Currently viewing the category: "Butterflies and Skippers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What butterfly is this?
Location: Old Fort, NC 28762
June 11, 2015 4:23 pm
This butterfly landed on the wood of my back porch and just stayed in one place until it left but it slowly opened and closed it’s wings the whole time (15-20 minutes). I’ve tried other butterfly/bug identifying websites but I couldn’t find a picture of it anywhere. I love butterflies and I really want to know if this one is native to this area because I’d love to see one again!
Signature: Thank you for your time, Victoria

Male Diana Fritillary

Male Diana Fritillary

Dear Victoria,
This spectacular and not very common butterfly is a male Diana Fritillary, a species with pronounced sexual dimorphism because the female Diana Fritillary looks like an entirely different species.  We wish you had sent higher resolution files.

Male Diana Fritillary

Male Diana Fritillary

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large Blue
Location: Collard Hill, UK
June 26, 2015 12:26 pm
Hi bugman
I thought you might like this picture for your site. It is a Large Blue, Phengaris arion, that i photographed on 20th June at Collard Hill here in the UK. Large Blues have a really weird lifecycle, with the caterpillar spending most of its life in an ants nest feeding on ant grubs. Large Blues became extinct in the UK in 1979, but they have been reintroduced and have spread to over 20 sirtes in south west England.
Signature: Zoovolunteer

Large Blue

Large Blue

Dear Zoovolunteer,
Thanks so much for sending your images of a Large Blue, but especially for providing the information on the reintroduction of the Large Blue to the UK after their extinction there.  We would love to know the circumstances surrounding their extinction as well as where the introduced individuals originated.
  According to the IUCN Red List site, the range is:  “From notthern [sic] Spain and eastwards to Italy, Greece and southern Scandinavia. Extinct in the United Kingdom due to the loss of the short turf habitat when rabbits died out during the myxamotosis crisis. Recently successfully reintroduced to a dozen or so sites in southwestern England.”  A different IUCN Red List page provides this information:  “This species occurs in Central Europe from north and central Spain via France to Denmark, south of Sweden and south of Finland and from the south of Italy and Greece to Siberia, Mongolia, China and Japan. Re-introduced successfully into a number of areas in southern England. 0-2,000 m. The global distribution area of the species is situated both within and outside Europe.”

Large Blue

Large Blue

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Little blue butterfly
Location: powell, Ohio
June 5, 2015 3:58 pm
This little guy, maybe the size of a quarter, was a pretty periwinkle blue on the backs of its wings. I could only get a picture when it landed and had its wings closed, sorry! Columbus area Ohio, wooded backyard, early June.
Signature: Amber

Blue

Blue

Dear Amber,
The color on your image does not look normal.  This is one of the Blues, a small small butterfly in the subfamily Polyommatinae, which you can find on BugGuide.
  We are postdating your letter to go live later in June while we are out of the office.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What butterfly is this?
Location: Rochester, New York
June 8, 2015 4:53 pm
Hey, Bugman. Love the site. I come on a lot! Could you please tell me what butterfly this is? Thanks!
Signature: ?

Red Admiral

Red Admiral

Your beautiful butterfly is a Red Admiral, a species found across North America and much of Eurasia.  As your finger perching individual demonstrates, this is arguably the North American butterfly with the most “personality” and they don’t really seem to fear humans.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this Gray Hairstreak laying eggs?
Location: Coryell County, Texas
May 14, 2015 6:17 pm
Hello,
I was filming this little butterfly this afternoon, trying to catch the fascinating forward-and-backwards wing action, when I noticed that it seemed to be laying eggs. Is it another Gray Hairstreak? You kindly identified one for me several years ago. This rather worn and battered butterfly stayed on this native plant, Malvaviscus drummondii, for a long time.
We had a brief dry spell between rain showers, and it’s raining again now, temperature in the low eighties.
Thank you so much!
Signature: Ellen

Gray Hairstreak laying Eggs

Gray Hairstreak laying Egg

Hi Ellen,
We agree with your evaluation that your images are documenting the process of a female Gray Hairstreak laying eggs.  Thanks so much for providing the name of the plant from the family Malvaceae, and according to BugGuide, the caterpillars feed upon:  “Flowers and fruits from an almost endless variety of (usually) herbaceous plants; most often from pea (Fabaceae) and mallow (Malvaceae) families including beans (Phaseolus), clovers (Trifolium), cotton (Gossypium), and mallow (Malva).”  The MrsRoadrunner Photography site has similar oviposition images.  Raising Butterflies has some great information on Gray Hairstreaks, and many images of the caterpillars, but alas, no images of oviposition or of the eggs. 

Gray Hairstreak Laying Egg

Gray Hairstreak Laying Egg

Female Gray Hairstreak

Female Gray Hairstreak

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: More Butterflies at the Beach
Location: Aransas Pass, Texas
May 4, 2015 9:13 am
Thank you so much for your help with the American Lady Butterfly! I hadn’t photographed one before.
We saw many, many butterflies on our trip to Corpus Christi, including a large number of Red Admirals. Here are some photos of a Red Admiral nectaring on Lantana at The University of Texas Marine Science Institute at Aransas Pass, Texas.
Thank you and best wishes!
Signature: Ellen

Red Admiral

Red Admiral

Hi Ellen,
We are thrilled to be able to post images of butterflies you encountered on your road trip.

Red Admiral

Red Admiral

Subject: Butterflies on the way to the Beach
Location: Pleasanton, Texas
May 4, 2015 9:18 am
Side note…
We stopped for gasoline at a mini mart south of Pleasanton, Texas, on our way to the Corpus Christi, and saw many Red Admirals puddling in the parking lot and visiting the trees edging the lot. Beauty at the quick stop! They definitely dressed up the place.
I saw at least ten Red Admirals within thirty minutes yesterday as I sat on the back porch at our home. Amazing this spring, so many butterflies!
Thank you and take care.
Signature: Ellen

Red Admiral Puddling

Red Admiral Puddling

Hi again Ellen,
Puddling, Butterflies taking moisture from damp soil and mud puddles is such a wonderful phenomenon to observe, especially in situations where there are multiple species and large numbers of individuals.

Red Admiral Puddling

Red Admiral Puddling

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination