Currently viewing the category: "Scarab Beetles"
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Subject: Beetles
Location: South Africa
November 21, 2014 4:23 am
Hello. I have been trying to identify this “heart beetle”- do you perhaps know what it is called? I found it on my chair at Kruger National Park in South Africa in October (Spring). The other beetle is just really pretty – amazing colours! Found by the car in a parking lot in Rustenburg, South Africa in November (Summer). Thanks :)
Signature: Kareen

Fruit Chafer

Fruit Chafer

Dear Kareen,
Our favorite place to identify South African insects is iSpot where we identified your Fruit Chafer as
Pedinorrhina trivittata.  We believe the green beetle is a Leaf Beetle, and we will do a unique posting of it eventually.

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Subject: Yellow & black beetle
Location: Zimbabwe
November 21, 2014 5:48 am
hiya!!! Here’s hoping you can identify this bug. Seen in the eastern area (mutare) of Zimbabwe in late November (summer/rainy season). Looking forward to hearing from you!!!!
Signature: Ange

Orange Spotted Fruit Chafer

Orange Spotted Fruit Chafer

Dear Ange,
This beautiful Scarab is an Orange Spotted Fruit Chafer,
Mecynorrhina passerinii, and it is pictured on Biodiversity Explorer as well as on Meloidae.com.  Finally, iSpot is a wonderful place to look up South African insects.  The horns indicate your individual is a male.

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Subject: Black beetle with 8 white dots

Location: Cape Town South Africa
November 15, 2014 7:03 am
Hi There
I hope you can help me identify this beetle. I have searched but can’t find a pic of this particular one. I am from Cape Town South Africa and every year in November to December (summer season) this beetle visits and eats my roses. It climbs inside the rose buds and eats them. What beetle is this and what can I do to protect my roses from them. I do not believe in using pesticides.
I look forward to hearing from you.
Thanks in advance.
Signature: Any

White Spotted Fruit Chafer

White Spotted Fruit Chafer

Dear Any,
We quickly identified your beetle as a White Spotted Fruit Chafer,
Mausoleopsis amabilis, on BioDiversity Explorer, and then we located additional images on iSpot.

 

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Subject: Tomato eating June beetle?
Location: Garden, Western Wisconsin
August 26, 2014 9:31 pm
Dear bugman,
This is a new beetle I haven’t see before that ate its way through one of my tomatoes leaving behind a canyon in its wake. It’s the only one I’ve ever seen, and I can’t seem to find it any where online. It seems similar to the common June beetles, but the colors are much more vibrant and it has a healthy amount of hair underneath the shell and on top of its head. It is almost as wide as it is long with misshapen spots and stripes on the shell. I have not known June beetles to eat fruits so this is rather puzzling. Maybe a type of Japanese beetle?
Signature: Derek

Scarab Beetle

Possibly Bumble Flower Beetle

Hi Derek,
June Beetles and Japanese Beetles are both Scarab Beetles in the family Scarabaeidae, and the tomato eater in your image is also a Scarab Beetle, but it is neither a June Beetle nor a Japanese Beetle.  This is not the ideal image for identification as it does not show the entire beetle.  It might be a Bumble Flower Beetle,
Euphoria inda, which is pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults visit flowers for pollen and/or nectar. Sometimes damage flowers. Also takes rotting fruit, corn, sap, other plant juices.” 

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Subject: Miss identified
Location: Almost all over the USA
August 12, 2014 11:12 pm
Hey guys! I was looking through your posts and noticed you miss identified a beetle I’m very fermiliar with. You claimed the beetle to be “a June bug on staroids” when it was intact a female eastern or western herculese beetle. It may have been hard to identify because when they go into the soul their shells absorb the moisture and turn dark brown. I know this well because I have recently been rearing this specious. I will include a photo of the original post and my own photo of the species (although in the photo she is light colored because she hadn’t been in moist soil)
Signature: Best regards, Nikki

Female Hercules Beetle

Female Hercules Beetle

Hi Nikki,
Thanks for providing a comment on our Scarab Beetle posting.  For the record, we did not claim it was “a June bug on staroids” but the person who submitted the image called it “a june bug but on steroids.”  We informed Cathy that it was a Scarab, but we couldn’t identify the species because of the camera angle.  Thank you for recognizing the genus for us.
  Since you have provided us with images, we are also creating a unique posting for your comment, but we would love to be able to provide a more specific location for your Hercules Beetle that “almost all over the USA.”

Oh, I appolagize, I’m still getting used to the website format. Well I can’t tell weather that is an eastern or western herculese so the range would be different.
Oh :3 my little girl was found in st.louis Missouri

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Subject: scarabae? Costa Rica
Location: costa rica Monteverde
August 7, 2014 2:53 pm
I found this “golden beetle” in the garden of Fonda Vela, Monteverde, Costa Rica
march 2014
Signature: fred from belgium

Gold Scarab:  Chrysina aurigans

Gold Scarab: Chrysina aurigans

Dear Fred from Belgium,
This is one gorgeous Scarab Beetle, and we had a sneaky suspicion it is classified as a Shining Leaf Chafer in the subfamily Rutelinae, and we were correct.  Our first visual hit came on FlickR with this image, but not much information.  Our next hit is Los escarabajos dorados (Chrysina) de Costa Rica with images of many gorgeous individuals in the genus
Chrysina, including Chrysina aurigans, a Gold Scarab.  Here is a Babylon translation of the opening paragraph:  “Beetles golden of Costa Rica are famous in the whole world. His fame is derived from its extraordinary beauty, for its gold color metal. However, these insects are part of a group (the gender Chrysina) that also presents species from other colors: coppery green, silver, blue or red bright metallic.”  We also located a wonderful article on Smithsonian that states:  “Costa Rica, rather lacking in actual gold and silver, is home to two beetle species that may have made a conquistador or two a little nuts: Chrysina aurigans, the gold variety, and C. limbata, in silver. Then again, maybe not, as the reflective surfaces likely provide good camouflage in the rainforest, where the light reflecting off them would look a lot like the light reflecting off wet leaves.” 

Thanks a lot for these beautyfull and usefull explanation, Daniel!
I didn’t know it was so good what I found there!! A piece of gold! Whouawwh!
Thank you !!
fredfrombelgium

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination