Currently viewing the category: "Scarab Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: assassin bug eating japanese beetle
Location: Hermann, Missouri
July 19, 2014 4:09 pm
stopped to close a gate and saw this. took about 30 pics in order to get one that was decent. sending in high rez. makes me really really happy that there are natural predators to the dang japanese beetles. not nearly enough of them, but still….
Signature: c. millard

Wheel Bug eats Japanese Beetle

Wheel Bug eats Japanese Beetle

Dear c. millard,
Thank you so much for sending in your excellent image of a Wheel Bug feeding on a Japanese Beetle, and we are certain it will warm the collective hearts of gardeners in the eastern portions of North America where the invasive, exotic Japanese Beetle feeds on hundreds of different ornamental garden plants and food crops.  According to our sources, Japanese Beetles were not a big problem in Ohio in 2014.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: are these cicadas nymphs?
Location: United States, Missouri
July 17, 2014 3:01 pm
so I was digging at the site of a rotten, dead tree that fell down and discovered these lil things! I thought they might be cicadas, but after looking at pictures I’m really not sure.
Signature: Stolz

Scarab Beetle Pupae

Scarab Beetle Pupae

Dear Stolz,
These are not Cicada Nymphs, but rather beetle pupae.  They are most likely Scarab Beetle Pupae.  The larvae of some Scarab Beetles feed on rotting wood, and they will pupate in the immediate vicinity.  You can compare your images to this image from Insect Images.

Scarab Pupa

Scarab Pupa

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please identify this beetle
Location: Northern California
July 17, 2014 9:05 am
I viewed this beetle outside my kids daycare this morning. I picked it up and brought it inside and put it in a nice hermit crab aquarium (crab is not there anymore). My thinking is that it would be nice for the kids to look at and learn something about before setting it free. Any response will be relayed to the daycare staff.
Thanks
Signature: Jeff Reynolds

Ten Lined June Beetle

Ten Lined June Beetle

Hi Jeff,
Because of its large size and striking markings, the Ten Lined June Beetle is a common identification request from western states.  The Ten Lined June Beetle is capable of stridulation, which is rubbing body parts together to make a squeeking noise, and the beetles will stridulate when handled.  You can try feeding this captive Ten Lined June Beetle the fresh needles from conifers (according to Hogue) while it is in captivity.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cool Grapevine Beetle
Location: south central Pennsylvania
July 11, 2014 7:56 pm
I was out watering the plants on my balcony when I came across this guy. He was lazily climbing the fence and gladly posed for pictures. :-) I used your site to determine that he (I named him “Loaf”) is a grapevine beetle. Just wanted to pass along a photo. We live at the edge of a wildlife preserve in south central Pennsylvania and have all sorts of interesting critters show up in the summer so I spend a lot of time on your site. You guys rock! Thanks for making me a little bit smarter!
Signature: Julie

Grapevine Beetle

Grapevine Beetle

Hi Julie,
We are happy to hear that you were able to navigate our site to identify your Grapevine Beetle.  It really is an impressive species.  There is probably wild grape in your wildlife preserve that provides a source of food for a population of Grapevine Beetles.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: 10-Lined Beauty
Location: West Seattle, WA
July 10, 2014 12:58 pm
Hi there,
Last night, the cat brought what I thought was a small mouse into the house. Rushing to the rescue, imagine my surprise that it was instead a very large, very beautiful insect.
I’ve lived in this neighborhood all of my life (nearly 50 years) and never seen anything like it. As I was photographing it, I was touched by how sweet-tempered it seemed. It hissed when I gently assisted it into a rescue jar and didn’t move quickly when released back out into the yard. Even when it hissed, it was cute.
What was I so lucky to have met last night?
Signature: West Seattle Nature Lover

Ten Lined June Beetle

Ten Lined June Beetle

Dear West Seattle Nature Lover,
We would have guessed that based on your subject line, you realized you had an encounter with a Ten Lined June Beetle,
Polyphylla decemlineata.  The hissing is created by a phenomenon known as stridulation, or the rubbing together of body parts, and it can be quite loud.  The Ten Lined June Beetle will stridulate when it is disturbed or handled. Because of your rescue intervention, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of beetle is this!
Location: Middle of texas
July 10, 2014 8:09 pm
I found this bug in our home it was huge. Looked like a june bug but on steroids. I’ve never saw one like it. It had a inch wing span that was very loud. It was dark brown ,hard shell,no large inteneas. It could fit in the palm of my hand. Can you tell me what this baby is.
Signature: Cathy

Scarab

Scarab

Hi Cathy,
The reason you believe this beetle looks like a June Bug on steroids is that both are Scarab Beetles in the family Scarabaeidae, but sadly, the images do not have the necessary detail for our staff to identify it more specifically.  It seems we are on a trend of posting images of fearless women with patriotic nail polish today.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination