Currently viewing the category: "Longhorn Beetles"
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Subject: Nepali beetle
Location: Kathmandu valley
September 21, 2014 12:02 am
This beetle (?) was the largest I saw in Nepal. It’s about 4 inches long and had scary-looking mandibles. Taken in July.
Signature: Bug curious

Longhorned Borer Beetle

Longhorned Borer Beetle

Dear Bug Curious,
This is some species of Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae, and we will attempt to determine the species for you.  Beetles in this family have very powerful mandibles and large individuals might draw blood should they chomp down on a finger.

Longhorned Borer Beetle

Longhorned Borer Beetle

Dear Daniel,
thanks for the ID on this and the tiger moth. If it helps, here is a link to my a post on my blog with a short film of the beetle.
http://miakt.wordpress.com/2014/09/20/lives-of-the-monster-insects/
I posted some random photos of large insects and other creatures I saw while teaching English in a monastery outside Kathmandu. I managed to identify a couple by googling, but some I couldn’t, so thanks for your help! I will update the blog with your information.
Mia

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Subject: Flat Faced Longhorn Beetle
Location: Dorrington, CA (Sierra Nevada)
September 11, 2014 6:42 pm
Based on what I’ve seen here and elsewhere, I believe this to be a Flat Faced Longhorn Beetle. This photo was taken in early July, 2012 at our cabin near Dorrington, California, elevation about 5,000 ft. We don’t see these every year, but 2012 we saw at least a half dozen of these large (two-inches of body, four inches total), intrepid beetles on our property. They don’t scare easily, and can be picked up and moved around (which I did so he wouldn’t get smooshed by an errant foot). I don’t know why they show up some years and not others, but they are always startling to see them crawl over a railing a foot from your face.
Signature: Typeaux — SF Bay Area, California

Whitespotted Sawyer

Whitespotted Sawyer

Dear Typeaux,
You are correct that this is a Flat Faced Longhorn Beetle in the subfamily Lamiinae, and we can be even more specific.  It is a
Whitespotted Sawyer, Monochamus scutellatus.  According to BugGuide:  “Two-year life cycle. Larvae excavates galleries in coniferous trees, often after they are damaged by a fire, storm, etc. Common hosts are: Balsam fir, spruces and white pine.”  Perhaps their sporadic appearances are connected to some event that affected the trees.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: bug in Boquete Panama
Location: Boquete, Panama
September 8, 2014 1:27 pm
We spotted this bug on our house wall and have never seen one before. From top to bottom it is around the size of a drink can! It has been there for hours and shows no signs of going anywhere soon.
Best regards
Carol Slater
Signature: Carol

Harlequin Beetle

Harlequin Beetle

Hi Carol,
Most images that we receive of Harlequin Beetles,
Acrocinus longimanus, are very poor quality, but your image is stunning.  Your beetle is a male which can be distinguished by the extremely developed front legs.  According to Encyclopedia Britannica:  “The common name refers to the beetle’s gaudy pattern; the Latin longimanus of the species name refers to the extremely long forelegs of the males. These legs are usually longer than the beetle’s entire body, which can measure nearly 76 mm (3 inches). In addition to serving as a sexual advertisement to females, the long legs help the males to traverse the branches of trees (the beetles fly as well as crawl). Despite the seemingly conspicuous colours, the harlequin hides itself effectively among the lichen- and fungus-covered trunks of tropical woods such as fig trees.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large beetle looking thing?
Location: Newberg, OR
August 20, 2014 9:47 pm
Hello, Bugman! Maybe you could tell me what bug this is? It’s very large (see penny in photo for scale)
It doesn’t appear to be a cockroach due the the antennae, so I’m stumped.
Signature: Buggily Yours

California Root Borer

California Root Borer

Dear Buggily Yours,
This is a male California Root Borer, and we posted another example just yesterday.

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Subject: What is this?
Location: Kelowna, BC
August 19, 2014 8:44 am
A friend posted a picture of this and nobody knows what it is. She lives in Kelowna BC.
Signature: Courtney

Male California Prionus

Male California Prionus

Dear Courtney,
Though is it named for the Golden State,  the range of the California Root Borer,
Prionus californicus, extends well beyond California as you can see from the sighting data on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Larva feed primarily on living deciduous trees (oaks, madrone, cottonwood) and are also recorded from roots of vines, grasses, and decomposing hardwoods and conifers. Will also attack fruit trees growing on light, well-drained soils (e.g. apple, cherry, peach).”  This individual is a male which can be distinguished from the female by his developed, distinctly sawlike antennae.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle juice
Location: Broken Arrow, Oklahoma
August 14, 2014 1:45 pm
Hi Man of Bugs,
I am from Oklahoma and it is super hot out here right now. I found this guy coolin’ down in the climate control units at Aspen Mini Storage. I believe it’s a Cottonwood Borer but I thought he was a beaut and had to show you!
Thank you!
Signature: Sommer

Cottonwood Borer

Cottonwood Borer

Hi Sommer,
You are correct that this is a Cottonwood Borer, and it is an impressive and unforgettable beetle.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination