Currently viewing the category: "Scarab Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Whats that bug?
Location: Israel
January 29, 2016 9:39 am
Hi,
Can you help me identify this one?
You might have to zoom in the photo, but that’s the best I’ve got.
Hope you can help!
Thanks,
Signature: NZ

Fruit Chafer

Fruit Chafer

Dear NZ,
Luckily there is a relatively robust network of folks in Israel who are interested in insects.  We learned the identity of your Fruit Chafer,
Tropinota vittula, thanks to the Scarabs of the Levant site where it states:  “The Cetoniinae are popularly called fruit and flower chafers, flower beetles and flower scarabs. Many species are diurnal and visit flowers for pollen and nectar, or to browse on the petals. Some species also take fruit few are termitophil.”   There are additional images on Israel’s Nature Site, but alas, we do not read Hebrew.  There are also images on Al’s Photo Page and a scholarly article entitled Tropinota vittula is a Good Species may provide you with additional information.

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Subject: What Is This Totally Nasty Thing??!!
Location: 10933 Gilbert Drive, Beaumont, Texas 77705
January 23, 2016 1:55 pm
My husband found this thing, the nastiest looking thing ever on this planet, this morning (Saturday, Jan. 23, 2016) on our back porch here in Fannett, Texas. Our exact address for GPS purposes is 10933 Gilbert Drive, Beaumont, Texas 77705. NASTY!!
Signature: Kathi and Richard Orgeron

Grub

Grub

Dear Kathi and Richard,
This is the grub of a Scarab Beetle, but we have never seen one so blue.  We are not certain of the species, but we suspect it belongs to a Rhinoceros Beetle in the subfamily Dynastinae.  Members of this family include some of the largest beetles in the world, including the heaviest North American beetle, the Eastern Hercules Beetle that is found in Texas.  Here is a BugGuide image of the grub of an Eastern Hercules Beetle.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae live in rotting heartwood of logs and stumps, particularly hardwoods, but sometimes pine.”  We are uncertain why you found this grub on your porch, but if someone was splitting firewood, or if firewood is stored on the back porch, the appearance may be connect to the wood.

Grub

Grub

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pelidnota sp. from Ecuador
Location: Ecuador
January 9, 2016 7:31 am
Found this at Cabanas San Isidro on the west slope of the Andes in Ecuador. Pattern of black spots does not match the Grapevine Borer we have in North America. Two photos found with an internet search were also taken in Ecuador that match mine, but neither of this is identified to species. Can this one be identified? Thanks very much!
Signature: Allen T. Chartier

Shining Leaf Chafer

Scarab Beetle

Hi Again Allen,
We cannot say for certain that this is a member of the genus
Pelidnota despite its resemblance to the North American Grapevine Beetle.  We do believe it is is the Shining Leaf Chafer subfamily Rutilinae.  Alas, we have not had any luck finding any matching images online.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck than we have had.

Daniel,
Thanks again for the quick reply. I have been fooled before with look-alikes to North American species. Has any museum put out digital photos of their insect collections? I know that many are doing that for birds…
Allen T. Chartier

Not that we know about.

Karl provides an identification
Hi Daniel and Allen:
Your beetle is probably Ancognatha sp., specifically Ancognatha vulgaris (Scarabaeidae: Dynastinae). As a group, beetles in the subfamily Dynastinae are often referred to as Rhinoceros Beetles because of characteristic horns worn by the males of most species. This species is appears atypical in that respect, based on a photo of both sexes posted on the Perou-Insectes site. Regarding your inquiry about museums posting digital photos of their insect collections, there are a few but they tend to be very specific regionally, taxonomically or both. Less focussed online databases are usually rather sparse but sometimes you get lucky. For example, click on the image at: the Pictorial beetle collection of the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences (Mal, N., Drumont, A., Kerkhof, S. & P. Grootaert, 2012). Regards. Karl

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Subject: Rhinoceros Beetle
Location: Delaware Watergap NJ
November 30, 2015 6:23 am
Hi Bug Man,
I know this adorable guy was a rhinoceros beetle the moment I saw him. However, I cannot find his exact species. All the images I can find do not have the same horn, his horn has three small nodes at the end.
Any idea??
Signature: Fern

Rhinoceros Beetle

Rhinoceros Beetle

Dear Fern,
We agree that this is a Rhinoceros Beetle, most likely Xyloryctes jamaicensis, though the bifurcated horn on your individual is quite curious and no individuals posted to BugGuide possess a similar horn.  We will contact Eric Eaton to see if he has an opinion.  Did you really see this beetle today?  Was the sighting at some other time of year?

Hi Daniel,
Thanks so much for the fast response!  The horn certainly confused me a little, as I haven’t been able to find a match for him.
This was late summer, maybe the last week of August.
Jennifern Hippely
Artist

Eric Eaton Responds
Hi, Daniel:
Wondering if it is not just debris on the horn.  I found several specimens of the western species in New Mexico, and they often had caked soil on them from having dug out of the ground.
Eric

Thanks Daniel,
I’m sorry to trouble you over this.  Mine is certainly a match for the Americana Rhinoceros except for the horn anomaly!  Ha ha.
I remember it had an unusual horn, and my poor quality picture even shows something there.  However, I have no other clearer pictures, and I can’t see the horn.  Perhaps I misinterpreted some dirt, or damage.
Thank you again for clearly identifying him.
Fern

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Subject: Beetle
Location: Cape Town, South Africa
November 18, 2015 6:36 am
This is a picture of a beetle we saw in Cape Town, South Africa. I searched for a picture to identify beetle but could not get one. I used to see the yellow and black one but never saw this one.
Signature: Pietman

White Spotted Fruit Chafer

White Spotted Fruit Chafer

Dear Pietman,
Commonly called a White Spotted Fruit Chafer,
Mausoleopsis amabilis, is a Scarab Beetle found in South Africa.

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Subject: Colourful Bug
Location: Hornsby NSW
October 30, 2015 7:16 pm
I found this bug while pulling a weed out of a pot, at Hornsby NSW. I thought it might be a harlequin bug but the colour differs from the specimen shown on your website. Could you please identify the bug for me?
Signature: Mary

Fiddler Beetle

Fiddler Beetle

Dear Mary,
Each year as winter begins to descend on the northern hemisphere, we depend upon increased submissions from Australia and South Africa to supply us with daily posting material.  This gorgeous Scarab Beetle is called a Fiddler Beetle,
Eupoecila australasiae, because of the beautiful green pattern on its body.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination