Currently viewing the category: "Weevils"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Biking Bug
Location: Tallahassee, FL
October 20, 2014 1:12 pm
Dear Bugman,
I found this bug sitting on my bike, right beside the back wheel. I had turned the bike over a few times to secure the chain on the wheel, without seeing this little guy fall off. I even tried to slightly move him over with a leaf, but this guy would NOT budge!
I continued to ride, downhill, and uphill until I reached my destination. When I locked up the bike, he (or she) had moved, but was still attached to my bicycle.
This bug had black and yellow patterns. It looks like a beetle, but I’m not entirely sure. It has a “bigger” antenna, as well as legs and feet that tend to stick and hold on to wherever they are.
Signature: Biking with a Bug

Diaprepes Root Weevil

Diaprepes Root Weevil

Dear Biking with a Bug,
This looks like a Diaprepes Root Weevil, and according to Featured Creatures: “It was first reported in Florida in 1964 from a nursery near Apopka. It was presumably introduced in an ornamental plant shipment from Puerto Rico. Since 1964, Diaprepes abbreviatus has spread over a large area of central and southern Florida where it is damaging to citrus, ornamental plants, and some other crops.”

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of beetle is this?
Location:  Marmaris, Turkey
September 20, 2014 3:59 pm
Hi, I am on holiday in Marmaris, Turkey and woke up to find quite a large beetle on my balcony. I took many photos and was just curious to learn what type it was. I have scoured the web and can’t seem to find it anywhere. Any help?
Signature: Joshua

There is no image attached.

Yeah because your website has no email or any way of attaching photos I shall send them to you now. I was just waiting for your reply so I could do so. Thanks!  I was particularly interested to find out what if those were eggs it was carrying?

Red Palm Weevil

Red Palm Weevil

Dear Joshua,
You can send identification request with images by using our Ask What’s That Bug? link on our site.  This is a Red Palm Weevil,
Rhynchophorus ferrugineus, a species that is doing significant damage to cultivated palm trees throughout the Mediterranean region.  According to BugGuide:  “native to so. Asia and Melanesia, since the 1980s spread into many warm coastal areas around the Indian Ocean and the Mediterranean.”  The UK Food and Environment Research Agency has an excellent pdf on the Red Palm Weevil.

Red Palm Weevil with Passengers

Red Palm Weevil with Passengers

We suspect that the passengers on your Red Palm Weevil are Mites, but we don’t know if they are parasitic or if they are phoretic, meaning they use the Weevil for transportation purposes and pose no harm to the tranporter.  The Iberia-Natur site includes images of a Red Palm Weevil with mites and it includes the following statement:  “that mites are transported on the legs of the bug. This process is called phoresy, which means the temporary use of another animal (in this case a bug) for transportation to another fee lot.”  Krishna Mohan PHotography also has images of Mites on a Red Palm Weevil and the statement:  “that mites are transported on the legs of this weevil. This process is called phoresy, which means one animal attaching to another for transportation only.”

Mites on Red Palm Weevil

Close-up of Mites on Red Palm Weevil

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug in our house
Location: Peterborugh, Ontario, Canada
August 1, 2014 9:43 am
Hello,
We found this bug on the floor of our house. The reason that this is important is that within the past few days before finding the bug our dog has lost all mobility in his back legs. We were almost forced to put him down as he is old and figured that it was simply the arthritis in his hips finally taking over. We love him so much that we decided to buy a set of dog wheels for him to give him one more chance. During the time that he has been beginning to be trained with the wheels we saw blood on his paw and the next day found this bug on the floor. We cannot tell if the front ligaments are antennae or legs. We wondered if it could be a tick. This would be good news to us because the paralysis in our dogs legs could be due to tick paralysis which is sometimes reversible. Our whole family and our puppy would appreciate greatly an answer.
Thanks so much!
The Wards
(Attached is the photo of the bug and our doggy with his new wheels!)
Signature: The Wards

Weevil:  Otiorhynchus raucus

Weevil: Otiorhynchus raucus

Dear Wards,
We wrote back earlier to inform you that we felt there was no connection between this Weevil and your dog’s paralysis, and though that has not changed, we have identified your Weevil as
Otiorhynchus raucus, a species that according to BugGuide is:  “native to w. Palaearctic (Europe to Kazakhstan), adventive in NA and widespread in the north (across so. Canada & adjacent US)” and “earliest record in our area: ON 1936.”  We hope you dog’s health improves.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug id
Location: Northern Maine
July 27, 2014 9:27 pm
Saw these getting busy on my boat trailer tire as I attempted to put air in it.
Signature: Nathan

Mating Pale Green Weevils

Mating Invasive Green Weevils

Dear Nathan,
We believe these are mating Green Immigrant Leaf Weevils,
Polydrusus sericeus, and according to BugGuide: “introduced from Europe, where it is widespread” and it feeds on “primarily Yellow Birch (Betula alleghaniensis).”  Since you image is not in critical focus, they might also be Pale Green Weevils, Polydrusus impressifrons, and they are also an invasive, introduced species.  According to BugGuide:  “native to Europe, adventive in NA (introduced ca. 1913)” though this date discrepancy information is also provided:  “earliest record in our area: NY 1906.”  Finally, BugGuide offers this comparison information with the Green Immigrant Leaf Weevil:  “P. impressifrons is similarly colored but has less conspicuous black lines in elytra, relatively small eyes positioned laterally and parallel to midline, least interocular distance 1.5 to 2 times width of eye, and elytral margins slightly sinuate and widest near apex (compare images of both species).”

Thanks for taking the time. Looks like the pale green after looking at some images. I guess it’s European bug time around here.

Originally we thought Pale Green Weevils, and then we thought the Green Immigrant Leaf Weevils were more likely.  Thanks for the confirmation.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What bug is this?
Location: New Jersey
June 29, 2014 8:48 pm
I saw this one crawling on the kitchen counter above my dishwasher just the other night June 26 in northern New Jersey. I haven’t been able to figure out what kind of insect this is.
Signature: Cat

Male Oak Timberworm

Male Oak Timberworm

Dear Cat,
Earlier this month, we spent a great deal of time trying to identify a male Oak Timberworm which we were relatively certain was a Weevil though it is lacking the snout normally associated with Weevils.  The earlier posting, also from New Jersey, had an image not nearly as sharp as the one you have provided.  According to BugGuide:  “Females lay eggs in living trees where sapwood exposed by injury; larvae bore into wood beneath.”

Oh thank you so much!  I was super curious.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Found in Southern NJ
Location: Moorestown NJ
June 5, 2014 8:57 am
Hello,
I found this bug last night in my house. I cannot seem to find it anywhere to identify it. I live in South Jersey, close to Philadelphia. The bug was about 3/8″ to half inch long.
Any help in figuring out what this is would be great. Thanks!
Signature: Megan

Male Oak Timberworm

Male Oak Timberworm

Dear Megan,
We have been obsessed with trying to identify your beetle, and we started researching it yesterday.  The mandibles are quite unusual, so we suppose it is understandable that we did not think this could be a Weevil or Snout Beetle.  We eventually located a matching image on BugGuide of a male Oak Timberworm,
Arrhenodes minutus, and upon viewing the information page on BugGuide, we learned the species is sexually dimorphic, and the female has a more typical snout.  We also learned:  “males are territorial and guard egg-laying females.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination