Currently viewing the category: "Leaf Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug/Beetle
Location: Paintsville, KY
July 18, 2014 5:39 pm
I have photographed bugs for over five years and have never run across one of these. Can you please help?
Signature: Jennifer Perdue

Case Bearing Leaf Beetle:  Cryptocephalus mutabilis

Case Bearing Leaf Beetle: Cryptocephalus mutabilis

Hi Jennifer,
We needed to do a bit of searching on BugGuide to identify your Leaf Beetle as
Cryptocephalus mutabilis, one of the Case Bearing Leaf Beetles in the subfamily Cryptocephalinae.  According to BugGuide it is “Polyphagous” meaning it is not especially particular about which leaves it will eat.

Case Bearing Leaf Beetle:  Cryptocephalus mutabilis

Case Bearing Leaf Beetle: Cryptocephalus mutabilis

Thank you so very much!!! I guess I didn’t search deep enough lol. Thank you again for your time and quick response!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unkown insect
Location: Nebraska
June 30, 2014 2:15 pm
I was walking around outside and I found these two sitting on a puncture vine..I’ve never seen anything like them, and I’m assuming that they are make and female due to one being bigger than the other. They are about the size of a pea, so not very big. They don’t seem to move around much. Can you help me figure out what they are, and everything about them? :)
Thanks!
Signature: Annalyn

hey, thank you for helping, but a couple of my friends helped me find out what I had. It’s a potato beetle larvae! :) I’ve just never seen them in this state before. :P I love discovering new things, so this is fun! Thanks!

Colorado Potato Beetle Larvae

Colorado Potato Beetle Larvae

Hi Annalyn,
We are happy to learn that you have already identified these Colorado Potato Beetle Larvae, and according to BugGuide, they can be distinguished from the larvae of other member of the genus because:  “Larva has two rows of black spots on each side. Falso Potato beetle larva has one row of black spots.”
  The range of the Colorado Potato Beetle was greatly expanded through agriculture and the cultivation of the potato.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Never seen before
Location: Central maine USA
June 28, 2014 8:04 pm
Found this on sons water bottle at the golf course.
Signature: sean

Clavate Tortoise Beetle

Clavate Tortoise Beetle

Dear Sean,
Both adults and larvae of the Clavate Tortoise Beetle,
Plagiometriona clavata, feed upon the leaves of plants in the family Solanaceae which includes many commonly cultivated garden plants like tomatoes, peppers and eggplant.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug in my vegetable garden
Location: Southern Connecticut
June 7, 2014 3:59 pm
I found this bug on a leaf of my eggplant plant in my vegetable garden. What kind of bug is it? Is it harmful to my garden? Will it eat the leaves off my vegetable plants?
Signature: ACR

Clavate Tortoise Beetle

Clavate Tortoise Beetle

Dear ACR,
This is a Clavate Tortoise Beetle,
Plagiometriona clavata, and according to BugGuide, adults and larvae feed upon:  “ground-cherries (Physalis), Jimsonweed (Datura stramonium), and Solanum spp. (Solanaceae).”  Those plants belong in the same family as eggplant, peppers and tomatoes.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown on my potato plants
Location: Norfolk, MA
June 9, 2014 7:00 am
This bug is on my potato plants in eastern Mass. Thie first time I found one I picked the leaf it was stuck to and took it to my CSA farmer, who had no ideas. They sort of suction onto the leaves. this year, there are more. I have some leaf damage, but not too bad. Then the other day my daughter was trying to get one to crawl/move, and away it flew! no visible wings when it’s sitting there, and it flies in a slow kinda clumsy way. Just trying to figure out if they are damaging to my garden, how to deal with them.
thanks!
Signature: Caroline

Mating Clavate Tortoise Beetles

Mating Clavate Tortoise Beetles

Hi Caroline,
These are mating Clavate Tortoise Beetles, and the adults and larvae feed on the leaves of plants in the family Solanacea, which includes potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant and other similar garden crops.

Thank you!  I’ve never seen anything like these, and based on your identification I’ll leave them alone unless the leaf damage gets to be too much.  Then possibly beetle relocation program!  (though I have read they like tomato, pepper and squash plants, all of which I have this year)

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Willow eating bug
Location: Eastern Pennsylvania, USA
June 3, 2014 4:49 am
Our willow tree leaves are being eaten away by this strange creature. Please help identify it.
Signature: David

these are predatory lady beetle larvae and they feed on aphids, not leaves.

Ah! So the aphids should be somewhere about eating the leaves then?
Sincerely,
David

no, aphids suck the juices from plants

I’ll try again…this little thing is definitely eating the leaves on my Willow tree.
Sincerely,
David

Leaf Beetle Larva

Leaf Beetle Larva

Bingo David,
This is the larva of a Leaf Beetle in the family Chrysomelidae, and we will attempt to identify it to the species level for you.  Willow is a popular food plant among insects, including species of butterfly caterpillars, moth caterpillars and aphids
.  We seem to recall a Willow Leaf Beetle identification in the past and we were correct, however, the larva pictured on BugGuide looks nothing like your Leaf Beetle Larva.  We believe we found a larva that matches yours identified on the Evolution in Structured Populations University of Vermont website, but the are only identified generally and this behavior is described:  “Imported willow leaf beetles are group foragers.  Larger groups survive better than small groups.”  The University of Minnesota Extension website identifies the Imported Willow Leaf Beetle as Plagiodera versicolora and states: “Adult beetles make notches or holes in leaves/  Larvae windowpane leaves, i.e. they feed on the upper surface of the leaves between the veins.  Prefers willows and poplars, especially weeping willow.  Adults are bluish-black to greenish blue, about ⅛ – ¼ inch long.  Larvae are dark, almost black and about ¼ inch long.”  According to BugGuide, you are in the range of the Imported Willow Leaf Beetle. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination