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Subject: Can you plZ help me ?
Location: Southern California
March 18, 2015 12:06 am
Hi there, my name is Sonia and I’m really interested in knowing what’s this beetle … I have two big Palm trees and they are being affected my something, the Palm treas are more than 40 years of and we had to cut one of them , the leaves are falling and it seems to be like rotten in the base of the leaf , I saw this guy’s the other day wondering in the garden near the head of the Palm that got cut, and he died 2 days after, I also saw another death one yesterday and I was “attacked” by something that was black and make noise while in my garden ( I think it was another one of these )
Can you plz help me figure out that is making my trees ill ???
Signature: Sonia Villerias

Possibly Red Palm Weevil

Possibly Red Palm Weevil

Dear Sonia,
But for the dark coloration, all indications are that this is a Red Palm Weevil or Asian Palm Weevil,
Rhynchophorus ferrugineus, a species that according to BugGuide is:  “native to so. Asia and Melanesia, since the 1980s spread into many warm coastal areas around the Indian Ocean and the Mediterranean(2); in our area, CA (Orange Co.; first reported in 2010).”  The damage to your trees is consistent with the damage caused by the Red Palm Weevil, though the solid dark coloration is unusual.  According to the Center for Invasive Species Research at UC Riverside:  “Economic Damage: Red Palm Weevil is widely considered to be the most damaging insect pest of palms in the world. RPW’s are usually attracted to unhealthy palm trees, but they will often attack healthy palms too. Red Palm Weevil larvae feed within the apical growing point of the palms creating extensive damage to palm tissues and weakening the structure of the palm trunk. Palms damaged by RPW may exhibit the following symptoms: (1) presence of tunnels on the trunk or base of fronds. (2) Infested palms may emit “gnawing” sounds caused by larvae feeding inside. (3) Oozing of viscous fluids from tunnels. (4) Appearane of chewed plant material (frass) at the external entrances of feeding tunnels and a highly distinctive “fermented” odor. (5) Empty pupal cases and the bodies of dead adult RPW in and around heavily infested palms, and (6) breaking of the trunk, or toppling of the palm crown.  Feeding damage leading to the death of infested palms is widely reported in areas invaded by this pest. The primary hosts of the Red Palm Weevil include 24 species of palms in 14 genera, including most of the common landscape palms found in California. The Canary Island date palm, one of the most conspicuous and prominent palms in California, is especially susceptible to attack. The Red Palm Weevil poses a very serious threat to California’s landscape plantings of ornamental palms if it were to become established here. Commercial date production is impacted in areas where RPW is established, resulting in tree death or reduced vigor in infested date palms. Red Palm Weevil represents a potential threat to California’s $30 million dollar date crop should it become established in date-growing areas of California. Ornamental palm tree sales are estimated at $70 million per year in California, and $127 million in Florida.”  The CISR also states:  “Adult Red Palm Weevils are very large beetles, attaining body lengths, including the rostrum of 35 to 40mm (1.4-1.6 inches). The weevils have a long, slender rostrum or “snout” which the female uses to penetrate palm tissue and create access wounds in which eggs are deposited. Coloration in Rhyncophorus ferrugineus is extremely variable and has historically led to the erroneous classification of color-defined polymorphs (variants) as distinct species. Coloration in the adult weevils is predominately reddish-brown in the most typical form. The Red Palm Weevil’s collected in Laguna Beach have displayed a distinct “red striped” coloration which consists of the dorsal surfaces appearing uniformly dark brown to black, with a single, contrasting red stripe running the length of the pronotum. Consequently, there are two different color types or color morphs for RPW, adults that are predominantly reddish in color, and the others that are dark with a red streak, like the Laguna Beach specimens.”  Your dark individual may represent yet another color variant.  We strongly urge you to collect a specimen and have it identified at your local Natural History Museum.

Possibly Red Palm Weevil

Possibly Red Palm Weevil

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Subject: Pretty, but what is it?
Location: Baguio City, Philippines
March 7, 2015 9:01 pm
Hi, bugman! :) I took a photo of this little guy late February in Baguio City, Philippines. After a while, a smaller version of the bug decided to hang out on him (her?). A reverse search of google images yielded no results, and my curiosity is killing me. An ID would be much appreciated — then I would no longer have to caption the photographs as “funky bugs!” :)
Signature: Thanks, Isa

Weevils engaged in mating activity.

Weevils engaged in mating activity.

Hi Isa,
All we can provide at this time is that these are Weevils, beetles in the family Curculionidae, and that they appear to be engaging in mating activity, including competition to see who gets the fertile female.

Mating Competition among Weevils

Mating Competition among Weevils

Thanks for the quick reply, Daniel! Much a lot! :)

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Subject: University Assignment
Location: Vereeniging, South Africa
February 21, 2015 6:19 am
Hi bugman!
I’m currently doing an assignment which requires me to find and identify insects that I come across and I recently found this beetle type thing. I’ve tried searching for the characteristics online but I haven’t found a picture that matches mine. It looks to be some type of beetle but it doesn’t seem to have any wings. It’s about 2 – 2.5cm long and about 1cm wide at its widest point. I live in South Africa, and it is currently the last month of Summer here. Please help!
Signature: Jess

Beetle

Lily Weevil

Dear Jess,
We agree that this is a Beetle, and many species of beetles, including some members of the Blister Beetle family and the Darkling Beetle family, have fused elytra that prohibit the beetles from flying.  We do not recognize this unusual beetle, and we plan to do additional research, but we have some errands to run this morning and we will return to this search.  Right now, we can say that your beetle reminds us of Desert Spider Beetles in the family Meloidae, but we searched through six pages on iSpot without finding a match.  Additionally, the antennae and legs are quite different.  Meanwhile, can you please provide us with more information on the sighting.  Where was it found?  In the home?  In the desert? On a plant?  Just as we were about to post, we decided to see if it might be a Weevil, and we believe this is a Weevil in the genus
 Brachycerus based on this image and others posted to iSpot.  We are going to go with Lily Weevil, Brachycerus labrusca, and there are several images on iSpot.

Beetle

Lily Weevil

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Subject: Bug eating my lemon tree leaves.
Location: South Florida
February 12, 2015 1:13 pm
I have this bug/beetle eating my little outdoor lemon tree leaves around the edges and is there a treatment for them?
I hope you can help.
Signature: Joe cocchario

Sri Lanka Weevil

Sri Lanka Weevil

Dear Joe,
This is a Sri Lanka Weevil,
Myllocerus undecimpustulatus.  According to BugGuide:  “native to Sri Lanka, adventive and established in so. FL.”  BugGuide also notes:  “in FL, recorded from 55 host plant spp., from palms to roadside weeds, including citrus.”  According to Featured Creatures:  “Leaf-feeding adults damage the foliage of ornamental plants, fruit trees, and vegetables, whereas the larvae injure root systems. Due to its feeding habits, the Sri Lankan weevil could negatively affect subtropical and tropical fruit, ornamental, and vegetable industries here in Florida. The possible impact to the horticulture industry in nurseries, landscape services, and horticultural retailers could reach billions of dollars based on the value they generate in Florida (Kachatryan and Hodges 2012). Extension agents and Master Gardener volunteers around the state have received requests from homeowners for information on the control of this weevil. Botanical gardens and plant nurseries have reported damage due to chewing injury and require effective control measures.”

Leaf Damage due to Weevils

Leaf Damage due to Weevils

Update:  It seems Joe submitted a photo previously posted to our site, so now we cannot be certain that the insect eating his lemon tree leaves is actually a Sri Lanka Weevil.

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Subject: This is the weirdest beetle I’ve ever seen
Location: Sarapiqui, Costa Rica
January 17, 2015 8:39 pm
Hi guys, I’ve got another puzzle for you! This time it’s a beetle (I think), maybe a sort of weevil? I found it hanging out on my bed (eek!) in Saripiqui, Costa Rica when I returned from a hike. It looks like its antennae are coming out of its nose! From the tip of the antennae to the bottom it was about a third the length of my hand, with yellow vertical marks on its back. (photo taken Jan 10, 2015)
Signature: Lauren

Tropical Weevil:  Brentus anchorago

Tropical Weevil: Brentus anchorago

Dear Lauren,
Your beetle is a Tropical Weevil,
Brentus anchorago.

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Subject: ID please
Location: Western Cape , South Africa
November 24, 2014 7:43 am
Hi
This delightful spotted bug I saw yesterday Nov 24 (summer in South Africa). It was on a bush that is found in the fynbos. This bush was next to a large (major) dam Theewaterskloof in the Western Cape .It din’t fly but was happy to crawl over the flower and down the stem I have included a pic of the terrain
What is it please?
Rgds
Signature: Tweet

Weevil

Weevil

Dear Tweet,
This is a Weevil in the family Curculionidae and we found a similar looking individual on iSpot, but alas, it is only identified to the family level.

Hi
Thank you so much that was really quick – humble weevil aka  a snout beetle, was hoing for  new species :-)
Warm regards

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