Currently viewing the category: "Longhorn Beetles"
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Subject: Bug
Location: Southwest Oregon
August 22, 2016 8:10 pm
I was hiking up Mt Mcloughlin Oregon and this attractive little bugger copped a ride. After he was kind enough to pose, he flew away, I can not find any information on this fella. Could you help?
Signature: Happy Hiker

Heart Beetle

Heart Beetle

Dear Happy Hiker,
It did not take us too long to identify your Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae as
Pachyta armata, but alas, BugGuide has no information on the species.  A comment by Gary Griswold on a BugGuide posting states:  ” in the Pacific Northwest we call them heart beetles. Assocated with high alpine enviroment….”  Other than finding some additional images online, we have not had any success in locating any species specific information.

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Subject: What’s that bug?
Location: Stavanger in Norway
August 19, 2016 3:37 am
Found it today in Norway, doesn’t seem to fly. It’s afraid to move.
Signature: Raphaël

Longicorn:  Leptura quadrifasciata

Longicorn: Leptura quadrifasciata

Dear Raphaël,
This is a Longicorn in the family Cerambycidae, and we believe we have correctly identified it as
Leptura quadrifasciata, beginning with a FlickR image that indicates:  “Origin: Europe
Ecology: Development in Hardwood Location: Germany, Bavaria, Upper Franconia, Kulmbach.”  We verified that identification on Biodiversity Reference where we learned:  “It has the long antennae characteristic of the family and, like most longhorns, is associated with old woodland, where its larvae are wood-borers in old trunks and stumps and logs.
L. quadrifasciata is said to be associated particularly with oak (Quercus) and alder (Alnus) (Lonsdale, 1991), though willows (Salix) are evidently also much used in central Europe. Nutrition of longhorn beetles appears to be from the wood itself, unlike a number of wood-boring beetles that feed primarily on the associated fungi. Adult L. quadrifasciata feeds on pollen and it is one of the species that can be seen on flowers such as various umbellifers.  Identification Longhorn beetles are variable in their patterning and identification can be difficult. L. quadrifasciata is, however, a distinctive species, with the four yellow bands running across its elytra, though the size of these bands can vary.”  It is called the Four-Banded Longhorn Beetle on Nature Spot, and while there is no image on the site, it states:  “Widespread but rather local distribution it is generally fairly frequent in Britain.”  There are plenty of images on BioPix, but not much information.  Both sexes are depicted on Cerambycidae, and this information is provided:  “Host plant:    polyphagous in deciduous trees (Alnus, Fagus, Salix, Populus, Quercus, Betula, Corylus etc.)  Distribution:    Europe, Turkey, Caucasus, Transcaucasia, North Iran.”  Finally, we found an image of Leptura quadrifasciata in our own archives, and we received a comment from Mardikavana that states:  “By the looks of it it is a male because the tip of female antennae is yellow (last three segments). Males have black antennae.”  It is difficult to discern the color in the tips of the antennae in the sharper of your images, and in the image that has more shallow depth of field, with the antennae out of focus, it appears the tips may be yellow, indicating you may have found a female Four Banded Longhorn Beetle, but since the color balance of your two images is different, we suspect the difference in the antennae we perceived might be due to light source, flash photography versus incandescent light.

Longicorn:  Leptura quadrifasciata

Longicorn: Leptura quadrifasciata

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Afghan Beetle
Location: Eastern Afghanistan
August 18, 2016 1:20 am
Hello,
I am currently deployed in Afghanistan and found this beetle outside our sleep tent. Just wandering if you could identify it and maybe give a little information about it. I’m more curious than anything and would like to pass on any helpful information to my guys here. Thanks.
Signature: CPT P

Prionid:  Prionus vartianorum

Prionid: Prionus vartianorum

Dear CPT P,
This is one of the Root Borers in the subfamily Prioninae.  We located the Afghanistan page of Prioninae of the World and it contains three species.  We believe your individual is a female
 Prionus vartianorum based on images on Prioninae of the World.  No host plant is listed and the distribution is listed as solely Afghanistan, meaning the species may be endemic to Afghanistan.  Male Prionids are frequently attracted to lights, and females of some species are also attracted to lights.  Virtual Collections has images of a male specimen, and the country listed is also just Afghanistan.  We believe it can go without saying that you should stay clear of the mandibles.  A large Prionid can easily draw blood should it bite a human.  

Prionid:  Prionus vartianorum

Prionid: Prionus vartianorum

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: OK Long Horned Beetle
Location: Owasso, Tulsa County, Oklahoma
August 15, 2016 7:56 pm
Dear Bugman,
Hoping you can help with identification of this longicorn. I looked through all the sub-families and tribes under “Cerambycidae” on Bug Guide and did not find this one… rather frustrating, but a good use of time, nonetheless.
Many thanks,
Signature: Critterphile

Banded Hickory Borer

Banded Hickory Borer

Dear Critterphile,
We were expecting this to take quite a chunk of time, but we got lucky quickly.  We have correctly identified your Longicorn as a Banded Hickory Borer,
Knulliana cincta, thanks to this and other Bugguide images.  This BugGuide posting highlights many of the distinctive features:  “spines on thorax, apex (tip) of elytra, and legs (femora). These are mentioned as distinguishing features in field guides.”  BugGuide also notes:  “There are no other NE longhorns of similar size and coloration that have strong spines on the femora, pronotum, and elytral apices.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: suspicious bug
Location: western pennsylvania
August 10, 2016 8:14 pm
The other day i was in this shower and this guy decided to join me. He was about 2 inches big. And when i tried to move him out of the window he squealed at me, literally. I was only wandering if you could tell me what he is? Is he harmful?
Signature: Tristyn Gravatt

Ivory Marked Beetle

Ivory Marked Beetle

Dear Tristyn,
This is an Ivory Marked Beetle, a member of the wood boring beetle family Cerambycidae.  They do have powerful mandibles that could nip at you, but they have no venom or poison, so they are no threat to humans.  According to BugGuide:  “hosts include a wide variety of hardwoods (oak, ash, hickory, locust, chestnut, maple, elm, beech, cherry); larvae bore in heartwood”
but we believe they are never plentiful enough to be a threat to healthy trees.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Yellow Cerambycidae from Costa Rica
Location: Monteverde, Costa Rica
August 7, 2016 12:54 pm
Hi again,
I feel I should have been able to ID this one on my one, but I haven’t managed to find it online.
I saw this Cerambyicid in Monteverde, Costa Rica, at night, on June 27, 2011.
It was a sizable insect, and if memory serves, its body was probably about 5 centimeters long. The antenna were spectacularly long.
Thanks in advance.
Signature: Thibaud Aronson

Longicorn: Plagiohammus pollinosus

Longicorn: Plagiohammus pollinosus

Hi again Thibaud,
As long as you keep providing our site with rare sightings, keep them coming.  We began this Longicorn identification search with the “CERAMBYCOIDEA” DE COSTA RICA site, starting with the subfamily Lamiinae page where we eventually located
 Plagiohammus pollinosus on the Cerambycidae Species Details page, but there were only images of mounted specimens.  We continued to find images of mounted specimens on Cerambycoidea Forum and eBay where a female of the species is listed as “rare.”  For a brief moment, we entertained the thought that you might be providing us with the opportunity to be the only site with an image of a living specimen, until we found this individual on Project Noah.  Thanks for your marvelous additions to our archives, by providing us with two new species for our site.

Wow, thanks again!
I’m glad I’m submitting species you haven’t got yet, and all the more impressed at how quickly you identify them!
I’ll send a couple others your way tomorrow.
Cheers
Thibaud

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination