Currently viewing the category: "Brush Footed Butterflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Penang Butterfly Farm
Location: Penang, Malaysia
February 7, 2016
Here are the adult’s. The one with more colour I think is the male.
Best wishes,
Aeve

Leopard Lacewing

Leopard Lacewing

Dear Aeve,
Thanks for sending some butterfly images to accompany the Caterpillar image you sent previously.  One image appears to be a male Leopard Lacewing,
Cethosia cyane, but we believe the other image is another species of Brushfooted Butterfly.  We quickly identified it as a Jewelled Nawab Butterfly, Polyura delphis, thanks to Getty ImagesLearn About Butterflies uses the common name White Nawab and states:  “The butterflies are characterised by their distinctive wing shape with twin tails on the hindwings, a feature strongly reminiscent of the African Charaxes. Most have dark brown uppersides with bands of dazzling creamy white which vary in size and shape from one species to another. These bands are usually repeated on the underside in a beautiful shade of pale green, but in the case of delphis the underside is white, and marked with orange, yellow and grey spots and lunules, hence its alternative name the Jewelled Nawab.  Polyura delphis is one of the scarcer species, and is found in Assam, Sikkim, Myanmar, Thailand, peninsular Malaysia, Sumatra, Sabah, Brunei, Kalimantan, Palawan and Java.”

Brushfooted Butterfly

Jeweled Nawab Butterfly

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Butterfly found in school garden
Location: Sierra Madre / CA
October 26, 2015 5:22 pm
Is this a painted lady? Thanks!!!!
Signature: Lisa

Gulf Fritillary

Gulf Fritillary

Dear Lisa,
This is a Gulf Fritillary, not a Painted Lady, though the two species are in the same family and both are mostly orange.  The Gulf Fritillary is rarely found far from passionflower vines as the leaves are the Gulf Fritillary Caterpillar‘s food.

Great thanks! I figured this out too. Glad for the verification! Are you in Altadena? Are you friends by chance with Gail Swanlund?

Hi again Lisa,
Our offices are in Mount Washington.  I do know Gail Swanlund.  She was a very early fan of What’s That Bug? when we were still in print and not yet online.  She is mentioned in this old Silverfish posting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Monarch Migration
Location: Coryell County, TX
October 20, 2015 1:53 pm
Hello again, the Monarch migration has begun here in central Texas. Just like last year, the butterflies stop to drink water droplets after our sprinkler has watered the lawn.
We need rain badly, although we are not under drought restrictions due to record-setting rains last spring. The weather is otherwise wonderful, 80 degrees and clear, with a light breeze. Here is a link to the current sightings:
http://www.learner.org/jnorth/monarch/fall2015/monarch-butterfly-migration100815.html
The monarchs remind me of fall leaves floating through the air and settling on the grass.
Signature: Ellen

Female Monarch

Female Monarch

He Ellen,
Your female Monarch is lovely.  We hope she visited the milkweed and laid some eggs for you to watch.  Monarchs do have such a lazy way of flying that we often marvel they are able to fly so many miles when they migrate.

Female Monarch

Female Monarch

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: butterfly
Location: El Naranjal, Colima, Mexico
October 19, 2015 6:53 pm
Hi Bug Man. Can you help me identify this beauty? Have I discovered a rare and endangered creature? It has a sliver underside.
Signature: Diane

Mexican Silverspot

Mexican Silverspot

Dear Diane,
While you haven’t discovered a rare and endangered creature, you did discover your almost namesake as the Mexican Silverspot has the scientific name Dione moneta poeyii.  We first found a matching image by scrolling to the very bottom of The Dauphins site, and we verified that identification on the Butterflies of America site.  The Butterflies and Moths of North America states:  ” Demonstrably secure globally, though it may be quite rare in parts of its range, especially at the periphery” and the range is indicated as “Brazil north through Central America and Mexico. Strays to southern New Mexico and Texas.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spotted Orange moth
Location: Chicago, IL USA
August 16, 2015 5:17 am
Hello –
I found this beautiful moth in Chicago last night, and can’t seem to find anything that looks similar. It was sitting in the sun for a while and seem to like getting it’s picture take. Could you help?
Signature: Robert

Questionmark

Questionmark

Dear Robert,
This is not a moth.  It is a butterfly, and if you look closely at your image with the closed wings, you will see a silver mark in the center of the hind wing that looks like a “?” and that marking gives this butterfly its common name Questionmark.

Questionmark

Questionmark

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Lots of Butterflies!!!
Location: Powell, Ohio
August 4, 2015 11:13 am
Two yellow swallowtails (I think), and a monarch, visited our garden today!!!! One swallowtail was noticeably bigger than the other and a bit raggedy. The monarch wasn’t cooperating for pictures, kept flirting about, but I got one off when it rested in a tree. The monarch was very interested in the milkweed plant we let grow by the patio! So pretty!
Signature: Amber

Female Tiger Swallowtail

Female Tiger Swallowtail

Dear Amber,
Thanks for sending us documentation of your day of butterfly watching.  The tattered Tiger Swallowtail is a female who can be distinguished from the male by the dusting of blue scales on the hind wings.

Tiger Swallowtail

Tiger Swallowtail

Monarch

Monarch

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination