Currently viewing the category: "Leaf Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Who is this?
Location: Brewster, NY
June 26, 2013 1:06 pm
A horde of these critters attacked my lilies, which I just discovered this morning (June 26). All the leaves were gnawed off, all the buds chewed into. I found zillions of these guys on the stems and buds. Of course they just fly off if I try to get them as I’m removing the dead plants. But they just moved next door to my stella doras, staging on the mum plants between the destroyed lilies and the stella doras.
I can’t find this in any of my bug books. Can you tell what it is? Is there anything much I could do about it? Obviously they love the lily family, but would they likely move on to other plants if these were not available?
Signature: Sister CG

Lily Leaf Beetle

Lily Leaf Beetle

Dear Sister CG,
This is a Lily Leaf Beetle, Lilioceris lilii, and it is an introduced species that has not made friends with gardeners who cultivate lilies.  You can read more about Lily Leaf Beetles on Gardener’s Supply Company.

Ah-HA! Thank you so much for this quick reply. I’m off to research possible treatments for this. We have a fully organic farm here, and the affected lilies are already goners for this year, so I’m thinking vinegar/water/soap to begin with. We’ll see.
Again, thanks so much for the help! (And no, this gardener is not in the mood to make friends with these guys either, pretty as they are.)
Catherine Grace, CHS
Bluestone Farm and Living Arts Center

We hope you are able to find an eco-friendly means of eradicating this invasive, exotic species from your farm.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: small bug on rudbeckia
Location: Decatur, GA
June 11, 2013 8:04 pm
I find these bugs only on my Rudbeckia plants, eating but not doing a lot of damage in crevices. If I touch one it drops to the ground. They can fly also.
Signature: Bill in GA

Flea Beetle

Flea Beetle

Dear Bill,
This is some species of Flea Beetle in the tribe Altacini.  Flea Beetles are Leaf Beetles that feed on leaves and flowers, chewing holes as they feed.  They can get very numerous.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Dogbane Leaf Beetle & Bug Love
Location: Sterling, Virginia
June 10, 2013 3:37 pm
Hello!
Two pics I took on 6/9/13 in Claude Moore Park in Sterling, Virginia. They had a large milkweed patch in their butterfly garden, which was attracting a lot more bugs than just the butterflies! So the first is what I believe is a Dogbane Leaf Beetle, and the second is bug love from what I believe is 4-eyed milkweed beetles. (They were about 2 feet above a tiny but voracious praying mantis, so dangerous bug love at that!) Enjoy!
Sincerely,
-M Harmon
Signature: M Harmon

Mating Milkweed Longhorns

Mating Four Eyed Milkweed Longhorns

Dear M Harmon,
Do you appear on television?  We have a tag on our site called Milkweed Meadow because we believe it is one of the most important native ecosystems wherever it is found.  We also strongly feel that only native milkweed should be grown.  Your eastern species are very different from our southern California ecosystems including Indian Milkweed,
Aesclapias eriocarpa.  Your mating beetles are Milkweed Longhorns, in the genus Tetraopes, which we suspect has something to do the number four and seeing.  According to Bugguide:  “Greek tetra ‘four’ + ops ‘eye’ (in this genus, each compound eye is separated in two).”  We had not heard the common name Four Eyed Milkweed Beetle until you wrote in.

Dogbane Leaf Beetle

Dogbane Leaf Beetle

Your Dogbane Leaf Beetle is a wonderful addition to the diversity at your MIlkweed Meadow.  We just returned from a holiday at the Ohio/Pennsylvania border and the milkweed is just beginning to show buds.   Your submission is the first we posted upon our return.  We wish you had sent the Preying Mantis photo as well, and we suspect it might not be native.

Hello again,
No, I’m not on TV, but thank you for the compliment!  I just located seeds at an online catalog for native species, so we’ll be planting Asclepias syriaca as soon as they arrive.  I got the common name “Four Eyed Milkweed Beetle” from this website:
http://www.easttennesseewildflowers.com/gallery/index.php/Beetles_Bugs
And I’ve attached the praying mantis picture as well, enjoy!  (We also saw either a Pearly or Beautiful Wood Nymph, but we didn’t get pics of that one unfortunately.)
Thanks again, and thanks for all the hard work you do for bug ID, it’s very much appreciated.
M Harmon

Preying Mantis

Preying Mantis

Thanks so much for sending the Preying Mantis photo.  Someone with considerably more experience than we have would have to do the species identification.

M. Harmon responds
June 25, 2013
Hello,
“We suspected Mark Harmon of CSI would not be writing to us.”
I am soooo tempted……allegedly (yeah, that and $1 gets you a bad cup of coffee) we’re very distantly related, it would be sooo fun to tease you by having him call you!  😉
“Thanks so much for sending the Preying Mantis photo.  Someone with considerably more experience than we have would have to do the species identification.”
No worries, I’m glad you liked the pics, and thanks again for the work you do!
Sincerely,
-M Harmon

We are happy you have a sense of humor.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle on Coreopsis grandiflora in late May, Ontario
Location: Ottawa, Ontario
May 26, 2013 12:28 pm
Hi Bugman,
I returned from a week away to find my garden in full bloom, and these bugs, beetles I think , covering the flower buds and in the leaf axils of 2 Coreopsis grandiflora that I planted in my garden about a month ago , obtained from a local nursery, that gets them from elsewhere I am sure.
I would like to know what they are, I think they seem intent on eating the foliage.
I have also notesd that where they were planted is too moist, the plants have powdery mildew which may be predisposing them to attack by bugs.
My garden is in Ottawa, Ontario, season late spring.
Here are some photos. Shall I pick and destroy. Or leave them be?
Signature: merrivet

Ragweed Leaf Beetles

Ragweed Leaf Beetles

Dear merrivet,
These are Leaf Beetles in the family Chrysomelidae.  We believe them to be in the genus
Zygogramma, and we believe they might be Ragweed Leaf Beetles, Zygogramma suturalis. According to bugGuide:  “Food host: ragweed (Ambrosia, Asteraceae).”  Coreopsis is in the family Asteraceae.  We will be leaving town in early June and we are postdating your submission to go live next week.  

Ragweed Leaf Beetles

Ragweed Leaf Beetles

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Who is eating my potatoes?
Location: Fairview (north of Dallas), Texas
May 24, 2013 8:56 am
Hey Bugman,
I found 2 of these guys on my potato plants this morning and was wondering what they are. I’ve never seen them before.
Signature: Gail in the Garden

Colorado Potato Beetle Larva

Colorado Potato Beetle Larva

Dear Gail,
This is the larva of a Colorado Potato Beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata, a native species that originated in high altitude areas of Colorado where it fed on native plants in the nightshade family Solanaceae.  When potatoes began to be grown commercially, the range of the Colorado Potato Beetle expanded greatly.  Here is some information from BugGuide:  “Before the introduction of the potato in the US this beetle was confined to Colorado and neighboring states feeding on some native species of Solanum (night shade), now it has spread to most potato growing areas.  It has been transported to Europe where it has become a serious pest.”  Your submission will go live to our site in early June as we must postdate submissions to populate our site with new material during our short absence away from the office.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spotted Bug Thailand – Koh Lanta
Location: Thailand, Koh Lanta – Southern part of Thailand
May 25, 2013 8:45 am
Dear Bugman
I spotted this scarab pin my bath room at around 9 pm Thai time. It is bit as my nail, maybe 1 and a half cm. has cream colour shell and black spots and yellow legs.
I have tried to identify it but cannot find anything on the web.
Thank you for your time.
Cheers Aruna
(www.baanraobedandbreakfast.com)
Signature: Aruna Singh

Leaf Beetle from Thailand

Leaf Beetle from Thailand

Dear Aruna,
We believe this is some species of Leaf Beetle in the family Chrysomelidae, but like you, we have not had any luck matching any photos on the internet.  Leaf Beetles will not pose any threats to you, your structure or your guests.

Thank you Daniel for your quick response. I was actually nor scared of it, was only very curious as I had never seen a beetle like that. Thank you for your time and welcome to Baan Rao anytime.
Cheers
Aruna

Karl provides an identification
Hi Daniel and Aruna:
I believe it is a species in the genus Podontia (Chrysomelidae: Galerucinae: Alticini), probably P. quatuordecimpunctata. The submitted photo is a bit fuzzy but I think the match is pretty close. This link provides quite a lot of good life cycle information, including: “Podontia quatuordecimpunctata is the best-known Podontia species because both adults and larvae defoliate the tree Spondias dulcis. This tree, commonly known as the mak-ok, hog plum, or golden apple tree, is cultivated for its edible fruits in Indonesia, Malaysia, India, Thailand, and the Caribbean…”. Regards. Karl

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination