Currently viewing the category: "Brush Footed Butterflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: More Butterflies at the Beach
Location: Aransas Pass, Texas
May 4, 2015 9:13 am
Thank you so much for your help with the American Lady Butterfly! I hadn’t photographed one before.
We saw many, many butterflies on our trip to Corpus Christi, including a large number of Red Admirals. Here are some photos of a Red Admiral nectaring on Lantana at The University of Texas Marine Science Institute at Aransas Pass, Texas.
Thank you and best wishes!
Signature: Ellen

Red Admiral

Red Admiral

Hi Ellen,
We are thrilled to be able to post images of butterflies you encountered on your road trip.

Red Admiral

Red Admiral

Subject: Butterflies on the way to the Beach
Location: Pleasanton, Texas
May 4, 2015 9:18 am
Side note…
We stopped for gasoline at a mini mart south of Pleasanton, Texas, on our way to the Corpus Christi, and saw many Red Admirals puddling in the parking lot and visiting the trees edging the lot. Beauty at the quick stop! They definitely dressed up the place.
I saw at least ten Red Admirals within thirty minutes yesterday as I sat on the back porch at our home. Amazing this spring, so many butterflies!
Thank you and take care.
Signature: Ellen

Red Admiral Puddling

Red Admiral Puddling

Hi again Ellen,
Puddling, Butterflies taking moisture from damp soil and mud puddles is such a wonderful phenomenon to observe, especially in situations where there are multiple species and large numbers of individuals.

Red Admiral Puddling

Red Admiral Puddling

Kathryn Allen, Sue Dougherty, Alisha Bragg, Carol Love, Kathy Haines, Jaye Ridet, Andrea Leonard Drummond, Amy Gosch, Mary Lemmink Lawrence liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Butterfly at the Beach
Location: Aransas Pass, Texas
May 3, 2015 9:32 pm
Hello, we’re seeing a tremendous number of butterflies this spring. This one was enjoying the lantana at The University of Texas Marine Science Institute on April 28th, just yards from the Gulf of Mexico. I think it’s an Emperor, but still find them confusing despite your help identifying them in the fall of 2013.
Thank you and best wishes!
Signature: Ellen

May 3, 2015 10:09 pm
Hello again,
Could the butterfly be one of the Ladies, perhaps an American Lady? I didn’t see the lovely rose color under the wing, though, and the eye spots are confusing me. Thank you!
Signature: Ellen

American Lady

American Lady

Dear Ellen,
You are correct that this is an American Lady,
Vanessa virginiensis, and this composite image on BugGuide explains the differences between the American Lady and the Painted Lady.  Though your garden photos of butterflies like this Red Admiral are lovely, it is refreshing to know you also take images of butterflies in your travels.

American Lady

American Lady

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: CA Sister?
Location: Foothills of the San Gabriel Mountains, Pasadena, CA
May 2, 2015 4:13 pm
Hi Daniel,
Here are two photos I took of what I think is a California sister last weekend. It was on a willow in the bed of the Arroyo Seco a little upstream of Hahamongna Watershed Park.
Signature: Scott

California Sister

California Sister

Dear Scott,
Thanks so much for sending in your images of a California Sister,
Adelpha californica, and it is wonderful that you were able to capture both a dorsal view and closed wing view revealing the ventral surface.  According to BugGuide, they are found in “Mostly mountain and canyon terrain. Associated with Oaks (Quercus species, which are the larval food plants.”

California Sister

California Sister

Andrea Leonard Drummond, Alisha Bragg, Alfonso Moreno, Norman Gems liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Red Admiral Butterfly?
Location: Coryell County, Central Texas
April 9, 2015 3:51 pm
Hello! You identified a Red Admiral for me several years ago, and I believe that’s what these are. I’m not sure if these photos all show the same individual. We are seeing a lot of these butterflies right now. Spring rains have yielded many flowers, including these Pinkie Indian Hawthorns and our neighbors’ Red Tip Photinias, another favorite of these butterflies. I saw online that Red Admiral larvae eat nettles; we have soooo many nettles, and the caterpillars are more than welcome to them!
The temperature is 80 degrees F, and we’re enjoying partly cloudy skies ahead of a supposedly severe thunderstorm to occur in a few hours.
Thank you and best wishes!
Signature: Ellen

Red Admiral

Red Admiral

Hi Ellen,
It is very nice to hear from you and your Red Admiral images are a wonderful addition to our spring postings.  This spring we have been watching several Red Admirals in our own garden where they appear on sunny afternoons.  We don’t witness nectaring activity, but rather territorial battling with individuals attempting to chase one another away.

Red Admiral

Red Admiral

Lori Filipovich Kelly, Leslie Gist, Amy Gosch, Sue Dougherty liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Mourning Cloak, Harbinger of Spring
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
March 29, 2015 8:50 AM
For the past few sunny days, we have observed Mourning Cloaks flying in the yard.  Just yesterday we watched two battling for territory.  This morning we were lucky to have a camera handy while walking into Elyria Canyon Park in Mount Washington.  We watched this freshly eclosed beauty soaking in the sun, but it flew as we approached.  We only got so close as it perched on the Wild Cucumber climbing a fence, but it soon alighted again on a nearby endangered California Black Walnut.  We knew this individual was probably a young specimen because those that hibernate through the winter often have tattered wings.

Mourning Cloak with Wild Cucumber

Mourning Cloak with Wild Cucumber

Mourning Cloak on California Black Walnut

Mourning Cloak on California Black Walnut

Erica Russo, Robin Powell, Andrea Leonard Drummond, Alfonso Moreno, Timothy Steele, Christy Harris, Carol Love, Sue Dougherty, Amy Gosch, Alisha Bragg, Kathy Haines liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Migrating Painted Ladies
Location: Elyria Canyon Park, Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
February 14, 2015 10:00 AM
Though we have received many images recently from our readers, we made a decision to select our Bug of the Month for March 2015 from our own images because of the significant seasonal migration of Painted Ladies this year.  According to Julian Donahue, the Painted Ladies are: “particularly active on the wing now, and most appear to be migrating, pausing to nectar on their way farther north.” The Painted Lady,
Vanessa cardui, is a medium sized orange butterfly with a mottled wing pattern and distinctive “eye spots” on the underwings. Painted Ladies were seen taking nectar from the pictured Mule Fat or Baccharis salicifolia, Coastal Bush Sunflower and Manroot. Caterpillars feed on both native and non-native leaves, and the Arroyo Lupine, that is currently blooming, is one native host plant.

Painted Lady

Painted Lady

Painted Lady

Painted Lady

Nadine Gray, Sue Dougherty, Rhiannon Thomas, Alfonso Moreno, Kristi E. Lambert liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination