Currently viewing the category: "Longhorn Beetles"
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Subject: Green Longhorn Beetle from Barbados
Location: Barbados, Caribbean
April 21, 2014 9:50 pm
Hi, This green longhorn beetle (looks like Chlorida festiva) flew into my room to get its picture taken last night. First time I’m seeing one of these and it was about 4cm (body) long. I also noticed what looks to be mites on its ‘neck’ area, can you confirm this? Thought it would be a nice addition to your collection.
Signature: Niaz

Longicorn, Chlorida Festiva, with Phoretic Mites

Longicorn, Chlorida festiva, with Phoretic Mites

Hi Niaz,
We agree that you have correctly identified your Longicorn as
Chlorida festiva, but in searching for an image online for a link, we stumbled upon this Superstock image of Chlorida festiva with Phoretic Mites identified as Histiogaster arborsignis.  Phoretic Mites do not prey upon the Longicorns, but rather use them to move from location to location.  Back to the Longicorn, according to American Insects:  “Linnaeus described this large and striking species in 1758. It can be found in the West Indies, and from Mexico south to Argentina.”  Your images are gorgeous.

Longicorn Chlorida festiva with Phoretic Mites

Longicorn Chlorida festiva with Phoretic Mites

Longicorn Chlorida festiva with Phoretic Mites

Longicorn Chlorida festiva with Phoretic Mites

 

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Subject: Black & Yellow 2 inch Bug
Location: Concord CA
April 20, 2014 9:19 pm
Should I be concerned about this bug? Or is it just a beetle? It is about two inches long with four inch antennae. The head is black. The body is mostly yellow from the head to the black band before getting to the yellow butt area. There are two symmetrically located black dots in the yellow area of its back. The legs and antennae appear to be brown.
I found this bug on an exterior garage wall under a light on Sunday, April 20, 2014. We live in Concord, CA, about 35 miles east of San Francisco. It is starting to stay warm throughout the day (average of 70′s to 80′s). The weather is cool at night with dew in the morning, and dry/not humid during the day.
The closest I could come to identifying it is calling an “Instable Longhorn beetle Judolia spp Family Cerambycidae” from the website address below:

http://share2.esd105.org/rsandelin/Fieldguide/Animalpages/Insects/Beetles.htm

The attached photo was taken with my iPhone and emailed to me as “Actual” size.
I’m not sure what to make of it. Any information you can provide will be greatly appreciated.
Thank you,
Raymond Winters
Signature: Ray W. of Concord CA

Eucalyptus Longhorn

Eucalyptus Longhorn

Dear Ray,
While you have misidentified this Longhorn Borer Beetle, you did get the family correct.  This is actually a Eucalyptus Longhorned Borer and it is an invasive species in Southern California, but luckily, its host tree is also an introduced genus, the Eucalyptus trees, which are ubiquitous in Southern California.  More information on Eucalyptus Longhorned Borers can be found on the UC Davis Statewide Integrated Pest Management Program website.

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Subject: Unknown Insect! :D
Location: Binnaguri,West Bengal
April 15, 2014 3:42 am
It was attracted to the lights……though i dn’t knw if it’s a beetle or something else!
Signature: Martin

Mango Stem Borer

Mango Stem Borer

Hi Martin,
This appears to be a Mango Stem Borer,
Batocera rufomaculata, a species that is considered a serious agricultural pest of mangos, figs and several other commercially grown trees.  According to Carnivora, the hosts include:  “edible fig, mango, guava, jackfruit, pomegranate, apple, rubber, and walnut. In India recorded for more than 30 different host plants.”  When crops are grown commercially, there is not much diversity in the field, and when food supplies are plentiful, species that feed on those plants also proliferate.  In a forest where trees are rarely homogenous and where natural predators are also present, the balance of nature keeps things under control.  Modern agricultural methods, with large swathes of land devoted to growing a single crop, create an ecosystem that is out of balance.  This individual may have been attracted to the lights in your home.

Mango Stem Borer

Mango Stem Borer

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Not a clue!
Location: Derbyshire, England
April 4, 2014 11:06 am
Hi,
Please could you help me identify this creature? I’ve been scrolling through photos for hours and had no luck. I’m afraid I’m completely ignorant with insects so I can’t even narrow my search.
I’ve found two of these in a Derbyshire bedroom at separate times over the last couple of weeks. I never seen them before, or anything similar, so I would like to know what they are if we’re sharing space.
I’m afraid I haven’t observed any useful behaviours, I just have this photo.
Thankyou for any help.
Signature: Rose

Longhorned Borer Beetle

Longhorned Borer Beetle is Placosternus species

Hi Rose,
This is a Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae, but we have not had any luck identifying the species.  It is not listed on Mark Telfer’s Longhorn Beetles page, nor on Eakring Birds.  Did you get any new furniture in the room where you have found the beetles?  We don’t want to be alarmist, but it is possible they emerged from the wood used in a new piece of furniture.  We will continue trying to identify the species.

Hi,
There is a wooden bowl my brother bought back from Belize. Looking at it I can see three holes, two have dust around them and one looks like there is something still in it.
As it’s likely these beetles are foreign to my ecosystem, is there some precaution I should take?
Thank you so much for your speedy reply!
Rose.

Hi again Daniel,
I’ve just been in touch with my brother and he says it is a rosewood bowl bought in Placencia Belize that we think it has come from. Hope that can help with the identification?
Thanks again for all your help.
Rose

Hi Rose,
We believe you probably found the source of the introduction of these Longhorned Borers with the discovery of the wooden bowl and its holes.  Many invasive species have been introduced in this manner to various parts of the world, however, we don’t think you need to fear that this tropical species will survive in your much colder English climate.  We will see if we can find a match among species from Belize, though nearby Costa Rica shares many of the same species and there is more comprehensive data on Costa Rican species on the internet because of the ecotourism.

Additional Information and Identification courtesy of Karl
Hi Daniel and Rose:
It looks like a species of Placosternus (Cerambycidae: Cerambycinae: Clytini) which includes the familiar Mesquite Borer (P. difficilis) that occurs as far north as the southern USA , and south to Honduras. There are four species of Placosternus altogether, all of which can be found in Belize, look very similar and include neotropical rosewoods as larval host plants. The adult coloration suggests that they may be wasp mimics. The commonly used rosewood species in Belize is the Honduras Rosewood (Dalbergia stevensoni). FYI, this species has long been a staple in the Belizian artisanal tourist industry (full disclosure – we also bought a few beautiful rosewood bowls in Belize a few years ago), but unfortunately, a massive increase in the harvest in recent years to feed Asian demand has caused concern and the Belizian government has recently implemented a ban on the harvest and export of rosewood. I am not sure if this includes the small-scale production and sale of carved products for the tourist trade. If so, this would be a serious and unfortunate hit on an important village-based income source. Regards. Karl

Thanks for doing this research Karl.  We did notice the resemblance to the Mesquite Borer when we wrote the original identification, and we tried searching its tribe in England to see if there were any relatives.

Hi Karl and Daniel,
Thank you very much for solving the mystery! Thanks for all your time and effort.
Kindest regards,
Rose

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Subject: Stripes & only 4 legs – what is it?
Location: South Orange, NJ
March 30, 2014 12:08 pm
Just found this guy crawling up my LR window & escorted him (or her) outside. The torso is about 1″.
Haven’t seen this before. Any idea what it is?
Signature: Thanks! Lory

Red Headed Ash Borer

Red Headed Ash Borer

Dear Lory,
This is a Red Headed Ash Borer, a beetle with a larva that bores in the wood of ash and other trees.  When we get reports of Red Headed Ash Borers indoors, especially in the winter, we ask if the querant has firewood indoors, as the adults will emerge prematurely from the wood infested with larvae if the indoor temperatures expedite the maturing process.
  Red Headed Ash Borer have six legs like other insects, and you can see a fifth leg on the left side of your image near the head.  The sixth leg might be missing or just hidden from view.  Red Headed Ash Borers are thought to mimic stinging wasps as a form of protective mimicry since the beetles do not sting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What type of longhorn beetle is this
Location: Northern California
March 26, 2014 10:30 pm
Snapped this pic while feeding the horses. Near a creek with mostly cottonwoods and willows. Located about 80 miles North of Sacramento CA. No one around here seems to know what it is…I’ve never seen one either.
Signature: Susan

Synaphaeta guexi

Synaphaeta guexi

Hi Susan,
Your Longicorn is
Synaphaeta guexi, and we get one or two requests each year from California to identify this lovely beetle.

Thank you so much for your reply!  I too thought it very beautiful.
Susan

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination