Currently viewing the category: "Lady Bug"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What IS this?
Location: Upstate New York
June 4, 2016 6:14 pm
Hello!
I live in Upstate New York (the Hudson River Valley, to be more precise), and this spring, I started noticing these strange bugs in my yard. I’ve never seen them before this year, but I’m finding them ALL OVER THE PLACE. They are super strange, and I’m hoping you can help me out!
Thanks!
Signature: Sara

Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle Larva

Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle Larva

Dear Sara,
This is the larva of a Lady Beetle, and both larvae and adults feed on other insects.  They are generally considered to be beneficial as they eat enormous quantities of Aphids.  Your larva appears to be that of the Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle
Harmonia axyridis, an introduced and invasive species, based on this BugGuide image.  Though they help control insect populations, they are crowding out native species of Lady Beetles, reducing their populations.  Adult Multicolored Asian Lady Beetles often enter homes in great numbers to hibernate, creating quite a nuisance for homemakers.  We will be postdating your submission to go live to our site next week while we are away from the office.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Never before seen backyard bug
Location: Allentown Pennsylvania
June 5, 2016 8:32 am
I have been living in the same house for 3 years and this year, a new bug appeared in my backyard I never seen in my life! Theres alot and I’m worried they might be poisonous or bite, because of their color and appearance. I have kids so I’m eager to find out what it is and if they are dangerous. Please help!!
Signature: Grace

Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle Larvae

Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle Larvae

Dear Grace,
The good news is that this is a Lady Beetle larva, and they are predators that eat other insects and they will not harm your children.  The bad news is that it is a Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle larva, an invasive, exotic species that is crowding out native species of Lady Beetles and threatening their existence.  Furthermore, adult Multicolored Asian Lady Beetles can get very numerous and they enter homes to hibernate, creating a nuisance for homemakers.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Six -legged gray bug with orangey spots
Location: Piedmont/upstate area of South Carolina – in my yard
May 25, 2016 5:59 pm
Dear Bugman,
I am trying to learn the different garden variety bugs and which ones are beneficial and which ones need to find other living (or not) arrangements.
I don’t indiscriminately destroy any bugs; but I learned my lesson to at least contain unknown ones, even if only long enough to I.D. them.
Last year I found the coolest bug ever in my garden on my tomato plant; however, by the time I could look it up and discover what this beautiful creature was, he had already camouflaged himself! So, one huge green horned tomato worm got a reprieve from instant and permanent eviction.
The attached photo was taken in my front yard while I was trying to identify some plants and came across these guys. I still do not know what the plant is, but there were several ladybugs around too. I only saw three of these gray-orangey spotted critters. The picture of the rolled up one is the bug’s reaction to being surprised. (No gray orangey spotted critter was harmed in the making of these pics)
I hope you can help.
Signature: It’s really buggin me- Dawn

Convergent Lady Beetle Larva

Convergent Lady Beetle Larva

Dear Dawn,
One of the reasons you found nearby Ladybugs is that this is the larva of a Convergent Lady Beetle,
Hippodamia convergens, a species we identified on the University of Kentucky Entomology site and then verified on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, they feed upon “Aphids, also whiteflies and other soft bodied insects” that are considered agricultural pests, hence the Convergent Lady Beetle is available through “commercial sales for biological control.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Garden Bug ID
Location: DFW Texas
April 26, 2016 6:50 pm
Is this bug eating my garden
Signature: Thanks – Mark

Lady Beetle Larva

Lady Beetle Larva

Dear Mark,
This Lady Beetle Larva or Ladybug Larva is not eating your garden, but it is eating Aphids and other insect pest that are eating your garden.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug???
Location: Napa, Ca
April 8, 2016 5:43 pm
What is this bug?
Signature: Emily

Pupae of Lady Beetles

Pupae of Lady Beetles

Dear Emily,
These are the pupae of Lady Beetles or Ladybugs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ladybeetle in Oman
Location: Wadi Shab, Oman (22°49’48.3″N 59°13’30.5″E)
March 4, 2016 11:00 am
Dear Daniel.
You have already helped me almost a year ago with 2 namibian insects, hope you can help me with this one.
I saw this Ladybeetle at my vacation in Oman and unfortunately, until now I was not able to identify these two mating beetles in the internet. I scrolled through your site, could not find it eather. Do you have any idea?
I saw them at the canyon “Wadi Shab”, near a small river at 5pm. Their size was “normal”, I mean, a size you would expect with ladybeetles. Btw, it was the first ladybeetle I have seen without spots, it`s sort of banded.
Hope you can help me :-) Thanks a lot in advance Daniel.
Bye,
Signature: Becky from Munich-Germany

Mating Lady Beetles

Mating Wave Striped Lady Beetles

Dear Becky,
There is not a very comprehensive insect archive from Oman available on the internet, but we did locate a page on Lady Beetles from the family Coccinellidae on Israel’s Nature Site, but alas, your species is not pictured.  We will continue to try to identify your mating Lady Beetles.

Update:  March 6, 2016
While attempting to identify this Mealy Bug or Scale Insect from India, we stumbled upon this image of a Lady Beetle from India on Wikipedia that matches the pair submitted for this posting.  Though it is not identified, we are invigorated to continue our search by expanding to Coccinellidae from India.  Birds of Malwa refers to it by the common name Indian Wave Striped Ladybug, but no scientific name is provided.  Continued searching led us to pBase and the name
Menochilus sexmaculatus.  We verified that identity and they synonym Cheilomenes sexmaculata (Fabricius, 1781) on Meloidae.com and on MalaysianLadyBirds.

Dear Daniel.
Wow, you guys really are incredible!!  :-))
Thank you very much for identifying my Omani ladybeetles!
Bye, Becky

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination