Currently viewing the category: "Booklice and Barklice"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mystery bugs
Location: St Petersburg, FL
April 10, 2016 5:30 pm
Hi— while walking my dog the other day I came across a swarming group of insects on the side of a small tree in the early morning, which included the nymphs. When I returned an hour later to take more photos, they had entirely disappeared. I posted a picture on Instagram and many people were interested in knowing what they could be. An online friend had posted a picture from Tennessee that showed the nymphs w/o any adults. I live in the Tampa Bay Area. Do you have any idea what they are? Many thanks for any help you can provide!
Signature: KARBARG

Tree Cattle

Tree Cattle

Dear KARBARG,
These benign insects are Barklice or Tree Cattle,
Cerastipsocus venosus.  The feed on lichens and do not harm the trees upon which they are found.

Many, many thanks for identifying them. I spotted three more groups this morning on another oak in the neighborhood. I’m very happy to share this information with my Instagram friends 🙋🏻💕

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: On Crepe Myrtle Bark
Location: Auburn Alabama
March 6, 2016 3:37 pm
Found this on crepe myrtle tree whilst pruning today–they traveled together in 20-30 bug groups, moving then stopping on the bark. What is this?
Signature: Bob Alabama

Barklice Carnage

Barklice Carnage

Dear Bob,
These are benign Barklice.  Home gardeners may find the presence of aggregations of Barklice or Tree Cattle as they are commonly called, alarming because generally insects found in large groups on plants are injurious, Barklice will not harm your crepe myrtle tree.  Barklice feed on lichens on tree bark and fence posts.  We hope future encounters do not meet with Unnecessary Carnage because it appears the Barklice in your image have succumbed to pesticide spray.

Barklice Carnage

Barklice Carnage

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Tick-like bug
Location: San Francisco, CA
March 3, 2016 6:46 pm
Hey The Bugman,
Wondering if you can help me id this bug. Sorry, it’s not the best quality pic. One pic is up close, the other is so that you can get an idea of the scale. I found the bug in my back yard on a calla lily. You’ll also see that there’s a smaller bug near it. I’m most curious about the larger bug.
Any ideas?
Thanks!
Signature: StormMiguel

Aphid on a Calla Lily

Aphid on a Calla Lily

Dear StormMiguel,
This is an Aphid and we do not believe its diet, which consists of sucking fluids from plants, is limited to the calla lily.  The other, smaller insect, appears to be a Psocid.

Aphid and possible Psocid

Aphid and possible Psocid

Thank you so much! I never would have guessed it was an aphid – as big as it was. I was worried it might be a tick.
I will make a donation to your site. Sorry that I can only afford $10 at this time.
Your help is greatly appreciated!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug?
Location: Sydney
February 18, 2016 2:03 am
I see it everywhere in our place. On my laptop, spoon drawer, on doors.
It’s cream coloured and very small.
Help appreciated
Signature: Maryam

Booklouse

Booklouse

Dear Maryam,
This is a Booklouse in the family Liposcelididae, probably in the genus Liposcelis.  According to BugGuide they are found:  “worldwide and across NA; many spp. are now nearly cosmopolitan or otherwise widely spread through agency of man, mostly with stored products.”  They are basically harmless to humans, though when they are plentiful, they might render stored foods unpalatable.  According to the Penn State Department of Entomology:  “Booklice, also called psocids, are not true lice. While they resemble lice in size and shape, booklice feed only on fungi or mold. If you find them in grain or other stored food products, it is an indication of high humidity which encourages mold growth. In addition to food products, psocids may be found under wallpaper, in furniture, along the sides of windows or on window sills around potted plants. Booklice do not bite, transmit disease, or damage food or fabric, but they can be very annoying when present in large numbers.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hopping Minute Bug
Location: Singapore
January 25, 2016 9:08 am
Hi,
I found a few of these bugs on my work desk where I store hardware stuff. The last time I saw them was when I cut an unused dish washing sponge to aid in some macro photography. They just appeared in a container that held a small insect.
The bug is slightly less than 1mm in size. The thickness of the plastic container rim is exactly 1mm (in the photo).
Signature: DeepWorld

Springtail

Booklouse

Dear DeepWorld,
This is a Hexapod in the Class Collembola, the Springtails, most likely a Globular Springtail in the Order Symphypleona.  Here is a photo from BugGuide that looks similar.  Springtails are benign creatures that may become a nuisance if they are too plentiful.  According to BugGuide, Springtails are found in:  “Soil, leaf litter, under bark, in decaying wood/fungi, on water surface; some on vegetation. In our area, at least 11 genera include truly aquatic members, >20 genera are regularly found on water surface, and others yet, occasionally. Often found indoors, especially in moist or damp situations such as basins, sinks, tubs, showers, potting soil of houseplants, and windowsills where condensation has accumulated.”

Springtail

Booklouse

Correction:  Booklouse, not Springtail
Thanks to a comment, we realized that we have once again misidentified a Booklouse as a Springtail.

Hi Daniels,
Thank you for the quick response. I am glad that it has been identified. You guys are great!
Regards,
Walter Loo

Hi Walter,
Actually this is a Booklouse, not a Springtail.

Hi Daniel,
This is exciting news. Thank you for the follow-up and correction! I will definitely read more on this creature.
Regards,
Walter Loo

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: tiny bug?
Location: Pacific Northwest (urban)
January 17, 2016 12:34 pm
Found this in my wife’s hair the day after visiting a beautician.
I think it is too small to be lice. It’s super tiny, barely visible. The pic is 100x.
Thank you,
Signature: Payton

Booklouse

Booklouse

Dear Payton,
We have taken the liberty of removing your surname from this posting as we do not want to draw unnecessary attention to your wife and her hitchhiker.  Though it is commonly called a Booklouse, and though it is classified with Biting Lice in the order Psocodea, Booklice are actually benign creatures that do not bite, but that may become a nuisance when they reach high population levels indoors.  According to BugGuide, Booklice are found:  “worldwide and across NA; many spp. are now nearly cosmopolitan or otherwise widely spread through agency of man, mostly with stored products.”  You can compare your image to this BugGuide image of a Booklouse in the genus
Liposcelis.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination