Currently viewing the category: "Pleasing Fungus Beetles"
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Subject: Id help
Location: Maryland
August 22, 2013 11:39 am
Hi,
Was out walking and thought these bugs were beautiful and have no idea what they are or what they are doing. Are they attacking a tree or feasting on a fungus? Would love help getting them identified. I’ve only seen them once in the forest.
Thanks you!
Signature: Nature lover

Pleasing Fungus Beetles

Pleasing Fungus Beetles

Dear Nature Lover,
These are Pleasing Fungus Beetles in the genus
Megalodacne.  They are feeding on fungus as their name implies.

Pleasing Fungus Beetles

Pleasing Fungus Beetles

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug?
Location: Southbury ct
June 11, 2013 12:07 pm
Dear bugman, I found these cool black & orange bugs this week out back on a fungus. They were 1/2 – 3/4 inches long. The color caught our eye immediately. what is this bug? Also, if you look closely at the picture you can also see small larva / baby bugs in the background. Are the big bugs feasting on the small ones? Could this fungus be their nest? Thanks!!!!!
Signature: Liz

Pleasing Fungus Beetle

Pleasing Fungus Beetle

Dear Liz,
This beauty is a Pleasing Fungus Beetle in the family Erotylidae and the genus
Megalodacne.  We cannot ascertain if it is Megalodacne heros, which is larger, or Megalodacne fasciata.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on bracket fungi. Adults overwinter under bark, often in groups.”  The larvae are grubs, and we believe that may be a larva visible in the photo you supplied.

Pleasing Fungus Beetle

Pleasing Fungus Beetle

  

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Subject: Strange bug nest
Location: Modesto, California
August 13, 2012 8:39 pm
Hello! I was outside walking my dog and saw what I thought was throw up. I took a closer look and realized it was not throw up, but a strange nest. When poked with a stick, the stick broke due to how tough this stuff was. When poked with a more DURABLE stick, a white liquid came out (but the stick eventually snapped). What might this all be? What type of bugs?
Signature: Kate

Pleasing Fungus Beetles

Hi Kate,
This is a most curious submission, and we are going to get a second opinion from Eric Eaton.  This is not a nest.  It is a fungus and the beetles are Pleasing Fungus Beetles.  The curious thing is your location in Modesto, California.  We are nearly certain that these Pleasing Fungus Beetles are in the genus
Megalodacne as evidenced by the photos posted to BugGuide, however, Bugguide states:  “Two Nearctic species” are found in “Eastern United States and Canada.”  BugGuidereports them as far west as Texas.  We can’t help but wonder which of the following possibilities is the solution.  Perhaps there is an undiscovered west coast species, or perhaps the range of one of the two eastern species is much greater than originally supposed, or perhaps they were somehow introduced, either accidentally or naturally through range expansion.  Further research led us to the FSCA Coleoptera site that states:  “There are two species of this genus occurring in the eastern United States, and a record of a potenitally [sic] establishment in California.”  We will contact Paul E. Skelley who is posted that statement with your sighting.  HGTV states:  “Megalodacne fasciata, which is smaller and has slightly different markings on its back, has been seen throughout most of the East and Midwest, plus California.”

Pleasing Fungus Beetles

Paul Skelley Responds
Daniel,
Megalodacne fasciata was first reported in California by Kitayama (See Attachment:  Kitayama 1986-New Distribution for Megalodacne fasciata). Since my page on the web was posted long ago, I have seen several other specimens from several other Californian localities. Megalodacne fasciata appears to be established. Megalodacne species prefer bracket fungi that are “soft” when fresh and growing, but which turn very hard as they mature. Your reader’s photo appears to be a Ganodera sp., bracket fungus, but I am not familiar with the western species.
Paul

Eric Eaton Responds
Daniel:
Yes, Art Evans features Megalodacne fasciata in his Field Guide to Beetles of California.  He says they are most active at night, so a daytime image would be something somewhat unusual.
Eric

 

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Cicada?
Location: Mogollon Rim, AZ
July 28, 2011 8:12 am
While camping in Mogollon Rim, AZ in July, we rolled over a log and found these bugs, so the images you’re seeing are upside down. These guys were hardly moving, but there were other slow-moving bugs (the black ones) boring into holes in the log. I’m interested in figuring out what these are and I appreciate your time to help in that effort.
Signature: Jenn

Fungus Beetle Pupae

Hi Jenn,
This is a real puzzle for us,  but we believe we know what you encountered.  These look like the Larvae and Pupae of Lady Beetles, commonly called Lady Bugs.  Here is a photo of the Larvae and Pupae of a Twice Stabbed Lady Beetle from BugGuide, and though the match is not exact, we believe you should be able to note the similarities.  We are going to tag this as a mystery because we cannot figure out why such a large number of Larval Lady Beetles would decide to pupate in such a large aggregation under a log.  That does not seem characteristic of what we would expect.  Perhaps we are wrong and they are not Lady Beetle Larvae and Pupae, but we are relatively certain that they are some other group of Beetles.  We will contact Eric Eaton to see if he can provide an answer.  We also want to continue searching to see if there is any documentation of such an occurrence elsewhere on the internet.  Thank you so much for submitting this puzzling identification request.

Aggregation of Fungus Beetle Larvae and Pupae

Eric Eaton makes a correction
August 1, 2011
Daniel:
The beetle pupae are actually of the fungus beetle Gibbifer californicus.
Eric

 

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Bug on Mushroom on down Oak Tree
Location: Memphis, TN
June 5, 2011 2:46 pm
Mr. Bugman,
These little critters are all over a downed oak tree in my yard. As you can see, the white part is mushrooms growing on the tree. The bugs are primarily on the mushrooms, but are on other part of the tree as well.
Signature: David Gordon

Pleasing Fungus Beetles, we believe

Hi David,
We believe these are Pleasing Fungus Beetles in the family Erotylidae (see BugGuide), but we cannot make out enough detail in your image to be certain.  They most resemble the BugGuide images of
Ischyrus quadripunctatus, but we cannot make out the identifying four spots in your photo.

Daniel,
Thank you so much. I didn’t really need a genus, I just really needed to make sure they weren’t “harmful” like ticks or something I needed to make an effort to get rid of them.  If they are beetles, from what I understand, they are beneficial and I will leave them to live their lives in peace.
Thank you again,
David

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costa rican beetle
March 28, 2010
This beetle was in the InBioParque in San Jose, Costa Rica last summer. It crawled to the sunny ends of branches and twigs. I only saw it by itself. Do you know what kind of beetle this is?
Thanks!
Jenny
costa Rica, San Jose, InBioParque

Pleasing Fungus Beetle

Hi again Jenny,
This is our final response for the night.  This is a Pleasing Fungus Beetle.  It bears a striking resemblance to Gibbifer californicus, the only species in the genus found in the U.S. according to BugGuide.  We posted a member of the genus from Costa Rica in 2007.  We searched for internet coverage of the genus from Costa Rica, and found a photo of a specimen on the La Anita Rainforest Ranch website that seems to look very similar to your individual, though we believe it is incorrectly identified as Gibbifer californicus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination