Currently viewing the category: "Rove Beetles"
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Subject: What’s this ?
Location: Scheeßel, Lower Saxony, Germany
August 29, 2015 2:06 pm
Hi, do you know this nice bug ?
Signature: Peter B.

Rove Beetle

Rove Beetle

Dear Peter,
We believe this Rove Beetle may be
Platydracus stercorarius and there are some very nice images on Eakring Birds.  According to Nature Spot, it “is also quite a large species reaching 2 cm or more in length. The legs and elytra are rust red, whilst the head, thorax and abdomen are mainly black. The head is very square at the back and there are bands of pale pubescence on the apical abdominal segments.”  It might also be the related Staphylinus caesareus.

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Subject: beetle?
Location: The Netherlands
August 26, 2015 8:56 am
Hi,
I am in The Netherlands (europe) and came across this bug. I have never seen it before and was a lot bigger then what I normally see crawling around.
It looks like a bug with a tough shell. Though when he found me a threat, he lifted his backside up as a scorpion and faced me. I have never seen a beetle do that, so it might just be something else entirely.
I am amazed and in awe since I never seen it, while I am always looking around for bugs haha. I find them very interesting. I hope you can help me out!
Thanks,
Signature: Niels

Devil's Coach Horse

Devil’s Coach Horse

Dear Niels,
We are very excited to be able to post an image of a Devil’s Coach Horse, a species of Rove Beetle, from its native habitat.  Most of our images are from North America because this species was introduced and it has naturalized.  We encourage Devil’s Coach Horses in our own garden as they are one of the few creatures that will feed on introduced Snails and Slugs, also from Europe.  Though the Devil’s Coach Horse rears up its abdomen in a threat position, and it will release a foul odor from scent glands, it is a harmless species that poses no threat to humans.

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Subject: Weird Bug That Flies and Terrifies
Location: Asheville, NC
June 5, 2015 2:21 pm
I saw this waiting at the bus stop, took a picture because it was entirely unfamiliar. Then it flew away and I shuddered and hoped it wouldn’t return. But it was cool, I just don’t think I want anything to do with it (but I was curious).
Signature: Wesley Stroupe

Rove Beetle

Rove Beetle

Dear Wesley,
This is a harmless Rove Beetle, and after scouring through images on BugGuide, we suspect it might be
Platydracus immaculatus, which according to BugGuide is:  “now infrequently collected over much of its range.”  We are postdating you submission to go live during our holiday later in June.

 

Kathy Haines, Sue Dougherty, Tracey Fertally, Cara Dailey liked this post
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Subject: Biology
Location: Nova Scotia, Canada
June 8, 2015 4:46 pm
Our biology class did a lab at one of the beaches in Nova Scotia, Canada. Well doing this lab our group found this small black and reddish brown bug well we were examining a part of the beach.
Signature: – Bio Student

Paederus Rove Beetle

Paederus Rove Beetle

Dear Bio Student,
Your insect is unmistakably a Rove Beetle in the genus
Paederus, and according to BugGuide:  “some species contain a toxic chemical (pederin) in their hemolymph which causes contact dermatitis in humans, usually as a result of slapping the beetle and crushing it against exposed skin. The affected area becomes red, swollen, and itchy, causing the skin to peel when scratched.(3) Extracts of Paederus beetles have been used by the Chinese since at least 739 AD in the medicinal treatment of boils, nasal polyps, and ringworm.”  BugGuide also indicates:  “15 spp. in our area, >600 worldwide(1), just one (P. littorarius) reaches Canada” which would mean your species is Paederus littorarius.  The genus has representatives in many places around the world, and those in Africa are known as Creechies or Acid Bugs because of the caustic chemical they release and the contact dermatitis that results. 

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Subject: Strangest bug I’ve ever seen
Location: Casablanca, Morocco
April 17, 2015 1:01 pm
Hi!
I was just wondering if anyone knew what this lovely looking insect was. It flew into my window then crawled up the wall.
Any help will be appreciated
Signature: Charlie

Devil's Coachhorse

Devil’s Coachhorse

Hi Charlie,
Though it does not look like a typical Beetle, this Rove Beetle in the genus
Ocypus is commonly called a Devil’s Coachhorse.  According to BugGuide, members of the genus are:  “native to the Old World (Eurasia & Africa), adventive in NA (2 spp. along the Pacific Coast + 2 in ne. US).”  The Devil’s Coachhorse is one of the few predators that will feed on snails, so they are welcome in our Los Angles garden where we occasionally encounter them.  TrekNature provides this information:  “Distribution: originally in great part of Europe and NW Africa, introduced to N America, Asia and Australia.” TrekNature also provides this interesting etomological information:  “English name: – devil’s coach-horse beetle comes from stories from the Middle Ages when this species has [b]een associated with Devil for the first time. Thanks to its black colouration, huge mandibles and night period of activity people believed that the Devil assumes the form of this beetle to eat sinners. Some other common names of this beetle are: Devil’s beast, Devil’s footman, Devil’s coachman and Devil’s steed.”  The Devil’s Coachhorse often strikes a threat posture when disturbed, and though it can release a foul odor (also associated with the devil), it is perfectly harmless to humans.

Andrea Leonard Drummond, Sue Dougherty, Alfonso Moreno, Christy Harris, Vanessa Simone, Margie Hudson, Leslie Ticer Lusch liked this post
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Subject: What type of beetle is this
Location: Westmeath, ireland
April 4, 2015 10:23 am
My 3 yr old found this outside and wanted to know what it’s called!! It arches it’s back like a scorpion too.
Signature: Noah Fagan

Rove Beetle

Rove Beetle

Dear Noah,
Congratulations on recognizing that this soft bodied insect is an unusual type of beetle, a Rove Beetle to be more precise, and we believe the species is
Staphylinus caesareusThough this particular Rove Beetle is harmless, the threat position you describe is quite daunting, and we believe the Rove Beetle has the ability to release a foul odor when disturbed.

Rove Beetle

Rove Beetle

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