Currently viewing the category: "Lady Bug"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Egg Cluster
Location: Central Florida
November 13, 2016 11:48 am
Found these eggs attached to the aerial roots of an orchid this morning. Mid Fall and mid morning.
I have both intact and another picture where they had hatched.
Signature: A Constant Florida Gardener

Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle Eggs, we believe

Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle Eggs, we believe

Dear Constant Florida Gardener,
These sure look like the Eggs of a Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle that are posted to BugGuide.  Though they will eat Aphids, we consider the Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle to be an Invasive Exotic species that might be partially responsible for the decline in native Lady Beetle populations.  We would not rule out that they are the eggs of a native Lady Beetle.

Thank you so much for the reference and quick response.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Lady bug cousin?
Location: Boulder CO
November 6, 2016 10:34 pm
What do you think this is? Found on bedroom curtain. Spouse did return from trip but also has 2 welts that look like tiny dots inside a big welt on torso & back that itch some. We live in Colorado, it’s been warm here almost 70. We have pets & doors open often.
Signature: Bugged Out

Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle

Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle

Dear Bugged Out,
This is a Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle,
Harmonia axyridis, a highly variable species that was introduced from Asia many years ago.  It is a species prone to forming large aggregations and also known for moving indoors as the weather cools to hibernate.  Its proliferation is believed to be a contributing factor to lower populations of native Lady Beetles.  It is possible to be bitten by predatory Lady Beetles, but we suspect the welts on your spouse are from another creature.  See BugGuide for more information on the Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Some sort of parasite?
Location: Lafayette, NJ
July 12, 2016 12:53 pm
I found a most curious thing today while out hiking – an asian multicolored lady beetle with it’s shell open, wings extended, and what appears to be some sort of growth or parasite on its back. I’ve never seen anything like this before and can’t come up with any explanation. So, hoping you can have a look at these photos and perhaps solve the mystery?
Signature: Deborah Bifulco

What Parasitized the Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle???

What Parasitized the Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle???

Hi Deborah,
Though we cannot at this time provide you with a conclusive identification of what parasitized this Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle,
Harmonia axyridis, we hope that whatever it is will help reduce the populations of this invasive Lady Beetle that is displacing many native species.  Our best guess is that it is the pupa of a Tachinid Fly or some parasitic Hymenopteran.  According to Featured Creatures:  “All insects have predators, parasites/parasitoids, and/or pathogens. Ladybirds are not exempt. Larvae of Epilachna borealis and E. varivestis are attacked by a native tachinid fly (Aplomyiopsis epilachnae (Aldrich)) which specializes in the genus Epilachna. Larvae of E. varivestis also are attacked by a eulophid wasp (Pediobius foveolatus, see above). This wasp is a parasitoid of other epilachnine ladybirds in India, and was introduced into the USA specifically to control Epilachna varivestis. Another native tachinid fly, Hyalmyodes triangulifer (Loew), is less specialized, attacking larvae not only of Epilachna varivestis, but also of Coleomegilla maculata, several weevils, and a pterophorid moth. Perhaps the best known of the parasitoids of ladybirds is the braconid wasp Perilitus coccinellae (Schrank). It attacks adult ladybirds and to a lesser extent larvae and pupae (Obrycki et al. 1985). It attacks Coccinella septempunctata, Coleomegilla maculata, and several other species. Many other parasitoids and pathogens of ladybirds are not mentioned here for lack of space.”

Thanks, Daniel – I just wasn’t quite sure what I was seeing, although some sort of parasite makes the most sense.
Interestingly, I have been seeing more native lady beetle species this summer in our area – many more than in past summers.  I am very encouraged by this as I know the asian has really hurt our native species.
Debbi

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What IS this?
Location: Upstate New York
June 4, 2016 6:14 pm
Hello!
I live in Upstate New York (the Hudson River Valley, to be more precise), and this spring, I started noticing these strange bugs in my yard. I’ve never seen them before this year, but I’m finding them ALL OVER THE PLACE. They are super strange, and I’m hoping you can help me out!
Thanks!
Signature: Sara

Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle Larva

Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle Larva

Dear Sara,
This is the larva of a Lady Beetle, and both larvae and adults feed on other insects.  They are generally considered to be beneficial as they eat enormous quantities of Aphids.  Your larva appears to be that of the Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle
Harmonia axyridis, an introduced and invasive species, based on this BugGuide image.  Though they help control insect populations, they are crowding out native species of Lady Beetles, reducing their populations.  Adult Multicolored Asian Lady Beetles often enter homes in great numbers to hibernate, creating quite a nuisance for homemakers.  We will be postdating your submission to go live to our site next week while we are away from the office.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Never before seen backyard bug
Location: Allentown Pennsylvania
June 5, 2016 8:32 am
I have been living in the same house for 3 years and this year, a new bug appeared in my backyard I never seen in my life! Theres alot and I’m worried they might be poisonous or bite, because of their color and appearance. I have kids so I’m eager to find out what it is and if they are dangerous. Please help!!
Signature: Grace

Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle Larvae

Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle Larvae

Dear Grace,
The good news is that this is a Lady Beetle larva, and they are predators that eat other insects and they will not harm your children.  The bad news is that it is a Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle larva, an invasive, exotic species that is crowding out native species of Lady Beetles and threatening their existence.  Furthermore, adult Multicolored Asian Lady Beetles can get very numerous and they enter homes to hibernate, creating a nuisance for homemakers.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Six -legged gray bug with orangey spots
Location: Piedmont/upstate area of South Carolina – in my yard
May 25, 2016 5:59 pm
Dear Bugman,
I am trying to learn the different garden variety bugs and which ones are beneficial and which ones need to find other living (or not) arrangements.
I don’t indiscriminately destroy any bugs; but I learned my lesson to at least contain unknown ones, even if only long enough to I.D. them.
Last year I found the coolest bug ever in my garden on my tomato plant; however, by the time I could look it up and discover what this beautiful creature was, he had already camouflaged himself! So, one huge green horned tomato worm got a reprieve from instant and permanent eviction.
The attached photo was taken in my front yard while I was trying to identify some plants and came across these guys. I still do not know what the plant is, but there were several ladybugs around too. I only saw three of these gray-orangey spotted critters. The picture of the rolled up one is the bug’s reaction to being surprised. (No gray orangey spotted critter was harmed in the making of these pics)
I hope you can help.
Signature: It’s really buggin me- Dawn

Convergent Lady Beetle Larva

Convergent Lady Beetle Larva

Dear Dawn,
One of the reasons you found nearby Ladybugs is that this is the larva of a Convergent Lady Beetle,
Hippodamia convergens, a species we identified on the University of Kentucky Entomology site and then verified on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, they feed upon “Aphids, also whiteflies and other soft bodied insects” that are considered agricultural pests, hence the Convergent Lady Beetle is available through “commercial sales for biological control.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination