Currently viewing the category: "Butterflies and Skippers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: butterfly
Location: Maryland
August 17, 2015 4:19 am
Saw this butterfly on our farm on the Eastern shore of Maryland on the Maryland Delaware line towards Dover Delaware. I didn’t get a good look at the top side of the wings but think they were mostly yellow. I have a good shot of the underside but I seem to be finding site using different names for what this appears to be. Would love to have your take on it.
Signature: Patti Cooper

Female Alfalfa Butterfly

Female Alfalfa Butterfly

Dear Patti,
Your digital file was named “Southern Dogface” and we disagree with that identification, though the family is correct.  Though you don’t have a dorsal view, it is possible to make out the markings through the wings, and we can see a row of lighter spots in the black border of the upper wing.  It also appears that the coloration is slightly orange, indicating this is a female Alfalfa Butterfly or Orange Sulphur,
Colias eurytheme.  You can compare your image to this BugGuide image.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spotted Orange moth
Location: Chicago, IL USA
August 16, 2015 5:17 am
Hello –
I found this beautiful moth in Chicago last night, and can’t seem to find anything that looks similar. It was sitting in the sun for a while and seem to like getting it’s picture take. Could you help?
Signature: Robert

Questionmark

Questionmark

Dear Robert,
This is not a moth.  It is a butterfly, and if you look closely at your image with the closed wings, you will see a silver mark in the center of the hind wing that looks like a “?” and that marking gives this butterfly its common name Questionmark.

Questionmark

Questionmark

Moira LeBlanc, Marieke Bruss, Sue Dougherty, Ann Levitsky, Rachael Alexandra, Courtney Wasacz, Andrea Leonard Drummond liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Lots of Butterflies!!!
Location: Powell, Ohio
August 4, 2015 11:13 am
Two yellow swallowtails (I think), and a monarch, visited our garden today!!!! One swallowtail was noticeably bigger than the other and a bit raggedy. The monarch wasn’t cooperating for pictures, kept flirting about, but I got one off when it rested in a tree. The monarch was very interested in the milkweed plant we let grow by the patio! So pretty!
Signature: Amber

Female Tiger Swallowtail

Female Tiger Swallowtail

Dear Amber,
Thanks for sending us documentation of your day of butterfly watching.  The tattered Tiger Swallowtail is a female who can be distinguished from the male by the dusting of blue scales on the hind wings.

Tiger Swallowtail

Tiger Swallowtail

Monarch

Monarch

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Subject: Red Admiral Butterfly
Location: Lancashire, UK
August 4, 2015 5:20 am
Hey Bugman,
found this beautiful butterfly (which I believe is a Red Admiral) yesterday while I was out running. It seemed very docile and only flew off when I moved in closer, was in the same spot when I was on the way back. ^^ Just thought I’d submit it. :)
Signature: Hope you like. Jordan.

Red Admiral

Red Admiral

Dear Jordan,
Though we are quite aware that the Red Admiral is found throughout the northern hemisphere, most of the images on our site are from North America, so your UK submission is a great addition to our site.  According to UK Butterflies:  “The Red Admiral is a frequent visitor to gardens throughout the British Isles and one of our most well-known butterflies. This butterfly is unmistakable, with the velvety black wings intersected by striking red bands.  This butterfly is primarily a migrant to our shores, although sightings of individuals and immature stages in the first few months of the year, especially in the south of England, mean that this butterfly is now considered resident. This resident population is considered to only be a small fraction of the population seen in the British Isles, which gets topped up every year with migrants arriving in May and June that originate in central Europe. Unfortunately, most individuals are unable to survive our winter, especially in the cooler regions of the British Isles.  The number of adults seen in any one year is therefore dependent on the number of migrants reaching the British Isles and numbers fluctuate as a result. In some years this butterfly can be widespread and common, in others rather local and scarce.” 

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Subject:  Western Tiger Swallowtail
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
July 31, 2015 9:46 AM
Several years ago we lamented that we were not able to capture any images of the Western Tiger Swallowtails that fly around the garden.  Today we got some early morning images of this individual.  The morning haze cleared and the sun had just begun to shine.  The Swallowtail was warming in the sun on the cypress, and it appears that it had narrowly escaped at least one predator since not only the swallowtail, but fully half of each of the hind wings is missing.

Western Tiger Swallowtail

Western Tiger Swallowtail

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Butterefly ID
Location: Tnorthern Illinois
July 25, 2015 8:07 am
Hi
I saw this beauty in my yard. They were around in late July for a week. Any idea what it is and where it lives and feeds?
Signature: Geo

Red Spotted Purple

Red Spotted Purple

Hi Geo,
In the opinion of the editorial staff of What’s That Bug?, the Red Spotted Purple, like the one in your image, is one of the most beautiful North American butterflies.

Thanks so much Daniel,
I am sitting on my patio and it just just flew by again. Now I know what to call it.
Have a nice day.
P.s. Blue jay baby just walked by. What a day.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination