Currently viewing the category: "Weevils"
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Subject: anteater/poop bug
Location: calgary, alberta, canada
July 4, 2015 12:05 am
Where shall I start? Well I’m an avid fisher in alberta and tend to come across alot of creepy crawlers on my trips. Aswell as a fishing enthusiast, I am a bug lover….. like a HUGE bug lover. I talk to bugs, name them, baby talk with them, form friendships. (Except mosquitos, I loathe those blood sneaking, greedy little bastards! !!) Any who, upon one of my visits to chain lakes (alberta canada) I stumbled upon an adorable little creature. At first I thought it was a poop, a small bird poop. That is, until I saw it move. Upon closer inspection I noticed he had an anteater looking snout. I fell in love with this adorable little critter ! I named him Henry (pronounced on-ri) I think he was french canadian. Well I spent a good half hour admiring Henry and his adorable qualities. He crawled about doing his bug thing while I doted on his endearing qualities. I spent a good 10 minutes taking over 30 pictures of my new found friend. I adored him enough to want to take him home, but loved him enough not to keep him, alas he belongs in nature as Jesus/alah/budah intended. I eventually placed my sweet little buglet on a soft blade of grass and bid my farewell. Well, here I am at past midnight sitting on my couch bed admiring my phenomenal studioesque portraits of Henry when I decided to Google what kind of bug Henry is. I tried “bird poop bug” and “ant eater bug” to no avail, until stumbling upon you site. To you I plead, please help me identify Henry. I must know what beautiful creature grazed my life for just a brief moment. Your help is greatly appreciated!.
Signature: yours truly, Miss Panda

Withy Weevil

Withy Weevil

Dear Miss Panda,
We found your inquiry positively entertaining, and far more enjoyable to research than the typical, terse identification requests we typically receive.  We found your Poplar and Willow Borer Weevil,
Cryptorhynchus lapathi, identified on the Ibycter blog where it is called a “bird-turd weevil”, and then we turned to BugGuide for additional information.  BugGuide provides the common names:  “Poplar-and-Willow Curculio, Mottled Willow Borer, Willow Beetle, Withy Weevil” and states:  “Adults and larvae are associated with various species of willow, poplar, alder and birch (Salicaceae, Betulaceae); larvae mine young stems.”

Withy Weevil

Withy Weevil

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Subject: Unique Insect
Location: Western India
June 3, 2015 11:19 am
Today evening, I spotted am extremely unique insect in my apartment. Due to there being a forested area near my residence, insects are frequently visitors.
However I have never seen anything like this before. I have been unable to locate anything similar online.
I would like to bring your attention to it. It may be an undiscovered species.
The insect was roughly 5 cm long. It was not moving, even when I blew air on it. When I picked it up using a piece of paper, if clung to it. I dropped him back into the forested area.
I would really like if you could identify it for me. Looking forward to hearing from you.
Signature: PD

Unknown Weevil

Unknown Weevil

Dear PD,
This is some species of Weevil, a member of a very large family of beetles.  We tried unsuccessfully to identify it online, and we hope to get some assistance from our readership, but we are postdating this submission to go live in mid June while we are out of the office.

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Subject: whats this bug – san diego
Location: San Diego
May 19, 2015 3:36 pm
Hi Bugman, great responses!!
Signature: Jen

Broad Nosed Weevil

Broad Nosed Weevil

Dear Jen,
We were quite certain your beetle is a Weevil, and though we did not recognize it, we found its overly developed front legs to be a very distinctive physical feature.  As we searched the internet for an identification, our first lead was to Arizona: Beetles, Bug, Birds and more where we found an image identified as
Pandeleteius buchanani.  Not an exact match, it looked similar enough to cause us to search BugGuide where we found a California relative in the same genus, Pandeleteius defectus, but alas, there is no information posted on the species.  The species is also pictured on SoCal Fauna, but again there is no specific information so we cannot provide any information on the diet of this Broad Nosed Weevil.

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Subject: Hard Shelled, Flightless Beetle
Location: 3 hours North-east of Alice Springs
April 24, 2015 4:37 pm
I have found this beetle three hours North-east of Alice Springs trying to burrow into the sand. He’s dark brown and has a really hard shell and when I tapped him with my finger he stuck his bottom up in the air with his head on the ground as if trying to scare me off with the small spikes on his back. He’s got antennas and six legs with really grippy ‘claws’. I was also wondering (for if you can find out what type of beetle he is) If you knew what he eats and how to look after him properly. I don’t know how to attach a photo to the website so if I could get an email address to send the photo to you, That would be really good. I’ve called him ‘Bob’ for now.
Signature: Thanks, B McKnight

Weevil

Weevil

Dear B McKnight,
This is some species of Weevil, and we found a similar looking, but not identical individual from Alice Springs pictured on LirraLirra.  Another similar looking individual is pictured on Nature’s Windows, Photos of the Month, and it is identified as
Leptopius areolatus, but though it looks similar to your individual, we do not believe it is the same species, but possibly in the same genus.  Other similar looking Weevils in the genus Leptopius are pictured on FlickRiver.  Another similar looking member of the genus is represented by this image on FlickR.

Weevil

Weevil

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Subject: Giant Weevil
Location: Trinidad
April 5, 2015 1:47 am
This beetle was attracted to a light. It looked like a very large broad-nosed weevil to me, maybe 2 cm.
Signature: Steve Nanz

Weevil or Longicorn???

Fungus Weevil

Dear Steve,
We agree that this looks like a Weevil, though we have never seen a Weevil image with such long antennae.  That trait is more like a Longicorn in the family Cerambycidae.  We have not been able to locate any matching images from either family from Trinidad, or any other place for that matter, so we are posting this beetle without identifying it and we hope to get a second opinion, and perhaps some assistance from our readership.

Unidentified Longhorned Weevil

Longhorned Fungus Weevil

Update
Cesar Crash of Insetologia, a Brazilian site similar to our own, provided us with a link to the Paraguay Biodiversidad site of the family Anthribidae that includes an image of Ptychoderes mixtus that looks identical to the image submitted by Steve.  A similar image can be found on the Coleoptera Neotropical site.  Anthribidae are commonly called Fungus Weevils.

Eric Eaton confirms
Daniel:
This is a fungus weevil, family Anthribidae.  Males of many species have really long antennae.
Eric

Thank you for the update and thanks to Cesar Crash for pointing me toward a possible ID. The descriptions for many in this genus are in German which I don’t speak. However I did find a key to some of the species:
Karl Jordan, 1907. Biologigia Central-America. Insecta. Coleoptera 5(6): 303
http://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/583600#page/315/mode/1up
It appears that Ptychoderes mixtus is a good contender and may be in range. Ptychoderes rugicollis is also possible. Barcoding Life images show the latter with shorter antennae. There are no images of the former. So P. mixtus does seem like a reasonable tentative ID.
Best Regards,
Steve Nanz

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Subject: Can you plZ help me ?
Location: Southern California
March 18, 2015 12:06 am
Hi there, my name is Sonia and I’m really interested in knowing what’s this beetle … I have two big Palm trees and they are being affected my something, the Palm treas are more than 40 years of and we had to cut one of them , the leaves are falling and it seems to be like rotten in the base of the leaf , I saw this guy’s the other day wondering in the garden near the head of the Palm that got cut, and he died 2 days after, I also saw another death one yesterday and I was “attacked” by something that was black and make noise while in my garden ( I think it was another one of these )
Can you plz help me figure out that is making my trees ill ???
Signature: Sonia Villerias

Possibly Red Palm Weevil

Possibly Red Palm Weevil

Dear Sonia,
But for the dark coloration, all indications are that this is a Red Palm Weevil or Asian Palm Weevil,
Rhynchophorus ferrugineus, a species that according to BugGuide is:  “native to so. Asia and Melanesia, since the 1980s spread into many warm coastal areas around the Indian Ocean and the Mediterranean(2); in our area, CA (Orange Co.; first reported in 2010).”  The damage to your trees is consistent with the damage caused by the Red Palm Weevil, though the solid dark coloration is unusual.  According to the Center for Invasive Species Research at UC Riverside:  “Economic Damage: Red Palm Weevil is widely considered to be the most damaging insect pest of palms in the world. RPW’s are usually attracted to unhealthy palm trees, but they will often attack healthy palms too. Red Palm Weevil larvae feed within the apical growing point of the palms creating extensive damage to palm tissues and weakening the structure of the palm trunk. Palms damaged by RPW may exhibit the following symptoms: (1) presence of tunnels on the trunk or base of fronds. (2) Infested palms may emit “gnawing” sounds caused by larvae feeding inside. (3) Oozing of viscous fluids from tunnels. (4) Appearane of chewed plant material (frass) at the external entrances of feeding tunnels and a highly distinctive “fermented” odor. (5) Empty pupal cases and the bodies of dead adult RPW in and around heavily infested palms, and (6) breaking of the trunk, or toppling of the palm crown.  Feeding damage leading to the death of infested palms is widely reported in areas invaded by this pest. The primary hosts of the Red Palm Weevil include 24 species of palms in 14 genera, including most of the common landscape palms found in California. The Canary Island date palm, one of the most conspicuous and prominent palms in California, is especially susceptible to attack. The Red Palm Weevil poses a very serious threat to California’s landscape plantings of ornamental palms if it were to become established here. Commercial date production is impacted in areas where RPW is established, resulting in tree death or reduced vigor in infested date palms. Red Palm Weevil represents a potential threat to California’s $30 million dollar date crop should it become established in date-growing areas of California. Ornamental palm tree sales are estimated at $70 million per year in California, and $127 million in Florida.”  The CISR also states:  “Adult Red Palm Weevils are very large beetles, attaining body lengths, including the rostrum of 35 to 40mm (1.4-1.6 inches). The weevils have a long, slender rostrum or “snout” which the female uses to penetrate palm tissue and create access wounds in which eggs are deposited. Coloration in Rhyncophorus ferrugineus is extremely variable and has historically led to the erroneous classification of color-defined polymorphs (variants) as distinct species. Coloration in the adult weevils is predominately reddish-brown in the most typical form. The Red Palm Weevil’s collected in Laguna Beach have displayed a distinct “red striped” coloration which consists of the dorsal surfaces appearing uniformly dark brown to black, with a single, contrasting red stripe running the length of the pronotum. Consequently, there are two different color types or color morphs for RPW, adults that are predominantly reddish in color, and the others that are dark with a red streak, like the Laguna Beach specimens.”  Your dark individual may represent yet another color variant.  We strongly urge you to collect a specimen and have it identified at your local Natural History Museum.

Possibly Red Palm Weevil

Possibly Red Palm Weevil

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