Currently viewing the category: "Scarab Beetles"
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Subject: Black & Maroon Fuzzy Beetle
Location: Carson City, NV
April 18, 2014 11:53 pm
Hi Bugman & crew! We took a mountain hike this afternoon & found this beauty. I’d say it was just under an inch long. Found him on a gorgeous 70-degree day in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of Northern Nevada – Carson City, specifically. I’ve tried to search the web & your site for identification but every search wants it to be a velvet ant, which I know it’s definitely not! Thanks for your help!
Signature: Michelle Pedersen

Paracotalpa ursina

Paracotalpa ursina

Dear Michelle,
You are correct.  This is not a Velvet Ant.  It is a Scarab in the subfamily Rutelinae, the Shining Leaf Chafers, and sadly, it does not have a common name, but we have identified it as
Paracotalpa ursina.  There is also an image on CalPhotos where it is identified as a Little Bear, a reference to its scientific species name.  The Sam Wells Bug Page has a nice account of an encounter with Little Bears near Fresno.

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Subject: A fuzzy scarab?
Location: Hudson, Florida
April 14, 2014 7:28 pm
This one was interesting! It was very sleepy when we found it and not very interested in going back outside. Haha. We tried to research what it could be and narrowed it to some kind of scarab but we were lost after that point. Any ideas?
Signature: Madde and Michaela

Scarab Beetle

Scarab Beetle

Hi Madde and Michaela,
WE agree that this fuzzy little guy is a Scarab Beetle, but we have not had any luck identifying the species on BugGuide either.  We will try to get some assistance in this identification.

Scarab

Scarab

Update:  We just approved a comment suggesting this might be a Bumble Bee Scarab in the family Glaphyridae, and we had considered that possibility, but we thought it didn’t look exactly like the individuals posted on BugGuide. We wrote to Eric Eaton to see if he can provide an identification.  At this time, we have not yet heard back from Eric.

Scarab

Scarab

Eric Eaton provides an broad identification
Daniel:
At least you correctly identified it as a scarab!  I was confounded by a similar beetle here in Colorado a couple years ago.
I’m pretty certain this is a May Beetle of some kind, genus Phyllophaga, but I can’t find a match in Bugguide or anywhere else, either.  I’ll see if I can get something more specific if I have permission to post the images to a Facebook group or two?
Still no word on the Dolerus sawfly swarm mystery, sorry.
Eric

Oh yes! Go ahead and post it. I hope we can figure out what it is eventually! It was such a friendly little guy too. =P Good luck and let us know if you find anything!
-Michaela and Madde

 

 

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Subject: what is this bug?
Location: 40.5 North 0.5 East
April 10, 2014 4:49 am
Hi
I live in rural Catalunya, NE Spain, not far from the mediteranean and a mostly olive growing area.
This time of year March/April it is about 20′C max in the day flowers are out and there is blossom on the fruit trees.
These (1 to 1.5 cm) bugs are often right in the blossom. Sometimes they are very hairy and can appear yellow with the pollen.
Please can you tell me what they are and if possible, are they damaging the blossom?
In hope and with thanks
Signature: Joseph

White Spotted Rose Beetle

White Spotted Rose Beetle

Dear Joseph,
We believe we have correctly identified your Scarab as a White Spotted Rose Beetle,
Oxythyrea funesta, thanks to the Things Biological website where it states:  “Its distribution includes Italy, France, Malta, Morocco, Asia Minor and parts of the Middle East. It is not a particularly important species economically, though they can significantly impact grape vines and flowering wheat.”  According to Csalomontraps:  “The adult beetle causes damage to flowers of peark cherry, European chestnut and other spring-blossoming fruit trees and ornamental plants (e.g. peony).  It damages frequently also cereals, first of all ears of rye.  The beetle can feed also on many flowering weeds, i.e. different spp. of Compositae and Cruciferae.  The beetle chews the petals, staminae and stigmae thus rendering the flower infertile.  It can damage not only flowers in full blossom, but also in the bud stage.  The grub (larva) lives in the soil, feeds on rotting plant material, it causes no damage.”  Since that information is provided by a company that produces traps, the account might be exaggerated, but we believe you most likely have cause for concern.

White Spotted Rose Beetle

White Spotted Rose Beetle

Absolutely fantastic, thank you very much.
Now to do something to help the plants as we have hundreds of the beetles.
Again, thank you for you help as we had failed to find it in our books

 

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Subject: What type of grub is this?
Location: The Pas, Manitoba, Canada
March 23, 2014 7:34 pm
We found this grub burrowed in the middle of a frozen dead ash? tree we knocked down. We were cutting it up with an axe and noticed a few of them. The inside of the tree was totally eaten and was full of dark brown casings/guano. The fat big grub was right in the hard wood in a self made hollow.
We thought ands were damaging our trees but maybe this is the culprit! What is it? Any information about how to get rid of it, damage it causes, etc? Pretty gross but pretty cool at the same time. Thank you
Signature: Snug as a grub

Scarab Grubs

Scarab Grubs

We believe these are Scarab Beetle Grubs, most likely Rhinoceros Beetle Grubs from the subfamily Dynastinae.  We do not believe the Grubs are responsible for the demise of the tree.  They will infest dead and dying trees that are beginning to decompose, but they will not kill healthy trees.

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Rhino Beetle
Location:  Kruger national Park, South Africa
February 2014
Thought I’d send my prize photo of a rhino beetle.   It was on the same wall as the Southern Cat’s-Eyed Emperor moth, but on a different night.  I was told by a guide that I am very lucky to have seen this beetle.   Trying to photograph it at night under CFLs was a trick.
Thanks again for IDing the moth.
Jeanne

Dung Beetle

Dung Beetle

Hi Jeanne,
We believe this is a Dung Beetle, not a Rhino Beetle.  Both are classified as Scarab Beetles.  It might be
Copris elphener which is pictured on PHotograph s from South Africa.

Oh, rats!   I see what you mean.   But when I Googled rhino beetle, I saw photos identical to mine.   Oh,well, I find dung beetles fascinating.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Gorgeous mirror finish on this gold guy
Location: Central America, Panamá, Boquete
March 18, 2014 7:21 pm
Hello,
I found this guy very much alive this morning in my dog’s empty food bowl. He was stuck on his back. I was amazed to see how metallic his underside was, so I flipped him over and he is a smooth shiny gold metallic finish on his back. You can even see the reflection of my turquoise jacket in his back. Do you know what he is or have any other info about him? I didn’t see any like it on your site. We’re in Panamá. Boquete to be exact. Mountains. Lots of trees and coffee around. It’s still dry season here.
Signature: Alyssa

Golden Scarab

Golden Scarab

Hi Alyssa,
This is a beautiful Golden Scarab Beetle,
Plusiotis resplendens, which we identified on VisualPHotos.  We verified its identity on Discover Yale Digital Content.

Golden Scarab Beetle

Golden Scarab Beetle

Thanks so much!


What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination