Currently viewing the category: "Metallic Borer Beetles"
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Subject: Cool flying beetle
Location: boyd lake state park, Loveland CO
July 13, 2014 2:26 am
This beetle flew into our truck near boyd lake in eastern colorado. It’s pretty cool looking and I wondered if it has a name
Signature: bc

Jewel Beetle:

Jewel Beetle:  Buprestis confluenta

Dear bc,
This is a Metallic Wood Boring Beetle or Jewel Beetle in the family Buprestidae, and we believe we have correctly identified it as
 Buprestis confluenta thanks to images posted to BugGuide.

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Subject: North Idaho 2 Years in a Row
Location: North Idaho
June 1, 2014 12:57 pm
Have never seen this beetle before last year and spotted again this year. Long slender silver with black streak-like dots. A little over an inch long. Whats that bug?
Signature: Allen

Western Sculptured Pine Borer

Western Sculptured Pine Borer

Hi Allen,
This looks to us like a Western Sculptured Pine Borer,
Chalcophora angulicollis, and according to bugGuide:  “Eggs are laid on bark of large branches or trunks of conifers, especially fir (Abies), or Pinus ponderosa).”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is the name of this beautiful bug
Location: Naran valley, Pakistan
May 28, 2014 12:44 am
This is a bug, I saw in Naran Pakistan. Can you please tell me the name of this bug? I am attaching the image of the bug for your analysis. Please tell me if you identify the bug.
Thank you!
Zohaib.
Signature: For analysis

Jewel Beetle

Jewel Beetle

Dear Zohaib,
This is a Metallic Borer Beetle or Jewel Beetle in the family Buprestidae.  The larvae bore in the wood of trees and shrubs, and most species of Jewel Beetle have specific host plants rather than feeding indiscriminately.  We will attempt to identify your beetle to the species or at least genus level.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Metallic boring beetle- what kind?
Location: Issaquah, Washington
May 18, 2014 2:36 pm
I think we have a metallic boring beetle here- what kind is it and what does it eat? We have 100+ year old douglas firs, western red cedars, and of course the house… This was taken in May, 2014
Signature: Athena

Western Cedar Borer

Western Cedar Borer

Hi Athena,
We believe we have correctly identified your Jewel Beetle as a Western Cedar Borer,
Trachykele blondeli, thanks to images posted on BugGuide with a comment by Eric Eaton that reads:  “This is one of the least common of buprestids.”  Though BugGuide does not offer any information, we can surmise that based on the name, the larvae feed on cedar.

Awesome, thanks! I really appreciate your help.
Take care,
-Athena

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this bug?
Location: New Braunfels, TX
May 8, 2014 6:42 pm
Can you identify this bug? Found it on our back porch in New Braunfels, TX.
Signature: Thanks, Roxann

Sculptured Pine Borer

Sculptured Pine Borer

Hi Roxann,
This beauty is a Sculptured Pine Borer,
Chalcophora virginiensis, or a closely related species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black and gray beetle on Mount Graham
Location: Mount Graham, Pinaleño Mountains, Graham County, Arizona, USA
April 9, 2014 11:54 am
Hi there!
I took a picture of this handsome fellow in mid-October at the Lower Twilight Campgrounds on Mount Graham in the Pinaleño Mountains in southeastern Arizona. He was about an inch and a half long. We were about 7,400 feet up, the temperature was 65-75 degrees Fahrenheit and the vegetation was medium-thick ponderosa pine.
Thanks so much for your help!
Signature: Kristin

Metallic Borer Beetle

Metallic Borer Beetle

Hi Kristin,
Thank you for being intelligent enough to indicate that this sighting did not happen this week.  You would be surprised at the number of folks who neglect to tell us that information because many times the actual month of a sighting is quite significant.  This is one of the Metallic Borer Beetles or Jewel Beetles from the family Buprestidae, and we believe it is the Western Sculptured Pine Borer,
Chalcophora angulicollis.  Though there are five member in the genus that look very similar, the only one that is reported from Arizona is the Western Sculptured Pine Borer.  According to BugGuide, it is found in “Coniferous forests” and its host trees include:  “hosts: various Pinaceae, incl. Abies concolor, A. grandis, Pinus ponderosa, Pseudotsuga menziesii(2); adults feed on leaves” which is very consistent with your sighting.  At least on BugGuide, sightings have been reported from May through July, so your October sighting is somewhat uncharacteristic, however BugGuide does offer the disclaimer that “Range and date information may be incomplete, overinclusive, or just plain wrong.” INaturalist also includes an August 26 sighting.  We suspect your altitude might have some bearing on the sighting occurring in October.

Daniel,
Awesome!!! Thanks so much for the quick reply and all of the excellent info.
My husband’s a Ph.D. student in evolutionary biology, and he’s done a little bit of collecting in Drosophila, Scaptomyza and Lycaenidae back before his current project. He’s given me a pretty good idea that more info is always better for an accurate ID.
Thanks again for your help!
Kristin

What an interesting combination of insects to have been collected by your husband.  Is he aware of the book Nabokov’s Blues which covers the two authors’ expedition to South America to discover new species of Lycaenidae?  They then classified them based on some theoretical papers written by the novelist and amateur lepidopterist, Vladimir Nabokov, which had been lost for nearly fifty years.  As it turned out, Nabokov’s theories held true and many new species were named after characters from his books.

Daniel,
I’m sure he’s heard of “Nabokov’s Blues” at the very least — he worked with Naomi Pierce (http://harvardmagazine.com/2001/07/a-life-with-lycaenids-html) for a few years out of undergrad. But we don’t have a copy around the house! He’s got a birthday coming up … thanks so much for the idea! :-)
Have a wonderful day.
Kristin

Nabokov’s Blues is a highly entertaining read and we believe it will make an excellent birthday present.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination