Currently viewing the category: "Weevils"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Red & back dot bug
Location: MT Pleasant SC
March 23, 2014 2:37 pm
Hi bugman,
I’m new to the Charleston, SC area. Sitting on my front steps, I spotted this strange looking bug which I have never seen before. Can you identify it?
It’s Spring, late March, 2014.
Thanks for your help.
~Linda
Signature: Linda SC Coast

Palmetto Weevil

Palmetto Weevil

Dear Linda,
This impressive Weevil is a Palmetto Weevil or Giant Palm Weevil,
Rhynchophorus cruentatus, and it is found in several southern states.  According to BugGuide:  “Eggs are laid in the bases of leaves or in wounds in a dying host palm and hatch in ~3 days. Larvae have tend to feed primarily on the soft tissue surrounding the apical meristem. Mature grubs migrate to the periphery of the stem or petioles, build a cocoon from palm fibers and pupate. The adult emerges in a few weeks and may immediately break free of the cocoon or spend several days within the cocoon. The entire life cycle (egg to adult) takes ~84 days. Adults may live for several weeks (up to 26 weeks in captivity).”

Hi Daniel,
Thank you for your prompt reply! Very interesting…. guess there’s no threat with this bug. It may have come from our dying or dead palm in the front which we’re having removed shortly.
Thanks again.
~Linda

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unidentified Weevil From Malaysia
Location: Malaysia
March 13, 2014 8:20 am
Hi, this is a weird weevil that i found on the dead tree in my backyard. This weevil has a weird eyes. Can you ID it for me?
Signature: Lanzz

Weevil

Weevil

Hi Lanzz,
We found a matching image of your Weevil on Some Wonderful Weevils of Malaysia and on FlickR, but it is not identified.  At this time, we are unable to provide any conclusive identification.

Weevil

Weevil

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle
Location: Lisboa
March 10, 2014 8:08 am
Hello im from Lisboa, Portugal.
I found this Bug with more and less 3 cm. I know is a beetle but i dont now what specime it is ….sorry my english
Signature: Miguel Monteiro

Red Palm Weevil

Red Palm Weevil

Dear Miguel,
This is a Red Palm Weevil,
Rhynchophorus ferrugineus, and it is an introduced species in Portugal where it is threatening the palm trees.  You can read more about the threat the Red Palm Weevil poses to palms in Portugal on Acción Ambiental.

Hello
I Aprecciate your answer.
Thank you very much
Kind regards
Miguel

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Prehistoric Snout Creature
Location: Guapimirim, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
March 2, 2014 9:23 am
Dear Bugman,
During our recent visit to the Atlantic Rainforests of Brazil we encountered many strange visitors in our poussada near the Serra dos Orgaos National Park in Teresopolis.
This particular one was allso known by our host Leandro, though not by name …
Roughly about 5 cm size. Not very agile and completely silent.
Signature: Lickafoot

Tropical Weevil

Tropical Weevil

Dear Lickafoot,
This beetle is classified as a Weevil, and it looks very similar to a Tropical Weevil,
Brentus anchorago, sometimes found in southern Florida that we have posted several times to our site.  According to BugGuide, it is:  “widespread in neotropics: Mexico, West Indies, South America. In North America, found only in southernmost Florida.”  There is a photo of Brentus anchorago on our sister site from Brazil, Insetologia.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetles on Loofah flowers
Location: Kedah, Malaysia
February 5, 2014 2:49 am
I found these two insects on yellow loofah flowers. I am not sure if the two are related (e.g. male/female). Both are small, body is about 1 cm long.
The brown and orange one have leaf-footed like feature.
Weather : Hot and humid
Climate : Tropical
Signature: Cohlinn

Weevil and Immature Citron Bug

Gold Dust Weevil and Immature Citron Bug

Hi again Cohlinn,
The yellow insect with what we believe is an immature Citron Bug is a Weevil, one of a group of beetles in the superfamily Curculionoidea.  At first we did have not had any luck identifying the species despite locating two matching images online.  There is an unidentified Weevil posted to The Flying Kiwi’s Cambodian Bugs page (scroll down to see it), and another image of an individual taken in Malaysia posted to FlickR.  Another unidentified individual is pictured on Interesting PHotos.  We then located some images on Project Noah that are identified as Gold Dust Weevils,
Hypomeces squamosus.  An individual from China is pictured on SinoBug.  Finally, a mating pair is pictured on PBase.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this bug?
Location: Canada Ontario
January 9, 2014 8:01 pm
Ever since I was a kid I’d see these little green bugs. I noticed that I never learned what they were called, I’ve asked around and no one seems to know. I would appreciate it if I could find out what they’re name is.
Signature: Alex Pottekkat

Green Immigrant Leaf Weevil

Green Immigrant Leaf Weevil

Hi Alex,
This is a Green Immigrant Leaf Weevil,
Polydrusus sericeus, and thanks to your letter, we can do some cleanup in our archives.  Our oldest postings of the Green Immigrant Leaf Weevil, dating to 2007, predate our Invasive Exotics tag which we use for nonnative species.  According to BugGuide, it can be identified because it is:  “completely covered with metallic green scales except for brownish or yellowish-brown legs and conspicuous black linear grooves in elytra; eyes relatively large.”  It feeds primarily on yellow birch.

Green Immigrant Leaf Weevil

Green Immigrant Leaf Weevil

Thank you so much, I’m glad I finally know what they are. :)

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination