Currently viewing the category: "Weevils"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug id
Location: Northern Maine
July 27, 2014 9:27 pm
Saw these getting busy on my boat trailer tire as I attempted to put air in it.
Signature: Nathan

Mating Pale Green Weevils

Mating Invasive Green Weevils

Dear Nathan,
We believe these are mating Green Immigrant Leaf Weevils,
Polydrusus sericeus, and according to BugGuide: “introduced from Europe, where it is widespread” and it feeds on “primarily Yellow Birch (Betula alleghaniensis).”  Since you image is not in critical focus, they might also be Pale Green Weevils, Polydrusus impressifrons, and they are also an invasive, introduced species.  According to BugGuide:  “native to Europe, adventive in NA (introduced ca. 1913)” though this date discrepancy information is also provided:  “earliest record in our area: NY 1906.”  Finally, BugGuide offers this comparison information with the Green Immigrant Leaf Weevil:  “P. impressifrons is similarly colored but has less conspicuous black lines in elytra, relatively small eyes positioned laterally and parallel to midline, least interocular distance 1.5 to 2 times width of eye, and elytral margins slightly sinuate and widest near apex (compare images of both species).”

Thanks for taking the time. Looks like the pale green after looking at some images. I guess it’s European bug time around here.

Originally we thought Pale Green Weevils, and then we thought the Green Immigrant Leaf Weevils were more likely.  Thanks for the confirmation.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What bug is this?
Location: New Jersey
June 29, 2014 8:48 pm
I saw this one crawling on the kitchen counter above my dishwasher just the other night June 26 in northern New Jersey. I haven’t been able to figure out what kind of insect this is.
Signature: Cat

Male Oak Timberworm

Male Oak Timberworm

Dear Cat,
Earlier this month, we spent a great deal of time trying to identify a male Oak Timberworm which we were relatively certain was a Weevil though it is lacking the snout normally associated with Weevils.  The earlier posting, also from New Jersey, had an image not nearly as sharp as the one you have provided.  According to BugGuide:  “Females lay eggs in living trees where sapwood exposed by injury; larvae bore into wood beneath.”

Oh thank you so much!  I was super curious.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Found in Southern NJ
Location: Moorestown NJ
June 5, 2014 8:57 am
Hello,
I found this bug last night in my house. I cannot seem to find it anywhere to identify it. I live in South Jersey, close to Philadelphia. The bug was about 3/8″ to half inch long.
Any help in figuring out what this is would be great. Thanks!
Signature: Megan

Male Oak Timberworm

Male Oak Timberworm

Dear Megan,
We have been obsessed with trying to identify your beetle, and we started researching it yesterday.  The mandibles are quite unusual, so we suppose it is understandable that we did not think this could be a Weevil or Snout Beetle.  We eventually located a matching image on BugGuide of a male Oak Timberworm,
Arrhenodes minutus, and upon viewing the information page on BugGuide, we learned the species is sexually dimorphic, and the female has a more typical snout.  We also learned:  “males are territorial and guard egg-laying females.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Found Bug
Location: Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic
June 1, 2014 3:26 pm
Warm greetings from the Dominican Republic. I found this curious bug resting on the wall of one of the stairs of the building where I live. I was wondering if this is a beneficial insect or a pest.
Thanks in advance for your support.
Signature: Alejandro

Weevil

Palm Weevil

Hi Alejandro,
This is a Weevil or Snout Beetle, and we have been searching the internet for a spell trying to identify it to the genus or species level.  We did find a close match on FlickR that was imaged in Brazil, but it is not identified.  We will continue searching.

Weevil

Palm Weevil

Hi Daniel
Many thanks for your kind support. Thanks to your information i could investigate that the classification of the Curculionidae species is very extensive.
Have a good week.

Hi Daniel and Alejandro:
It looks like the Palm Weevil, Rhinostomus scrutator (Curculionidae: Dryophthorinae: Rhinostomini). According to Vaurie (1970) its distribution is limited to the Dominican half of Hispanola. Also: “The species on which there is some biological information (barbirostris, niger, oblitus, and scrutator) live at the expense of palms, notably the coconut palm (Palmaceae or Arecaceae). The adults, which are nocturnal, generally attack only damaged, fallen, or decomposing trunks. The larvae bore within and pupate near the outer bark. (See the species for further details). These weevils are not found on other Caribbean islands that have palm trees, perhaps because the other islands are too small.” Regards.  Karl

Thanks so much for doing the research on this Karl.

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Subject: A long proboscis
Location: Andover, NJ
May 25, 2014 5:00 pm
Hi,
Hoping you can id this one for me. Found it today on a patch of bee-balm (not blooming yet) and thought it looked like a red milkweed beetle except for the very long proboscis. It was between 1/4 and 1/2 inch in length and the colors in the photo are accurate.
Hope you can help!
Signature: Deborah Bifulco

Cocklebur Weevil

Cocklebur Weevil

Hi Deborah,
Your beetle is a Cocklebur Weevil,
Rhodobaenus tredecimpunctatus, or another member of the genus, and according to BugGuide:  “Breeds in Asteraceae such as cocklebur (Xanthium), ironweed (Vernonia), joe-pye-weed (Eupatorium), ragweed (Ambrosia).”  Bee Balm is in the mint family, so we don’t believe this individual was feeding on the plant upon which it was discovered.  Perhaps you have some of the identified foodplants in your garden or growing as weeds nearby.  We especially like the image with your Cocklebur Weaving beginning to take flight.

Cocklebur Weevil beginning to take flight.

Cocklebur Weevil beginning to take flight.

Thanks for the iD, Daniel!  I actually do have both Joe Pye and ironweed starting to come up around the yard, so perhaps the little guy was just having a rest in the bee balm patch.  A very cool looking little bug – glad to know what it is.
Debbi

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Help a Bugger Out
Location: Tosa Peninsula, Kochi, Shikoku, Japan
May 15, 2014 6:17 am
Hello bugman!
Me and my boyfriend have been travelling in Japan now for 7 months. We came here originally for the birds but the huge variety of strange, colourful and giant insects have been stealing the show a bit.
This guy flew down off a tree, looking closely at its face we decided it was the funniest bug we had seen all trip, so that seems like a good place to start.
I would like to send more if that’s okay?
Signature: Ellie

Acorn Weevil

Acorn Weevil

Hi Ellie,
This is an Acorn Weevil in the genus
Curculio, but our quick research did not determine which species are found in Japan.  You can find information on BugGuide regarding North American species that might be helpful for you.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination