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Subject: This is the weirdest beetle I’ve ever seen
Location: Sarapiqui, Costa Rica
January 17, 2015 8:39 pm
Hi guys, I’ve got another puzzle for you! This time it’s a beetle (I think), maybe a sort of weevil? I found it hanging out on my bed (eek!) in Saripiqui, Costa Rica when I returned from a hike. It looks like its antennae are coming out of its nose! From the tip of the antennae to the bottom it was about a third the length of my hand, with yellow vertical marks on its back. (photo taken Jan 10, 2015)
Signature: Lauren

Tropical Weevil:  Brentus anchorago

Tropical Weevil: Brentus anchorago

Dear Lauren,
Your beetle is a Tropical Weevil,
Brentus anchorago.

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Subject: ID please
Location: Western Cape , South Africa
November 24, 2014 7:43 am
Hi
This delightful spotted bug I saw yesterday Nov 24 (summer in South Africa). It was on a bush that is found in the fynbos. This bush was next to a large (major) dam Theewaterskloof in the Western Cape .It din’t fly but was happy to crawl over the flower and down the stem I have included a pic of the terrain
What is it please?
Rgds
Signature: Tweet

Weevil

Weevil

Dear Tweet,
This is a Weevil in the family Curculionidae and we found a similar looking individual on iSpot, but alas, it is only identified to the family level.

Hi
Thank you so much that was really quick – humble weevil aka  a snout beetle, was hoing for  new species :-)
Warm regards

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Subject: Night invasion of beetles
Location: maui, Hawaii
November 13, 2014 10:50 pm
Aloha from Maui,
We’ve had intermittent rain this year and each time we get invaded by these peculiar beetles within a week. They are attracted to light and will make their way through our screens. Turning on the light outside reveals dozens on the screen. We haven’t been bit by them that we know. They are annoying and will land on us while watching TV.
I searched the internet and the closest identification might be “Triatomine nymphal instal” but I can’t be certain as the shape doesn’t seem exact.
They have 6 legs and can fly.
Any ideas?
With aloha,
Michelle
Signature: Michelle in Maui

Weevil

Weevil

Dear Michelle,
This is not a Blood Sucking Conenose Bug, also known as a Kissing Bug in the genus
Triatoma, that you can read about on the Kiss of Death page, but rather a Weevil, a member of the family Curculionidae, that is well represented on BugGuide.  You do not need to worry about getting bitten by a Weevil.  Many Weevils are agricultural pests and they can proliferate in areas where their food plant is commercially grown.

Weevil

Weevil

Aloha Daniel,
What a relief! I didn’t think they were Blood-Sucking Conenose bugs but they do look a little like it. Being that they haven’t bitten us I had my doubts.
Funny that a common weevil inundates us each year after rains. Last night it was breezy with rain and we had minimal invasion. Perhaps they can’t fly in the rain?
Either way, thank you so much for the identification and the link to Bug Guide. It was a very interesting read!
With aloha,
Michelle

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Subject: Unidentified bug
Location: Jacksonville, Florida
November 5, 2014 9:03 pm
Can you identify this bug? I spotted it on the wall and I seated it with my hat. I thought it was dead until I picked it up to throw it outside.
Signature: Chris DiLullo

Diaprepes Root Weevil

Diaprepes Root Weevil

Hi Chris,
This is a Diaprepes Root Weevil,
Diaprepes abbreviatus.  It is an introduced species from the Caribbean and according to BugGuide:  “Major pest of citrus crops: larvae often girdle the taproot, which may kill the plant and provide an avenue for Phythophora infections. A single larva can kill young hosts while several larvae can cause serious decline of older, established hosts.  Pest of sugarcane in the Caribbean(2); earliest record in our area: FL 1964.” 

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Subject: bug
Location: East Gippsland Australia
October 23, 2014 12:44 am
Gday, sorry to bug you man. Cool bug, spring time, coastal dunes, banksia closest trees.
Signature: Aaron

Wattle Pig Weevil, we believe

Wattle Pig Weevil, we believe

Dear Aaron,
This is a Broad Nosed Weevil, and we believe we have identified it as a Wattle Pig Weevil in the genus
Leptopius thanks to the Brisbane Insect Website.  You can also find images on Project Noah.

Probably Wattle Pig Weevil

Probably Wattle Pig Weevil

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Subject: Biking Bug
Location: Tallahassee, FL
October 20, 2014 1:12 pm
Dear Bugman,
I found this bug sitting on my bike, right beside the back wheel. I had turned the bike over a few times to secure the chain on the wheel, without seeing this little guy fall off. I even tried to slightly move him over with a leaf, but this guy would NOT budge!
I continued to ride, downhill, and uphill until I reached my destination. When I locked up the bike, he (or she) had moved, but was still attached to my bicycle.
This bug had black and yellow patterns. It looks like a beetle, but I’m not entirely sure. It has a “bigger” antenna, as well as legs and feet that tend to stick and hold on to wherever they are.
Signature: Biking with a Bug

Diaprepes Root Weevil

Diaprepes Root Weevil

Dear Biking with a Bug,
This looks like a Diaprepes Root Weevil, and according to Featured Creatures: “It was first reported in Florida in 1964 from a nursery near Apopka. It was presumably introduced in an ornamental plant shipment from Puerto Rico. Since 1964, Diaprepes abbreviatus has spread over a large area of central and southern Florida where it is damaging to citrus, ornamental plants, and some other crops.”

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination