Currently viewing the category: "Longhorn Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug?
Location: South central Texas, just east of San Antonio
May 21, 2016 7:17 pm
Hello! I was hoping you guys could help identify this bug, and let me know if it’s by any chance dangerous to our outdoor pets. At first I thought it might be a kissing bug, although I realize it is not. Thank you in advance!!  I meant to mention that it’s about a inch long, minus antennae.
Signature: Alan K., Seguin, TX

Longicorn

Longicorn

Dear Alan,
This is a Longicorn or Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae.  Though they are not poisonous, larger individuals do have very strong mandibles, and some species may draw blood if they bite.  The closest match we could find on BugGuide is Achryson surinamum, but we are not certain that is a correct identification.  We will try to contact Arthur Evans, an expert in Beetles, for assistance.

Correction courtesy of Arthur Evans
Arthur Evans provided us with a link to BugGuide and the identification of
Elytrimitatrix undata, the only member of the genus found in North America and whose “Larvae [are found] in var. hardwoods and pine”

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: Roseville ca
May 16, 2016 6:42 am
I found this in the hallway this morning. It didn’t move at all when I passed by and was easy to catch with Tupperware container. It’s body is about an inch long.
Signature: Debbie

California Root Borer

California Root Borer

Dear Debbie,
This is a male California Root Borer,
Prionus californicus, which you can verify by comparing your individual to this image on BugGuide.  We thought this May sighting was a bit early and unusual, but BugGuide includes data on sightings in California as early as April.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults active summer through early fall; fly at dusk or in the evening” and “Larva feed primarily on living deciduous trees (oaks, madrone, cottonwood) and are also recorded from roots of vines, grasses, and decomposing hardwoods and conifers. Will also attack fruit trees growing on light, well-drained soils (e.g. apple, cherry, peach).”

Thank you Mr. Marlos –
We do, in fact, have an apple tree and many oak trees in the field behind our home.  My boys were cutting wood yesterday.  I’ll bet it hitched a ride in with one of them or the dog.
The apple is dying a slow, mysterious death.  Could this critter’s activity be part of the problem?  Don’t worry, I won’t use pesticides.
-Debbie Mulligan

They don’t normally attack healthy trees, but they will attack a compromised tree. The drought has been tough on trees.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s that bug?
Location: North America, New York, Waterford.
May 7, 2016 6:06 pm
North America, New York, Waterford.
Thinking some variety of longhorn beetle?
Signature: Trevor Grimm

Tanbark Borer

Tanbark Borer

Dear Trevor,
This is certainly a Longicorn Beetle in the family Cerambycidae, and we believe it is the Eurasian Tanbark Borer,
Phymatodes testaceus, a species that has become established in North America.  See images on BugGuide for verification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Intimidating
Location: I live in Tetovo Macedonia located in Europe
May 5, 2016 9:57 am
Sir. Bugman
I really would like to know the name of this bug that i saw at class today it looked very interesting because i havent seen a insect like that before
I just took some pictures of it and left. But i kept thinking about it so i searched on the internet but couldnt find anything, if you have time i would like to know the species of the insect.. Thank you
P.s I named it Ghost
Signature: Ballz

Longicorn: Morimus funereus

Longicorn: Morimus funereus

Dear Ballz,
This is a very exciting posting for us.  We found your Longicorn,
Morimus funereus, on FlickR where it states the host plants are beech and oak and that the species is found in Southern Europe, and we realized we have an individual from Serbia in our own archives.  Upon doing additional research, we learned on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species that it is a vulnerable species.  According to Cerambyx, it “is a nocturnal species but can easily be found hiding in piles of cordwood or sitting on stumps even during the day.”  Because she has shorter antennae, Ghost is a female.  We hope you are able to release her into a suitable habitat where she can attract a mate and reproduce.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bee mimic?
Location: Northern California (Sierra Nevada Foothills)
May 4, 2016 5:18 am
Hiya bugman,
What is this thing??? Looks like some kind of beetle to me, based on the antennae and wings, but that inverted abdomen is wild! Found in Northern California a couple of days ago. Please help us figure out just what this little critter is.
Thanks!
Signature: -M

Lion Beetle

Lion Beetle

Dear M,
We absolutely love to receive images of Lion Beetles,
Ulochaetes leoninus, as they are not commonly seen.  Lion Beetles are Longhorned Borer Beetles in the family Cerambycidae and they are effective mimics of stinging bees or wasps.

You’re the best. I love your site. I’ve been using it since probably 2002 or 2003, but this is the first time I sent anything. Keep up the GREAT work; you’re literally one of the best sites on the entire internet in my opinion.
Best,
Marc

Dear Marc,
We had a rough day at work today and your comment really helped improve our mood.

Daniel,
Sorry it took me a week to respond to this, but I want you to know that there have been MANY days when WTB pulled me out of a funk just by looking at all the amazing specimens and knowledge that you have. It is seriously one of my favorite sites, and I visit all the time. Thanks to WTB I was able to identify quite a few of the crazy critters that have visited my home over the years… hellgrammites and their adult version Dobson flies; crane flies; solpugids; about 3 thousand different kinds of spiders (OK that’s an exaggeration); june beetles, and the bug that started it all for me — the house centipede.
Hope this Wednesday is going better than your last. :)
-Marc
  

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Red headed beetle in SE PA?
Location: Southeastern PA
May 1, 2016 7:04 pm
Hi, we found this bug in our house in southeastern PA. After a web search, the closest I can ID is the blister beetle, but the head does not seem to be an exact match. Found today, mid-Spring. Grateful for any help identifying this bug!
Signature: -InsectIlliterate

Tanbark Borer, we believe

Tanbark Borer, we believe

Dear InsecIlliterate,
We believe we have correctly identified your Longhorned Borer Beetle from the family Cerambycidae as the Tanbark Borer,
Phymatodes testaceus, a species that according to BugGuide is:  “native to Eurasia; widely established around the world, incl. e. US and, more recently, in the Pacific Northwest.”  According to iNaturalist:  “Larvae develop in and under the bark of various deciduous tree species, causing damage. Larvae pupate in the spring. The beetle’s life cycle lasts one year in central and southern parts, and two years in northern climes.”  It is described on Nature Spot as being:  “Length 8 to 13mm. Very variable in colour from golden brown, through reddish to a deep blue-black. A common form has the thorax reddish and the elytra deep blue.”

Tanbark Borer, we believe

Tanbark Borer, we believe

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination