Currently viewing the category: "Butterflies and Skippers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: unknown insect attacking butterfly
Location: Forest Road 22 at Brice Creek east of Cottage Grove, Oregon
September 22, 2016 3:39 pm
Taking pictures of a Clodius Parnassian butterfly when I saw some winged insect attempting to land on the butterfly’s abdomen. I shooed it away from the butterfly. Later when I was checking my photos I found that I had actually snapped it while it was just about to land on the butterfly. The closest I could come to a partial ID is some kind of carpenter ant. Just don’t know if the size is a match and it is actually something else.
Signature: G Price

Parnassus Butterfly and Beetle

Parnassus Butterfly and Beetle

Dear G Price,
This is some species of Beetle, probably a Longicorn in the family Cerambycidae.  Unfortunately, there is not enough detail for us to determine a species.  We do not think it is attaching this lovely Clodius Parnassian, but rather, more of an accidental encounter.  We have so few examples of Parnassian Butterflies on our site.

Thanks for the tip.  Maybe next year I’ll be able to get a better
capture of it when I’m in the area again.   Feel free to add the
Parnassian to your group if you’d like.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Butterfly ID
Location: Pacific Grove, CA
September 23, 2016 11:48 pm
Hi, This butterfly appeared on our back deck and stayed on the flower for quite a while. We think it’s a kind of American Lady. We were curious whether it is color or markings that distinguishes among sub-families. It was in Pacific Grove, California, morning, and spent a lot of time on the flower. Note that because of squirrels we’ve converted from fruit trees to pollinators and installed a very successful beehive. Thanks for taking a look at this. Good luck!
Signature: David

American Lady

American Lady

Dear David,
We agree that this is an American Lady,
Vanessa virginiensis, and according to BugGuide:  “If present (it isn’t always–see below), a white dot in the orange of the forewing distinguishes American Lady from the Painted Lady.”  This BugGuide illustration nicely explains how to distinguish various species.  Though its wings are faded, your individual still shows the telltale white spot.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Easter tiger swallowtail, light and dark
Location: Troy, VA
September 16, 2016 11:55 am
I thought you might like these photos I took of female Eastern tiger swallowtails in their light and dark variations. A couple of weeks ago when the Joe Pye weed was blooming we had an extraordinary display of butterflies, particularly swallowtails. If people want to know how to attract butterflies, get some native weeds.
Signature: Grace Pedalino

Female Tiger Swallowtail: Dark Form

Female Tiger Swallowtail: Dark Form

Dear Grace,
We love your images of dark and light female Tiger Swallowtails, and we totally agree about Joe Pye Weed, Goldenrod, Milkweed and other native plants being perfect for attracting butterflies.  We hope you will be able to provide us with an image of a male Tiger Swallowtail in the near future.  We managed to get a few images several summers past of a very wary male Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, who can be recognized because of the absence of blue coloration on the lower wings.

Female Tiger Swallowtails

Female Tiger Swallowtails

Female Tiger Swallowtails

Female Tiger Swallowtails

Subject: Male tiger swallowtails
Location: Troy, VA
September 17, 2016 10:30 am
Hi Daniel,
I went through my photos and only had a couple of images with males. They were either not as plentiful as the females, or they were shyer. In two of the images you can see ailanthus webworm moths and in one the webworm moth and a skipper. I haven’t seen any swallowtails lately, so I don’t know if I will be able to get any other images. I hope you like these. What I have been seeing lately are skippers and crescent moths.
Signature: Grace Pedalino

Male Eastern Tiger Swallowtail

Male Eastern Tiger Swallowtail

Hi Grace,
Thanks so much for rounding out your Eastern Tiger Swallowtail posting with a few images of the male, who lacks the blue scales on his lower wings.

Male Eastern Tiger Swallowtail with Ailanthus Webworm Moth

Male Eastern Tiger Swallowtail with Ailanthus Webworm Moth

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Butterfly Invasion
Location: Coryell County, TX
September 15, 2016 7:21 pm
Hello! We’re being invaded by small, fast butterflies in the hundreds, thousands, maybe millions. I think they’re American snout butterflies (“snout-nosed”). You kindly identified one for me a few years ago. I haven’t seen so many butterflies at one time since 1961, when clouds of monarchs in Illinois fled south ahead of a drastic cold front.
These have made the news! http://texasbutterflyranch.com/2016/09/10/invasion-of-snout-nosed-butterflies-returns-to-central-and-south-texas/
Please excuse the poor photography. They sometimes stop to puddle or rest, but aren’t visiting our flowers. The American snouts in our area are all heading toward the E/NE, most are battered and worn. Quite sad, actually. I saw one monarch today, but it was heading south.
Butterfly mania. Best wishes, love your site.
Signature: Ellen

American Snout

American Snout

Good Morning Ellen,
These are indeed American Snouts, and when we posted your previous images in 2013, we quoted Butterflies Through Binoculars:  The West by Jeffrey Glassberg who wrote:  “Sometimes swarming in the millions (in the Rio Grande Valley), this is the chameleon of the butterfly world.  When you are searching for a special butterfly, American Snouts will magically assume the appearance of that butterfly, or perhaps it’s vice versa.”

American Snout

American Snout

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Small black butterfly with orange eyespots
Location: Nebraska
September 14, 2016 6:01 am
Greetings!
I am from south-central Nebraska and when I went out to put birdseed in the feeder this morning, I saw this little butterfly resting on my sun coleus. I have never seen one like it before and was unable to locate one in your archives. It has an approximately 1 1/4″ wingspan. I’m sorry that the focus is a bit lacking but I still haven’t mastered this camera. I hope that there is enough detail for you to be able to work your magic! Thanks in advance!
Signature: Huskerkim

Gray Hairstreak

Gray Hairstreak

Dear Huskerkim,
Images of Gray Hairstreaks,
Strymon melinus, are archived on our site under the Gossamer Wings Butterflies category.  According to BugGuide:  “Males perch all afternoon on small trees and shrubs to seek receptive females. Eggs are laid singly on flowers of host plant. Young caterpillars feed on flowers and fruits; older ones may eat leaves. Caterpillars are sometimes attended by ants, which receive a sugary solution from the dorsal nectary organ … . Chrysalids hibernate.”  We believe the dark coloration on your individual indicates it is a male, perhaps perching “all afternoon on small trees and shrubs to seek receptive females.”

Dear Daniel,
Thank you so much for your reply.  We will keep an eye out for such females!  Also, I have attached a better photo that I took later with my phone.
Thanks again!
Kim

Gray Hairstreak

Gray Hairstreak

Thanks for the much sharper image Kim.  Obviously he is waiting patiently for that female.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Butterfly
Location: Kenai,alaska
September 10, 2016 11:42 am
Wondering what the name of this butterfly is?? I live in Kenai,Alaska and it is September. A lot different looking than the milbert fortis shell morning cloak.
Signature: Tammy Thompson

Anglewing Butterfly

Green Comma Butterfly

Dear Tammy,
This is one of the Anglewing Butterflies in the genus
Polygonia.  It might be the Green Comma, Polygonia faunus, based on this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide the habitat is:  “Northern and high mountain woodlands, often associated with broken terrain and near streams.”  Another possibility is the Hoary Comma, Polygonia gracilis, and according to Butterflies and Moths of North America, the range is:  “Boreal North America south of the tundra. Central Alaska south to central California and northern New Mexico; east across southern Canada and the Great Lakes region to New England and the Maritimes.”  We turned away from the internet and referenced our Butterflies Through Binoculars, The West field guide by Jeffrey Glassberg and we are now confident this is a Green Comma, because of the description:  “Usually the wings are more jagged than other anglewings.  … Above note the two black spots on the inner margin of the FW (top spot sometimes faint) and the black spot in the middle of the HW.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination