Currently viewing the category: "Leaf Beetles"
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Subject: Weird bug with turtle shape
Location: Southern Connecticut
May 21, 2013 1:09 pm
The bug crawled over to my friend, and we both hadn’t seen anything like it. She immediately noticed what looks like a turtle on the back of the bug, while the edges are semi-translucent. We brought it outside and it disappeared shortly after.
Signature: AF

Clavate Tortoise Beetle

Clavate Tortoise Beetle

Dear AF,
Obviously the Clavate Tortoise Beetle is aptly named if you thought it resembled a turtle.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: It’s blue – Trevor’s FAVORITE color
Location: Moore, OK
May 14, 2013 3:36 pm
It’s been about a year since our last submission (a Sumac Flea Beetle June 2012)! On Mother’s Day (May 12) my son found another really cool beetle that we would like to know what it is. Despite being a little guy, it stood out like a sore thumb on the beige ceiling of our back covered porch. Hopefully the picture is sufficient, fingers crossed. We had a really tough time getting the lighting just right to show off the truly bright blue metallic color of its carapace (in the pictures it appears dark but in real life it is lighter and bright). However, you can definitely see the distinct details of its orange head, antennae (not orange but ”segmented”), and its legs are the same bright orange as well.
Hope you can satisfy my 5 year old aspiring entomologist son’s curiosity (I’m pretty anxious too because it is such a beautiful little guy!)
Signature: Trevor’s mom

Shiny Flea Beetle

Shiny Flea Beetle

Dear Trevor’s Mom,
We are happy to hear Trevor’s interest in entomology hasn’t waned.  This is another Flea Beetle in the tribe Alticini.  It sure looks to us like the Shiny Flea Beetle,
Asphaera lustrans, a species that is found in Oklahoma according to BugGuide.

Yay!! That’s it!! Trevor is sooooo excited!  I guess our creek in our backyard has all the right food sources for our various little “Leaf Beetle” friends :-)  Thank you so much for your help.  My little entomologist cannot wait to send you his next exciting, but tougher to identify, live discovery.
I also have attached a few other pictures you and your staff might enjoy.  One is of Trevor’s collection that my mom (his Grandma), “Ma-su,” have put together from specimens they’ve gathered…pretty impressive for a 4-5year old kiddo! He also has a pet jumping spider of which we have some fun pictures which I have attached, including his picture with a blow up spider at our local museum’s (Sam Noble Museum in Norman, OK) Bug Exhibit! We also did an ant farm; soon we will order ladybug larvae for his Ladybug Land so we can watch their metamorphosis. Disclaimer: no bugs in the collection picture were harmed intentionally…all were discovered either in the swimming pool skimmer and/or after they had already gone to bug heaven before we found them!
Thanks again,
Trevor’s mom

Trevor's Insect Collection

Trevor’s Insect Collection

Wow, your swimming pool is a magnet for insects, including Caterpillar Hunters, Wheel Bugs, Grasshoppers, Scarabs, Cicadas, a Cottonwood Longhorn Borer, an Io Moth and a Painted Lady.  Trevor looks rapt with his ant farm.

Ant Farm has Trevor's attention.

Ant Farm has Trevor’s attention.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Can you help me?
Location: Pennsylvania , USA
May 11, 2013 2:30 pm
I found this bug on my door outside and I never seen a gold bug before. Can you tell me what type it is?
Signature: Tom R.

Tortoise Beetle

Tortoise Beetle

Hi Tom,
This beautiful insect that looks like a drop of gold paint is a Golden Tortoise Beetle,
Charidotella sexpunctata, and it feeds on the leaves of morning glories and other plants in the family Convolvulaceae.  Golden Tortoise Beetles are capable of changing colors, and much to the dismay of insect collectors, they lose their lovely golden color after death.  See Bugguide for additional information on the Golden Tortoise Beetle.

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Subject: Beautiful Beetle!
Location: Sidcup, Kent – England (UK)
May 6, 2013 3:54 pm
Hi,
I’ve lived in South East London since a child and never seen one of these before. I saw two this afternoon on a Rosemary bush and Pineapple Broom at the end of our garden. We have an area of unmanaged scrub at the end of the garden where there are a number of fallen /rotting trees, so we usually see quite a few beetles. But these are new to me and I can’t find any pictures on line to identify them by.
Can you help, Bugman?
I have more photo’s at other angles if you want them.
Kind regards,
Signature: Alun Harrison

Leaf Beetle

Rosemary Leaf Beetle

Dear Alun,
Because we haven’t received a new photo of this species in several years, we couldn’t recall the name of this Rosemary Leaf Beetle.  At first we had trouble finding the identity when we searched the scientific family name Chrysomelidae, but once we switched to the common name Leaf Beetle, we quickly found this Rosemary Leaf Beetle identified on FlickR.  A You Tube video indicates the Rosemary Leaf Beetle successfully invaded the UK in 2002 though it was most likely introduced prior to that.  The Rosemary Leaf Beetle,
Chrysolina americana, is native to the Mediterranean region, but the cultivation of its food plants like rosemary and sage has allowed it to expand its range.

Wow! That was amazingly quick. Thank you for that info, Daniel. I will follow the advice for hand removal since we do use the herbs for culinary purposes, but feel terrible about harming such beautiful creatures.
I will look at perhaps providing more ‘sacrificial’ lavender for them until I read up on their potential “pest” status.
My very best regards & thank you for your response.
Best wishes,
Alun Harrison

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Subject: Metallic Green Bug
Location: Northern Costa Rica
May 2, 2013 1:58 pm
I encountered these insects on the edge of the forest in Northern Costa Rica. At first I thought they were some sort of beetle, but I found the same plants also had what seem to be nymphs of the same species. Searching for some ID for them online I came up empty. My guess is some sort of shield bug.
Signature: Siggy

Tortoise Beetle

Tortoise Beetle:  Omocerus casta

Dear Siggy,
You have two distinct insect orders represented in your request, and at least two, and possibly three different species.  The “metallic green bug” is actually a Tortoise Beetle, and we believe it is in the genus
Omocerus based on an image we located on The Befuddled Loris (scroll down) and verified on the Coleoptera of Costa Rica where it is identified as Omocerus casta.  This same beetle can also be found on the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute and Discover Life.

Stink Bug Nymph

Stink Bug Nymph

The other two creatures are Hemipteran nymphs and we believe they are different species.  They are most likely Stink Bugs in the family Pentatomidae.

Stink Bug Nymph

Stink Bug Nymph

Daniel,
Well that clarifies things a bit. I found several of each kind of the insects I sent images of in the same small area, so I thought they must be of the same species. Thanks for taking the time to respond.

 

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Subject: Flea Beetles Eating Up Texas Primrose?
Location: Coryell County, central Texas
April 28, 2013 11:04 pm
Are these Flea Beetles, perhaps even Altica litigata, eating the Texas primrose? Bug Guide lists primrose as a food for the A. litigata, but I’m not sure if that’s what these insects are. They look like miniature Egyptian scarabs to me. I’ve included a photo of a healthy Texas primrose as contrast to the eaten ones. Warm, sunny weather today, 80 degrees. Thank you so much.
http://bugguide.net/node/view/492289
(Last entry for awhile, back to work for me! I enjoy your website so much. Makes me think, helps hone my research skills, and it’s all so interesting.)
Signature: Ellen

Flea Beetles

Flea Beetles

Hi again Ellen,
We agree that these are Flea Beetles.  We haven’t the necessary skills to key them down to a species level, but based on the stated food plants, we believe your identification of
Altica litigata is most likely correct.

Flea Beetles

Flea Beetles

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination