Currently viewing the category: "Scarab Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Green beetle
Location: South Africa, Gauteng Province, Pretoria
January 24, 2015 7:43 am
I found this green beetle in the back yard trying to hide in the grass. Not sure if it can fly or how it got here, quite curious to find out what it is. I searched a bit on the internet but couldn’t find anything about it.
Signature: George

Flower Chafer

Flower Chafer

Dear George,
Just yesterday we posted some images of this pretty Flower Chafer,
Dicranorrhina derbyana, also from South Africa.

Fruit Chafer

Fruit Chafer

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Subject: What beetle is this?
Location: Centurion, South Africa
January 22, 2015 2:43 am
Hi Bugman
attached pics from my cellphone refer. Just called out into the garden by my wife, we have both never seen this one before, it was on the figtree ( in fruit). Just interested to know about it? We are in sunny South Africa in the town of Centurion in Gauteng Province….
Kind regards
Signature: Kind regards Andrew & Jenni Foxley

Flower Chafer:  Dicranorrhina derbyana

Flower Chafer: Dicranorrhina derbyana

Have just identified the beetle as a flower chafer…….  no need to reply, thanks all the same!!!

Flower Chafer:  Dicranorrhina derbyana

Flower Chafer: Dicranorrhina derbyana

Dear Andrew and Jenni Foxley,
We are happy that you have already identified your Fruit or Flower Chafer. In our opinion, it is
Dicranorrhina derbyana, a species represented on our site in several postings.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: chlorobapta frontalis
Location: Forbes, NSW
January 20, 2015 8:10 pm
Hi guys,
I found this little guy sneaking into my house, did a google search and found your page – http://www.whatsthatbug.com/2011/03/02/green-fiddler-beetle-from-australia/
I live in Forbes NSW and have just released it back into the garden. I just wanted to send you the photos i took.
Regards,
Signature: Bri

Scarab Beetle:  Chlorobapta frontalis

Scarab Beetle: Chlorobapta frontalis

Dear Bri,
When we originally created that posting, we misidentified this Fruit Chafer,
Chlorobapta frontalis, as a Green Fiddler Beetle, but we were corrected by Karl.  Karl always provides links with his comments, and we can’t help but to wonder if the links have been broken in the intervening years.  There is a photo on iNaturalist and a link from there to this lovely FlickR image.  Project Noah has the correct scientific name, but interestingly calls it the common name Fiddler Beetle, which is generally used to describe Eupoecila australasiae.

Scarab Beetle:  Chlorobapta frontalis

Scarab Beetle: Chlorobapta frontalis

Hi Daniel,
Thanks for your reply.
Please feel free to use the photos on your site if you wish, though the quality isn’t great because i used my phone camera and didn’t want to harm the little guy by trying to get better shots!

Hi again Bri,
We really like your images, and we posted all three, though we did increase the contrast and employ conservative digital sharpening.

Fruit Chafer

Fruit Chafer

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug in my kitchen
Location: Cork, Ireland
January 1, 2015 5:11 pm
Hi, I was just wondering if you could tell me what this bug is? It scared the life out of me! It’s nt something that you would usually see. Hope the photos are ok because there’s not a hope I’m taking the glass off for a closer look!
Signature: H France

Cockchafer

Cockchafer

Dear H France,
This Scarab Beetle is commonly called a Cockchafer,
Melolontha melolontha, and they are found throughout Europe.  This January sighting is very unusual.  According to the Natural History Museum site, Cockchafers are generally sighted:  “flying on warm evenings from May to July. Melolontha melolontha is attracted to artificial light and often comes indoors through open windows or even down chimneys. May bugs may cause consternation to those who encounter them but are harmless to humans.”

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Life span of adult fig eater beetle
December 28, 2014 11:43 am
I rescued an adult fig eater beetle last July. He has damaged wings and is unable to fly. I left him out for a couple of days so nature could take its course but on the morning the gardeners were coming I found him hanging on to a blade of grass and couldn’t let him get chopped by the mower. Since then he has lived in a terrarium with grass, leaves, dirt, sticks and is eating grapes, figs and blueberries. He has occasional visits outside, where he crawls in the grass and climbs onto sticks and tries to fly But can’t manage to do so.
I am amazed he is still alive! How long will my house guest survive?
Signature: Kate

Injured Figeater Rescued

Injured Figeater Rescued

Dear Kate,
Since you did not provide us with an image, we are illustrating your query with an image of a Figeater from our archives.  Since you have rescued this lovely Scarab from a premature death, we are tagging your letter with the Bug Humanitarian Award.  Having averted the natural predators and food shortages that limit the life span of wild beetles, you have extended the life of the Figeater you rescued.  We can’t imagine it living more than a year, so we speculate that your individual will expire by summer.

Thanks so much for the award! I am honored. I am also including a photo of the actual beetle (who is generally referred to as Bugman, although I am not sure of his/her gender). He is taking one of his walks on a hibiscus.
Please once again accept my humble thanks for the award! Glad to know that others support Bug Rescue :-)
Kate

Hello again Kate,
Thanks so much for sending in your image of a Figeater with damaged elytra, the hard wing covers.  We have formatted the image to illustrate the posting as the primary image and the image we found in our archives is now relegated to a secondary status.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle in Sierra Leone
Location: Sierra Leone
December 6, 2014 12:08 pm
Bugman,
I am out in Sierra Leone, living in Freetown at the moment and came across this beautiful beetle. My son Ethan would be over the moon if we can identify it.
Signature: C

Scarab Beetle

Scarab Beetle:  Pachnoda marginata

Subject: Beetle in Sierra Leone
Location: Sierra Leone
December 6, 2014 12:11 pm
I continue my insect hunt in Sierra Leone and would appreciate some help with identifying this bug

Scarab Beetle

Scarab Beetle:  Pachnoda chordata

Dear C,
Both of these are beautiful Scarab Beetles.  We believe we have identified the first as
Pachnoda marginata by matching your image to images on Shutterstock and Pinterest where it is called a Sunspot Beetle.  We also found it pictured on Bug Nation and our research shows much variation in the markings, so seeing a comparison of various subspecies on Beetlespace may prove interesting to you.  We believe your subspecies is Pachnoda marginata marginata and it is also pictured on BioLib where it is called a Sun BeetleBioLib lists the countries where this subspecies has been sighted as:  “Ghana, Guinea, Ivory Coast, Sierra Leone.”   We believe your second Scarab is Pachnoda chordata based on an image we located on FlickeR and then continued to research, eventually locating images on SAReptiles and BioLib where the country of origin is listed as Sierra Leone.  We also believe your subspecies is Pachnoda chordata chordata and BioLib expands the list of countries of the entire species as “Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Senegal, Sierra Leone.”  If our research is correct, both of your beetles are in the same genus.

 

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination