Currently viewing the category: "Stag Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Stag beetle?
Location: Maryland
July 12, 2014 4:04 pm
I found this stag beetle on the stairs in front of my house in Maryland right outside Washington DC last week. It looks like what one website called a Pinching Bug, which I hope is right because it’s the greatest name ever.
Signature: wombat

Reddish Brown Stag Beetle

Reddish Brown Stag Beetle

Dear wombat,
This Reddish Brown Stag Beetle and other members of its family Lucanidae are called Pinching Bugs according to BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big brown creepy looking big on window
Location: North east ohio
July 7, 2014 9:24 am
I have found this huge brown big on my window looks to be hard shelled and has two huge curved pinchers in the front it is about 2 inches long and is stuck to the screen on second floor window , have never seen anything like it
Signature: Please help

Reddish Brown Stag Beetle

Reddish Brown Stag Beetle

This magnificent insect is a male Reddish Brown Stag Beetle, Lucanus capreolus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Need help identifying Bug
Location: Eastern Hanover Virginia, USA
July 4, 2014 9:23 am
Hello,
Have a look at this prize. Awaiting at my back door facing to go in on a deck four feet off the ground. Location: Central Virginia, USA> Temp: 80 F. Humidity: 98%. Date: 7/3/2014. Time: 11:30 PM.
Photo taken with flash on. I live in a subdivision with large wooded acres. WE are on a ten acre lot – of mostly wooded acres. Hope you can help with identifying this baby.
Thanks.
Signature: AC in the woods

Giant Stag Beetle

Giant Stag Beetle

Hi AC in the woods,
Your sighting of a Giant Stag Beetle is enviable.  Rotting logs are needed to provide habitat for the grubs of Giant Stag Beetles, and habitat destruction and carefully manicured gardens are contributing to the decline in their numbers.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Giant Stag Beetle
Location: Carrboro NC
June 26, 2014 9:25 pm
Hi Bugman, I know this is a male Giant Stag Beetle…I just wanted to share his photo, because I don’t often find them alive, and undamaged. This fellow has been buzzing around my house for a couple of days. I saw him first on my back deck, then again on the kitchen screen the following day. He is very feisty , and rears up whenever I get close to him for his beauty shots.
Signature: Mary S

Giant Stag Beetle

Giant Stag Beetle

Hi Mary,
This Giant Stag Beetle is sure an impressive creature and we are very happy to hear he was feisty.  If this is not your first sighting, you must have a nearby habitat that includes stumps or rotting trees that will support the growth of the grubs.  Pristine yards do not provide the necessary larval food, and as development encroaches upon wooded areas, the available native habitat dwindles, resulting in reduced numbers of many native insects.
  Thank you for supplying our site with your wonderful images.

Giant Stag Beetle

Giant Stag Beetle

We do indeed have the perfect yard for Beetles. We adjoin a nature preserve that is chock full of rotting wood, stumps and snags…which translates to lots of great summer beetles arriving at our doorstep! I enjoy your website very much..nice to see a place where insects are not considered pests.
Thank you for all you do to bring appreciation of the natural world to people who are not professionals in the field.
All the best,
Mary S

Thank you so much for your kind response Mary.  We are happy that our mission to provide educational information about the natural world to a popular culture audience is evident.  For the record, our editorial staff has no formal entomological training and there is probably much misinformation contained in our archives as we are constantly learning more through submissions from our readers.  Though we strive for accuracy, we are only human.

Dear Daniel, I find that you do very careful work, and it is sometimes better than a large number of websites that lack your zeal for the subject. just yesterday, I sent a correction to a Univ of Michigan website ..written by a Phd that talked about the “Elephant Stag Beetle” Elaphus translates to Deer…not elephant…well you guys know that, but there it was on an educational website.I find that you also are open to correction, and interested in getting it right. Your site is also witty, and fun to read. I do wonder how you hold your temper when people write in about some uncommon insect that they crushed because they couldn’t identify it. I get both discouraged and angry when I see that response to our native wildlife. Anyway, you all rock! You make searching the web fun.
Mary

We are positively blushing now Mary.  In our original response, we were going to state that had we not already prepared a posting of Stump Stabbers for the Bug of the Month for July 2014 earlier than usual, we would have strongly considered your submission.  We have featured the Giant Stag Beetle from North Carolina in that capacity in July 2009 as July tends to be the month with the most Stag Beetle sightings.  Since we generally only feature one Bug of the Month per month, and since we uncharacteristically prepared a posting very early, we had no choice but to stick to our original selection.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle from Patagonian rain forest
Location: Cahuelmó, Parque Pumalín, Patagonia, Chile
March 8, 2014 3:06 pm
This very large beetle was found in temperate rain forest at Cahuelmó in the northern part of Parque Pumalín. Can you help putting a name on this species? We were told it’s supposed to be endangered, is that true?
Signature: Henriette

Chilean Stag Beetle

Chilean Stag Beetle

Dear Henriette,
We are so thrilled to have received your identification request and this excellent photo.  We couldn’t imagine it to be anything other than a major male Stag Beetle in the family Lucanidae.  We quickly located your Stag Beetle on Community Idea Stations where it is identified as
Chiasognathus granti Stephens, the Chilean Stag Beetle or Darwin’s Stag Beetle.  The site includes an NPR interview with Dr. Art Evans who states that this is the only species in the genus that stridulates, and that Charles Darwin, in the Descent of Man, described the male’s use of his impressive mandibles to fight other males and defend females.  The Generic Guide to New World Stag Beetles has a map with its very limited range in Patagonia.

Thank you very much for the identification! I saw the Darwin’s Stag Beetle on jan 10th this year, but unfortunately the ranger, who found the beetle, killed the bug to bring it home with him (he was a forestry student). I hope there are stille lots of them in the vast Patagonian rain forests…
Best regards,
Henriette
Mvh Henriette

Dear Henriette,
We don’t want to imagine the worst, but we hope the ranger isn’t using his job to deal in the global insect trade.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: A Lucanid, but further…?
Location: Kampong Lubok Gayau, Lundu, Sarawak, Malaysia
December 31, 2013 9:56 pm
We live in Lundu, Sarawak, on the island of Borneo, just about on the jungle. One morning I found this lovely critter clinging to the shower curtain. Length, about 50mm. While I’ve got family, Lucanidae, and possibly genus, Prosopocoilus, can yuo assess my information… and maybe even give me species?
Signature: Otto

Stag Beetle

Stag Beetle is male Cyclommatus canaliculatus

Happy New Year Otto,
Right now we only have time to confirm that this is a Stag Beetle in the family Lucanidae, and we can post your letter and photo, but we don’t have the time to research its species identity.  We have a prior commitment to attend to and we will continue to research this matter when we return.  Meanwhile, one of our readers might provide a comment or provide a link with a proper identification.

Update:  January 2, 2013
Thanks to a comment from Mardikavana, we now know that this is a male Cyclommatus canaliculatus.  We were able to find a photo on Wikimedia Commons and one on Beetle Space.

Daniel,
Fantastic!  Many thanks.
Otto

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination