Currently viewing the category: "Butterflies and Skippers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Penang Butterfly Farm
Location: Penang, Malaysia
February 7, 2016
Here are the adult’s. The one with more colour I think is the male.
Best wishes,
Aeve

Leopard Lacewing

Leopard Lacewing

Dear Aeve,
Thanks for sending some butterfly images to accompany the Caterpillar image you sent previously.  One image appears to be a male Leopard Lacewing,
Cethosia cyane, but we believe the other image is another species of Brushfooted Butterfly.  We quickly identified it as a Jewelled Nawab Butterfly, Polyura delphis, thanks to Getty ImagesLearn About Butterflies uses the common name White Nawab and states:  “The butterflies are characterised by their distinctive wing shape with twin tails on the hindwings, a feature strongly reminiscent of the African Charaxes. Most have dark brown uppersides with bands of dazzling creamy white which vary in size and shape from one species to another. These bands are usually repeated on the underside in a beautiful shade of pale green, but in the case of delphis the underside is white, and marked with orange, yellow and grey spots and lunules, hence its alternative name the Jewelled Nawab.  Polyura delphis is one of the scarcer species, and is found in Assam, Sikkim, Myanmar, Thailand, peninsular Malaysia, Sumatra, Sabah, Brunei, Kalimantan, Palawan and Java.”

Brushfooted Butterfly

Jeweled Nawab Butterfly

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What butterfly is this?
Location: Sao Paulo, Brazil
January 21, 2016 5:15 pm
Hello everyone!
I’ve taken this photo today on my garden. I’m from São Paulo, Brazil, and I’ve never seen this here.
Could someone please identify it?
Signature: David Lynch

Papilio thoas

Papilio thoas

Dear David,
We believe we have correctly identified your swallowtail as
Heraclides (formerly Papilio) thoas which you can verify by comparing your individual to the image on Butterflies of America or on FlickR.  As Wikipedia demonstrates, this lovely Swallowtail was commemorated on a Brazilian stamp in 1971.  According to the Butterflies of America, the larval food plant is  Piper auritum, commonly called hoja santa in Spanish speaking countries.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Papilio on Tanzania Highlands
Location: Loliondo Highlands, see above.
January 15, 2016 11:38 pm
Dearr WTB!
I have not yet learned wat you include in the expression BUG. I just received an id-ed Idolomantis diabolica, I´m grateful for that. I guess you include butterflies.
During eco-safai in northern Tanzania I studied mainly birds, mammals and reptiles but photographed a few butterflies.
In the genus Papilio. there is a fair number of species with the common name Green-banded Swallowtaul. They were not easy to get fair photos of since they were rather cautious (- for good reasons). Iam pretty sure I saw at least three species during my trip. None of them I caught on fair photos. Yet I believe you can identify at least some of them by their geographic location + habitat. I´m ready to pit it to a test. The encolsed animal I photographed in a forest patch at about 2500 metres a.s.l. on Lolliondo Highlands, Tanzania almost at the botrder of Kenya.
To me it seems like a very long shot to get a name on that, but it´s worth a try,
The animal was photographed nexst to a small stream, revived by the last days rain on Nov 13.
From what I have learned, the subterminal white spots on upper hind wings are rather clear for a Green-banded Swallowtail on this individual. (- barely visible on this photo)
Best regards
Signature: slit

Swallowtail

Swallowtail

Dear slit,
In our most loose interpretation, a “bug” is a creature that crawls, so we include worms, amphibians and lizards on our site, though we are mainly concerned with Arthropods of all kinds.  We are not prepared to go on record with your Swallowtail identification beyond the genus, and we know first hand how difficult it can be to get a good image of a Swallowtail that is soaring, but refusing to land.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Stay tuned for our review

A nice gift idea for butterfly fans

A nice gift idea for butterfly fans

Subject: Butterflies Book
Website: http://www.fireflybooks.com/
November 25, 2015 1:42 pm
Hi Daniel,
I’ve been reading through your blog and there is so much amazing information here! I’ve seen bugs that I never knew existed before. What a great resource on the web.
I’m writing because I think your readers will love our new book, Butterflies. The book features some of the most colorful, spectacular and sometimes weird examples of the world’s butterflies and moths. Thomas Marent’s stunning photographs provide a close-up view of the remarkable family of insects known as Lepidoptera. The macro photography complements the enlightening text written by zoologist Ronald Orenstein, who explains the scientific curiosities of these amazing insects. Examples include such seldom-seen species as the green dragontail (Indonesia), Mexican kite-swallowtail (Costa Rica), the alpine black swallowtail (China) and European sulphurs.
Would you like a review copy? If so, send me your mailing address and I’ll send one off to you.
Best,
Caroline
Signature: Caroline Young

December 2, 2015
Dear Caroline,
The Butterflies arrived today and we haven’t opened it yet.  We cannot get past the stunningly beautiful cover
image of an amorous pair of Marbled White Butterflies (see Butterflies).  Do you have an image to accompany the posting we will be writing?

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Butterfly found in school garden
Location: Sierra Madre / CA
October 26, 2015 5:22 pm
Is this a painted lady? Thanks!!!!
Signature: Lisa

Gulf Fritillary

Gulf Fritillary

Dear Lisa,
This is a Gulf Fritillary, not a Painted Lady, though the two species are in the same family and both are mostly orange.  The Gulf Fritillary is rarely found far from passionflower vines as the leaves are the Gulf Fritillary Caterpillar‘s food.

Great thanks! I figured this out too. Glad for the verification! Are you in Altadena? Are you friends by chance with Gail Swanlund?

Hi again Lisa,
Our offices are in Mount Washington.  I do know Gail Swanlund.  She was a very early fan of What’s That Bug? when we were still in print and not yet online.  She is mentioned in this old Silverfish posting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Monarch Migration
Location: Coryell County, TX
October 20, 2015 1:53 pm
Hello again, the Monarch migration has begun here in central Texas. Just like last year, the butterflies stop to drink water droplets after our sprinkler has watered the lawn.
We need rain badly, although we are not under drought restrictions due to record-setting rains last spring. The weather is otherwise wonderful, 80 degrees and clear, with a light breeze. Here is a link to the current sightings:
http://www.learner.org/jnorth/monarch/fall2015/monarch-butterfly-migration100815.html
The monarchs remind me of fall leaves floating through the air and settling on the grass.
Signature: Ellen

Female Monarch

Female Monarch

He Ellen,
Your female Monarch is lovely.  We hope she visited the milkweed and laid some eggs for you to watch.  Monarchs do have such a lazy way of flying that we often marvel they are able to fly so many miles when they migrate.

Female Monarch

Female Monarch

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination