Currently viewing the category: "Lady Bug"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: bug
Location: advance,nc
January 11, 2016 11:12 pm
Please tell me what kind of bug this is eating this ladybug.I took this pic on my back steps.
Signature: Michelle christenberry

Florida Predatory Stink Bug eats Lady Beetle

Florida Predatory Stink Bug eats Lady Beetle

Hi Michelle,
Though both insects are predators, the individual doing the eating in your image is a Florida Predatory Stink Bug.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Interesting ladybug from Johannesburg
Location: Northern Johannesburg, Gauteng, South Africa
January 29, 2015 5:24 am
Hello, I head the Eco-Schools initiative from HeronBridge College in Johannesburg, South Africa. We have started an initiative at the school called “Wild HeronBridge”. The aim is to compile lists of the creatures that share our space so we often have photos of bugs etc. that we would love to have identified. This is a case in point. It was photographed earlier in January at HeronBridge, which is in the extreme northern parts of Johannesburg, province Gauteng, South Africa. it looks like a Cheilomenes but the colour and patterning are different from the regular red orange variety. We would greatly appreciate it if you could ID it for us so that we can add it to our insect lists.
Signature: HeronBridge College

Beetle

Beetle

Dear HeronBridge College,
Do you have a larger file with greater resolution?  Are there any views showing the head of the beetle?  We are more inclined to speculate that this is a Leaf Beetle in the family Chrysomelidae, but we would like to see a better image prior to researching its identity.

Hello
Thanks so much for your email regarding our insect.  Unfortunately there was only one picture taken of the bug but here it is with a better resolution.  We really appreciate any assistance you can give us!
Regards
Charlotte

Leaf Beetle we believe

Potato Ladybird Beetle

Thanks for providing a higher resolution image Charlotte.  The plant it is on has a distinctive seed pod.  Can you provide the name of the plant?  That may assist in a proper identification of the Beetle, which we still believe to be a Leaf Beetle.

Leaf Beetle we believe

Potato Ladybird Beetle on Datura, we believe

Hi Daniel
Thanks again for your perseverance with this identification!  I have found out that the plant it is on is and it is interestingly a poisonous plant – Datura Stramonium:
Datura stramonium, known by the common names Jimson weed, Devil’s snare, or datura, is a plant in the Solanaceae (nightshade) family. It is believed to have originated in the Americas, but is now found around the world.[1] Other common names for D. stramonium include thornapple and moon flower,[2] and it has the Spanish name Toloache.[3] Other names for the plant include hell’s bells, devil’s trumpet, devil’s weed, tolguacha, Jamestown weed, stinkweed, locoweed, pricklyburr, and devil’s cucumber.[4]
From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Datura_stramonium
I hope this helps – especially as it must be quite an amazing beetle to be able to eat a poisonous plant.
Regards
Charlotte

Hi Charlotte,
Thanks for the well researched plant identification.  We did a quick search and did not come up with anything regarding Leaf Beetles, but that information should prove helpful.  We wish there was more detail in your beetle image.  We did some additional research and there are several similar looking Lady Beetles in the family Coccinellidae in South Africa, including the individual on South African PHotographs, and the ones pictured on BioDiversity Explorer.  The image of
Cheilomenes lunata on BioDiversity Explorer might be the closest. The Lunate Ladybird Beetle is well represented on iSpot.

Hi Daniel
Thanks so much – you have been extremely helpful!  Having had a look at the pictures I concur with you that the Cheilomenes Lunata comes the closest.
Much appreciated – we can post it on our Wild HeronBridge blog – where we post interesting creatures we find at the school (http://heronbridgecollege.co.za/blog  – if you have a moment!)
Regards
Charlotte

Thanks for providing a link to your wonderful blog.

Correction:  April 25, 2015
Cesar Crash from our sister site Insetologia, provided a comment indicating that this looks like a Potato Ladybird,
Epilachna dregei, which is identified on Photographs from South Africa.  According to information on iSpot, this species congregates in large aggregations in the winter.  According to Biodiversity Explorer:  “Lays eggs and feeds on potato and tomato leaves. Larvae feed on the underside of the leaves and adults on the top side. Adults congregate in large numbers and spend the dry season on hilltops.”  Most Lady Beetles are predatory, but there are a few species, including the Potato Ladybird, that feed on plants.  Since Datura is in the same family as potato and tomato, it makes sense that Charlotte found this individual on Datura.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Colorful beetle
Location: Chubut Province, Argentina
December 19, 2014 8:51 pm
While traveling in Patagonia near the Valdes Peninsula we saw this truly beautiful bug. The picture was taken in mid-November. We were close to the Atlantic Ocean. I have looked through the web trying to identify. I hope you may have an answer. Thank you,
Signature: Homer Shell

Unknown Beetle

Lady Beetle

Dear Homer,
This is sure a colorful and distinctive looking beetle.  Our first inclination is to speculate it is a Leaf Beetle in the family Chrysomelidae.  We will attempt a more specific identification and we hope to get some assistance from our readership.

Lady Beetle identification courtesy of Karl
Hi Daniel and Homer Shell:
Although it really doesn’t look like one, this is actually a Lady Beetle (a.k.a. Ladybug or Ladybird). The species is Eriopis connexa (Coccinellidae: Coccinellinae) and it is one of the most wide spread beetles in South America. Like most Lady beetles, it is a voracious predator of aphids and is widely used for biological control of pests on crops such as maize and sorghum.
lRegards.  Karl

Thanks very much to Daniel and Karl for the ID.  You were a great help.
Homer Shell

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: yellow worm/ larvae/ milkweed plants
Location: traprockridge Plainville CT
August 7, 2014 12:54 am
Here is an aadditional photo to add to my original question of what are the yellow larvae worm ? things eating the milkweed pods. You can also see the red beetle to the left.
Signature: hopefish

Aphid Infestation and Lady Beetle on Milkweed

Aphid Infestation and Lady Beetle on Milkweed

Dear hopefish,
We did not see any additional submission from you.  You have a major infestation of Milkweed Aphids or Oleander Aphids, Aphis nerii, and since Aphids release honeydew, it also appears you are getting a black buildup on the plant.  None of this is healthy since Aphids suck juices from plants.  The beetle is a predatory Lady Beetle, but that single Lady Beetle will not put a dent in this Aphid infestation.  We would recommend attempting to control the Aphid population, but without pesticides as those will have an injurious effect on other creatures that feed on milkweed, including Monarch butterfly caterpillars.  See BugGuide for additional information on the Oleander Aphid.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: orange bug from basswood
Location: Natick, MA
June 25, 2014 2:30 pm
any idea what this is? It was on an American Basswood (Tilia americana) tree leef. The chewing damage might be from it, or from the winter moths that have already attacked the tree, or from something else entirely.
I found another one on the tree, this time with spots. Still don’t know what it is though.
Signature: natickoldmoose

Pupa of a Lady Beetle

Pupa of a Lady Beetle

Dear natickoldmoose,
Both of your images are of Pupa of Lady Beetles, and we are not certain if they are the same species, though we suspect both belong to the nonnative Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle which is pictured on BugGuide.  Coloration of pupae of many insects changes over the course of metamorphosis, and we suspect the pupa image with the spots is closer to the emergence time of the adult Lady Beetle, often commonly called a Ladybug.  While most folks would recognize a Lady Beetle or Ladybug, many do not recognize the other stages of the metamorphosis, including the pupa and the Larva, which has been likened to a tiny alligator by many of our readers.

Pupa of a Lady Beetle

Pupa of a Lady Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ask What’s This Bug?
Location: Lake Balboa in Van Nuys, in the San Fernando Valley part of Los Angeles, California
April 14, 2014 8:40 am
Hi, my friends and I were at Lake Balboa in Van Nuys, in the San Fernando Valley part of Los Angeles, California. We thought we were taking photos of an orange ladybug. But when I enlarged my shot, I started thinking that this is like no ladybug I’ve seen. Can you tell me what kind of bug it is?
Signature: Helaine

Lady Beetle Pupa

Lady Beetle Pupa

Hi Helaine,
Your first impression was actually correct.  This is the pupa of a Lady Beetle.  We are not certain which species, but we are relatively confident it is not the pupa of the invasive Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination