Currently viewing the category: "Longhorn Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beatle identification
Location: Truckee Ca
July 29, 2014 8:57 am
Was on vacation in Truckee CA and found this large beatle under a cushion for the patio chair. It was between the size of a quarter and a fifty cent piece. Slow moving and seemed to be waiting for the morning sun. A bit of a shocker!
Signature: Warrren

Yellow Douglas Fir Borer

Yellow Douglas Fir Borer

Hi Warrren,
This impressive beetle is a Yellow Douglas Fir Borer,
Centrodera spurca, and we have sporadic sightings as postings on our site.  According to the Oregon State University Insect ID Clinic site:  “This is a common long horned beetle in the west that feeds under the bark of Douglas-fir as a larva. The black spots on the sides of the beetle distinguish it from some of the other species that occur in Oregon .”

Daniel,
Thanks for the information. So this is the Beatle that we have had trouble with killing the trees.  Right?
Warren

Hi again Warren,
You dropped an “r”.  To the best of our knowledge, the Yellow Douglas Fir Borer is not considered a significant problem regarding killing trees.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Long Horn Beetle?
Location: Massachusetts
July 28, 2014 4:35 pm
Found this outside my house and would like to know a little more about it. Bit of a Asian Longhorn beetle scare round here and I know this is not one but now my kids and I have caught the bug (pun intended) and want to know what it is.
Thanks for time!
Signature: Sean

Red Banded Pine Borer

Red Banded Pine Borer

Hi Sean,
This pretty beetle is a Red Banded Pine Borer,
Stictoleptura canadensis, and according to bugGuide:  “The normal colouration of Stictoleptura c. canadensis (Olivier) is with banded antennae (male and female). Rarely the antennae are all black.… Christopher Majka, 31 January, 2013.” 

Thank you!   My kids are very excited.  Definitely starting a love of insects

It is nice to know our humble site is helping to foster a love of the natural world among youngsters.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula
Location: Marquette County, Michigan
July 28, 2014 9:16 am
Found this beetle last week on bedrock at Wetmore Pond, in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula in boreal habitat. Appears to be a longhorn or some type of sawyer?
Signature: Mike Sherman

Round Headed Apple Borer

Round Headed Apple Borer

Dear Mike,
This beautiful Longicorn is a Round Headed Apple Borer,
Saperda candida, and according to Arthur V. Evans in his new book Beetles of Eastern North America: “Larvae attack many deciduous hardwoods, including orchard and ornamental trees.”  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on the wood of apples (Malus) and related trees in the rose family, such as pear (Pyrus), hawthorn (Crataegus), mountain ash (Sorbus) and Saskatoon (Amelanchier). Also: Aronia, Cotoneaster, Cydonia, Prunus” and “These insects seek out trees which are already weakened due to some other stress. A heavy infestation can kill a tree.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: brown beetle?
Location: currently in IL, but not where it came from
July 27, 2014 10:40 am
We just returned from a two week trip that took us through Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, West Virginia, and Kentucky. It was hot and humid, with a few big storms that rolled through. When we got home, this bug was in our van. It is about two inches in length, not including the antennae, which add another inch (if pulled straight). It flies and seems attracted to light. Wondering what it is. We live in central IL and aren’t comfortable with just letting it go, without knowing if it’ll cause harm.
If we can’t let it go back into the wild, then we need to know what it is so we can care for it. Thank you!
Signature: Heather

Brown Prionid

Brown Prionid

Dear Heather,
We have received more than the usual number of Brown Prionid,
Orthosoma brunneum, identification requests from eastern North America this summer.  According to BugGuide, Illinois is well within the sighting range of the species, which is native.  Local populations may vary from place to place within the range.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle I think?
Location: Thunder Bay, ontario, Canada
July 25, 2014 5:08 pm
Hey there. I live in a little town in the bush in ontario and I’ve never seen one of these around. Happen to know exactly what this one is?
Signature: Vicki

Poplar Borer

Poplar Borer

We certainly do Vicki,
This is a Poplar Borer,
Saperda calcarata.  According to BugGuide:  “This species is of considerable economic importance on account of its serious injury to the trunks and larger branches of poplars. These trees rarely attain any size in New York State before showing the operations of this insect, and in not a few instances very serious injury is inflicted. This applies not only to neglected trees along road sides and in forests but also to magnificent specimens grown for ornamental purposes in parks.  Professor Riley, in his early writings, states that this insect has been universally destructive to cottonwoods and poplars in the western states, and Professor Bruner, in his paper, ‘The Insect Enemies of Ornamental and Shade Trees,’ states that this borer is by far the most destructive enemy of poplars and cottonwoods in the west. He further adds that it is almost impossible to grow these trees of any size in cities and towns of Nebraska away from the friendly care of birds and parasitic insects. (Felt and Joutel, 1904).”  With that stated, it is important to understand that this is a native species, and that it does fill an important place in the web of life associated with poplar trees.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: beetle on screen door
Location: Princeton, NJ
July 25, 2014 7:21 pm
I found this guy hanging on my screen door in Princeton, NJ last night. Never seen one like it before! Some type of beetle, obviously. It’s about an inch and a half long, reddish-brown, with a orange stomach. Got any ideas?
Signature: Lynn

Brown Prionid

Brown Prionid

Dear Lynn,
It seems we have fielded more than the usual number of Brown Prionid,
Orthosoma brunneum, identifications this summer.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination