Currently viewing the category: "Tumbling Flower Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Insect identification
Location: Highlands, near Victoria B.C.
August 4, 2011 11:25 pm
These tiny flying bugs were all over the pearly everlasting flowers. What are they? Can you tell me about their life cycle? Thank you!
Signature: Pattie

Tumbling Flower Beetle

Hi Pattie,
This sure looks to us like a Tumbling Flower Beetle in the family Mordellidae, based on photos posted to BugGuide which states they are:  “Common on flowers and foliage; sometimes on dead trees and logs. Larvae occur in dead or dying hardwoods, in pith of weeds or in bracket fungi.” 
BugGuide also remarks that they are:  “small, wedge-shaped beetles; body arched, head bent downward; abdomen usually prolonged into a style or pointed process; hind legs in most species very long and stout, fitted for leaping; antennae long and slender; thorax as wide at base as the elytra. The body is densely covered with fine silky hairs, usually black, but often very prettily spotted or banded with yellow or silvery hues. The adults occur on flowers or on dead trees and are very active, flying and running with great rapidity and in the net or beating umbrella jumping and tumbling about in grotesque manner in their efforts to escape. The larvae live in old wood or in the pith of plants, and those of some species are said to be carnivorous in habit, feeding upon the young of Lepidoptera and Diptera which they find in the plant stems.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Black & White Bug
July 14, 2010
These photos were taken at around 5:20PM in Northeastern Ohio (Strongsville to be exact) on July 14th.
Lindsay Blaha
Strongsville, OH

Tumbling Flower Beetle

Hi Lindsay,
We did a quick search of the family Buprestidae on BugGuide in an attempt to quickly identify your Metallic Wood Boring Beetle.  We did not have any luck, and this will require a more thorough search.  We are posting your letter to see if any of our readers can identify your Metallic Wood Boring Beetle.  It appears your specimen is a female judging by the pointed ovipositor at the tail end of her abdomen.

Ed Note:  Correction
Mardikavana wrote in with a comment correcting our identification.  This species,
Hoshihananomia octopunctata, is actually one of the Tumbling Flower Beetles and there is more information available on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Black insect on Queen’s delight
Sun, May 24, 2009 at 3:52 PM
Can you help me ID this small black insect on Stillingia sylvatica (“Queen’s-delight”? It was on most of the flowers. Because of the pointy tail I was guessing it was immature? An instar of a wood-boring beetle perhaps? (Just guessing). Thanks for your help.
Joan
Georgia, Appling County

Rove Beetle

Tumbling Flower Beetle

Dear Joan,
Our money is on this being a Rove Beetle in the family Staphylinidae. According to BugGuide, there are “In North America, about 17 subfamilies, 313 genera, 3100 species.” We hope to get a second opinion on this being a Rove Beetle. According to our Audubon Guide: “most Rove Beetles and their larvae oprey upon mites, other insects, and small worms. They are usually found on mushrooms, flowers, or under bark.”

Correction: from Eric Eaton Mon, 25 May 2009 08:36:54 -0700 (PDT)
Daniel:
Nope.  It is a “tumbling flower beetle,” family Mordellidae.  Can’t tell more than that from the image alone.
Eric

Thanks for the correction Eric.  We can link to BugGuide which states:  “Body humpbacked, more or less wedge-shaped; broadest at front; head is bent forward, attached ventrally; abdomen pointy, extending beyond elytra. Hind legs enlarged. They kick and tumble about when disturbed. Black or gray, some brown; hairy, sometimes light patches of hair form pattern. Antennae short to moderate, threadlike, sawtoothed or clubbed. “

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination