Currently viewing the category: "Scarab Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large beetle – central Ontario
Location: Parry Sound, ON
August 31, 2015 3:40 am
Trying to ID this beauty. Spotted in a well-treed residential area adjacent to a forest. Thanks!
Signature: Jason

Odor of Leather Beetle

Odor of Leather Beetle

Dear Jason,
We verified the identity of your Scarab Beetle as a Hermit Beetle or Odor of Leather Beetle,
Osmoderma eremicola, thanks to the images posted on BugGuide where it states the habitat is:  “rotten logs in woodlands and orchards; adults nocturnal, come to lights.”

Cool. It’s so big. Thanks!

It is the time of the month to select a Bug of the Month for September 2015, and because we are intrigued that BugGuide indicates that the Hermit Beetle gets its other common name “for strong odor of ‘Russian Leather,'” it is a worthy subject to feature next month.  The Backyard Arthropod Project notes:  ” The thing is, the way people talk about it, the odor is supposed to be really strong and noticeable, but with this one it is practically nonexistent.”

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Iridescent Dung Beetle?
Location: Bennett, CO
August 20, 2015 7:32 pm
We found this beetle in a water tank at the ranch where we board our horses in Bennett, CO just east of Denver on 8/20/2015. We think we’ve identified it as a dung beetle but I can seem to find any pictures on your website confirming this.
Signature: Curious in Colorado

Rainbow Scarab

Rainbow Scarab

Dear Curious in Colorado,
This is a female Rainbow Scarab,
Phanaeus vindex, and you are correct that it is a Dung Beetle.  We have numerous images on our site, but we just recently created a sub-subcategory for Dung Beetles that is embedded in our Scarab Beetle subcategory.  Here is a BugGuide image for confirmation.

Rainbow Scarab

Rainbow Scarab

Laura Maura, Ann Levitsky, Megan Zuelsdorff, Heather Duggan-Christensen, Russ DeRouen liked this post
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Subject: Super Shiny Ox Beetle
Location: Palm Beach Gardens, Florida
August 19, 2015 1:36 pm
We came across this big guy while removing trash from Frenchman’s Forest Natural Area in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida. In fact, one of the volunteers at first thought the beetle was a piece of glass and leaned down to pick it up and put it in his garbage bag. That was how shiny the carapace was! Once the volunteer realized the piece of glass was a beetle, he called everyone over to “ohhh and ahhh” over the big bug. The ox beetle was very gracious and posed for many pictures. When we clicked our last photo, the beetle walked away to do important beetle business.
Signature: Ann Mathews

Ox Beetle

Ox Beetle

Dear Ann,
Thanks so much for sending us your lovely image of a beautiful, male Ox Beetle, in the genus
Strategus, and thank you for volunteering your time to help keep public land free of trash.

Andrea Leonard Drummond, Norman Gems liked this post
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Subject: Yellow and black beatle ID
Location: Trinidad, south of the Caribbean
August 17, 2015 2:16 pm
I have found this beatle dry and dead on the deck of the vessel I am working on. We are at anchor offshore Chaguaramas, Trinidad. Would like to know which species is. I live in Europe so I am not used to tropical beatles. I have try in many webpages to identified but to not avail.
Many thanks
Regards
Signature: To Antonio

Harlequin Flower Beetle

Harlequin Flower Beetle

Dear Antonio,
Your beetle bears such a striking resemblance to the North American Harlequin Flower Beetle,
Gymnetis caseyi, that we were certain your individual from Trinidad is either the same species, a subspecies or a different species within the genus.  According to BugGuide:  “Ratcliffe determined 18 spp. within Gymnetis, but only G. caseyi reaches the U.S.”  Zipcode Zoo lists numerous species and subspecies, and at least one, Gymnetis bajula banghaasi, is found in Trinidad and Tobago.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

The Figeater and the California Mantis:  Drama on the Butterfly Bush
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
August 17, 2015, 6:30 PM
It has been a hot couple of days in Los Angeles, and our editorial staff has been staying indoors to beat the heat, and we have been reserving the late afternoon and twilight hours for doing yardwork.  A Figeater was noisily circling the yard and it landed on a magenta
Buddleia, so we moved in closer to see if it was eating nectar, and as its bulky weight caused the flower stalk to bob up and down, we spotted a stick moving and we couldn’t help but to wonder what a Walkingstick was doing on the plant.  A closer inspection revealed an immature green California Mantis almost three inches long carefully scrutinizing the Figeater, trying to determine if it would be a good meal.  We knew immediately that the Mantis would not be able to capture the large, heavy beetle, but we thought it was photo worthy anyways, with the two pretty green insects on the magenta blossom, but alas, when we tried to download the images, the card was blank, mysteriously erased, possibly through a camera malfunction or perhaps a computer glitch.  So while you won’t be seeing the image, we thought you might enjoy the account of the sighting.

Figeater (from our archives)

Figeater (from our archives)

Yesterday we trimmed the guajes trees because we didn’t want all the dried seed pods to drop to the ground and we found two immature California Mantids, just under two inches long, one green and one brown, living in the branches.  We relocated them and we noticed that they had grown considerably larger than the little guy we took some images of last month.  We have seen more little mantids this year than we ever remember seeing, so our Southern California drought is not negatively affecting the population in our garden.  After trimming the branches we placed them in the green bin with the lid open in the event any other Mantids were camouflaged among the leaves so that they can find their way to freedom.

Female California Mantis eats Honey Bee (from our archives)

Female California Mantis eats Honey Bee (from our archives)

Subject: Your lost image
Location: South Pasadena
August 17, 2015 10:55 pm
I saw your post about your lost image, and it reminded me of this picture I got in 2011. They seemed not to notice one another. It was a big rose.
Signature: Barbara

Figeater and California Mantis

Figeater and California Mantis

Dear Barbara,
Thanks so much for sending in your image to replace our own lost image.  You mentioned they did not seem to notice one another.  In our case, the Mantis appeared to be stalking the Figeater, but it never struck, perhaps sensing that the Figeater was too large.  We have added your letter and image to the original posting we made rather than to make a unique posting.

Hayley Nasman, Sue Dougherty, Heather Duggan-Christensen, Mary Sheridan Page Fatzinger liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: frilly antennae
Location: Idyllwild, CA
August 8, 2015 7:28 pm
Hi there!
Saw a few of this guy in Idyllwild, CA in July of this year. Dying to know what it is!!! I’ve never seen antennae like that! Can you identify??
Signature: dp

LIned June Beetle

LIned June Beetle

Dear dp,
This is one of the Lined June Beetles in the genus
Polyphylla, and the well developed antennae indicate this is a male.

Stephanie Hood, Sue Dougherty, Ann Levitsky, Anna Fletcher liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination