Currently viewing the category: "Longhorn Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Red headed beetle in SE PA?
Location: Southeastern PA
May 1, 2016 7:04 pm
Hi, we found this bug in our house in southeastern PA. After a web search, the closest I can ID is the blister beetle, but the head does not seem to be an exact match. Found today, mid-Spring. Grateful for any help identifying this bug!
Signature: -InsectIlliterate

Tanbark Borer, we believe

Tanbark Borer, we believe

Dear InsecIlliterate,
We believe we have correctly identified your Longhorned Borer Beetle from the family Cerambycidae as the Tanbark Borer,
Phymatodes testaceus, a species that according to BugGuide is:  “native to Eurasia; widely established around the world, incl. e. US and, more recently, in the Pacific Northwest.”  According to iNaturalist:  “Larvae develop in and under the bark of various deciduous tree species, causing damage. Larvae pupate in the spring. The beetle’s life cycle lasts one year in central and southern parts, and two years in northern climes.”  It is described on Nature Spot as being:  “Length 8 to 13mm. Very variable in colour from golden brown, through reddish to a deep blue-black. A common form has the thorax reddish and the elytra deep blue.”

Tanbark Borer, we believe

Tanbark Borer, we believe

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: BC Beetle
Location: BC
April 30, 2016 4:12 pm
This Beetle has been hanging around our backyard the last three days. We live in southwestern, British Columbia, Canada. Cannot find a match anywhere.
Signature: Jason Peckham

Elderberry Longhorn: Desmocerus aureipennis cribripennis

Elderberry Longhorn: Desmocerus aureipennis cribripennis

Dear Jason,
This gorgeous Longhorned Borer Beetle is a subspecies of an Elderberry Longhorn that does not have a common name,
Desmocerus aureipennis cribripennis.  A close relative in the same genus is more typically called an Elderberry Longhorn, but the same common name also applies to the entire genus.  The Elderberry Longhorns are not common and they are generally not found far from their host plant, Elderberry, according to Eric Eaton.  Because of your submission’s timely arrival at the beginning of the month, and because of your excellent image, we are designating your Elderberry Longhorn as the Bug of the Month for May 2016.  The common name Golden Winged Elder Borer is used on Encyclopedia of Life.

Daniel;
Well that just made my day!
Thank-you so much for you time to enlighten me and everyone in my Facebook and Instagram feeds who were drawing blanks.
I have four little girls and I love that exposing them to and coaching an appreciation for the diversity of life, they come running into the house yelling like someone is on fire when they find a new insect.
Thanks again,
Jason Peckham
Cheers,
Jason

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What the hell is this
Location: Cambridge oh
April 25, 2016 2:00 pm
what is it. Never seen one Before
Signature: don’t care

Hickory Borer

Hickory Borer

This is a Hickory Borer.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wasp or beetle?
Location: Eastern Nebraska
April 17, 2016 9:42 am
Can you identify this? They are on the south side of my house and I just noticed them yesterday when my niece stepped on one. Location eastern Nebraska.
Signature: Thanks, Stacy

Hickory Borer

Hickory Borer

Dear Stacy,
This is a beetle commonly called a Hickory Borer,
Megacyllene caryae.  Do you have any nearby hickory or other nut trees, or perhaps a wood pile near where they are appearing?  The larvae are wood borers and the adults emerge in the spring.  They are thought to mimic stinging wasps for protection and the Hickory Borers are harmless, though they do have strong mandibles and they might pinch someone who carelessly handles one of them.  See BugGuide for additional information.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is it?
Location: SE Uganda, E Africa
April 7, 2016 1:21 am
Good morning.
I live in SE Uganda, and a tree in my garden is getting eaten by these bugs. They bore big holes in the branches. Each beetle is about 2-3 inches long.
Nobody can tell me what they are.
Please note, I am not concerned about the tree, just curious about the beetles!
Can you help?
Signature: Mark Vine

Longicorn: Petrognathus gigas

Longicorn: Petrognathus gigas

Dear Mark,
This is a Longhorned Borer Beetle or Longicorn in the family Cerambycidae, and the larvae from this family do bore in the stems, trunks and roots of trees and shrubs.  They are usually quite host specific, confining their feeding to a single species or family.  We quickly discovered the identity of your Longicorn as
Petrognathus gigas on Insect Designs, and we found additional documentation on Meinbezirk, but alas, we did not discover the host tree.

Longicorn: Petrognathus gigas

Longicorn: Petrognathus gigas

Hi Daniel,
Wow, that was quick!
Thank you very much, mystery solved.
We can’t identify the host tree either.
It’s just a useless, non-native, soft-wood, so our Petrognathus gigas’ are more than welcome to it!
Kind regards
Mark

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Red bug UK
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne, UK
March 27, 2016 6:22 am
This was found this week in my house in the north east of the UK. Newcastle upon Tyne. It was about a centimetre in length.
I’d love to know what it is :-)
Signature: Katie

Unknown Red Bycid we believe

Red Bycid is Welsh Oak Longhorn Beetle

Dear Katie,
Your request has us stumped.  Our initial impression remains that this is a Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae, however we could not locate any matching images on the sites Nature Spot, the Website of the Watford Coleoptera Group or Eakring Birds.  Longhorned Borer Beetles and Leaf Beetles are grouped together taxonomically into the superfamily Chrysomeloidea, which means they share some physical similarities, and there is a red Lily Leaf Beetle that looks similar to your individual, however, the antennae in your images look more like the antennae of a member of the family Cerambycidae than of a Leaf Beetle in the family Chrysomelidae.  Information on the Lily Leaf Beetle can be found on The Telegraph.  We really don’t believe you have submitted an image of a Lily Leaf Beetle, but that is a possibility.  We are leaning toward this being a Longhorned Borer Beetle or Bycid, and we hope to have a conclusive ID for you soon.  Perhaps our readership will be able to assist us.

Update:  March 27, 2016
Upon receiving a comment that this is a rare Cerambycid,
Pyrrhidium sanguinium, we located an Encyclopedia of Life posting indicating the common name is the Welsh Oak Longhorn Beetle.  The description on Forest Pests is:  “7-12 mm. Holomediterranean, common in broad-leaved forests. The main foodplant is oak. Larvae develop under the bark, and pupate in the heartwood, where the pupae overwinter. Adults fly in April and May.”  According to iNaturalist:  “larva of Pyrrhidium sanguineum feeds within dead surface sapwood (stump) of Quercus.”  The most information we located quickly is on the Worcestershire Record where it states:  “LITERALLY COMING OUT OF THE WOODWORK  Roger Umpelby
This small (6-15mm long) bright red species seems to be establishing itself across the county with the latest record coming from the south-eastern corner of the county in Ashton-under-Hill in April 2009. As with several previous records the beetles emerged from cut logs both inside and outside. The original source of the logs is not known, but the timber had been stored in the wood yard in the village for well over a year, and since the beetle has a one-year life cycle, it must be established and breeding here. Previous county records are from March 2006 at Defford, Wyre Forest in 2008 and Drakes Broughton in May 2008.
This species is distributed throughout Europe and North Africa and into the Middle East. In central Europe it is one of the commonest longhorn beetles, but in the UK it is rare (RDB2). The larvae feed under bark of dead branches and trunks but, unlike some other longhorn species, eggs are readily laid in newly cut timber. Although oak is the favoured host, other deciduous trees are also hosts.
Sadly like other red beetles in the UK it frequently suffers from ‘mistaken identity’, as most gardeners assume any all-red beetle is a lily beetle
Lilioceris lilii and kill them.”

Hi Daniel
How interesting! It could have come from the cut timber we bought for firewood I guess! I’ll keep an eye out for more. Thank you for letting me know :-)
Katie

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination