Currently viewing the category: "Metallic Borer Beetles"
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Subject: Colorado bug
Location: Longmont, CO
July 6, 2016 3:35 pm
Found this bug in my shirt collar. Yuck!
Signature: Matt

Jewel Beetle: Buprestis confluenta

Jewel Beetle: Buprestis confluenta

Dear Matt,
We believe we have correctly identified your Jewel Beetle on BugGuide as
Buprestis confluenta.  Your Jewel Beetle appeared right on schedule because according to BugGuide, they appear:  “Primarily July (per pix posted here).”  According to Beetles in the Bush:  “B. confluenta is downright stunning! Brilliant green, perhaps with a slight coppery brown to purplish blue hue and with more or less confluent (thus the species name) fine yellow flecks densely scattered over the elytra, it is one of the easiest to identify of any species in the genus.”  We somehow feel your “Yuck!” comment is a tad bit harsh.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Jewel Bug?
Location: Powell River, B.C. Canada
July 6, 2016 6:30 pm
The sunlight reflecting off this small little bug is what got my attention. I tried to get a picture before it flew away…the original photo being about 3 feet away. I’ve never seen this kind of bug before, and posted the picture on social media in an attempt to identify it. The only answers I got was that it was a June Bug, which I disagreed. Through your wonderful site, i narrowed it down to a Jewel Bug, or a Golden Flatheaded borer. Any final clarification would be great, but I would also enjoy sharing this picture with others if it is of a quality good enough for you to use.
Signature: Yvonne Kelshaw

Golden Buprestid

Golden Buprestid

Dear Yvonne,
Your self-identification is basically correct, but we would like to make a few clarifications.  This is a Golden Buprestid,
Buprestis aurulenta.  The members of the family Buprestidae are sometimes called Metallic Borer Beetles or Jewel Beetles.  Jewel Bug is a common name for a Shield Bug in the family Scutelleridae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Flying Insect
Location: Reseda, Ca
June 19, 2016 8:52 pm
Hi, there are flying beetle like bugs that are eating a tree in our backyard. My dad started to notice them this year and doesn’t remember seeing then before. Please help!
Signature: Won Cho

Glassy Winged Sharpshooters

Glassy Winged Sharpshooters

Dear Won Cho,
You have two different insects here, in different orders.  Two of them are Glassy Winged Sharpshooters that feed by sucking fluids from plants, and they do the most damage to new shoots.  According to BugGuide:  “A major vector of Pierce’s disease on grape. Usually not a serious pest within its native range, southeastern US. This species was accidentally introduced into so. California in the early 1990s, probably with ornamental or agricultural stock. There, it has become a serious threat to viticulture.  The biggest problem is that it can spread the disease-causing bacterium Xylella fastidiosa.”  According to the University of California Integrated Pest Management System site:  “The real problem associated with glassy-winged sharpshooter, however, is that it can spread the disease-causing bacterium Xylella fastidiosa from one plant to another. This bacterium is the causal agent of devastating plant diseases such as Pierce’s disease of grape, oleander leaf scorch, almond leaf scorch and mulberry leaf scorch. Other diseases to landscape plants in California include sweet gum dieback and cherry plum leaf scorch. Outside of California, other strains of X. fastidiosa cause phony peach disease, plum leaf scald, leaf scorches in sycamore, elm, maple, and oak,and variegated citrus chlorosis, but these diseases have not been detected in California. It should be noted that the strain of X. fastidiosa that causes oleander leaf scorch will not cause Pierce’s disease in grapes and the strain of X. fastidiosa that causes mulberry leaf scorch does not cause disease in oleanders or grapes. At this time there is no cure for any of these diseases.”  The other insect we can only identify to the family.  It is a Metallic Borer Beetle in the family Buprestidae, and the larvae bore in the wood.  They are generally very host specific.  Telling us what tree is affected may help in further identifications.

Borer Beetle

Borer Beetle

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Subject: What is this beautiful beetle?
Location: Seattle, WA
June 2, 2016 7:36 pm
I found this beautiful beetle crawling on my windowsill. I’m located just outside of Seattle, WA and found him in June. I love the iridescent colors on his back. Please tell me what he is
Signature: Jessie

Golden Buprestid

Golden Buprestid

Dear Jessie,
This gorgeous Jewel Beetle or Metallic Borer Beetle in the family Buprestidae is commonly called a Golden Buprestid.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pretty beetle
Location: New York
May 20, 2016 5:05 am
I had never seen this bug before. Can you identify it for me. Thank you
Signature: Melissa Mandeville

Eastern Poplar Buprestid

Eastern Poplar Buprestid

Dear Melissa,
This is one of the Metallic Borer Beetles or Jewel Beetles in the family Buprestidae.  We have identified it as the Eastern Poplar Buprestid,
Poecilonota cyanipes, thanks to BugGuide images.  According to BugGuide larvae bore in poplar, locust and willow trees.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle ID
Location: NE Washington State
May 18, 2016 10:02 am
Very pretty. About 1″ long. In a dry pine site that was recently logged.
Signature: Sue

Golden Buprestid

Golden Buprestid

Dear Sue,
This positively gorgeous Metallic Borer Beetle or Jewel Beetle from the family Buprestidae is aptly called a Golden Buprestid,
Buprestis aurulenta.  Developing larvae have their normal life cycle interrupted when the trees they are boring in are cut and milled.  The larvae seem to go into a suspended animation and emerge many years later.  We created a posting of a Golden Buprestid that emerged from a pine cutting board after eight years, and the record is allegedly 51 years.

Golden Buprestid

Golden Buprestid

Golden Buprestid

Golden Buprestid

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination