Currently viewing the category: "Scarab Beetles"
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Subject: Strange Bug
Location: Dunnellon, Florida
May 23, 2015 8:18 pm
Noticed this guy on the porch this evening and we have never seen anything like it. What is this?!
Signature: Brittney

LIned June Beetle

LIned June Beetle

Dear Brittney,
This is a Lined June Beetle in the genus
Polyphylla, and because of your location, we believe it might be Polyphylla occidentalis, which according to BugGuide is found in Florida.

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Subject: Found in house, uk
Location: Uk
May 23, 2015 8:01 am
Just found this beetle in my house, it’s may, West Yorkshire, uk, googled and looks like a cedar, but there not common to uk?
Signature: Juzza2

Cockchafer

Cockchafer

Dear Juzza2,
Several years ago we read that populations of this distinctive Scarab Beetle known as a Cockchafer were on the decline, though in recent years the number of identification requests for Cockchafers from the UK is on the rise.  It is possible that it was attracted to lights, which would explain its presence in the home.

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Subject: What’s this bug?
Location: Chester, Cheshire, England
May 15, 2015 8:34 am
Hi there, I currently reside in Chester, Cheshire , England. We live by the river dee that runs through the city and found this bug in our sink.
Any help you can give in trying to figure out what species this is would be greatly appreciated. Is was about an inch and a half long and almost an inch wide.This is the first time I’ve ever seen a bug like this.
Signature: Darrell m

Cockchafer

Cockchafer

Dear Darrell,
This Scarab Beetle is commonly called a Cockchafer.

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Subject: Unknown
Location: Barrie Ontario
May 13, 2015 5:49 pm
My niece sent me a pic of a bug and I’m not sure where to begin looking. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Signature: Deborah

Bumble Flower Beetle

Bumble Flower Beetle

Dear Deborah,
This appears to be a Bumble Flower Beetle,
Euphoria inda, and according to BugGuide:  “Adults visit flowers for pollen and/or nectar. Sometimes damage flowers. Also takes rotting fruit, corn, sap, other plant juices.”

Bumble Flower Beetle

Bumble Flower Beetle

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Subject: Unknown Beetle
Location: Mansfield, Texas
May 2, 2015 4:48 pm
Can you help ID these guys? Two of the same beetle but different colors. One cream and the other orange. Pretty sure I brought them home on some Shasta Daisies I just bought. Are the y considered a pest or beneficial – Thanks so very much
Signature: Jeanine

Kern's Flower Scarabs

Kern’s Flower Scarabs

Dear Jeanine,
The two larger beetles in your image are variations in coloration of Kern’s Flower Scarabs or Plains Bumble Scarab,
Euphoria kernii, which we identified on BugGuide where you can also see these same color variations and where it is noted:  “This species is extremely variable in its color and pattern ranging from all black to nearly all yellow with all stages in between.”  We will also attempt to identify the smaller insect visible in your image.

Awesomeness! Thank you for the reply, I watched them through a macro lens for over an hour as they went from flower head to flower head. When one would go the other would follow. I have no idea what the little black and white stripped insect is either. Also the little brown dot to the left is also an insect, its head is down into the flower so you’re only seeing the bottom half. Further over onto the left petals I believe are a cluster of Thrips.

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Subject: Scarabs in Chicago?!
Location: Chicago, Illinois USA
April 26, 2015 7:28 pm
These grubs were inside of a dying silver maple. Found in the middle amongst wood pulp and poop. We live just north of the Windy City. I figured it was some kind of rhino or tricerotops beetle.
Signature: Jim Griesenauer

Scarab Beetle Grubs

Scarab Beetle Grubs

Dear Jim,
We agree with your assessment that these Scarab Beetle Grubs are in the subfamily Dynastinae, the Rhinoceros Beetles.  In our opinion, they probably began feeding on the rotting portion of the dying tree because we do not believe that the grubs were responsible for the tree’s demise.  Thanks for including the images of the children because they provide a nice sense of scale for these large grubs.  We suspect that large Scarab grubs are considered edible by entomophages, so we will attempt to contact David Gracer (see Huffington Post Food Blog) for his opinion.

Scarab Beetle Grubs

Scarab Beetle Grubs

Scarab Beetle Grubs with Children for scale

Scarab Beetle Grubs with Children for scale

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination