Currently viewing the category: "Scarab Beetles"
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Subject: ODD ivory colored insect that bites
Location: Mississippi
November 13, 2016 4:39 pm
My son was bitten by what he called a “mean caterpillar”. However, I don’t believe it is a caterpillar. I have no idea what this insect might be. Please help.
Thank you,
The Parker’s
Signature: Alicia

Scarab Beetle Grub

Scarab Beetle Grub

Dear Alicia,
This is the grub of a Scarab Beetle, probably one of the June Beetles.  There is no concern regarding the bite.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: A beetle?
Location: Honolulu, Hawaii
November 11, 2016 10:06 pm
Just want to know if this kind of bug is known to bite?
Signature: Kim

Oriental Flower Beetle

Oriental Flower Beetle

Dear Kim,
The Oriental Flower Beetle,
Protaetia orientalis, is an introduced species in Hawaii that is considered an invasive species that feeds on fruit.  We would not rule out that it might bite, but its real threat to Hawaiians is not the threat of a bite, but the damage that is done to fruiting trees.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Dung Beetle
Location: Laikipia Air Base, Nanyuki, Kenya
October 27, 2016 4:27 am
Hi, Bugman.
Came across this little guy stranded on his (her?) back being attacked by ants in Nanyuki, Kenya. After flipping him over, he seemed determined to either stamp on the ants or crush them with his head. Retribution was his!
Signature: Some British Squaddie

Dung Beetle

Dung Beetle

Dear British Squaddie,
Your Dung Beetle appears to be
Scarabaeus sacer if this image on Alamy is correctly identified.

Thank you for the reply.
Chris Blakey.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Lovely little beetle found on Jura
Location: Jura, Scottish Hebridies
October 24, 2016 12:23 pm
Hello!
Please could you identify this beautiful beetle we found in the summer on the way to Barnhill on the isle of Jura?
Many thanks,
Signature: Ruth & Chris Kettle-Frisby

Probably Dung Beetle

Probably Dung Beetle

Dear Ruth & Chris,
We believe this Scarab Beetle is most likely one of the Dung Beetles.

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Subject: Beetle
Location: Sayulita, Nayarit. México
October 2, 2016 1:13 pm
Hello! i found this shiny beetle in the jungle of the coast of Nayarit, México.
Signature: Ana

Shining Leaf Chafer

Shining Leaf Chafer

Dear Ana,
This magnificent Scarab Beetle is a Shining Leaf Chafer in the subfamily Rutelinae, and we are pretty certain it is in the genus Chrysina.  There are only four species represented on BugGuide from North America north of Mexico, but there are additional species in Mexico.  It might be LeConte’s Chrysina,
Chrysina lecontei, which is pictured on BugGuide where it states:  “Considered by New Mexico to be a ‘Species of Greatest Conservation Need'”  Alas, we are unable to provide you with a species identification with any certainty even though 85 species are pictured on the Generic Guide to New World Scarab Beetles Chrysina Gallery, but another possibility is Chrysina quetzalcoatli which is also pictured on the Chrysina Gallery.  We will attempt to get an expert opinion for you.

Shining Leaf Chafer

Shining Leaf Chafer

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown beetle
Location: Warsash, England
August 24, 2016 11:15 am
Found this beauty in our back garden today, in Warsash on the south coast of England. It was very hot here today and he appeared to be resting in the shade. Can’t find him in our Beetle books!
Many thanks
Signature: Tracy Dukes

Sun Beetle:  Pachnoda marginata

Sun Beetle: Pachnoda marginata

Dear Tracy,
Our first impression proved correct:  This is not a native species in England.  We believe we have correctly identified your Scarab Beetle as a Sun Beetle,
Pachnoda marginata, a species that according to Shutterstock is:  “a beetle from the subfamily Cetoniinae (Scarabaeidae) that lives in west and central Africa. They are used as food for terrarium animals.”  Perhaps this individual escaped from someone who is raising them in captivity.  According to BioLib, it is a Congo Chafer.  According to the Global Biodiversity Information Facility:  “Pachnoda marginata is a beetle from the subfamily Cetoniinae with a large number of subspecies that lives in west and central Africa.  They are sometimes used as food for terrarium animals.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination