa clyton clyton as pictured on BugGuide.  There are some nice images on The Butterflies and Moths of North America where this account is provided of the “Life History: Males perch on trees in full sun to watch for females. Eggs are laid in large groups of 200-500 on bark or the underside of mature leaves of host plants. Caterpillars eat leaves and young ones feed gregariously. Third-stage caterpillars hibernate in groups of about 10 inside a dead curled leaf.”  We think your photo with the foreshortened perspective on the perfect wings is quite unique among images we have seen online.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination