Currently viewing the category: "Tortoise Beetles"
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Subject: Indentify bug
Location: Cartago, Costa Rica
July 17, 2015 9:59 am
Hi Mr. Bugman, I found a weird bug, but nobody can tell me what kind of bug is, maybe you can help me to to identify it. Thank you so much
Signature: Jc Nuñez

Unknown Horned Larva

Wild Olive Tortoise Beetle Pupa

Dear Jc Nuñez,
Wow, you nearly had us stumped.  This is such a unique looking creature that we thought it would be easier to identify.  We believe it is some larval or pupal stage of an insect.  We wish your image had better details as we cannot even begin to try to classify this creature.  Our best guess at this time is that this is the Pupa of a Tortoise Beetle from the subfamily Cassidinae based on its resemblance to this image, also from Costa Rica, posted on FlickR.  It is obvious that they are not the same species, but there are similarities.  Not wanting to give up, we continued to search and we found an image on FlickR from Mexico that is identified as the larva and adult Wild Olive Tortoise Beetle, but alas, there is no scientific name.  The poster, Seth Patterson, writes:  “one of most common here in the Lower Rio Grande Valley is a larger species that feeds on our Mexican Wild Olive trees. They are called the Wild Olive Tortoise Beetle. My first encounter with this species left me truly smitten. I actually didn’t first encounter the ‘beetle’ (adult stage) but rather the larval stage. Their spiny, robust bodies are incredibly similar in appearance to the prehistoric trilobites. When threatened, the larvae raise their forked tails in an imposing display. Of course, they are all show and completely harmless to humans.”  The leaves in your image do resemble the leaves of an olive, so we continued to search.  The Texas Entomology page identifies the Wild Olive Tortoise Beetle as
Physonota alutacea, but there is no image of the pupa.  This image of a pupa of the Wild Olive Tortoise Beetle on BugGuide looks like an exact match to your critter.

Unknown Horned Larva

Wild Olive Tortoise Beetle Pupa

Hi, you are really, really great !!!
Thank you so much for check it out my image, Sincerely I didn´t expected for an answer.  Unfortunally, I shot just two photos of that bug, which was been sent to you, here you can find them in more high resolution :  Physonota Alutacea.
Thank you for your quick response.
By
JC

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Subject: School insect collection
Location: UK
June 22, 2015 5:45 am
I’m a biology technician at a 6th form school and have inherited a collection of animals/ plants/ insects that I’m slowly trying to identify. So far I have 1 in the insect section left to identify. Unfortunately I can’t give any details about where it came from or what it’s habits are like as they are all dead! All I know is they are currently in England and I believe are likely to have been caught here. I’m not even 100% certain they’re real, beetles are not my forte
Signature: Hannah

Leaf Beetle:  Desmonota variolosa

Leaf Beetle: Desmonota variolosa

Dear Hannah,
This Leaf Beetle, Desmonota variolosa, is native to Brazil, not England.  We first encountered this Leaf Beetle when we tried to identify the insects used in the making of an antique brooch, a common practice in Victorian times.  New jewelry is also available using these real beetles.   There are plenty of links on that posting to follow our original research.  You can also find a mounted specimen pictured on the Hunterian Museum & Art Gallery Collections site.

Leaf Beetle:  Desmonota variolosa

Leaf Beetle: Desmonota variolosa

Thank you so much, the girls will be so happy to finally know what it is and that it’s used in jewellery!
Hannah

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Subject: Unknown ladybug
Location: Middle Nebraska
June 11, 2015 10:36 pm
I’ve looked high and low, and then I looked low and high, and I can’t find an exact match to this ladybug, which is a little bit bigger than our usual Asian ladybug.
Signature: Sarah Lynn

Argus Tortoise Beetle

Argus Tortoise Beetle

Dear Sarah,
Though the markings resemble those of a Lady Beetle, your individual is actually an Argus Tortoise Beetle,
Chelymorpha cassidea, and you can compare your individual to this image on BugGuide.

Argus Tortoise Beetle

Argus Tortoise Beetle

 

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Subject: Slug Caterpillar?
Location: Taiwan
December 16, 2014 7:13 am
I found this little creature 2 days ago, sitting quietly on a leaf in a park just outside of Taipei, Taiwan. It’s about one centimeter long, and it wasn’t moving; just sitting there minding its own business. A quick image search shows “slug moth” as a possible candidate, but I couldn’t find anything quite like it. Any ideas? Many thanks! :)
Signature: Robert

Leaf Beetle Larva, we believe

Leaf Beetle Larva, we believe

Dear Robert,
In our opinion, this is most likely a Leaf Beetle Larva, probably a Tortoise Beetle Larva in the subfamily Cassidinae and not a Slug Moth Caterpillar.
  It looks similar to this individual from Belize from FlickR as well as this individual from our archives.

Dear Daniel,
Thank you so much for identifying my photo as belonging to a Tortoise Beetle larva! I think you were spot on, as I took the photo only 2 minutes after I photographed a Mottled Tortoise Beetle only a meter away. The larva is so eye-catching that I didn’t make the connection, but now I can clearly see that the black markings on the adult beetle wings mirror the black markings on the larva. I’ve attached photos that I took of each.
Kind regards,
Robert

Tortoise Beetle

Tortoise Beetle

Dear Robert,
Thanks so much for the update.  We cannot say for certain that the Tortoise Beetle and the larva are the same species, but their proximity to one another is a stronger indication than the similarity in the markings as adults often differ drastically in appearance from the larvae.

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Tortoise Beetle from Brazil

Tortoise Beetle from Brazil

Subject: Unidentified Beetle
Location: Iguacu, Brazil
October 20, 2014 5:47 am
I took this picture of an iridescent beetle at the Iguacu Falls in Brazil.
Can you please identify it.
Regards
Ina
Signature: Ian Rowlings

Dear Ian,
This is a Tortoise Beetle in the tribe Cassidini, and it is similar to this individual on Insetologia.  We located an image on FlickR of
Cyrtonota cyanea that looks like a very good match to your Tortoise Beetle.  We found an image of a mounted specimen on Cassidinae of the World, but dead specimens of Tortoise Beetles often lose their beautiful coloration.

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Subject: larva of what?
Location: Meadow in Southern MN USA
August 24, 2014 7:56 pm
Hello there Bugman & Staff,
We work at the local Nature center here & ran across this unusual bug. We have these two shots of it. We have searched, but to no avail… now I am searching sites online. This was found friday aug. 22nd, in a meadow on a grass. It did not seem to be feeding on the plant. We found it during our search for monarch caterpillars. ( We tag the adults & use some of them in a display for the public). We would appreciate any help or guidance identifying this small creature. We are located in Southern Minnesota.
Thank you kindly,
Jillian
Signature: Nature Center Staff

Sunflower Tortoise Beetle Larva

Sunflower Tortoise Beetle Larva

Dear Jillian,
We knew immediately that this creature is a Tortoise Beetle Larva, and that thing on the end of its tail is excrement.
  We felt it could not be an Arizona Tortoise Beetle, Physonota arizonae, but we also believed it was closely related.  We believe it is the Sunflower Tortoise Beetle Larva, Physonota helianthi, which we identified on BugGuide and that belongs in the same genus.  According to BugGuide:  “Food: hosts on members of the aster family, Asteraceae.”

Sunflower Tortoise Beetle Larva

Sunflower Tortoise Beetle Larva

Thank You so graciously from our staff, to yours!
We have been identifying a lot of species, and that one gave us a hard time. It was a larva stage, I suppose that’s why. We were able to find and identify a cicada wasp, that was interesting study also.
I wont take up more of your time than necessary, I know it’s precious.
Thank You so kindly,
Jillian
“May many smiles brighten your every day!”

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination