Currently viewing the category: "Scarab Beetles"
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Subject: Large bug
Location: Yonkers, ny
June 30, 2016 3:13 pm
Please identify this bug outside my house. We are overwhelmed with them right now and I’ve lived here 25 years. We’ve never seen them before. They’re approximately 3/4-1 inch long
Signature: Julie

Green June Beetle

Green June Beetle

Dear Julie,
This highly variable species,
Cotinis nitida, can range from a yellow-brown color to bright green, but it is commonly called a Green June Beetle.  See BugGuide for additional information.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Idk what it is
Location: Womelsdorf pa
June 29, 2016 2:57 pm
This beatles looking about the size of a dime if not a bit bigger has been on our outside light for a few days.
Signature: Connie Wansley

Grapevine Beetle

Grapevine Beetle

Dear Connie,
Also known as a Spotted June Beetle, this Grapevine Beetle,
Pelidnota punctata, is closer to the size of a quarter than a dime.  They are about an inch long.  Since it is the end of the month, we need to select a Bug of the Month for July 2016, and we have decided to feature your submission.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults feed on grape (Vitis) foliage and fruit Larvae host on dead Acer, Celtis, Juglans, Malus, Platanus, Quercus, Ulmus spp [a variety of hardwood trees]” and “Eggs are laid on stumps and rotting logs. Larvae feed on decaying roots and stumps of trees, pupate in adjacent soil. Adults emerge May-September and come to lights.”  According to the University of Wisconsin at Madison:  “Look for GBs east of the Great Plains, in woodlands, thickets, vineyards and gardens – places where rotting wood/stumps are found near grape vines. Adults eat the leaves of grape (wild and domestic) and Virginia creeper (and there’s one account of a GB browsing on spinach in a garden), and the larvae (grubs) feed on rotting wood. Most sources say that the adults do minimal damage in a well-kept vineyard and do not need ‘controlling’.  Ms. GB lays her eggs in stumps and other rotting wood, or on the ground near stumps and rotting wood, apparently favoring dead elm, oak, maple, apple, and hickory. The pale, C-shaped larvae hatch two weeks later, dig/bore in, and feed – and feed, and feed – for the rest of their first year and through their second summer. They eventually reach two inches in length and pupate underground, not surfacing until they emerge as adults the following year.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: North Dakotan Beetle
Location: Theodor Roosevelt National Park
June 26, 2016 8:36 am
A beetle stumbled upon my campsite in June. It was night and attracted to my lantern. I was located by Medora, in the badlands of North Dakota.
Just curious on what it may be. My thoughts are Grapevine Hoplia?
Signature: Dan

Goldsmith Beetle

Goldsmith Beetle

Dear Dan,
This beautiful beetle is a Goldsmith Beetle,
Cotalpa lanigera.

Oh that is amazing! Thank you for the reply. Your awesome.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle with Fan Antennae?
Location: Burlington County, NJ
June 24, 2016 7:10 pm
Hello, I was swimming in my pool today when I saw a fairly large sized beetle struggling i the water. I turned on my light to see it better and it was like no beetle I had seen before. I was wondering if you could shed some light on it since insectidentification.org failed me.
Signature: Thanks, Connor

Lined June Beetle

Variegated June Beetle

Dear Conner,
We are sorry to hear that insectidentification.org failed you.  What’s That Bug? delivers.  This is a Lined June Beetle in the genus Polyphylla, and we believe it might be
Polyphylla variolosa, the Variegated June Beetle, based on images posted to BugGuide.  The Variegated June Beetle is found in New Jersey, according to data on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Phileurus truncatus?
Location: Near Orlando, FL
June 24, 2016 8:00 am
I found this beetle outside a hotel room in central Florida. I looked it up (here, actually) and came to the Phileurus truncatus page after a bit of digging. But I just wanted to confirm whether this was in fact a specimen of Phileurus.
Signature: Jacob S.

Triceratops Beetle

Triceratops Beetle

Dear Jacob,
Congratulations on correctly identifying your Triceratops Beetle,
Phileurus truncatus, which we feel is an exact match to this BugGuide image.  It is described on BugGuide as being:  “Black, distinctly flattened, both sexes with three prominent horns on head. Elytra deeply striated. …  Both genders have horns. This is unusual among horned scarabs.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug ID Request…
Location: New Zealand
June 22, 2016 11:51 pm
Hi Daniel, my daughter has a question for you…
Hi Daniel, my name is alice. I am six. can you please tell me what this bug is? Its body is just under 3.5cm long. It is encased in plastic. We live in New Zealand but don’t know where this bug came from.
Thank you for reading this. Love from Alice. Xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
Signature: Alice and Stephen McLuckie

Scarab preserved in Lucite

Scarab preserved in Lucite

Dear Alice and Stephen,
Most of these lucite insect trinkets are made in Asia, and we presume they are using native insects to embed in the plastic.  The beetle is a Scarab Beetle and AliExpress has an identical example for sale on their site that is identified as a Chinese Green Scarab Beetle.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination