Currently viewing the category: "Leaf Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: who’s this?
Location: Prescott AZ
July 10, 2013 2:06 pm
Bright red beetle walking around in the splash from a fountain on the patio?
Is it going to eat something I’m trying to grow?
Signature: gnatknees

Reddish Potato Beetle

Reddish Potato Beetle

Dear gnatknees,
It did not take us long to identify your Leaf Beetle as a Reddish Potato Beetle,
Leptinotarsa rubiginosa.  BugGuide reports the Reddish Potato Beetle from Arizona and New Mexico and states it feeds on Solanacea, the family that includes tomatoes, peppers and eggplant as well as potatoes and many native plants like jimsonweed and nightshade.  We are not certain if they indiscriminately feed on all members of the family, or only certain plants, but the family contains many cultivated food plants as well as some ornamental garden plants.  We believe this is the only example of this species in our archives, so thank you very much for submitting your excellent photograph.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: unknown (to me) bugs 1,2,3
Location: hungary, south shore of lake balaton
July 7, 2013 12:07 am
hallo,
1 – this brown-winged thing populates my willow tree in may. what is it and is it harmful to fruit trees e.g. cherry, plum, apricot, pear? or is it harmful to anything else?

Unknown Scarab

Cockchafer

2 – this ladybird-like thing – is it a ladybird and does it damage my grapes or anything else?

Unknown Beetle

Leaf Beetle:  Clytra quadripunctata

3 – found this in wood i was about to chop up
i like bugs and i have a redstart with babies at the moment so i do not want to destroy anything he might want to eat, am just curious about the critters. i can look them up on the net once i know what they are called.
thanks
sue
Signature: sue

Unknown Longicorn

Longicorn:  Cerambyx scopolii

Hi Sue,
Beetle #1 is a Scarab in the family Scarabidae, but we do not know the species.  Beetle #3 is a Longicorn in the family Cerambycidae, but we do not know the species.  Beetle #2 is striking in color and markings, but we cannot determine its family.  It somewhat resembles the Pleasing Fungus Beetles in the family Erotylidae, but your photo does not reveal enough of the physical characteristics to be certain. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Tortoise Beetle?
Location: Baltimore, MD
June 27, 2013 7:42 pm
I found this cute little guy on the side of my coffee mug. He looked like a drop of gold! I snapped a few photos, and when I scrolled in for a closer look I realized that the edges of his exoskeleton are actually translucent! Very beautiful insect!
Signature: Enchantedmama

Tortoise Beetle

Golden Tortoise Beetle

Dear Enchantedmama,
We have to admit that we were drawn to your submission because of your beguiling signature.  Thank you for submitting a wonderful photo of a Golden Tortoise Beetle,
 Charidotella sexpunctata. We hope you continue to be enchanted by the world of insects.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Who is this?
Location: Brewster, NY
June 26, 2013 1:06 pm
A horde of these critters attacked my lilies, which I just discovered this morning (June 26). All the leaves were gnawed off, all the buds chewed into. I found zillions of these guys on the stems and buds. Of course they just fly off if I try to get them as I’m removing the dead plants. But they just moved next door to my stella doras, staging on the mum plants between the destroyed lilies and the stella doras.
I can’t find this in any of my bug books. Can you tell what it is? Is there anything much I could do about it? Obviously they love the lily family, but would they likely move on to other plants if these were not available?
Signature: Sister CG

Lily Leaf Beetle

Lily Leaf Beetle

Dear Sister CG,
This is a Lily Leaf Beetle, Lilioceris lilii, and it is an introduced species that has not made friends with gardeners who cultivate lilies.  You can read more about Lily Leaf Beetles on Gardener’s Supply Company.

Ah-HA! Thank you so much for this quick reply. I’m off to research possible treatments for this. We have a fully organic farm here, and the affected lilies are already goners for this year, so I’m thinking vinegar/water/soap to begin with. We’ll see.
Again, thanks so much for the help! (And no, this gardener is not in the mood to make friends with these guys either, pretty as they are.)
Catherine Grace, CHS
Bluestone Farm and Living Arts Center

We hope you are able to find an eco-friendly means of eradicating this invasive, exotic species from your farm.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: small bug on rudbeckia
Location: Decatur, GA
June 11, 2013 8:04 pm
I find these bugs only on my Rudbeckia plants, eating but not doing a lot of damage in crevices. If I touch one it drops to the ground. They can fly also.
Signature: Bill in GA

Flea Beetle

Flea Beetle

Dear Bill,
This is some species of Flea Beetle in the tribe Altacini.  Flea Beetles are Leaf Beetles that feed on leaves and flowers, chewing holes as they feed.  They can get very numerous.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Dogbane Leaf Beetle & Bug Love
Location: Sterling, Virginia
June 10, 2013 3:37 pm
Hello!
Two pics I took on 6/9/13 in Claude Moore Park in Sterling, Virginia. They had a large milkweed patch in their butterfly garden, which was attracting a lot more bugs than just the butterflies! So the first is what I believe is a Dogbane Leaf Beetle, and the second is bug love from what I believe is 4-eyed milkweed beetles. (They were about 2 feet above a tiny but voracious praying mantis, so dangerous bug love at that!) Enjoy!
Sincerely,
-M Harmon
Signature: M Harmon

Mating Milkweed Longhorns

Mating Four Eyed Milkweed Longhorns

Dear M Harmon,
Do you appear on television?  We have a tag on our site called Milkweed Meadow because we believe it is one of the most important native ecosystems wherever it is found.  We also strongly feel that only native milkweed should be grown.  Your eastern species are very different from our southern California ecosystems including Indian Milkweed,
Aesclapias eriocarpa.  Your mating beetles are Milkweed Longhorns, in the genus Tetraopes, which we suspect has something to do the number four and seeing.  According to Bugguide:  “Greek tetra ‘four’ + ops ‘eye’ (in this genus, each compound eye is separated in two).”  We had not heard the common name Four Eyed Milkweed Beetle until you wrote in.

Dogbane Leaf Beetle

Dogbane Leaf Beetle

Your Dogbane Leaf Beetle is a wonderful addition to the diversity at your MIlkweed Meadow.  We just returned from a holiday at the Ohio/Pennsylvania border and the milkweed is just beginning to show buds.   Your submission is the first we posted upon our return.  We wish you had sent the Preying Mantis photo as well, and we suspect it might not be native.

Hello again,
No, I’m not on TV, but thank you for the compliment!  I just located seeds at an online catalog for native species, so we’ll be planting Asclepias syriaca as soon as they arrive.  I got the common name “Four Eyed Milkweed Beetle” from this website:
http://www.easttennesseewildflowers.com/gallery/index.php/Beetles_Bugs
And I’ve attached the praying mantis picture as well, enjoy!  (We also saw either a Pearly or Beautiful Wood Nymph, but we didn’t get pics of that one unfortunately.)
Thanks again, and thanks for all the hard work you do for bug ID, it’s very much appreciated.
M Harmon

Preying Mantis

Preying Mantis

Thanks so much for sending the Preying Mantis photo.  Someone with considerably more experience than we have would have to do the species identification.

M. Harmon responds
June 25, 2013
Hello,
“We suspected Mark Harmon of CSI would not be writing to us.”
I am soooo tempted……allegedly (yeah, that and $1 gets you a bad cup of coffee) we’re very distantly related, it would be sooo fun to tease you by having him call you!  😉
“Thanks so much for sending the Preying Mantis photo.  Someone with considerably more experience than we have would have to do the species identification.”
No worries, I’m glad you liked the pics, and thanks again for the work you do!
Sincerely,
-M Harmon

We are happy you have a sense of humor.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination