Currently viewing the category: "Longhorn Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug Identification
Location: Southwest Virginia
July 27, 2016 5:38 am
I found this bug in my house on a windowsill. I have never seen it before.
Signature: Terry Volant

Ivory Marked Beetle

Ivory Marked Beetle

Dear Terry,
This is an Ivory Marked Beetle.  According to BugGuide:  “hosts include a wide variety of hardwoods (oak, ash, hickory, locust, chestnut, maple, elm, beech, cherry); larvae bore in heartwood” and “Notorious for emerging from furniture after as many as 10-40 yrs.”  You just need to determine if this individual happened to wander in from the outside or if it emerged from a piece of furniture you have in your home.  We tend to lean toward the former.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: BIG ONE
Location: Northern NJ
July 26, 2016 8:14 pm
Please tell me what this is! I have found 2 so far in my kitchen… July in NJ. They don’t seem to be doing anything wrong but they are so big! I would like to know if they are dangerous in any way. Thank you so much!
Signature: TB

Brown Prionid

Brown Prionid

Dear TB,
Though we always get reports of Brown Prionids each summer, this year there seems to be more than the usual number of sightings.  We suspect they are being attracted to your kitchen because of lights at night.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: beatle/cockroach looking monstrosity
Location: northern new jersey suburbs
July 25, 2016 1:10 pm
Dear bugman,
Hello old sport was wondering if you could help me I.d. this scoundrel. Only have seen them at night, mostly seen flying into my garage from the outside. My brother says they fly sort of upright rather than parallel to the ground. Summer time in Northern New Jersey Suburbia. Checked numerous bug data bases of new jersey insects and came up empty handed. Thanks!
Signature: Gene Jefferson

Dead Brown Prionids

Dead Brown Prionids

Dear Gene,
These are Brown Prionids,
Orthosoma brunneum, and according to BugGuide:  “Breeds in poles, roots(?) in contact with wet ground” so they may be emerging from dead stumps you have in the vicinity.  They are also attracted to lights.  We are tagging this posting as Unnecessary Carnage as these two Brown Prionids do not look like they died of natural causes.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s that bug?
Location: Idaho City, Idaho
July 23, 2016 7:42 pm
Found in Idaho City in July, beautiful but never seen one before! Could be because I’m from Ohio…
Signature: Meg shap

Banded Alder Borer

Banded Alder Borer

Dear Meg,
If we had to vote today on what we think the most beautiful North American beetle is, our vote would go to the Banded Alder Borer.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big Baja Bug
Location: Northern Baja California, Mexico
July 24, 2016 2:44 pm
Hi Daniel,
We encountered this big guy coming out of the mother-in-law’s tongue one night in front of our place in northern Baja Mexico. His body is about 2″ long!
Do you recognize him?
Thanks!
Signature: Dana and Alan

Palo Verde Root Borer

Palo Verde Root Borer

Dear Dana and Alan,
This is a Palo Verde Root Borer.

Thanks, Daniel!
xo
D & A

Dana Duff,
I did not realize that email came from you.  If you want more information on the Palo Verde Root Borer,
Derobrachus hovorei, you can check out the information on BugGuide where it states:  “attracted to lights” which might explain its appearance if there was a porch light lit.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identification help please!
Location: Raymond NH
July 23, 2016 6:58 am
Hi, I was in my yard last night and this interesting beetle landed beside me.
I was wondering if you might have an idea as to who my visitor was!
Signature: Courtney

Maple Sugar Borer

Sugar Maple Borer

Dear Courtney,
Along with its relative the Banded Alder Borer, we find the Sugar Maple Borer,
Glycobius speciosus, to be one of North America’s most beautiful native beetles.  BugGuide notes:  “Larvae mine under bark of living Sugar Maple, Acer saccharum” and that the species is “rare” which probably explains the scarcity of submissions of this gorgeous beetle to our site.  According to the USDA Forest Service Northeastern Area site:  “The sugar maple borer, Glycobius speciosus (Say), a long-horned wood boring beetle, is a common pest of sugar maple (the only known host) throughout the range of the tree. Although borer-caused mortality is rare, infestations lead to value loss through lumber defect caused by larval galleries, discoloration, decay, and twisted grain.”  According to the Cornell Sugar Maple Research& Extension Program:  “Damage by the sugar maple borer (Glycobius speciosus) varies among forest types and stands within a type. Infestation rates, the proportion of damages stems per acre or hectare, range from less than 5 to nearly 50 percent. Sugar maples in all stands are susceptible, but the incidence of damage is highest in stands with high proportion of sugar maple. Rarely does sugar maple borer kill a tree, but it directly affects the main part of the stem, sometimes reducing the available space for tapping. Borer attack is most prevalent on trees of low vigor.”  While this is just our opinion, in reading that information and the information contained in the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation pdf, we conclude that because the Sugar Maple Borer is rare, it is not a threat to the general population of Sugar Maple trees, but that the beetle does take advantage of already stressed trees, and in doing so, the general health of the Sugar Maple population is ensured.

Thank you so much for your reply! I love your site and use it all the time when I have a new bug friend in my life.
Again, thank you for your continued services!
– Courtney

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination