Currently viewing the category: "Lady Bug"
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Subject: Six -legged gray bug with orangey spots
Location: Piedmont/upstate area of South Carolina – in my yard
May 25, 2016 5:59 pm
Dear Bugman,
I am trying to learn the different garden variety bugs and which ones are beneficial and which ones need to find other living (or not) arrangements.
I don’t indiscriminately destroy any bugs; but I learned my lesson to at least contain unknown ones, even if only long enough to I.D. them.
Last year I found the coolest bug ever in my garden on my tomato plant; however, by the time I could look it up and discover what this beautiful creature was, he had already camouflaged himself! So, one huge green horned tomato worm got a reprieve from instant and permanent eviction.
The attached photo was taken in my front yard while I was trying to identify some plants and came across these guys. I still do not know what the plant is, but there were several ladybugs around too. I only saw three of these gray-orangey spotted critters. The picture of the rolled up one is the bug’s reaction to being surprised. (No gray orangey spotted critter was harmed in the making of these pics)
I hope you can help.
Signature: It’s really buggin me- Dawn

Convergent Lady Beetle Larva

Convergent Lady Beetle Larva

Dear Dawn,
One of the reasons you found nearby Ladybugs is that this is the larva of a Convergent Lady Beetle,
Hippodamia convergens, a species we identified on the University of Kentucky Entomology site and then verified on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, they feed upon “Aphids, also whiteflies and other soft bodied insects” that are considered agricultural pests, hence the Convergent Lady Beetle is available through “commercial sales for biological control.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Garden Bug ID
Location: DFW Texas
April 26, 2016 6:50 pm
Is this bug eating my garden
Signature: Thanks – Mark

Lady Beetle Larva

Lady Beetle Larva

Dear Mark,
This Lady Beetle Larva or Ladybug Larva is not eating your garden, but it is eating Aphids and other insect pest that are eating your garden.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug???
Location: Napa, Ca
April 8, 2016 5:43 pm
What is this bug?
Signature: Emily

Pupae of Lady Beetles

Pupae of Lady Beetles

Dear Emily,
These are the pupae of Lady Beetles or Ladybugs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ladybeetle in Oman
Location: Wadi Shab, Oman (22°49’48.3″N 59°13’30.5″E)
March 4, 2016 11:00 am
Dear Daniel.
You have already helped me almost a year ago with 2 namibian insects, hope you can help me with this one.
I saw this Ladybeetle at my vacation in Oman and unfortunately, until now I was not able to identify these two mating beetles in the internet. I scrolled through your site, could not find it eather. Do you have any idea?
I saw them at the canyon “Wadi Shab”, near a small river at 5pm. Their size was “normal”, I mean, a size you would expect with ladybeetles. Btw, it was the first ladybeetle I have seen without spots, it`s sort of banded.
Hope you can help me :-) Thanks a lot in advance Daniel.
Bye,
Signature: Becky from Munich-Germany

Mating Lady Beetles

Mating Wave Striped Lady Beetles

Dear Becky,
There is not a very comprehensive insect archive from Oman available on the internet, but we did locate a page on Lady Beetles from the family Coccinellidae on Israel’s Nature Site, but alas, your species is not pictured.  We will continue to try to identify your mating Lady Beetles.

Update:  March 6, 2016
While attempting to identify this Mealy Bug or Scale Insect from India, we stumbled upon this image of a Lady Beetle from India on Wikipedia that matches the pair submitted for this posting.  Though it is not identified, we are invigorated to continue our search by expanding to Coccinellidae from India.  Birds of Malwa refers to it by the common name Indian Wave Striped Ladybug, but no scientific name is provided.  Continued searching led us to pBase and the name
Menochilus sexmaculatus.  We verified that identity and they synonym Cheilomenes sexmaculata (Fabricius, 1781) on Meloidae.com and on MalaysianLadyBirds.

Dear Daniel.
Wow, you guys really are incredible!!  :-))
Thank you very much for identifying my Omani ladybeetles!
Bye, Becky

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: bug
Location: advance,nc
January 11, 2016 11:12 pm
Please tell me what kind of bug this is eating this ladybug.I took this pic on my back steps.
Signature: Michelle christenberry

Florida Predatory Stink Bug eats Lady Beetle

Florida Predatory Stink Bug eats Lady Beetle

Hi Michelle,
Though both insects are predators, the individual doing the eating in your image is a Florida Predatory Stink Bug.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Interesting ladybug from Johannesburg
Location: Northern Johannesburg, Gauteng, South Africa
January 29, 2015 5:24 am
Hello, I head the Eco-Schools initiative from HeronBridge College in Johannesburg, South Africa. We have started an initiative at the school called “Wild HeronBridge”. The aim is to compile lists of the creatures that share our space so we often have photos of bugs etc. that we would love to have identified. This is a case in point. It was photographed earlier in January at HeronBridge, which is in the extreme northern parts of Johannesburg, province Gauteng, South Africa. it looks like a Cheilomenes but the colour and patterning are different from the regular red orange variety. We would greatly appreciate it if you could ID it for us so that we can add it to our insect lists.
Signature: HeronBridge College

Beetle

Beetle

Dear HeronBridge College,
Do you have a larger file with greater resolution?  Are there any views showing the head of the beetle?  We are more inclined to speculate that this is a Leaf Beetle in the family Chrysomelidae, but we would like to see a better image prior to researching its identity.

Hello
Thanks so much for your email regarding our insect.  Unfortunately there was only one picture taken of the bug but here it is with a better resolution.  We really appreciate any assistance you can give us!
Regards
Charlotte

Leaf Beetle we believe

Potato Ladybird Beetle

Thanks for providing a higher resolution image Charlotte.  The plant it is on has a distinctive seed pod.  Can you provide the name of the plant?  That may assist in a proper identification of the Beetle, which we still believe to be a Leaf Beetle.

Leaf Beetle we believe

Potato Ladybird Beetle on Datura, we believe

Hi Daniel
Thanks again for your perseverance with this identification!  I have found out that the plant it is on is and it is interestingly a poisonous plant – Datura Stramonium:
Datura stramonium, known by the common names Jimson weed, Devil’s snare, or datura, is a plant in the Solanaceae (nightshade) family. It is believed to have originated in the Americas, but is now found around the world.[1] Other common names for D. stramonium include thornapple and moon flower,[2] and it has the Spanish name Toloache.[3] Other names for the plant include hell’s bells, devil’s trumpet, devil’s weed, tolguacha, Jamestown weed, stinkweed, locoweed, pricklyburr, and devil’s cucumber.[4]
From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Datura_stramonium
I hope this helps – especially as it must be quite an amazing beetle to be able to eat a poisonous plant.
Regards
Charlotte

Hi Charlotte,
Thanks for the well researched plant identification.  We did a quick search and did not come up with anything regarding Leaf Beetles, but that information should prove helpful.  We wish there was more detail in your beetle image.  We did some additional research and there are several similar looking Lady Beetles in the family Coccinellidae in South Africa, including the individual on South African PHotographs, and the ones pictured on BioDiversity Explorer.  The image of
Cheilomenes lunata on BioDiversity Explorer might be the closest. The Lunate Ladybird Beetle is well represented on iSpot.

Hi Daniel
Thanks so much – you have been extremely helpful!  Having had a look at the pictures I concur with you that the Cheilomenes Lunata comes the closest.
Much appreciated – we can post it on our Wild HeronBridge blog – where we post interesting creatures we find at the school (http://heronbridgecollege.co.za/blog  – if you have a moment!)
Regards
Charlotte

Thanks for providing a link to your wonderful blog.

Correction:  April 25, 2015
Cesar Crash from our sister site Insetologia, provided a comment indicating that this looks like a Potato Ladybird,
Epilachna dregei, which is identified on Photographs from South Africa.  According to information on iSpot, this species congregates in large aggregations in the winter.  According to Biodiversity Explorer:  “Lays eggs and feeds on potato and tomato leaves. Larvae feed on the underside of the leaves and adults on the top side. Adults congregate in large numbers and spend the dry season on hilltops.”  Most Lady Beetles are predatory, but there are a few species, including the Potato Ladybird, that feed on plants.  Since Datura is in the same family as potato and tomato, it makes sense that Charlotte found this individual on Datura.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination