Currently viewing the category: "Brush Footed Butterflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Butterfly or Moth? Then what kind?
Location: New York
July 18, 2014 7:30 am
I live in Upstate New York and found this guy fluttering around. I’m sure it’s common but cannot find one with the same ratio of orange on top wings to basically all brown lower wings.
Signature: Thank You, Sarah Burr

Questionmark

Questionmark

Dear Sarah,
This is one of the Anglewing Butterflies in the genus
Polygonia.  We believe it is the Questionmark, Polygonia interrogationis.  These are butterflies that hibernate, and judging from the tattered wings, this is an old individual, perhaps one that originally emerged in Fall 2013 and hibernated through the winter.  It is likely near the end of its life.  Here is a BugGuide image of a lovely younger individual.  The common name Questionmark is due to the presence of a silver marking on the ventral surface of the hindwing which resembles the punctuation mark.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Butterfly
Location: Morgantown, wv
July 16, 2014 4:47 am
This butterfly had me awestruck due to its beauty and how it would not leave. My son and I were having a phone conversation over some serious issues and it was like God was speaking thru nature to say he would be faithful as he also provides for this beautiful butterfly. I took May photos with my iPad and I could get very close.
Signature: What’s that bug

Red Spotted Purple

Red Spotted Purple

Your butterfly is a Red Spotted Purple.  Several years ago we proposed that the Red Spotted Purple might be the most beautiful North American butterfly, though your image does not really do it justice.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: butterfly or moth
Location: south eastern CT
July 10, 2014 11:15 am
this photo was taken in July in SE CT. the butterfly or moth is on butterfly weed. Can you identify it?
Signature: curious

Greater Fritillary

Greater Fritillary

Dear curious,
This gorgeous butterfly is a Greater Fritillary in the genus
Speyeria, and as you can see from BugGuide, there are many similar looking species.  We suspect this is most likely a Great Spangled Fritillary, Speyeria cybele.

thank you so much.  I was looking on a CT insects web site, but there are so many different, but similar pictures, I didn’t know where to start.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Butterfly
Location: Yunguilla Valley, Ecuador
June 11, 2014 10:08 pm
June 9, 2014, I photographed this small blue butterfly near our house in the Yunguilla Valley, Azuay Province, Ecuador, 53 km southwest of Cuenca, EC. It’s wingspan is probably less than 3 cm. We are in the mountains of the Yunguilla Valley at an elevation of about 1900 meters. I haven’t seen this particular butterfly before and have only seen this one.
Signature: Kathie Sedwick

Possibly Brush Footed Butterfly

Brush Footed Butterfly is Dynamine sara

Hi Kathie,
This is a lovely butterfly, and we believe it might be a Brushfooted Butterfly in the family Nymphalidae.  For some reason, we are having internet problems this morning which is slowing down our research.  To further complicate things, we are about to leave town for a spell, and we want to get this posted, however, identification may take some time.

Thank you for your fast response.  That could narrow it down some for me.  Have a good trip!

Update:  Dynamine sara
Thanks to a comment from Cesar Crash of Insetologia, the Brazilian equivalent of What’s That Bug?, we have verified that this is
Dynamine sara thanks to Pinterest and Butterflies of America.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: mourning cloaks abound
Location: hermann, missouri
June 9, 2014 2:17 pm
we saw the first one or two here on our farm for the first time in 2012. last year there were a small number and THIS YEAR…. they are abundant! we had a flight of them about two months ago and then, from Weds 6/4-today 6/9 they are everywhere you look. Why are there so many this summer?
Signature: eight pond farm

Mourning Cloak

Mourning Cloak

Dear eight pond farm,
Like many other insects and living creatures for that matter, the varying numbers of Mourning Cloaks from year to year are an effect of other conditions, including weather patterns, available food, number of predators and countless other, sometimes seemingly unrelated factors.  All life is interconnected and perhaps the winter favored the survival of the hibernating adults which then laid numerous eggs and the caterpillars might have escaped predation because a predator did not have a similar success rate.  Interestingly, last month you sent in an image of a population explosion of the predatory Caterpillar Hunters known as Fiery Searchers.
 Since there was a healthy population of Mourning Cloak Caterpillars, that fed an equally healthy population of Fiery Searchers, it is evident from this inquiry that both predators and prey have abounded, and obviously a large number of the caterpillars survived predation. We also received a report this spring from Texas of a large number of Mourning Cloak Chrysalides.  We wish your image was a higher resolution.

Thanks Daniel!   i’ll take another photo and send it in a large-rez Mourning Cloak for you.   and thanks for the explanation.   the firery searchers don’t seem large enough to prey upon mourning cloak larvae??   and yes, both these upsurges are quite noticeable!    but i am not noticing a downtrend in anything except for monarchs.   our bee population seems to be the same as it always has been btw, even bumblebees….
connie

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beautiful butterfly
Location: Raanana, Israel
May 10, 2014 2:26 pm
Hello
I found this beautiful, colorful butterfly in a garden in Raanana, central Israel.
Can you please identify it?
Sorry about the picture quality, all I had was a cell phone camera, plus I was keeping my distance to avoid scaring it off.
Thank you
Signature: Gal

Red Admiral

Red Admiral

Dear Gal,
This is a Red Admiral butterfly, a species found worldwide across the northern hemisphere.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination