Currently viewing the category: "Brush Footed Butterflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Butterfly ID
Location: Pacific Grove, CA
September 23, 2016 11:48 pm
Hi, This butterfly appeared on our back deck and stayed on the flower for quite a while. We think it’s a kind of American Lady. We were curious whether it is color or markings that distinguishes among sub-families. It was in Pacific Grove, California, morning, and spent a lot of time on the flower. Note that because of squirrels we’ve converted from fruit trees to pollinators and installed a very successful beehive. Thanks for taking a look at this. Good luck!
Signature: David

American Lady

American Lady

Dear David,
We agree that this is an American Lady,
Vanessa virginiensis, and according to BugGuide:  “If present (it isn’t always–see below), a white dot in the orange of the forewing distinguishes American Lady from the Painted Lady.”  This BugGuide illustration nicely explains how to distinguish various species.  Though its wings are faded, your individual still shows the telltale white spot.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Butterfly Invasion
Location: Coryell County, TX
September 15, 2016 7:21 pm
Hello! We’re being invaded by small, fast butterflies in the hundreds, thousands, maybe millions. I think they’re American snout butterflies (“snout-nosed”). You kindly identified one for me a few years ago. I haven’t seen so many butterflies at one time since 1961, when clouds of monarchs in Illinois fled south ahead of a drastic cold front.
These have made the news! http://texasbutterflyranch.com/2016/09/10/invasion-of-snout-nosed-butterflies-returns-to-central-and-south-texas/
Please excuse the poor photography. They sometimes stop to puddle or rest, but aren’t visiting our flowers. The American snouts in our area are all heading toward the E/NE, most are battered and worn. Quite sad, actually. I saw one monarch today, but it was heading south.
Butterfly mania. Best wishes, love your site.
Signature: Ellen

American Snout

American Snout

Good Morning Ellen,
These are indeed American Snouts, and when we posted your previous images in 2013, we quoted Butterflies Through Binoculars:  The West by Jeffrey Glassberg who wrote:  “Sometimes swarming in the millions (in the Rio Grande Valley), this is the chameleon of the butterfly world.  When you are searching for a special butterfly, American Snouts will magically assume the appearance of that butterfly, or perhaps it’s vice versa.”

American Snout

American Snout

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Butterfly
Location: Kenai,alaska
September 10, 2016 11:42 am
Wondering what the name of this butterfly is?? I live in Kenai,Alaska and it is September. A lot different looking than the milbert fortis shell morning cloak.
Signature: Tammy Thompson

Anglewing Butterfly

Green Comma Butterfly

Dear Tammy,
This is one of the Anglewing Butterflies in the genus
Polygonia.  It might be the Green Comma, Polygonia faunus, based on this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide the habitat is:  “Northern and high mountain woodlands, often associated with broken terrain and near streams.”  Another possibility is the Hoary Comma, Polygonia gracilis, and according to Butterflies and Moths of North America, the range is:  “Boreal North America south of the tundra. Central Alaska south to central California and northern New Mexico; east across southern Canada and the Great Lakes region to New England and the Maritimes.”  We turned away from the internet and referenced our Butterflies Through Binoculars, The West field guide by Jeffrey Glassberg and we are now confident this is a Green Comma, because of the description:  “Usually the wings are more jagged than other anglewings.  … Above note the two black spots on the inner margin of the FW (top spot sometimes faint) and the black spot in the middle of the HW.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: isnt this a paper kite butterfly..??
Location: Kalimantan Island, Indonesia
September 4, 2016 9:34 pm
hello.. i want to know about this butterfly.. do you think this is a paper kite butterfly (Idea leuconoe)..?? i took the picture in Kalimantan Island,, Indonesia..
Signature: Reza Adi Pratama

Blue Glassy Tiger

Blue Glassy Tiger

Dear Reza,
We found the butterfly you mentioned,
Idea leuconoe, pictured on Butterfly Circle where it is commonly called a Mangrove Tree Nymph, and it is listed in the subfamily Danainae, which is the same subfamily as your individual, but it is also a different species.  We located an image on FlickR that matches your image and the butterfly is identified as a Blue Glassy Tiger, Ideopsis vulgaris.  According to Butterflies of Singapore:  “This species is locally common in Singapore and is most   likely encountered in coastal mangrove habitats such as the Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve and Pasir Ris Park. Occasionally the adults can also be spotted in some urban parks and gardens.”  The site also has excellent images of the entire life cycle of the Blue Glassy Tiger.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Red admiral camoflage
Location: Troy, VA
August 31, 2016 8:47 am
I thought you might like these photos I took of a red admiral beautifully camoflaged against tree bark. I saw the butterfly land and grabbed my camera. When I looked through the viewfinder, it had disappeared. I looked again and realized it was just magnificently camoflaged. Looking at it with the naked eye, it was invisible. I’ve included one photo of the butterfly with its wings open.
Signature: Grace Pedalino

Red Admiral

Red Admiral

Dear Grace,
Thanks for sending us your marvelous images illustrating the camouflage ability of the Red Admiral.  Many butterflies with brightly colored wings have brown, camouflage patterns on the undersides, including morphos, leaf butterflies and anglewings.

Red Admiral

Red Admiral

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: White Admiral
Location: Perinton, NY
August 15, 2016 6:38 pm
Here are some pics of a beautiful White Admiral that was on the right-of-way behind our home. This has been an amazing summer for finding a variety of different butterflies, all on the right-of-way, which is allowed to grow wild each year (in late Fall, the power company that owns it cuts everything down, but allows it to grow untouched in the Spring and Summer!). My son took the pic of the butterfly on my phone, it decided to land there as I was attempting a close-up shot of it! Enjoy!
Signature: Jennifer

White Admiral

White Admiral

Wow Jennifer,
This really is a gorgeous White Admiral.  Where we grew up in Ohio, we only saw the southern subspecies, the Red Spotted Purple.

White Admiral and Bumble Bee

White Admiral and Bumble Bee

Hi again Jennifer,
Once we posted your images, we realized that there was much more red on your White Admiral than on the individual from Ontario that we linked to, and that your individual actually looked more like the Western White Admiral, the subspecies
Limenitis arthemis rubrofasciata that is described on BugGuide.  There is a fourth, but somewhat unclear division for the species.  Here is the explanation on BugGuide for this color variation:  “There has been resistance to calling these subspecies rubrofasciata, yet they look very much the same. They replace typical subspecies arthemis at high elevation in the northeast U.S. and northward in eastern Canada, and form an eastern end to a continuum of similar looking insects that occurs right across Canada, barely lapping into the U.S. An interpretation that is becoming more and more widely accepted is that these northern insects (east or west) represent the main population of “White Admirals”. What we call typical subpsecies arthemis actually represents the intermediates or a cline (= transition) between White Admirals and Red-spotted Purples. They have the white band, but they also have increased bluish/purplish reflective area above, and less orange/red on the hind wing both above and below.
Because of all the confusion and discussion that has occurred to date, the northern types from the east are separated (probably temporarily) here to make the comparisons easier to make. They will perhaps eventually be officially called subspecies rubrofasciata, but alternately may receive their own subspecies name. It is impossible to draw a line between east and west (here, rather arbitrarily it is Ontario and Minnesota east, and Manitoba and North Dakota West). The line to the south is somewhat arbitrary too, since the northern and more southern “types” blend into one another, but generally northern insects with prominent submarginal reddish coloring on the upper hind wing and more extensive orange below are included here. This also emphasizes the point that the transition from White Admiral and Red-spotted Purple involves more features than just the presence or absence of a white band. It starts well into the populations that have white bands, and extends southward well into populations that mostly lack white bands entirely.”

White Admiral

White Admiral

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination