Currently viewing the category: "Booklice and Barklice"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug identification
Location: Bandung, Indonesia.
April 7, 2014 2:20 pm
North west Bandung, Indonesia.
Adjacent to a small stream. Altitude 1000m. Towards end of wet season.
Location – Lat: -6.8468, Long: 107.5815
Found feeding on a leaf, but not on the leaf itself, some kind of deposit. When I disturbed the leaf, the bugs did not take flight, just scrambled about.
Size – small, about 6mm long. My first thought was a fly, but the antennae don’t seem right. Also there is no visible ‘drumstick’. A group of 3 ocelli are visible, so this rules out moth. The bugs were not bothered by my intrusion, so this rules out wasps. The eyes are small, indicating a nocturnal bug. The time was 09:11 (dawn 05:30).
Hope you can help.
Dave
Signature: Vodkaman

Barklice, we believe

Barklice, we believe

Dear Vodkaman,
These creatures resemble North American Barklice in the suborder Psocomorpha, and armed with that information, we did locate a similar looking Barklouse image on the Potokito Myshot Blog, but we have not been able to locate any other images to substantiate our supposition.  That individual, which is not an exact match to your images, is classified as:  “Suborder : Psocomorpha, Infraorder : Caeciliusetae, Family : Caeciliusidae – Lizard Barklice, Genus :
Valenzuela.“  According to BugGuide:  “Barklice feed on lichens and fungi on tree bark.”  We will try to do additional research on your request.

Barklouse, we believe

Barklouse, we believe

Barklice, we believe

Barklice, we believe

 

  

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please help identify bug ASAP
Location: Maui, Hawaii
February 14, 2014 12:25 pm
I have 3 small children and worry if its something bad i found these little bugs on a wood little chest my son got from a yard sale
Signature: Jen

Booklouse

Booklouse

Hi Jen,
These appear to be Booklice, and they are benign, though if conditions are right, they can be numerous and a nuisance.  You can read more about Booklice on the Penn State University Entomology page where it states:  “Booklice feed on molds and will overrun cereals and similar materials that support mold growth. Their presence, therefore, is a nuisance and can render some foods unfit. The starchy paste of wallpaper and books also can support mold growth or may be attacked directly by booklice. Outside of annoyance, their damage is insignificant.”

Booklouse

Booklouse

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Curious bug to be identified
Location: Singapore
January 9, 2014 2:42 am
Hi guys,
My friend recently found this bug in his Drosophila culture bottle and we are curious in its identity and, perhaps, why is it doing in that bottle. Random chance or looking for food?
The body length of this bug is around 1mm. Got a few images with the microscope and it does look odd to us. Can’t even be sure if it is a Dipteran, as its hind wings are not completely absent (Image 3, though it may be a bit hard to see).
Looking forward to your reply. Thank you.
Regards,
Nsh
Signature: Nsh

Psocid

Psocid

Dear Nsh,
We hope you are content with a tentative identification to the Order level.  We believe this is a Psocid in the order Psocodea, a group that includes Barklice, Booklice and Parasitic Lice.  You can find many examples on BugGuide.  We would eliminate the subgroup that includes the Parasitic Lice, but we cannot say for certain if this is a Booklouse or a Barklouse.  According to BugGuide:  “barklice are always found outdoors, and occupy a wide variety of habitats; booklice often live in homes” and “Barklice feed on lichens and fungi on tree bark, booklice are best known for feeding on the starch in book bindings.”  Since there is probably starch in your friend’s Drosophila culture bottle, a Booklouse would be a likely candidate, however BugGuide does not picture any winged Booklice from the family Liposcelididae.  Your photos are excellent and we are sure an expert will have no trouble providing a more specific identification, however our staff is not capable of that task.  If pressed for a more focused identification, we would guess this might be a Tropical Barklouse in the family Amphientomidae, based again on photos posted to bugGuide.  We do not believe your friend needs to worry about this Psocid infesting the culture, though it would be curious to know how this little guy ended up there in the first place.

Psocid

Psocid

Psocid

Psocid

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black Bug ID
Location: Florence, Alabama
October 29, 2013 5:48 pm
My daughter photographed this bug. It has a very clear pattern on its back, like a decorated suit coat.
Signature: Jerry Owen

Barklouse

Barklouse

Hi Jerry,
These are Barklice and they are commonly called Tree Cattle because they form colonies on trees.  They are benign creatures that feed on lichens and they do not harm the trees.

Tree Cattle

Tree Cattle

Daniel Marlos,
My daughter lives in Alabama and I in Mississippi.  But she got me an insect book for Father’s Day, and with the PC, we stay in touch.
And I thank you.
Jerry W. Owen
Ripley, MS

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: WTB
Location: Olean, NY
July 24, 2013 7:17 pm
I took a photo of just one of the numerous clusters of unidentified insects just sitting in these clusters, not moving too much, on our magnolia tree. If you zoom in on the photo you can see two distinct looking insects, possibly the male and female? We first noticed them about 3 days ago and they are still there, not doing much except huddling in these large masses. Can you tell me what they are and if they are dangerous? I live in Olean, NY.
Signature: Pat

Tree Cattle

Tree Cattle

Dear Pat,
These are Barklice, and they are sometimes called Tree Cattle.  They are benign insects that feed on lichens, and they will not harm your trees.  The striped individuals are immature nymphs and the dark individuals are winged adults.

Tree Cattle

Tree Cattle

Thanks so much, Daniel!  We’re relieved to hear they’re harmless critters.  You da man!  Thanks for the great vice you provide.
Patrick

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Small red bugs with black stripes
Location: Nelson, New Hampshire
July 17, 2013 7:19 pm
Dear Bugman,
These small critters were found on my mother-in-law while canoeing in a pond this past Monday, July 15th 2013 in Nelson, New Hampshire. After brushing against some leaves from a nearby tree these bugs were found on her shirt. They are very small. You can compare their size with the clothe stiching. I have scoured over photos from insect guides and the internet and I cannot figure out what these are. Nymphs? Ants? Aphids? I’m stumped.
Signature: Stumped

Booklice

Barklice

Dear Stumped,
These are Barklice, benign creatures that you may read about on BugGuide, which states:  “barklice are always found outdoors, and occupy a wide variety of habitats; booklice often live in homes” and “Barklice feed on lichens and fungi on tree bark, booklice are best known for feeding on the starch in book bindings.”  They look very similar to this member of the genus
Ectopsocus which is pictured on BugGuide and was also found in New Hampshire.

Barklice

Barklice

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination