Currently viewing the category: "Brush Footed Butterflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Puerto Rican Butterfly
Location: Puerto Rico
April 3, 2014 6:07 pm
Hi Bugman,
I’ve been following your website for years and greatly enjoy it, so I’m excited to finally be able to send in an identification request. A few weeks ago I took a trip to Puerto Rico with fellow biologists and artists, and we came across this butterfly. I’m not sure which rainforest it was in, but the forest was about an hour away from the town of Manati and had several caves (we found a Puerto Rican boa!). I wish I could have taken a picture with its wings open, but I did not want to disturb it.
The photo was captured with the Canon 100mm f/2.8.
Thank you!
Signature: Casey

Malachite

Malachite

Hi Casey,
We are glad to learn that you have been enjoying what What’s That Bug? has to offer to the world.  This beautiful green butterfly is a Malachite,
Siproeta stelenes, and the Puerto Rico Wildlife website confirms is presence in Puerto Rico.  According to the Butterflies and Moths of North America, the range of the Malachite is:  “Brazil north through Central America, Mexico, and the West Indies to southern Florida and South Texas. A rare stray into Kansas. Comments: The southern Florida populations have become established since the 1960s; presumably having emigrated from Cuba.”  Despite being naturalized in North America, we haven’t ever received an image of this lovely species, and your wonderful image is the first.  We have seen many decorative butterfly collections that include the Malachite, so we suspect it is a species that is common on butterfly farms.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Daniel – Monarch Butterfly Eclosion
Location: Hawthorne, CA
January 22, 2014 1:42 pm
Hi Daniel,
Marty noticed Monday that the only Monarch chrysalis we’ve spotted this go ’round was turning very dark and clearing. He predicted eclosion to within 15 minutes! I set up the camera and went inside to cook while he kept watch. She spent the night protected amongst the Rock Purslane in front of the shed, and took flight as soon as the sun hit them Tuesday morning. She’s a real beauty and is still visiting the back today. Hope you enjoy the photos.
Signature: Anna Carreon

Monarch Chrysalis about to undergo transformation

Monarch Chrysalis about to undergo transformation

Hi Anna,
Thanks for providing this wonderful documentation of the eclosion of a Monarch.  We are happy to learn that producing these images did not delay your culinary diversions.

Monarch emerges from Chrysalis

Monarch emerges from Chrysalis

Female Monarch expands her wings after eclosion

Female Monarch expands her wings after eclosion

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Catapiller
Location: Central Brazil
January 4, 2014 5:53 am
What is this guy? We found him in our garage and have not seen this type before.
Signature: Bug Boys

Ruddy Daggerwing Caterpillar

Ruddy Daggerwing Caterpillar

Dear Bug Boys,
We had this pegged as the caterpillar of a butterfly in the family Nymphalidae, and when we searched for possible matches, we learned it is a Ruddy Daggerwing Caterpillar because of a matching photo on Butterfly Fun Facts.  We verified that identification on BugGuide, and according to the information page on BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on fig, Ficus species. In Florida this is likely to be Strangler Fig, Ficus aurea.”  We are deducing that you must have a nearby Ficus plant.  Butterflies of America, which pictures the adult Ruddy Daggerwing, confirms that this species is found in Brazil.

Wow, thanks! You are right.  We do have some Ficus around.  You are my boys new favorite website.
Sincerely,
Bridget

You are very welcome Bridget.  Though we have a significant number of Brazilian species on our site, most of our archives is made up of North American and Australian insects.  You might also want to look at Cesar Crash’s Insetologia website which is patterned on our format.  Cesar is a frequent contributor to What’s That Bug? and his site will most likely have more local species for you.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  mourning cloak hanging out on a motorcycle
Location:  Long Beach, California
December 31, 2013 5:20 AM
Thank you for the quick response!  Actually, it was easy to explain, since I was taking the picture when my boss got back from his own lunch break.  And yes, potato bugs–we find those in our yard quite often.  The dogs are freaked out by them :-)  I’ve never taken any pics of those, but I do have some (in my humble opinion) nice shots of a mourning cloak hanging out on a motorcycle.
Signature: SMTO

Mourning Cloak on a Motorcycle

Mourning Cloak on a Motorcycle

Thank you for attaching your Mourning Cloak photo.  Was it taken in Irvine as well?  We used a lovely image of a Viceroy on a Motorcycle when we produced a What’s That Bug? calendar back in 2006.

The mourning cloak was in Long Beach, taken several years ago.  I managed about 10 decent shots before it flew off.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: aussietrev
Location: Queensland, Australia
December 30, 2013 11:13 pm
Hi guys,
All the best for the festive season and a fantastic new year. Hope you like this shot of the Blue Tiger Butterfly, seems a bit under represented on the site. They pass through my property on their migratory journey each year but it is rare to get one sitting still long enough for a shot.
Keep up the good work, till next year then,
best wishes
Trevor
Signature: aussietrev

Blue Tiger Butterfly

Blue Tiger Butterfly

Hi Trevor,
Thanks for sending in your beautiful image.  We have to admit that for the past few days, we have been mostly fielding requests to identify Household Intruders and many of those images have been blurry and lacking in critical detail.  While cellular telephones allow folks to document things they encounter, the bottom line is that the quality of the images produced on the best portable communication devices pales when compared to the fine digital images that are produced with professional cameras when they are in trained artistic hands.  As the relevance of teaching photography comes under scrutiny due to budget cuts at the college level in America, we can’t help but to ponder the ubiquity of the photographic image and the importance good photographs play on successful websites.  Excellent quality images like your Blue Tiger Butterfly,
Tirumala hamata, help to make our humble website a more exciting place to visit.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Sting from below caterpillar
Location: Singapore
December 13, 2013 7:27 am
Hi there, wonder if you can help. Got stung on the finger by photographed caterpillar as I was touching it (now I know I shouldn’t).
Felt the sting at that moment though I’m not seeing any welts for past six hours.
Any course for worry? Can you identify this species and is this poisonous?
Hope to get your email reply.
Best,
Signature: Nicky

Probably Brush Footed Butterfly Caterpillar

Probably Brush Footed Butterfly Caterpillar

Dear Nicky,
We believe this is the caterpillar of a Brush Footed Butterfly.  It looks very similar to some North American Caterpillars like the Questionmark and the Mourning Cloak.  We will try to contact Keith Wolfe to see if he is able to identify your caterpillar to the species level.  While a stinging sensation may occur upon contact with the spines, to the best of our knowledge, there are no lasting effects.

Keith Wolfe identifies the Tawny Coster Caterpillar
Hello Nicky and Daniel,
This is a Tawny Coster (Acraea violae) caterpillar, a butterfly that only recently became established in Singapore (http://butterflycircle.blogspot.com/2008/03/voyage-of-tawny-coster.html).  Nicky, I’d wager that what you felt was a prick from a sharp spine and NOT a poisonous sting, for though these caterpillars feed on a family of toxic plants (Passifloraceae; additional photos/info — http://butterflycircle.blogspot.com/2013/02/life-history-of-tawny-coster.html), they’re essentially harmless to touch, at least in my hands-on experience.  Of course, the outcome could be different if a person is allergic or sensitive to such contact or decided to eat one (as a bird would) for breakfast.
Best wishes,
Keith

Dear Daniel and Keith,
Thanks for your prompt replies. Bingo on the caterpilla – what a beauty it will transform into.
Cheers,
Nicky

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination