Currently viewing the category: "Ground Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle invasion.
Location: Chantilly, Virginia, USA
May 9, 2014 7:09 am
Today I came to work in Chantilly, Virginia and our building is inundated with these beetles. At first glance I thought that they are Japanese Beetles, but something about the shape of the body tells me I’m wrong. I’ve searched several of the insect identification guides but I cannot find any photos that match this beetle.
I’d like to find out what this beetle is, in hopes of understanding why there were none yesterday and there are hundreds of them today.
Signature: +Ed

Caterpillar Hunter

Caterpillar Hunter

Hi Ed,
Your beetles are Caterpillar Hunters in the genus
Calosoma. The beetle in one image seems considerably darker than the beetle in the other image, so we are wondering if they are all metallic green with red or gold borders.  We believe the discrepancy in coloration is due to camera exposure and lighting.  We also believe your beetles are most likely Fiery Searchers, Calosoma scrutator, and you may compare your images to the images on BugGuide.  Perhaps populations are peaking this year because there is a significantly larger proportion of prey, namely caterpillars and other insects.

Caterpillar Hunter

Caterpillar Hunter

Thank you for the quick response.  I did some searching later and you confirmed my suspicion about Calosoma Scrutator.  Truly a beautiful beetle.
~Ed

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: green spotted beetle
Location: ede, Netherlands
May 3, 2014 6:22 pm
My son lives in ede, Netherlands and took this picture. Can you help identify it! Flies and climbs up and down trees.
Signature: svenskalinda

Tiger Beetle

Tiger Beetle

Dear svenskalinda,
This is a Tiger Beetle in the subfamily Cicindelinae, but we are not certain of the species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetles Matting?
Location: S.E. British Columbia Canada
April 15, 2014 8:14 pm
Observed these two beetles when looking for spring flowers. They were in a grass meadow, Douglas Fir forest at the headwaters of the Columbia River, Invermere, BC Canada. Date was April 13, 2014
Signature: Larry Halverson

Mating Tiger Beetles

Mating Cow Patch Tiger Beetles

Hi Larry,
These are mating Tiger Beetles in the subfamily Cicindelinae, probably in the genus
Cicindela.  We will continue to attempt a species identification, but as you can see from BugGuide, there are many similar looking species.  Tiger Beetles are adept predators that run down their prey, though they are also capable of flight.

Thank you for your quick response. What a  wonderful service you offer.
Larry

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black Ground Beetle?
Location: Victoria, Australia
January 9, 2014 6:44 am
I found this black beetle flying against my window tonight (a warm summer’s night, around 20 degrees C), and am unsure what it is. It looks like a member of Scarites, but I didn’t think they lived in Australia, and I couldn’t find anything about their ability to fly (this was capable of flying roughly two metres off the ground and maintaining that height for several seconds). If it helps, it seemed to be attracted to light.
Thank you in advance for your time.
Signature: –Natasha

Big Headed Ground Beetle, we believe

Big Headed Ground Beetle, we believe

Hi Natasha,
We are very intrigued with your request.  Your information is very thorough and your photo is excellent.  The research you have done already is commendable.  First, this is a Ground Beetle, and it is black, but it is most definitely NOT the Black Ground Beetle pictured on the Brisbane Insect website, which is noticeably low on examples from the family Carabidae.  We actually agree that this appears to be a Big Headed Ground Beetle in the genus
Scarites, and as you have indicated, it is not a genus that is native to Australia.  The similarity to that genus is obvious when you compare your photo to this image on BugGuide.  According to this online PDF we found from The Coleopterists’ Bulletin entitled Observations on Behavior in Scarites by Thomas F. Hlavac which was published in 1967:  “The genus Scarites Fabricius contains a large number of species of large, fossorial, pedunculate beetles and is found in all geographic regions, except the Australian.”  With so much global travel in the last fifty years, that may have changed and Scarites might have been introduced to Australia.  This FlickR posting would support that possibility.  We have not had any luck finding any information on Scarites being able to fly, but we are very curious about that possibility and we thank you for supplying that observation.  Of Ground Beetles in general Squidoo observes:  “Although some species can fly, they seldom do. In most species the wings have totally disappeared and the wing cases have grown together to form one strong shield.”  We will continue to try to research the flying ability of Scarites.

Thank you very much for your fast response! I really appreciate the information, and love your website. Hope you continue the amazing work into futurity!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: unwanted house guest
Location: northeast Alabama
October 17, 2013 6:48 am
I have been finding these little guys every morning for about two Weeks. They will be lying at random places throughout the house. The first few I thought (ah,a bug got in from outside.) Now finding four to five every morning i’m thinking (uh, we got a problem). They resemble a false blister beatle, but have orange legs along with the orange neck. With a black body and black head and long orangish antennas. And measure about an inch long. Any help would be appreciated.
Signature: unhappy hostess

False Bombardier Beetle

False Bombardier Beetle

Dear unhappy hostess,
As unwanted visitors go, you could do much worse than this False Bombardier Beetle.  According to BugGuide, the False Bombardier Beetles in the genus
Galerita:  “eat other insects, especially caterpillars.”  BugGuide also notes they are found in:  “Open woodlands, under stones, leaves. Come to lights, sometimes wander into houses.”  Perhaps you have a light near where they are finding access and you should consider keeping that light off at night.  False Bombardier Beetles do possess chemical defenses, but they pose no serious threat to humans or pets.

Subject: Found it!
October 19, 2013 9:29 am
Found it, False Bombardier Beetle. Makes sense.
Your website was the only thing I found helpful!!!
Warmly,
Signature: Kim E.

Thank you!  I actually had figured it out after sending you this message thanks to your page. It was the only page I found helpful! Thanks again so much!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mystery beetle in a state park
Location: Saint Edward Park, WA state
October 11, 2013 7:53 pm
Hello WTB magicians!
I stumbled onto this site when trying to find out what a local beetle is, and I’m so amazed by it! Thanks for doing this, it looks like a wonderful resource for solving some of the mysteries of the bug world.
The bug I would like to identify is one that I saw recently in abundance wandering the trails of Saint Edward state park in Washington state, USA. My husband and I tried to take a few pictures of them running around on the paths, but they were too fast for any of our photos to turn out, so we gently scooped one into a shallow tupperware dish to temporarily corral it so we could get better shots. (She has already been released outside)
They have long legs and are quite fast. We thought maybe it is some kind of tiger beetle, but we know sometimes those can be pretty aggressive, and this one was not bitey in the least. The photos don’t show it very well with the unnatural light being used, but their abdomen has a rich reddish-purple sheen, and there are little facets around the edge of it that sparkle in the natural light. We didn’t have a ruler handy, but we put a dime near her for an idea of the size.
Thank you so much for your time and effort, I hope you can work your magic on this one! Cheers!
Signature: – A grateful bug enthusiast

Snail Eater

Snail Eater

Dear grateful bug enthusiast,
We believe we have correctly identified your Ground Beetle as a Snail Eater,
Scaphinotus angusticollis (Mannerheim 1823), thanks to swell photos posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, their habitat is “Mostly forests, under logs, rocks, in leaf litter” and they “Feed on snails, slugs. Mandibles specially adapted for insertion into opening of a snail’s shell.”  Ground Beetle often run quickly as you observed.  Tiger Beetles are one subfamily of Ground Beetles, so your comparison is valid.

Snail Eater

Snail Eater

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination