Currently viewing the category: "Rove Beetles"
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Subject: Weird Bug That Flies and Terrifies
Location: Asheville, NC
June 5, 2015 2:21 pm
I saw this waiting at the bus stop, took a picture because it was entirely unfamiliar. Then it flew away and I shuddered and hoped it wouldn’t return. But it was cool, I just don’t think I want anything to do with it (but I was curious).
Signature: Wesley Stroupe

Rove Beetle

Rove Beetle

Dear Wesley,
This is a harmless Rove Beetle, and after scouring through images on BugGuide, we suspect it might be
Platydracus immaculatus, which according to BugGuide is:  “now infrequently collected over much of its range.”  We are postdating you submission to go live during our holiday later in June.

 

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Biology
Location: Nova Scotia, Canada
June 8, 2015 4:46 pm
Our biology class did a lab at one of the beaches in Nova Scotia, Canada. Well doing this lab our group found this small black and reddish brown bug well we were examining a part of the beach.
Signature: – Bio Student

Paederus Rove Beetle

Paederus Rove Beetle

Dear Bio Student,
Your insect is unmistakably a Rove Beetle in the genus
Paederus, and according to BugGuide:  “some species contain a toxic chemical (pederin) in their hemolymph which causes contact dermatitis in humans, usually as a result of slapping the beetle and crushing it against exposed skin. The affected area becomes red, swollen, and itchy, causing the skin to peel when scratched.(3) Extracts of Paederus beetles have been used by the Chinese since at least 739 AD in the medicinal treatment of boils, nasal polyps, and ringworm.”  BugGuide also indicates:  “15 spp. in our area, >600 worldwide(1), just one (P. littorarius) reaches Canada” which would mean your species is Paederus littorarius.  The genus has representatives in many places around the world, and those in Africa are known as Creechies or Acid Bugs because of the caustic chemical they release and the contact dermatitis that results. 

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Subject: Strangest bug I’ve ever seen
Location: Casablanca, Morocco
April 17, 2015 1:01 pm
Hi!
I was just wondering if anyone knew what this lovely looking insect was. It flew into my window then crawled up the wall.
Any help will be appreciated
Signature: Charlie

Devil's Coachhorse

Devil’s Coachhorse

Hi Charlie,
Though it does not look like a typical Beetle, this Rove Beetle in the genus
Ocypus is commonly called a Devil’s Coachhorse.  According to BugGuide, members of the genus are:  “native to the Old World (Eurasia & Africa), adventive in NA (2 spp. along the Pacific Coast + 2 in ne. US).”  The Devil’s Coachhorse is one of the few predators that will feed on snails, so they are welcome in our Los Angles garden where we occasionally encounter them.  TrekNature provides this information:  “Distribution: originally in great part of Europe and NW Africa, introduced to N America, Asia and Australia.” TrekNature also provides this interesting etomological information:  “English name: – devil’s coach-horse beetle comes from stories from the Middle Ages when this species has [b]een associated with Devil for the first time. Thanks to its black colouration, huge mandibles and night period of activity people believed that the Devil assumes the form of this beetle to eat sinners. Some other common names of this beetle are: Devil’s beast, Devil’s footman, Devil’s coachman and Devil’s steed.”  The Devil’s Coachhorse often strikes a threat posture when disturbed, and though it can release a foul odor (also associated with the devil), it is perfectly harmless to humans.

Andrea Leonard Drummond, Sue Dougherty, Alfonso Moreno, Christy Harris, Vanessa Simone, Margie Hudson, Leslie Ticer Lusch liked this post
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Subject: What type of beetle is this
Location: Westmeath, ireland
April 4, 2015 10:23 am
My 3 yr old found this outside and wanted to know what it’s called!! It arches it’s back like a scorpion too.
Signature: Noah Fagan

Rove Beetle

Rove Beetle

Dear Noah,
Congratulations on recognizing that this soft bodied insect is an unusual type of beetle, a Rove Beetle to be more precise, and we believe the species is
Staphylinus caesareusThough this particular Rove Beetle is harmless, the threat position you describe is quite daunting, and we believe the Rove Beetle has the ability to release a foul odor when disturbed.

Rove Beetle

Rove Beetle

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Subject: Beetle
Location: Minnesota
May 18, 2011 8:45 am
Hello bugman,
These images were taken on 5.18.2011 in Minnesota, east of Minneapolis about 20 miles, and although the image quality isn’t very good, I was hoping to learn what it is. It was rather large, perhaps 3 inches. It’s hard to see but on the side view image it looks as though there’s a good size hole in the abdomen, but that could just be an illusion because of the angle and poor image quality. At first I thought it was an Odonata excuviea but ruled it out. Then I thought it might be a click beetle, but I don’t think it is.
I looked on Bug Guide, but wasn’t able to ID this bug. So, I hoping you may be ab;e to shed some light on this ugly, but fascinating little bug
Signature: Laura

Brown and Gold Rove Beetle

Possibly Brown and Gold Rove Beetle

Dear Laura,
Even though you were unable to properly identify this Rove Beetle, we are impressed that you recognized it as a beetle as Rove Beetles do not resemble most beetles as they lack hard elytra.  It looks similar to 
Platydracus maculosus which is pictured on BugGuide, but we would not entirely discount that it might be a Brown and Gold Rove Beetle, Ontholestes cingulatus, which is also pictured on BugGuide.  Rove Beetles are a large family and your individual might be in an entirely different genusSince your image is several years old, this is not a timely or seasonal posting.  We are preparing several posts to go live while we are away from the office in early January, so you will be able to find this posting on our site in the coming week.

Brown and Gold Rove Beetle

Possibly Brown and Gold Rove Beetle

Thank you so much for your speedy reply and information. I don’t often see beetles of any kind and certainly not as large as this, at least not alive!
Thanks again, Bugman!
Laura from Mound Mn

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Subject: Whats this
Location: Warwickshire England
September 2, 2014 2:53 am
I found a bug in my home and have never seen this before , please can you identify it it was found in rugby Warwickshire ,on 31st of August 2015
Thanks in advance
J Powell
Signature: J Powell

Rove Beetle

Rove Beetle

Dear J Powell,
Wow, is Warwickshire a portal to the future???  Found in 2015???  This is a beneficial Rove Beetle in the family Staphylinidae, but we are uncertain of the species.  According to BNHS YounGnats:  “There are over 1100 different rove beetles in UK.”  According to the Empire Pest Control site:  “This casual intruder is associated with the forest environment for the whole of it’s life, however they do enter homes seeking shelter. Common in UK around field and forestry areas. Are not known for feeding on regular household food stuffs. Despite their somewhat aggresive appearance they pose no threat to people.”  The description continues with:  “What this predator is really looking for are insects, small invertebrates. It also catches maggots and other insect larvae. Will also feed on old decaying forest mushrooms and escaping sap on tree trunks.”
  We don’t really want to know why your individual appears bent into an unnatural position, though we suspect Unnecessary Carnage.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination