Currently viewing the category: "Metallic Borer Beetles"
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Subject: Metallic Green Beetle
Location: Gaston, Oregon
November 8, 2016 12:11 pm
I found this little guy crawling across my carpet this morning. It’s a glittery green, with copper edges. About 15mm long. It pulled in its legs and played dead when I poked at it. Found on November 8, in Gaston, Oregon; a rural area. Thanks!
Signature: Colin F

Golden Buprestid

Golden Buprestid

Dear Colin,
This beautiful beetle is a Golden Buprestid, a species with wood boring larvae.  Occasionally we receive reports of adults that emerge from milled lumber after many years.

Golden Buprestid

Golden Buprestid

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: bug spain malaga
Location: Andalucia, Mijas, Spain
September 1, 2016 1:54 am
Dear Bugman,
Maybe you could help me identifying this bug, I have no idea where to look for first.
photographed two weeks in july. Southern Spain, Malaga.
There where more than one in between two wooden beams of a Pinewood bench.
Thanks in advance
Signature: Perry

Jewel Beetle

Jewel Beetle

Dear Perry,
This is a Metallic Borer or Jewel Beetle in the family Buprestidae.  We cannot say for certain to which species it belongs, but you can see some Spanish Buprestids on the Living Jewels European Buprestidae Blog that were documented in Spain in June 2013.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: bug
Location: alaska
August 14, 2016 8:55 pm
howdy this bug bites what is it pleasr
Signature: ok

Black Fire Beetle

Black Fire Beetle

Dear ok,
We immediately recognized this as a Metallic Borer Beetle or Jewel Beetle from the family Buprestidae, and when we researched species in Alaska, we discovered, much to our delight, that this appears to be a Black Fire Beetle or Fire Bug,
Melanophila acuminata, which according to a poster on BugGuide, is “famously known for its habit of flocking to freshly burned and sometimes still smoldering pine trees to mate and oviposit.”  According to the University of Alaska at Alberta Entomology site:  “Evans (Ecology 47:1061-1065,1966) demonstrated that these beetles can detect, infrared sources using paired receptors situated on the mesothorax near the coxal cavities and orientate towards the heat source. The structure of these receptors, are figured in Evans and Kuster (Can. Ent. 112:211-216,1980). Adults continue to be attracted to burned trees in the year following a fire.”  The site also states:  “These beetles may use most any conifer for larval development (Bright 1987). In Alberta it has been reared from white spruce and fire killed jack pine.”  According to the Montana State University site, the host trees include ” Balsam Fir, Grand Fir, Yellow Birch, Monterey Cypress, White Spruce, Lodgepole Pine, Eastern White Pine, Red Pine, Northern White-cedar; adults – various species of spruce, pine, cedar ” and “Size: 8-12mm”  which seems right for your individual if that is a pierced earring in your image.  Was this individual by chance found near a recent fire?

Facebook Comment from Melissa
Ah, yes. Crawling up your pants leg and gnawing on your skin is what they excel at! We firefighters just call them Little Bitey B*stards because they show up to every fire by the thousands.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hairy bug
Location: South Africa , west coast
August 13, 2016 8:47 am
This bug was found on the west coast of the western cape South Africa in mid winter. It doesn’t appear to have wings
Signature: Bonnie

Brush Jewel Beetle

Brush Jewel Beetle

Dear Bonnie,
This is a gorgeous Jewel Beetle in the family Buprestidae, and we quickly identified it on iSpot as the Brush Jewel Beetle,
Julodis hirsuta subsp. hirsuta.  Your description of a “hairy bug” is so amusing in that entomologists who determined the scientific name decided that one reference to it being hirsute was not sufficient.  We would not entirely rule out that this might be Julodis cirrosa, also pictured on iSpot, based on this comment on iSpot from BeetleDude:  “Only two (sub)species of Julodis co-occur in the Klein Karoo, namely Julodis cirrosa cirrosa and Julodis hirsuta hirsuta. Their other subspecies are more easily identifiable, but it is really not easy to discriminate between J. c. cirrosa and J. h. hirsuta. But this set of photographs is just great! With specimens in hand, the identification would be clinched by studying sculptural patterns on the cuticle, details of the legs and the internal male genitalia, but these are just not ever visible enough on pictures not taken under a microscope and by a specialist.  Nonetheless, these pictures show lots and lots of character states one needs to take into account. I’ll skip the detail. Here are three important reasons for my identification of this beast as Julodis hirsuta hirsuta.
1. Setal brushes on dorsum confused, not in longitudinal rows, with small setal patches among the larger ones, and the setal brushes covering at least one quarter of elytral surface (different in J. c. cirrosa).
2. Majority of setal brushes on head longer than half the width of the eye (different in J. c. cirrosa).
3. Apex of underside of last visible abdominal segment truncate in the male {which this is} (different in J. c. cirrosa).”  A Brush Jewel Beetle is also pictured on BioDiversity Explorer

Brush Jewel Beetle

Brush Jewel Beetle

Thank you so much for your quick response. It was a very exciting discovery for us.

 

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Subject: Colorado bug
Location: Longmont, CO
July 6, 2016 3:35 pm
Found this bug in my shirt collar. Yuck!
Signature: Matt

Jewel Beetle: Buprestis confluenta

Jewel Beetle: Buprestis confluenta

Dear Matt,
We believe we have correctly identified your Jewel Beetle on BugGuide as
Buprestis confluenta.  Your Jewel Beetle appeared right on schedule because according to BugGuide, they appear:  “Primarily July (per pix posted here).”  According to Beetles in the Bush:  “B. confluenta is downright stunning! Brilliant green, perhaps with a slight coppery brown to purplish blue hue and with more or less confluent (thus the species name) fine yellow flecks densely scattered over the elytra, it is one of the easiest to identify of any species in the genus.”  We somehow feel your “Yuck!” comment is a tad bit harsh.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Jewel Bug?
Location: Powell River, B.C. Canada
July 6, 2016 6:30 pm
The sunlight reflecting off this small little bug is what got my attention. I tried to get a picture before it flew away…the original photo being about 3 feet away. I’ve never seen this kind of bug before, and posted the picture on social media in an attempt to identify it. The only answers I got was that it was a June Bug, which I disagreed. Through your wonderful site, i narrowed it down to a Jewel Bug, or a Golden Flatheaded borer. Any final clarification would be great, but I would also enjoy sharing this picture with others if it is of a quality good enough for you to use.
Signature: Yvonne Kelshaw

Golden Buprestid

Golden Buprestid

Dear Yvonne,
Your self-identification is basically correct, but we would like to make a few clarifications.  This is a Golden Buprestid,
Buprestis aurulenta.  The members of the family Buprestidae are sometimes called Metallic Borer Beetles or Jewel Beetles.  Jewel Bug is a common name for a Shield Bug in the family Scutelleridae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination