Currently viewing the category: "Weevils"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Red Beetle
Location: Negev, Israel
November 15, 2016 4:45 am
Found this beetle on a cut down Palm tree, as I approached him he stopped in place.
I wanted to find out what this bug is but couldn’t find anything similar.
Signature: Michael

Red Palm Weevil

Red Palm Weevil

Dear Michael,
The Red Palm Weevil,
Rhynchophorus ferrugineus, is considered a pest of cultivated palm trees in many parts of the world.  The Invasive Species Compendium has a map of its distribution,  Times of Malta and Springer Link both have helpful information on the Red Palm Weevil.  

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this Bug?
Location: Hillsborough County, Florida
August 28, 2016 5:26 am
I have looked at all the black and white beetles and cannot find one that looks quite like this. It was on dog fennel in west central Florida. I would like to know what it is and if it is native. It looks like it is missing an antennae.
Thank you for this wonderful reference site.
Signature: Donna Bollenbach

Diaprepes Root Weevil

Diaprepes Root Weevil

Dear Donna,
This looks to us like a Diaprepes Root Weevil,
Diaprepes abbreviatus, a species that according to BugGuide is:  “Native to the Caribbean, adventive and established in so. US: so. & central FL (1964), so. TX (Cameron & Hidalgo Cos 2000, Corpus Christi 2005, Houston 2009; map), so. CA (2005), LA (2008); further north in greenhouses.”  BugGuide also indicates it is  “highly polyphagous; larvae feed on roots, adults on foliage of citrus trees (esp. oranges in TX) and almost 300 other plant species” and “Major pest of citrus crops: larvae often girdle the taproot, which may kill the plant and provide an avenue for Phythophora infections. A single larva can kill young hosts while several larvae can cause serious decline of older, established hosts.”

Diaprepes Root Weevil

Diaprepes Root Weevil

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What bug is this?
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
August 14, 2016 6:17 pm
These bugs were in bird seed we bought in Toronto. What bug is this?
Signature: Thanks, Katie Rancourt

Weevils Infest Bird Seed

Granary Weevils Infest Bird Seed

Dear Katie,
Many insects infest stored food, especially grain products.  These are probably Granary Weevils.

Weevils infest Bird Seed

Granary Weevils infest Bird Seed

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Need ID: Bugs seen mating in Mumbai, India
Location: Mumbai, Maharashtra – India
August 9, 2016 12:45 am
Spotted these bugs in the moist deciduous forest in the monsoon season here in Mumbai.
Signature: Rizwan Mithawala

Unknown Mating Weevils

Unknown Mating Weevils

Dear Rizwan,
Your image of mating Weevils is quite stunning.  It depicts both the mating behavior and the damage the beetles make to the leaves while feeding.  Many Weevils are generalist feeders, meaning they do not limit their diet to a single plant, or even a single genus or family.  We are not sure of the species, and since Weevils are members of the largest family of animals on planet earth, and since India does not have the best online archive for insect identification, we are not even going to attempt a species identification, but we would challenge our readership to give it a try.

Dear Daniel,
Thank you so much for your help!
Could it be this one?
Asiatic oak weevil
Cyrtepistomus castaneus
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Cyrtepistomus_castaneus_Kaldari.jpg
http://www.invasive.org/browse/subthumb.cfm?sub=2136
http://bugguide.net/node/view/52987
Rizwan Mithawala
Photographer & Correspondent
The Times of India, Mumbai

Perhaps.  Was it feeding on Oak or Chestnut?

Sorry, I don’t know. Can you guess looking at the leaves?

sorry, we are What’s That Bug? not What’s That Leaf?

Hahaha…thanks for your help!

Unknown Mating Weevils

Unknown Mating Weevils

Our pleasure Rizwan.  Seriously, we really have no scientific credentials and this site began as a lark many years ago as part of an art project/writing collaboration.  Since knowing the plant upon which a particular insect is feeding is often a great assistance in the identification process, we are going back to your original uncropped image and posting it as well.  Weevils are such an enormous family, and though it does contain many colorful and distinctive species, most are rather drab and ordinary, and look alike to our relatively untrained eyes.  Proper identification of insects often includes careful examination of the actual specimen, counting things like antennae segments, or wing veins, or even the examination of genitalia, and all of that is well beyond our capabilities.  Additionally, many folks just want to know what something is in a general sense, and not a specific one.  We are pretty good at general.  Specific often eludes us.  We never really know what the purpose of an identification request is when we receive it.  Is it feeding on a treasured plant in the garden?  Was it seen on vacation?  Will it bite and kill me?  Is this an exotic introduction that will decimate the crops in its newly expanded range?  These are just some of the myriad possibilities that go unstated when a brief request is made.  Perhaps someday a real expert will see your image on our site and write in and comment with a proper identification.

Hi Daniel,
Thanks so much; really appreciate your interest and efforts. These pictures are shot for a newspaper story about how life flourishes in the monsoon (in the forest). It’s a photo-feature about the season of abundance, feeding and mating. Hence, I needed to identify the beetles and know their role in the forest ecosystem. Any additional information you can share will be of great help for me. Thanks!
Regards,
Rizwan

Hi again Rizwan,
We suspect general weevil information will suffice for your readership, and exact species information might not be necessary.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of bug is this?
Location: Northern Maine
July 15, 2016 2:45 pm
We have many of these small green bugs around our house and we are wondering what they are?
Signature: Elizabeth Collins

Green Immigrant Leaf Weevil

Green Immigrant Leaf Weevil

Dear Elizabeth,
This is a Green Immigrant Leaf Weevil,
Polydrusus formosus, a species introduced from Europe.  According to BugGuide, it feeds on “primarily Yellow Birch (Betula alleghaniensis).”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beautiful Aqua Teeny Guy!
Location: Gladwin, Michigan
July 6, 2016 5:36 pm
This intriguing little thing found its way onto my hand while visiting family in Michigan this 4th of July weekend. Very small, very active. The only aqua colored insects I could find online were weevils and this guy didn’t have a weevil face. I tried to get a closer shot but this was as clear as I could get. It was a sunny day, approx 79-82 degrees with low humidity near Lake Lancer in Gladwin, MI (mid-Michigan, lower peninsula). Thank you for your beautiful website 💛
Signature: Bugs are beautiful

Green Immigrant Leaf Weevil

Green Immigrant Leaf Weevil

Your insect is in fact a Weevil, which is a classification of Beetles.  It is a Green Immigrant Leaf Weevil, Polydrusus formosus, which is represented on BugGuide.   According to BugGuide:  “introduced from Europe, where it is widespread.”

Green Immigrant Leaf Weevil

Green Immigrant Leaf Weevil

Thank you so much!  What a pretty little thing.  I hate that it’s an invasive introduced species.  Your website is just wonderful, thank you for your love for the little guys!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination