Currently viewing the category: "Butterflies and Skippers"
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Subject: Leafwing Butterflies
Location: Wichita County, North Texas, USA
December 1, 2014 11:36 am
I snapped these two photos of what I presume are leafwing butterflies in my backyard on November 29, 2014. Is there a way to narrow down their identification? They were feasting on old bananas.
Signature: Anna

Leafwing

Leafwing

Dear Anna,
This is indeed one of three Leafwing species in the genus
Anaea found in the U.S., however only two species are reported from Florida.  We are uncertain if this is a Tropical Leafwing or a Goatweed Leafwing.  Perhaps someone with more experience with Leafwings can identify the species.  BugGuide does not offer a means of distinguishing the two species, and we can try figuring out their differences by reading Jeffrey Glassberg’s “Butterflies Through Binoculars, The West”.  That excellent guide book does have range maps, and only the Goatweed Leafwing, Anaea andria, is found in North Texas, so that is our best guess.  We would not rule out the possibility that Global Warming may have increased the range of the Tropical Leafwing.

Leafwing

Leafwing

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: green catipillar
Location: southern arizona
November 9, 2014 7:41 pm
do you know what kind of catapillar this is. I have alot of orange butterflies around, but this one is different. It started making a coccoon right before my eyes. It’s in a weed I was pulling out of my yard. I have some great butterfly pics. I’ve included a few.
Signature: babbs greg

Mating Gulf Fritillaries

Mating Gulf Fritillaries

Dear Babbs,
There is not enough detail for us to identify your caterpillar, but as it is spinning a cocoon, we are speculating that it is a moth.  Your mating Gulf Fritillaries image is a nice addition to our site.

Andrea Leonard Drummond, Julieta Stangaferro, Mary Lemmink Lawrence liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar ID
Location: Celaya, Guanajuato, Mexico
November 7, 2014 5:56 pm
Hi,
I took this picture today in Celaya, Guanajuato, Mexico. Here it is November 7th. The temperature is around 70 degrees even though it is winter here. I have close to 40 or more of these caterpillars on a climbing vine in my backyard. I have noticed orange moths or butterflies around them once or twice. Any idea what they could be? I have no intention of getting rid of them but want to know if I should keep children away from them.
Signature: Maria V.

Brush-Footed Butterfly Caterpillars

Juno Longwing Caterpillars

Dear Maria V.,
We feel confident that these are Brush-Footed Butterfly Caterpillars from the family Nymphalidae, but we are not certain of the species.  Are you able to provide us with the name of the vine they are feeding upon?  Often knowing the food plant is an excellent way to search for the identity of an insect that is feeding.  Meanwhile, we will attempt to contact Keith Wolfe to see if he recognizes these caterpillars.  We do not believe they pose any threat to your children, though the spines may be prickly.

Brush-Footed Butterfly Caterpillars

Juno Longwing Caterpillars

I managed to get an ID from a local butterfly expert about 45 minutes ago.  They are Dione Juno caterpillars and they are feeding on a Passion flower vine.  Completely harmless.  I am excitedly watching them and hope to have butterflies in about 20 days.  You guys are awesome and let me know if you want any insects in this area tracked down, photographed, or any other way I can help. I will totally be donating!!
Thanks for all the awesome work you do :)
Maria

Thanks for letting us know.  Them being Longwings in the tribe Heliconiini makes sense because we thought they looked similar to Gulf Fritillary Caterpillars, a related species.

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November 1, 2014
Location:  Elyria Canyon Park, Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
This past weekend, while planting native wildflowers in Elyria Canyon Park, I couldn’t resist taking a few images of this lovely Painted Lady.

Painted Lady

Painted Lady

Painted Lady

Sue Dougherty liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Monarch Migration
Location: Coryell County, Texas
October 28, 2014 9:48 pm
Hello, this isn’t a usual inquiry in that I’m quite sure that these are Monarch Butterflies.
I’ve never been able to photograph one before, but today they were all over the yard. I’ve often seen them fly past our yard, usually quite high above the ground during migration times, but today many stopped to drink from our newly-watered lawn. It was incredible.
I haven’t seen so many Monarchs since I was six years old, in Illinois, and clouds of Monarchs dashed south ahead of a severe cold front.
So beautiful!
Here is a link to recent “clouds” of Monarchs in the news: http://goodnature.nathab.com/are-they-clouds-of-monarchs-mysterious-unidentifiable-blobs-spotted-by-radar-over-the-midwest/
Thank you and best wishes.
Signature: Ellen

Monarch

Monarch

Hi Ellen,

There has been much talk lately of diminishing populations of Monarch butterflies, and this year we observed many more Monarchs in our garden than we have ever seen in Los Angeles.  It seems populations might be increasing across the country.  Thanks for this newsworthy posting.  It must have been a spectacular sight.  We took a bit of creative license with our most recent Bug of the Month posting of a pair of mating Wheel Bugs by designating their month as Halloween, which frees us up for a November Bug of the Month, and your submission is an excellent choice.

Monarch

Monarch

Subject: Monarch Migration, Part 2
Location: Coryell County, Texas
October 30, 2014 2:04 pm
Hello, and thank you so much for your reply.
I’m sending another few photos of the Monarchs in our yard, and an additional link to the Fall of 2014 migration news. This link adds up-to-date migration news and photos as they are reported. The great news is that observers are currently seeing a large migration.
Sending highest regards.
http://www.learner.org/jnorth/monarch/News.html
Signature: Ellen

Male Monarch

Male Monarch

Hi again Ellen,
The image of the male Monarch in flight (notice those scent patches on his lower wings) is a nice addition to the images you sent earlier.  Thanks for the additional link.

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Subject: Daniel, Mating Marine Blue Butterflies
Location: Hawthorne, California
October 28, 2014 6:02 pm
Hi Daniel,
Hope all is going well with you and yours this fall. I haven’t been able to be out in the back much until now and imagine my surprise when this pair of mating Marine Blues stayed still long enough for me to drag the camera out . Marty wanted to tear out the pincushion plants a few weeks ago, but I asked him to hold on as they are close to some milkweed and we may yet have some Monarch chryalids (sp?). Anyways, I thought you might like to see that our Marine Blues are alive and well! I know they’re common, but I enjoy them nontheless.
Signature: Anna Carreon

Mating Marine Blues

Mating Marine Blues

Hi Anna,
Your image of Marine Blues mating is quite lovely.  Thanks for taking the time to drag out the camera.  Though they are common, they are quite cheerful flitting around the garden.

Your correction is duly noted.  Drag out the camera rather than drag the camera out.  My mother will be mortified to find I made such a horrid mistake. . .

Our own grammar is not the best.  Grammar check is constantly warning us of passive voice.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination