Currently viewing the category: "Leaf Beetles"
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Subject: Who is eating my potatoes?
Location: Fairview (north of Dallas), Texas
May 24, 2013 8:56 am
Hey Bugman,
I found 2 of these guys on my potato plants this morning and was wondering what they are. I’ve never seen them before.
Signature: Gail in the Garden

Colorado Potato Beetle Larva

Colorado Potato Beetle Larva

Dear Gail,
This is the larva of a Colorado Potato Beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata, a native species that originated in high altitude areas of Colorado where it fed on native plants in the nightshade family Solanaceae.  When potatoes began to be grown commercially, the range of the Colorado Potato Beetle expanded greatly.  Here is some information from BugGuide:  “Before the introduction of the potato in the US this beetle was confined to Colorado and neighboring states feeding on some native species of Solanum (night shade), now it has spread to most potato growing areas.  It has been transported to Europe where it has become a serious pest.”  Your submission will go live to our site in early June as we must postdate submissions to populate our site with new material during our short absence away from the office.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spotted Bug Thailand – Koh Lanta
Location: Thailand, Koh Lanta – Southern part of Thailand
May 25, 2013 8:45 am
Dear Bugman
I spotted this scarab pin my bath room at around 9 pm Thai time. It is bit as my nail, maybe 1 and a half cm. has cream colour shell and black spots and yellow legs.
I have tried to identify it but cannot find anything on the web.
Thank you for your time.
Cheers Aruna
(www.baanraobedandbreakfast.com)
Signature: Aruna Singh

Leaf Beetle from Thailand

Leaf Beetle from Thailand

Dear Aruna,
We believe this is some species of Leaf Beetle in the family Chrysomelidae, but like you, we have not had any luck matching any photos on the internet.  Leaf Beetles will not pose any threats to you, your structure or your guests.

Thank you Daniel for your quick response. I was actually nor scared of it, was only very curious as I had never seen a beetle like that. Thank you for your time and welcome to Baan Rao anytime.
Cheers
Aruna

Karl provides an identification
Hi Daniel and Aruna:
I believe it is a species in the genus Podontia (Chrysomelidae: Galerucinae: Alticini), probably P. quatuordecimpunctata. The submitted photo is a bit fuzzy but I think the match is pretty close. This link provides quite a lot of good life cycle information, including: “Podontia quatuordecimpunctata is the best-known Podontia species because both adults and larvae defoliate the tree Spondias dulcis. This tree, commonly known as the mak-ok, hog plum, or golden apple tree, is cultivated for its edible fruits in Indonesia, Malaysia, India, Thailand, and the Caribbean…”. Regards. Karl

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle ID?
Location: San Jose CA
May 23, 2013 6:38 pm
Hi,
curious what this beetle is!
Photographed 5/23/13, they spend time between rose petals and inside rose blossom.
Thanks!
Signature: Frank

Spotted Cucumber Beetle

Spotted Cucumber Beetle

Hi Frank,
These are excellent images of a Spotted Cucumber Beetle,
Diabrotica undecimpunctata.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on roots of a wide range of plants, including many field crops” and “Considered a major pest of many field crops including cucumbers and other squashes, corn, soy. Beetles also transmit crop diseases such as bacterial wilt. Adults also reported damaging to garden plants including hibiscus, roses.”  Since you have adults in the roses, perhaps you also grow vegetables that serve as the larval food plant.

Spotted Cucumber Beetle

Spotted Cucumber Beetle


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Subject: Weird bug with turtle shape
Location: Southern Connecticut
May 21, 2013 1:09 pm
The bug crawled over to my friend, and we both hadn’t seen anything like it. She immediately noticed what looks like a turtle on the back of the bug, while the edges are semi-translucent. We brought it outside and it disappeared shortly after.
Signature: AF

Clavate Tortoise Beetle

Clavate Tortoise Beetle

Dear AF,
Obviously the Clavate Tortoise Beetle is aptly named if you thought it resembled a turtle.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: It’s blue – Trevor’s FAVORITE color
Location: Moore, OK
May 14, 2013 3:36 pm
It’s been about a year since our last submission (a Sumac Flea Beetle June 2012)! On Mother’s Day (May 12) my son found another really cool beetle that we would like to know what it is. Despite being a little guy, it stood out like a sore thumb on the beige ceiling of our back covered porch. Hopefully the picture is sufficient, fingers crossed. We had a really tough time getting the lighting just right to show off the truly bright blue metallic color of its carapace (in the pictures it appears dark but in real life it is lighter and bright). However, you can definitely see the distinct details of its orange head, antennae (not orange but ”segmented”), and its legs are the same bright orange as well.
Hope you can satisfy my 5 year old aspiring entomologist son’s curiosity (I’m pretty anxious too because it is such a beautiful little guy!)
Signature: Trevor’s mom

Shiny Flea Beetle

Shiny Flea Beetle

Dear Trevor’s Mom,
We are happy to hear Trevor’s interest in entomology hasn’t waned.  This is another Flea Beetle in the tribe Alticini.  It sure looks to us like the Shiny Flea Beetle,
Asphaera lustrans, a species that is found in Oklahoma according to BugGuide.

Yay!! That’s it!! Trevor is sooooo excited!  I guess our creek in our backyard has all the right food sources for our various little “Leaf Beetle” friends :-)  Thank you so much for your help.  My little entomologist cannot wait to send you his next exciting, but tougher to identify, live discovery.
I also have attached a few other pictures you and your staff might enjoy.  One is of Trevor’s collection that my mom (his Grandma), “Ma-su,” have put together from specimens they’ve gathered…pretty impressive for a 4-5year old kiddo! He also has a pet jumping spider of which we have some fun pictures which I have attached, including his picture with a blow up spider at our local museum’s (Sam Noble Museum in Norman, OK) Bug Exhibit! We also did an ant farm; soon we will order ladybug larvae for his Ladybug Land so we can watch their metamorphosis. Disclaimer: no bugs in the collection picture were harmed intentionally…all were discovered either in the swimming pool skimmer and/or after they had already gone to bug heaven before we found them!
Thanks again,
Trevor’s mom

Trevor's Insect Collection

Trevor’s Insect Collection

Wow, your swimming pool is a magnet for insects, including Caterpillar Hunters, Wheel Bugs, Grasshoppers, Scarabs, Cicadas, a Cottonwood Longhorn Borer, an Io Moth and a Painted Lady.  Trevor looks rapt with his ant farm.

Ant Farm has Trevor's attention.

Ant Farm has Trevor’s attention.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Can you help me?
Location: Pennsylvania , USA
May 11, 2013 2:30 pm
I found this bug on my door outside and I never seen a gold bug before. Can you tell me what type it is?
Signature: Tom R.

Tortoise Beetle

Tortoise Beetle

Hi Tom,
This beautiful insect that looks like a drop of gold paint is a Golden Tortoise Beetle,
Charidotella sexpunctata, and it feeds on the leaves of morning glories and other plants in the family Convolvulaceae.  Golden Tortoise Beetles are capable of changing colors, and much to the dismay of insect collectors, they lose their lovely golden color after death.  See Bugguide for additional information on the Golden Tortoise Beetle.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination