Currently viewing the category: "Leaf Beetles"
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Subject: School insect collection
Location: UK
June 22, 2015 5:45 am
I’m a biology technician at a 6th form school and have inherited a collection of animals/ plants/ insects that I’m slowly trying to identify. So far I have 1 in the insect section left to identify. Unfortunately I can’t give any details about where it came from or what it’s habits are like as they are all dead! All I know is they are currently in England and I believe are likely to have been caught here. I’m not even 100% certain they’re real, beetles are not my forte
Signature: Hannah

Leaf Beetle:  Desmonota variolosa

Leaf Beetle: Desmonota variolosa

Dear Hannah,
This Leaf Beetle, Desmonota variolosa, is native to Brazil, not England.  We first encountered this Leaf Beetle when we tried to identify the insects used in the making of an antique brooch, a common practice in Victorian times.  New jewelry is also available using these real beetles.   There are plenty of links on that posting to follow our original research.  You can also find a mounted specimen pictured on the Hunterian Museum & Art Gallery Collections site.

Leaf Beetle:  Desmonota variolosa

Leaf Beetle: Desmonota variolosa

Thank you so much, the girls will be so happy to finally know what it is and that it’s used in jewellery!
Hannah

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Subject: apple tree infestation
Location: Guildford Surrey
June 28, 2015 10:38 am
Hi, I found lots of these climbing on my apple tree. There was also a type of white fungus around which some of them congregated – this possibly contains eggs?
I don’t know if they are bad for the tree or not. They measure approx. 1cm, but some are slightly smaller. They have 6 legs but the back part of their body looks like a caterpillar.
I hope you can help.
Signature: Barbara

Lady Beetle Larvae eat Hemipterans

Lady Beetle Larvae eat Hemipterans

Dear Barbara,
While there is a pest problem on your apple tree, nature seems to be controlling the situation.  What you have mistaken for fungus or eggs is actually a type of Hemipteran, possibly a Woolly Aphid which you can read about on the Royal Horticultural Society site.  The crawling insects are the larvae of Lady Beetles, and they are feeding on the Hemipterans.   The bad news here is that the Lady Beetle Larva is an Asian Lady Beetle Larva, a nonnative species, and it is believed that the proliferation of nonnative Asian Lady Beetles in North America is contributing to the decline in numbers of native species.

Lady Beetle Larva

Lady Beetle Larva

Hi Daniel,
Thank you so much for the information – so it is good news and bad news!
Since posting, many of the larva have now attached their back ends to the tree bark and are hanging upside down, obviously in preparation for their next stage of development.  Also, there is now very little evidence of the ‘white fluff’ so they have probably done their job.  Unfortunately, many of the leaves on the tree are not looking very healthy but I am loathe to spray anything and just let nature take its course so I can review the tree in the autumn (it is past its prime anyway).
Thank you again for your help.
Regards
Barbara

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Subject: Unknown ladybug
Location: Middle Nebraska
June 11, 2015 10:36 pm
I’ve looked high and low, and then I looked low and high, and I can’t find an exact match to this ladybug, which is a little bit bigger than our usual Asian ladybug.
Signature: Sarah Lynn

Argus Tortoise Beetle

Argus Tortoise Beetle

Dear Sarah,
Though the markings resemble those of a Lady Beetle, your individual is actually an Argus Tortoise Beetle,
Chelymorpha cassidea, and you can compare your individual to this image on BugGuide.

Argus Tortoise Beetle

Argus Tortoise Beetle

 

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Subject: green beetle swarm west texas
Location: western Hodspeth County Texas
June 7, 2015 4:05 pm
Bugman,
We live in west Texas in high (5100 ft.) desert grassland. This week we are being swarmed by small (approx. 1/4″) shiny green beetles. Can you identify them from this picture? Sorry it is not a better one. I am only concerned about them being destructive.
Thanks in advance.
Signature: Ray Ornberg

Flea Beetles

Flea Beetles

Hi Ray,
As you have indicated, the quality of your image is not optimal, but we believe based on your description that these are Flea Beetles in the tribe Alticini, and we also believe that they might be Apple Flea Beetles,
Altica foliaceae.  According to BugGuide: “In recent years, several outbreaks of this insect have occurred throughout Colorado.”  We will be postdating your submission to go live in the near future while we are away from the office.

Daniel,
Thank you so much for the very quick and very accurate response. Based on the pix accessed from the Bugman link you have certainly nailed it!
Best Regards,
Ray Ornberg

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Subject: bugs on my weeping willow
Location: south east, north sc
May 20, 2015 3:08 am
These are all over my weeping willows and eating all the leaves.
Signature: paula

Cottonwood Leaf Beetle Pupa

Cottonwood Leaf Beetle Pupa

Dear Paula,
This is a beetle pupa, and we were immediately struck by its resemblance to the larvae of the Cottonwood Leaf Beetle that we just posted.  We did a quick internet search and our suspicion was confirmed on Featured Creatures.  We are certain that this is the pupa of a Cottonwood Leaf Beetle,
Chrysomela scripta.

Thank you so much. I’ve got to get rid of them. They are on just about every leaf of my weeping willows and in my birdfeeders. I would hope the birds would eat them. But it’s not happening. The leafs on my willows are just about gone.

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Subject: What is this bug?
Location: Suffolk, Virginia
May 17, 2015 1:14 pm
These little bugs are all over my deck, and the willow tree nearby. What are they, and how can I get rid of them?
Signature: Robin Moore

Cottonwood Leaf Beetle Larva

Cottonwood Leaf Beetle Larva

Dear Robin,
You are being troubled by Cottonwood Leaf Beetle Larvae,
Chrysomela scripta, and according to BugGuide, it:  “used to be considered a pest when willows were grown commercially for baskets, now of little economic consequence.”  Featured Creatures has a very nice page on this species where it states:  “The cottonwood leaf beetle, Chrysomela scripta Fabricius, is one of the most economically-important pests of managed cottonwood, aspen and some poplar and willow species. Although it does not present a serious pest problem in forests, often it is a severe pest of urban ornamental trees. This leaf feeder has several generations each year, may cause extensive leaf loss, and can consequently reduce stem volume up to 70% (Coyle et al. 2005).”

Cottonwood Leaf Beetle Larvae

Cottonwood Leaf Beetle Larvae

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