Currently viewing the category: "Scarab Beetles"
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Subject: Insect???
Location: South west England
May 22, 2016 5:57 am
Do you please know what insect it is. Looks kinda like a moth. I found it in south west England in spring in my garden. It has 2 sets of wings underneath the shell bit. And weird antenna and a pointy tail. Thanks
Signature: I don’t know what this means but I have to fill it in anyway

Cockchafer

Cockchafer

The signature line on our standardized form is a place for the submitter to include either their real name or some pseudonym, like “Perplexed in England” as a signature to the submission.  This is a Cockchafer or Billy Witch, Melolontha melolontha, a native Scarab Beetle that generally appears in the spring.  Thought to be on the decline in England for years, populations seem to once again be on the rise.

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Subject: Big bug
Location: Hertford, Hertfordshire, England
May 17, 2016 3:04 pm
Hi,
I had this very large bug with furry antenna come into my living room last night , I thought at first it was a moth but on inspection its wings were solid and very beetle like . I have never seen one before . Please could you let me know what it is .
Signature: Lisa

Billy Witch

Billy Witch

Dear Lisa,
This Cockchafer or Billy Witch is a European Scarab beetle whose populations were on the decline in the UK, but in recent years, there seems to be a new surge in the population.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown bug
Location: Leland NC
May 13, 2016 5:35 am
We found this bug on our front porch last night at the base of a flower. Can you please identify what it is.
Thanks.
Signature: Joe Calla

Dung Beetle

Dung Beetle

Dear Joe,
We believe we have correctly identified your Dung Beetle as
Dichotomius carolinus thanks to images posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “A big, black or blackish-brown, and bulky dung beetle. Note prominent striations on elytra, though these are often partly filled with dirt. Pronotum distinctively shaped. Vertex of head has short, blunt horn in male” and the horn is visible in your image indicating your individual is a male.  You may enjoy this Gizmodo Dung Beetle Article on Dung Beetles.

Dung Beetle

Dung Beetle

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Subject: Bemuda Dunes, California Beetle
Location: Bermuda Dunes, California
May 7, 2016 3:27 am
Just bought a house in Bermuda Dunes, in the hot desert of Coachella Valley, California. This past three weeks our yard has been inundated with these beetles (please see picture). We’ve tried to identify it by searching the web for a similar picture, but can’t find one. Can you possibly tell us what kind of beetle this is?
Thanks in advance.
Signature: David Pepin

Lined June Beetle

Lined June Beetle

Dear David,
This is a Lined June Beetle in the genus
Polyphylla, but we are not certain of the species.  Based on the species posted to BugGuide, one possible species identification might be Polyphylla cavifrons which is pictured on BugGuide and looks very similar, though BugGuide does note “Species identification often difficult.”  We tried searching for the genus in Coachella Valley and discovered an article on Digital Commons that mentions a new species, Polyphylla aeolus, from your area.  The images on BugGuide do look similar but they appear to have more markings on the elytra than your individual.

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Subject: Beetle identification
Location: East central Alabama
May 2, 2016 8:01 am
This beetle caught my eye she was so bright! I live in Alabama I just moved here and live within many pine trees. I am afraid it is a bad beetle for my trees so I would love to get an identification so I know whether to worry about them or not.
Thank you in advance. I’m in no hurry.
Signature: Jodie Edwards

Male Rainbow Scarab

Male Rainbow Scarab

Dear Jodie,
This beautiful Dung Beetle is a male Rainbow Scarab.  Males of the species have a single horn, while female Rainbow Scarabs have no horn, though both have lovely metallic coloration.

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Subject: Two beetles from Greece
Location: Kos, Dodecanese, Greece
April 28, 2016 7:18 am
I hope it’s OK to submit two for the price of one, but they are on the same flower! I took this while birdwatching on Kos in the Aegean a couple of days ago (i.e. April 26th). There were lots of both species around, but particularly the stripy ones whose wing-cases seem to have shrunk in the wash.
Signature: Harry R

Two Scarabs

Two Scarabs

OK, I searched your site for ‘spotted scarab’ and the black and white one is clearly some species of Oxythyrea. I’d still like to know about the other one though!
Harry

Dear Harry,
We love your twofer.  Both of your beetles are Scarab Beetles, and we agree that the smaller is a White Spotted Rose Beetle in the genus
Oxythyrea.  We believe your other Scarab may be Eulasia vittata based on this Masterfile image.  There is also a nice image on Dogalhayat.org and the image on Kaefer der Welt – Beetles of the World nicely illustrates the short elytra.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination