Currently viewing the category: "Fungus Beetles and Pleasing Fungus Beetles"
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Subject: Penthe obliquata–fungus beetle
Location: Mancelona, MI
June 30, 2014 4:26 pm
I found this distinctive black beetle while I was out last night moth hunting, and since he seems to be missing from your archives I’m passing him along! This particular species of polypore fungus beetle is about 1-1.4 cm long (according to Bugguide; consistent with my specimen). That little orange scutellum (right between the thorax and the abdomen) is the key to identifying it, along with the overall rounded shape. Evidently they like living in dry fungus and decomposing trees, both of which we have in abundance around here, though this one was drawn to a lamppost.
Signature: Helen

Fungus Beetle

Fungus Beetle

Dear Helen,
Thank you for your continued efforts to supplement our archives with your excellent images.  BugGuide does have some additional information on this Fungus Beetle that does not have a common name.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pleasing Fungus Beetle (Gibbifer sp.)
Location: Rincon de la Vieja NP, Costa Rica
May 10, 2014 5:48 pm
I found this beetle while hiking in the Rincon de la Vieja National Park in Costa Rica. I’m guessing that it belongs to the genus Gibbifer based on the ID that I found here on your pages. But I couldn’t find any matches for a species ID. Maybe you or some of your readers can help.
Signature: Siggy

Pleasing Fungus Beetle

Pleasing Fungus Beetle

Hi Siggy,
You are correct that we have several examples from Costa Rica of Pleasing Fungus Beetles in the genus
Gibbifer, but we cannot substantiate their species identity.  There is a posting on Project Noah that is identified as Gibbifer costaricensis.  That same species is represented on Biologia Centrali Americana, however, the obsolete genus name Cypherotylus is used.  It is also important to understand that insects do not respect international boundaries drawn up by humans.

Pleasing Fungus Beetle

Pleasing Fungus Beetle

Daniel,
Thanks for replying so quickly. I seen that plate from Biologia Centrali Americana as well and thought insect #3 matched mine pretty closely. But when I did a search on Gibbifer gibbosus, what I assume would be the current name, I found pictures of beetles without the black band across the middle. I don’t know how much variability can be expected in a species, but maybe it’s just a variant.
I have a few more pictures of some insects that I want to ID from that hike. If I can’t come up with anything myself I may resort to enlisting your help again. Even if I can ID them, I’ll submit the images for use on your site.
Siggy

Hi again Siggy,
We would love to see any identified images from your hike.  It is much easier for us to post interesting images of interesting creatures without having to do any additional research.  Please include the species name and location in the subject line to catch our attention as traffic is once again increasing due to warming weather in much of the northern hemisphere.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Id help
Location: Maryland
August 22, 2013 11:39 am
Hi,
Was out walking and thought these bugs were beautiful and have no idea what they are or what they are doing. Are they attacking a tree or feasting on a fungus? Would love help getting them identified. I’ve only seen them once in the forest.
Thanks you!
Signature: Nature lover

Pleasing Fungus Beetles

Pleasing Fungus Beetles

Dear Nature Lover,
These are Pleasing Fungus Beetles in the genus
Megalodacne.  They are feeding on fungus as their name implies.

Pleasing Fungus Beetles

Pleasing Fungus Beetles

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug?
Location: Southbury ct
June 11, 2013 12:07 pm
Dear bugman, I found these cool black & orange bugs this week out back on a fungus. They were 1/2 – 3/4 inches long. The color caught our eye immediately. what is this bug? Also, if you look closely at the picture you can also see small larva / baby bugs in the background. Are the big bugs feasting on the small ones? Could this fungus be their nest? Thanks!!!!!
Signature: Liz

Pleasing Fungus Beetle

Pleasing Fungus Beetle

Dear Liz,
This beauty is a Pleasing Fungus Beetle in the family Erotylidae and the genus
Megalodacne.  We cannot ascertain if it is Megalodacne heros, which is larger, or Megalodacne fasciata.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on bracket fungi. Adults overwinter under bark, often in groups.”  The larvae are grubs, and we believe that may be a larva visible in the photo you supplied.

Pleasing Fungus Beetle

Pleasing Fungus Beetle

  

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black beetle with 4 yellow dots
Location: Singapore
November 21, 2012 1:18 am
Hi sir,
Please help us. we saw this beetle and we are very curious what species it is
Signature: shirlynn

Handsome Fungus Beetle

Dear Shirlynn,
This beetle is very distinctive looking, but we haven’t the time to research it right now as we are preparing to leave the office to spend Thanksgiving with family for several days.  Perhaps in our absence, one of our readers will digest turkey at the computer and they might write in with a comment that identifies the species.

Handsome Fungus Beetle

Hi Daniel and shirlynn:
This is a Handsome Fungus Beetle (Endomychidae), not to confused with the Pleasing Fungus Beetles (Erotylidae). Both are large families of beetles that specialize by feeding on fungi or rotting wood. Your beetle is in the genus Eumorphus, but it gets a little tricky after that as there are many to choose from and they are all quite similar. As far as I can determine, at least seven species are native to Singapore and there are probably more. Eumorphus marginatus looks like a pretty close match but I really can’t be certain that that is it. Regards. Karl

Thanks so much for the assistance Karl.  We will need to create a new subcategory for this Handsome Fungus Beetle.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange bug nest
Location: Modesto, California
August 13, 2012 8:39 pm
Hello! I was outside walking my dog and saw what I thought was throw up. I took a closer look and realized it was not throw up, but a strange nest. When poked with a stick, the stick broke due to how tough this stuff was. When poked with a more DURABLE stick, a white liquid came out (but the stick eventually snapped). What might this all be? What type of bugs?
Signature: Kate

Pleasing Fungus Beetles

Hi Kate,
This is a most curious submission, and we are going to get a second opinion from Eric Eaton.  This is not a nest.  It is a fungus and the beetles are Pleasing Fungus Beetles.  The curious thing is your location in Modesto, California.  We are nearly certain that these Pleasing Fungus Beetles are in the genus
Megalodacne as evidenced by the photos posted to BugGuide, however, Bugguide states:  “Two Nearctic species” are found in “Eastern United States and Canada.”  BugGuidereports them as far west as Texas.  We can’t help but wonder which of the following possibilities is the solution.  Perhaps there is an undiscovered west coast species, or perhaps the range of one of the two eastern species is much greater than originally supposed, or perhaps they were somehow introduced, either accidentally or naturally through range expansion.  Further research led us to the FSCA Coleoptera site that states:  “There are two species of this genus occurring in the eastern United States, and a record of a potenitally [sic] establishment in California.”  We will contact Paul E. Skelley who is posted that statement with your sighting.  HGTV states:  “Megalodacne fasciata, which is smaller and has slightly different markings on its back, has been seen throughout most of the East and Midwest, plus California.”

Pleasing Fungus Beetles

Paul Skelley Responds
Daniel,
Megalodacne fasciata was first reported in California by Kitayama (See Attachment:  Kitayama 1986-New Distribution for Megalodacne fasciata). Since my page on the web was posted long ago, I have seen several other specimens from several other Californian localities. Megalodacne fasciata appears to be established. Megalodacne species prefer bracket fungi that are “soft” when fresh and growing, but which turn very hard as they mature. Your reader’s photo appears to be a Ganodera sp., bracket fungus, but I am not familiar with the western species.
Paul

Eric Eaton Responds
Daniel:
Yes, Art Evans features Megalodacne fasciata in his Field Guide to Beetles of California.  He says they are most active at night, so a daytime image would be something somewhat unusual.
Eric

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination