Currently viewing the category: "Pantry Beetles, Grain Weevils, Spider Beetles, Meal Worms and Carpet Beetles"
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Subject: Home invasion in Austria
Location: Vienna, Austria
January 7, 2013 4:14 pm
Hi Bugman,
I came home from my winter vacation and found lots of those little black guys everywhere in my flat. They are about 3 to 4 millimeters long. Can you held me to identify their species?
Signature: Cheers, Hannes

Pantry Weevil is Caulophilus oryzae

Hi Hannes,
By your letter, it would seem to us that you have some species of beetle that infests stored foods and we would encourage you to carefully inspect the pantry for all stored grain products to see if you can determine the source of the infestation.  Don’t forget large bags of pet food including bird seed.  We do not recognize this particular species which appears to be a Weevil or Snout Beetle, but they are not the typical Grain or Rice Weevilswe encounter.  There are many small beetles that infest stored foods.  We will try to contact Eric Eaton to see if he can provide any additional information.

Pantry Weevils:  Caulophilus oryzae

On Jan 8, 2013, at 11:06 AM, Eric Eaton wrote:
Hi, Daniel:
Well, I don’t recognize them, either, so I’ll copy this to Charlie O’Brien, and see if he does.  Hopefully he is in good health….
Eric

Thanks much Eric,
Do you agree that they are weevils?
Daniel

Yes, definitely weevils.  Great images should make ID by an authority fairly easy.
Eric

Daniel:
Here is the answer.  I thought I recognized it to subfamily, but that didn’t make any sense since most species bore in conifer bark.
Eric

Charlie O’Brien provides an identification
Hi Eric:
Happy to hear from you at any time.. The weevil is Caulophilus oryzae (Gyllenhal) formerly placed in Rhyncolus and it is a stored grain pest in the Cossoninae. It is almost Cosmopolitan..
… Sincerely,
Charlie

Thanks a lot for identifying!
I sent you 5€ via paypal for your great service :)
kind regards,
Hannes

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Subject: help!! I’m concernrd this may be a bedbug!!!
Location: princeton bc
December 5, 2012 10:17 pm
I was at my friends house playing with their 5 month old baby when I noticed this bug crawling up his arm. I flicked it on to the carpet and immediately took a picture and squished it . My dad is suspecting a bedbug but could it be a carpet Beetle???? Please help!!
Signature: Jennifer

Carpet Beetle

Hi Jennifer,
If that rug is wool, it might be the reason your friend has Carpet Beetles, a common household pest.

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Subject: Everywhere
Location: Ft. Worth Texas
November 28, 2012 8:00 pm
Have these all around my house…every room. Sometimes they’re alive and sometimes dead by the time I see them. Tried to take pics of front and back but they’re so tiny it may be difficult to see details. They’re always this size…have never seen any larger or smaller.
Signature: Stacy in Ft. worth

Carpet Beetle Larva

Hi Stacey,
This is a Carpet Beetle larva and it is a common household pest.  They feed on all types of organic matter around the home, including pet fur and the fibers of wool carpets and upholstery.  Try vacuuming more often as a means of control.

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Subject: white spotted spider beetle
Location: Nova Scotia
November 26, 2012 12:29 pm
I do not see this bug species on your site. I have a problem with it. It recently appeared from a void in the BR, under the vanity. Quickly becoming a pest I have to deal with. Crawling bugs are controlable but flying is a problem. Has been identified; sharing photos; hope they come thru. I have seen egg, partially developed, crawling and flying. Is not in my kitchen or food. Does not bite, but the flying ones burn like a no-see-um if they light on me. I do not know how it got here, must have come on store products. Could almost miss the flyers for fruit flies. How prevalent are they in Canada?
Signature: Bugged

Whitemarked Spider Beetles

Dear Bugged,
Since we did not know this species, we looked it up on BugGuide and believe you are speaking of the Whitemarked Spider Beetle,
Ptinus fur.  BugGuide indicates it was:  “introduced to NA before 1870.”  BugGuide reports sightings in Ontario and the United States across the border.  Thank you for adding to our archive of Household Pests.

Whitemarked Spider Beetles

Is that really a photo of the egg?

Whitemarked Spider Beetle Egg, we suppose.

These photos surprised me when I enlarged them as it looks like a spec on the sticky paper of the monitor box I photographed. It is certainly some stage of development. I thought it had started to change color on one end?  Have not seen any nests or fuzzy pupae they describe in some writing and the “fur” is not evident without magnification, they are very small to start.  Am certain these are the developing ones.  In the further monitoring I checked yesterday there is a fully developed winged one, looks much like a common small housefly, plus there is the first I have seen that shows the spotted body really well (female?).  I will try and get a decent photo of that box.  I got the ID through Orkin pest control who contacted their lead entomologist at their Quality Control.
“It is white marked spider beetle. There are differences between females and males looks. The white patch may not always be the same.”
The worst of this specific one for control is that it flies.  I am not sure how it arrived, but I did buy a new sisal cat scratch post from a pet store in Oct.. and it sat on the floor on the opposite side of the bathroom wall, BR being where they emerged.  I have no carpets.  They are not in the kitchen, BdR or living room except a rare crawling one killed early on.  But they have moved into the basement and I see very few in the BR now.
I was surprised to find that of the ones caught on paper first (in the pictures I sent) and placed in a ziplock bag, some still had faint life a week later.  They are extremely hardy.
Carol

Update from Carol January 3, 3013
Hi Daniel:  Sorry to be so long getting this done.  In 1271 note there is an egg in the 4 o’clock position.  It is quite round and black when the picture is enlarged and in Picasa3 which I use I tried to correct the blur and it just went quite black so I left it untouched.  Enlargement is not as clear as it should be but it is the camera.
Would like to say these beetles seem to go on to become some version of a small fly from what I can tell.  There is no evidence they came on the cat post I mentioned.  I believe myself they either came on clothes from the line stored under the cabinet or under the siding and followed the double beam across the house.  I did see ants going there during our very hot dry August and got them but this could be from the same area.  No other explanation comes to mind.
I have had pest control once a few weeks ago.  They are gone now from upstairs, but not gone entirely from the basement and PC will come again to redo.  I am hopefully optimistic they will be eradicated but it is a real problem as they are so minute and even microscopic as some of this I could not see until photographed… more that I ever wanted to know about them!
regards,
Carol
http://home.cc.umanitoba.ca/~fieldspg/fields/beetles.pdf
Beetles Identification Guide
Ptinus fur (Linnaeus)
whitemarked spider beetle
ptine bigarré
Diagnosis: The species is distinguished from the other Ptinus included here in
having 2 tufts of setae on the pronotal disc, with the surface between the tufts
dull, punctured, and granulated.
Sexual dimorphism: Males (Fig. 224) have the elytra subparallel-sided, the eyes
larger and more convex, the antennae longer (10th segment about five times as
long as wide), the tufts of setae on the pronotal disc less defined, and the
metasternum longer and convex. Females (Fig. 225) have the elytra subobovate,
the eyes smaller and less convex, the antennae shorter (10th segment about
twice as long as wide), the tufts of setae on the pronotal disc more defined, and
the metasternum shorter and flat.
Distribution: Reported from Europe, North Africa, Asia, New Zealand, and
North America, where it was introduced before 1870. In Canada the species has
been collected in all provinces.
Economic importance: In Canada, this species is found mainly in warehouses
and dwellings, less frequently in museums, granaries, and grain elevators. It is
one of the most commonly reported ptinids in British Columbia.
Ptinus ocellus Brown (synonym: P. tectus auct.)
Australian spider beetle
ptine ocellé
161
Fig. 224 Ptinus fur (Linnaeus); male. Scale = 0.5 mm.
162
Fig. 225 Ptinus fur (Linnaeus); female. Scale = 0.5 mm.

 

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Subject: hope this is the thing biting me.
Location: Canton, Ohio, USA
November 19, 2012 1:13 am
Hey Bugman. I’m kinda scared to be in my own home. I thought bedbugs were just a story til recently. Long story short, my fiance said he seen a tick-like bug that was reddish-white in color. I being paranoid immediately thought bed bugs. I also have had a couple bites and then recently a small dime size rash looking spot on my chest with small blister-like bumps in it. I freaked out and started searching my bed and couches and came up with nothing, then I pulled off my fitted sheet and found this. It was in the crevice of my bed and was very round like a caterpillar, but picking it with tweezers flattened it. It was also solid colored but the color went out when squeezed. From what I’ve researched I’m thinking it may be a carpet beetle larva, and not a bed bug but I am still freaked out. If this isn’t a bed bug, is it possible that this is what’s causing me to break out? Even though my fiance has no marks or bites or anything. I have two kitte ns that were rescued from outside about six months ago, two rose hair tarantulas (in separate tanks) and a small feeder tank for feeder crickets. I live in apartments and we have raccoons outside and stray cats but I live on the third floor and the outside animals have never been close to my door. I clean regularly and dust and vacuum at least once a week. Any thing will help to hopefully calm my nerves. Thank you!
Signature: LaDesta

Carpet Beetle Larva

Dear LaDesta,
This is a Carpet Beetle Larva and they do not bite.  We are not experts in allergic reactions, so we cannot say for certain if any skin reaction you are having is in any way related to Carpet Beetles.  If you are being bitten, you need to look elsewhere for the source of the bites.  Good luck.

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Subject: Very small beetle in So. Cal.
Location: Running Springs, California (San Bernardino Mountains)
November 18, 2012 1:29 am
It is a very small beetle. I think it may bite. Found while lying in my bed reading (not under the covers).
Signature: Steve in So. Cal

Variegated Carpet Beetle

Hi Steve,
This is a Variegated Carpet Beetle,
Anthrenus verbasci, and while they do not bite, they are considered Household Pests.  We have been getting numerous photos of their larvae in recent weeks.

Variegated Carpet Beetle

Thank you!  That confirms my additional Internet research.  Love your site!
Steven Blood

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination